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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access  
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.296
Number of Followers: 85  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2044-1282 - ISSN (Online) 2044-1290
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • The space between the rock and the hard place: personality disorder
           diagnosis in people with intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Claire Marie Downs , Kelly Rayner-Smith
      Abstract: The assessment for and diagnosis of personality disorder (PD) continue to be contentious, with many prominent practitioner psychologists arguing against this specific label and providing a credible alternative framework to psychiatric diagnosis more generally. This paper aims to summarise the literature and support practitioners identifying PD in people with intellectual disabilities (ID). Relevant National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidance and literature were reviewed to provide a service position on the assessment and diagnosis of PD in people with ID. For people with intellectual disabilities, the PD label can be even less robustly applied and may be even more pejorative and obstructive. That said, there are people for whom a PD diagnosis has clear clinical utility and opens access to suitable specialist services. Evidence suggests that a diagnosis of PD can be both facilitative and obstructive, and the assessment and diagnosis process should, therefore, be undertaken with caution. This paper presents an account of NICE guidance and evidence on the assessment and diagnosis of PD in people with intellectual disabilities.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-05-04
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-11-2021-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Compassion‐focused therapy group for men with intellectual disabilities
           who had maladaptive conceptualisations of masculinity

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      Authors: Robert John Searle , Ianiv Borseti , Katy-May Price
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to determine the effectiveness of an adapted compassion-focused therapy (CFT) group treatment programme for individuals with an intellectual disability (ID), specifically aimed to help address maladaptive conceptualisations of masculinity. Outcome measurements were competed at pre- and post-group and the effectiveness of the intervention were assessed using a Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Findings demonstrated that the treatment group showed significant differences in their “gender role conflict” subscales including the Success, Power, Control and “Restrictive Affectionate Behavior Between Men” subscales; however, no significant differences were found on the Restrictive Emotionality or Conflicts Between Work and Leisure subscales. Furthermore, no significant differences were found on participants psychological well-being, psychological distress, anxiety, self-compassion or quality of life measures. Limitations include that a lack of qualitative information regarding outcomes, a lack of control group and a small number of participants may have impacted the outcome of the research. The Men’s Masculinity group had a positive impact on the participant’s sense of success, power and control, so it could be considered that this group enabled participants to feel more powerful and in control of their difficulties which is associated with the “drive” system of CFT. Overall, this study adds to the small but growing literature that supports using CFT groups as a stand-alone psychological intervention when working with people with an ID.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-06-2021-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • What outcome measures are most useful in measuring the effectiveness of
           anti-dementia medication in people with intellectual disabilities and
           dementia'

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      Authors: Marjan Ghazirad , Olivia Hewitt , Sarah Walden
      Abstract: The use of anti-dementia medication in people with intellectual disabilities has been controversial and requires additional research to assess the efficacy of such medications. An essential part of this treatment (both in terms of research and clinical practice) is having robust outcome measures to assess the efficacy of these medications for individuals. Currently there is no consensus in the UK regarding which outcome measures, in conjunction with clinical judgement, are effective in informing clinicians’ decision-making regarding anti-dementia medication management and this paper aims to present useful outcome measures. A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify relevant outcome measures. Outcome measures focused on aspects of patients’ presentation such as cognition, activities of daily living, neuropsychiatric presentation or the impact of their presentation (either on themselves, or on others). These outcome measures were critically appraised to ascertain their suitability in informing clinician’s decisions regarding management of anti-dementia medication. The focus of this appraisal was on good quality measures that are practical and accessible and can be easily used within clinical NHS services. This paper provides advice for clinicians on using appropriate outcome measures, depending on patients’ presentations and the symptoms of dementia being targeted, that can be used alongside their clinical assessment to enhance their anti-dementia medication management. Two case studies are presented to illustrate the use of such outcome measures. The case for using a range of assessments that are both broad in focus, and those specifically selected to measure the areas of functioning targeted by the anti-dementia medication, is presented.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-10-2021-0038
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Beyond the psychometrics: harnessing clinical psychology to improve the
           well-being of inpatient intellectual disability teams

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      Authors: Elysia Megan Walker , Yasmine Olabi , Kelly Rayner-Smith
      Abstract: Nursing teams supporting people with intellectual disabilities in inpatient settings are known to be vulnerable to burnout, compassion fatigue and vicarious trauma. Aspects such as resourcing, support, training and the fundamental challenges of supporting this patient group are known risk factors for these difficulties. The aim of this paper is to synthesise the literature on these issues and provide suggestions for operationalising solutions. Literature on the experiences of nursing teams supporting people with intellectual disabilities in inpatient settings was considered, alongside the established offer of clinical psychologists working into these services. There are common themes of staff’s emotional health and the impact this can have on patient care and the steps that managers and organisations can take to support their teams to remain emotionally healthy, compassionate and effective practitioners. Clinical psychology can play a role in offering this support only where services and teams are aware of the contribution they can make. Clinical psychology has been undersold and under-represented in inpatient settings for people with intellectual disabilities, and this practice paper outlines the important contributions that they can make to the psychological well-being of all within the system, not just patients.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-10-2021-0039
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Co-production of post-diagnostic psychosocial intervention with carers of
           people with intellectual disability and dementia

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      Authors: Daniel Acton , Caroline Duncan , Sujeet Jaydeokar
      Abstract: This paper aims to underline the importance of using a collaborative approach when designing and adapting a post diagnostic psychosocial intervention of cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) for people with intellectual disability and dementia. As part of a service improvement, a manual of CST was adapted, for delivery in clinical practice. A qualitative co-production method allowed participants with a lived experience to provide regular feedback relating to the development of the adapted CST manual and intervention programme. This feedback was used to make continual development changes to the CST manual. The study demonstrated co-production with those who provide care is valuable in adapting psychosocial therapies for people with an intellectual disability and dementia. Additional findings identified the need for carer education in ageing, dementia care and the physical health needs for older people with intellectual disability. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that has used a co-production approach with families and carers in adapting a group therapy programme for people with an intellectual disability. This paper underlines the need for post diagnostic clinical interventions for people with dementia and those who provide care.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-04-21
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-01-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Disability therapy and Valerie Sinason

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      Authors: David O'Driscoll
      Abstract: This paper aims to discuss the work of Dr Valerie Sinason and her contribution to working with people with an intellectual disability with psychotherapy. Dr Valerie Sinason is a psychoanalyst, and the author is trained in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. The author believes there is important value in reading Valerie Sinason's contribution to the literature of psychotherapy with people with intellectual disabilities. It is a review of Sinason’s contribution, and the author believes she's very original and important thinker.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-04-18
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-02-2022-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Psychologists’ views on the accessibility and effectiveness of
           psychological therapies for people with intellectual disabilities and
           autism

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      Authors: Poppy Siddell
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore the views of psychologists working in community teams for people who have intellectual disabilities (ID) on the provision of psychological therapies to those with ID and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Semi-structured interviews were carried out with seven clinical psychologists working across a large geographical area. Interviews concerned the accessibility and effectiveness of psychological therapies. These were transcribed and analysed thematically. Participants expressed concern about lack of access to mainstream services, the lack of visibility of their service and the suitability of the physical space to deliver therapy. They were positive about the effectiveness of therapy but emphasised the importance of adaptations and managing expectations. There is a lack of research in this area, and further research is needed with service users to develop a fuller understanding of their needs. Consideration needs to be given on how to optimally deliver psychological therapies for this group. This will need services to become more flexible and focussed on the needs of this group of service users. This paper provides insights into the views of psychologists on providing psychological therapy to people who have autism and ID.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-03-24
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-11-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A review of recent clinical measures that can be used to support
           psychological therapies with adults with intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Thomas Richard Gourley , Luke Yates
      Abstract: Psychometrically sound measures are essential for clinical practice to provide appropriate therapeutic input. Vlissides et al. (2016) reviewed measures used in psychological therapies with people who have intellectual disabilities (ID). This paper aims to review the evidence for the psychometric properties of recent clinical measures published since/overlooked by Vlissides et al. (2016). A literature search was conducted to identify relevant clinical measures. Experts in the field also were contacted. Twenty papers were identified, relating to five novel clinical measures: psychological therapies outcome scale – intellectual disabilities, clinical outcome in routine evaluation – learning disabilities scale 30, quality of early relatedness rating scale, scale of emotional development – short and the Frankish assessment of the impact of trauma. Evidence was found supporting a proportion of the psychometric properties of each measure, and some measures were found to be useful in directing interventions and informing clinical decisions. None of the measures identified, however, are yet to be fully psychometrically investigated, requiring further research. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to review the evidence of psychometric properties for these five emerging clinical measures and as such contributes an original perspective on their current state and requirements for future development.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-03-09
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-01-2022-0005
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Evaluating a mindfulness-based group intervention for adults with
           intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Niall Power , Gregg H. Rawlings , Claire Bennett
      Abstract: There is growing evidence examining mindfulness-based interventions (MI) for people with intellectual disabilities (IDs). As discussed in this paper, MI may be particularly suited for people with ID given high rates of difficulties in identifying and regulating emotions and as this approach may rely less on cognitive ability compared to other therapies. This study aims to assess the acceptability and preliminary effectiveness of a six-session MI group [the Coping Well Group (CWG)] delivered within routine clinical practice. Six separate cohorts (n = 25) of adults with ID attended CWG. Quantitative data were collected from service users, including a pre- and post-quality of life (QoL) measure and qualitative data from group facilitators. Roughly one-half (53%) of service users invited to the group attended at least one session, with low levels of dropout observed among group attendees. A significant improvement in QoL was reported demonstrating a small effect (d = 0.46, p = 0.022) after attending the group. Most service users (72%) were referred to the CWG for help managing difficult emotions. One-half (44%) of attendees required individual therapy after attending the group. Limitations of the evaluation and potential future research are discussed. The current evaluation contributes a practice-based service evaluation of an MI group for people with ID and mental health difficulties to the currently limited evidence base. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to investigate the impact of group psychological interventions collecting data across cohorts and assessing QoL, a more general measure of well-being than has been used previously.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-03-01
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • “You’re changing the pattern”: cognitive analytic team formulation
           with learning disabilities care staff

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      Authors: Rowena B. Russell , Kate Theodore , Julie Lloyd
      Abstract: This study aims to explore how care staff working with people with learning disabilities experienced psychologist-facilitated team formulation sessions in a cognitive analytic style (contextual reformulation). Eleven participants attended at least one contextual reformulation session regarding a client their team referred because of challenging behaviour. Post-intervention semi-structured interviews were analysed using qualitative inductive thematic analysis. Five themes were developed: multiple roles and functions of sessions and clinicians; challenging behaviour in relationship; making links – understanding can be enlightening, containing and practical; the process of developing a shared understanding and approach; and caught between two perspectives. Findings suggested contextual reformulation helped staff see challenging behaviour as relational, provided them with the space to reflect on their emotions and relate compassionately to themselves and others, and ultimately helped them to focus their interventions on understanding and relationally managing rather than acting to reduce behaviour. Qualitative methodology allows no causal inferences to be made. Ten of 11 participants were female. This qualitative study adds to the limited research base on team formulation in learning disabilities settings and specifically that using a cognitive analytic approach.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-01-12
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-05-2021-0024
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • EMDR therapy with people who have intellectual disabilities: process,
           adaptations and outcomes

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      Authors: Joanne L.B. Porter
      Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that adapted eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) can be useful for people with intellectual disabilities in treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the required adaptations are not described in enough detail across the literature, making it difficult for therapists to easily adapt EMDR for people with intellectual disabilities. This paper aims to address this by describing 14 clinical cases, along with outcome data for six people, and the views of five people with intellectual disabilities about EMDR. A total of 14 people with mild or moderate intellectual disabilities and varied experiences of trauma were offered EMDR by one clinical psychologist in a UK NHS setting; nine people completed EMDR therapy, six people provided outcome data with pre-post measures and five people were asked two questions about EMDR therapy. Adaptations are described. The outcome data indicate reductions in symptoms of PTSD following EMDR intervention. EMDR was liked and perceived as useful. This paper provides details about adaptations that can be made to the standard EMDR protocol, reports the views of service users about EMDR and adds evidence that EMDR reduces symptoms of PTSD in people who have intellectual disabilities.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-07-2021-0033
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Relationship between quality of life and physical fitness in adults with
           intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Antonio Cuesta Vargas , David Perez Cruzado , Alejandro Rodriguez Moya
      Abstract: People with intellectual disabilities have lower levels of physical fitness compared with peers without intellectual disability, because of the high levels of sedentary behaviour in this population. This study aims to know the relationship between quality of life and physical fitness in adults with intellectual disability. Ninety-six adults with intellectual disability were assessed with quality of life questionnaire and physical fitness tests, which involve balance, muscle strength, flexibility and aerobic condition. Adults with higher self-reported levels of quality of life reported higher levels of physical fitness in balance, muscular strength and flexibility. In contrast, in aerobic condition were not found significant correlations with self-reported quality of life. These findings support the hypothesis that people with intellectual disability with lower levels of physical fitness could influence in their levels of quality of life. This insight is useful for improving treatments to improve physical fitness in this population.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2022-01-03
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-03-2021-0014
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Understanding the mental health experiences of adult men with intellectual
           disabilities in Singapore

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      Authors: Jonathan Ee , Jan Mei Lim , Biza Stenfert Kroese , John Rose
      Abstract: This study aims to explore the experiences of people with intellectual disabilities in Singapore receiving inpatient mental health treatment. To date, there has not been any research that examines the views and experiences of this population in Singapore. The research examines how the participants view their mental health problems and their experiences of the services they received. A qualitative design was chosen to address the research question. Six adult men with intellectual disabilities were recruited from the tertiary hospital and interviewed. The transcripts of these interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four super-ordinate themes were identified; awareness of mental health problems; yearn for a life outside the ward; interacting with other people and finding purpose. The participants reported that they struggled with being segregated from their families and communities following an inpatient admission. They were able to report on the emotional difficulties that they experienced and hoped to find employment after their discharge from the hospital. They talked about reconstructing their self-identity and forming friendships to cope with their hospital stay. This research is one of its kind carried out in a non-western society and the findings are discussed in the light of how mental health professionals can best support people with intellectual disabilities during their inpatient treatment.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2021-12-01
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-06-2021-0029
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 1 (2021)
       
  • The development and evaluation of an integrated intensive support service

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      Authors: Karen Dodd , Vicky Laute , Selven Daniel
      Abstract: This paper aims to describe the development and evaluation of integrated intensive support service (ISS) for adults with learning disabilities who have complex needs and are at risk of admission to an inpatient unit. Existing services were remodelled. The service explored external service models and established an integrated ISS comprising intensive community support and intensive support beds. Data indicates that the majority of people referred to the service avoid both admission to an inpatient unit and placement breakdown. Most people admitted to the inpatient unit are not known to community services. Length of stay has significantly reduced. Other services can use the information to remodel how to provide intensive support and avoid admission to an inpatient unit. It demonstrates how remodelling can drive improvements to reduce placement breakdown and risk of admission.
      Citation: Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities
      PubDate: 2021-11-30
      DOI: 10.1108/AMHID-04-2021-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 16 , No. 1 (2021)
       
  • Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities

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