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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Society and Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.692
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2156-8693 - ISSN (Online) 2156-8731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Treatment’s Role in Clinical and Perceived Recoveries from Mental
           Illness

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      Authors: Peggy A. Thoits
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      How mental health treatment relates to clinical and perceived recoveries is examined with the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, drawing from treatment-seeking and labeling theories. Clinical recovery and perceived recoveries were assessed among adult respondents who had a lifetime major depressive episode and reported ever having a mental health problem (N = 5,628). The “probably well” (with no current care need nor treatment involvement), individuals with unmet treatment needs, voluntary patients, and involuntary patients were contrasted. Compared with the high recovery rates of the “probably well,” individuals with unmet care needs had low clinical and perceived recoveries, and voluntary patients had low clinical but high perceived recoveries, supporting treatment-seeking predictions. With current distress symptoms controlled, involuntary patients’ perceived recovery rates were identical to “probably well” and voluntary patients,’ counter to labeling predictions. Because recovery perceptions may encourage (or weaken) treatment continuation, they warrant further research.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-11T11:23:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221131912
       
  • The Early 2020 COVID-19 Outbreak in China and Subsequent Flourishing:
           Medium-Term Effects and Intervening Mechanisms

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      Authors: Yue Qian, Wen Fan
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      In early 2020, a COVID-19 outbreak occurred in Hubei Province of China. Exploiting the geographic concentration of China’s COVID-19 cases in Hubei (the initial epicenter), we compare Hubei and non-Hubei residents to examine the medium-term effect of exposure to the COVID-19 outbreak on mental well-being. We examine flourishing—a comprehensive assessment of well-being that is not merely the absence of mental illness—and investigate a broad set of psychosocial and economic mediators that may link initial outbreak exposure to subsequent flourishing. We use ordinary least squares regression models to analyze national panel data collected in early 2020 and late 2021 (N = 3,169). Results show that flourishing scores remain lower for Hubei than non-Hubei residents almost two years following the early 2020 COVID-19 outbreak. Mediation analysis reveals that Hubei residents’ lower incidences of job promotion and lower sense of control are the two most important mediators accounting for their lower flourishing relative to non-Hubei residents. Combined, this study provides the first evidence of the medium-term psychological vulnerability borne by individuals who lived in the initial epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings on the intervening mechanisms shed light on the policy initiatives needed for post-pandemic mental well-being recovery in China and other countries.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-02T04:26:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221131819
       
  • Market Transition, Occupational Status, and Depression in Urban China: A
           Population-based Multilevel Analysis

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      Authors: Yanhui Xu, Dongpeng Lai, Qingsong Chang
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the effects of ecological-level marketization, individual-level occupational status, and their interaction, on depression in residents in urban China. Population-based data (N = 13,004) from the 2016 China Family Panel Survey were used. A multilevel mixed-effects generalized linear model explored whether and to what extent market transition measured by the marketization index (MI), occupational status measured by international socio-economic index (ISEI), and their interaction, affected people’s depression. Results showed that higher MI (b = –.157, p < .001) and ISEI scores (b = –.124, p < .001) were associated with lower levels of depression. However, residents with high occupational status might suffer a uniquely elevated level of depression when living in highly marketized cities (b = .139, p < .05). Raising the public mental health awareness of residents with low occupational status from low marketized areas and that of residents with high occupational status from high marketized areas is warranted in societies undergoing rapid marketization, such as China.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T06:29:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221122864
       
  • Welcome to the Dark Side: The Role of Religious/Spiritual Struggles in the
           Black-White Mental Health Paradox

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      Authors: Laura Upenieks, Patricia Louie, Terrence D. Hill
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past two decades, researchers have worked to make sense of the fact that black Americans tend to exhibit similar or better mental health profiles relative to their white counterparts. In this study, we extend previous research by proposing and testing a new potential explanation of the black-white mental health paradox: the dark side of religion or religious/spiritual (R/S) struggles. We also consider whether the association between R/S struggles and mental health is moderated by race. Our mediation analysis of data collected from a 2021 nationally representative sample of American adults (n = 1,381) indicates that black respondents tend to exhibit lower levels of non-specific psychological distress than white respondents partly because black respondents also tend to report lower levels of R/S struggles. Our moderation analysis demonstrates that the positive association between R/S struggles and psychological distress is more pronounced for white respondents than for black respondents.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T11:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221119786
       
  • The Risk for Food Insecurity and Suicide Ideation among Young Adults in
           the United States: The Mediating Roles of Perceived Stress and Social
           Isolation

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      Authors: Carlyn Graham, Gabriele Ciciurkaite
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Young adults in the United States have the highest prevalence of suicidal thoughts of any adult age group. While limited, research indicates food insecurity heightens the risk of suicide ideation among young adults. However, research has not explored the pathways underlying the food insecurity—suicide ideation association among this population. Using 2008 data from Wave IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), we fill this gap by testing for the mediating roles of perceived stress and social isolation in the association between the risk for food insecurity and suicide ideation among young adults ages 24–32 (N = 14,897). Our findings reveal that perceived stress and social isolation account for almost half of this association. Given the eradication of food insecurity in the United States is unlikely imminent, our results indicate an exigent need for interventions and programs to address psychosocial risk factors associated with food insecurity.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T01:05:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221120066
       
  • Religious Transitions, Sexual Minority Status, and Depressive Symptoms
           from Adolescence to Early Adulthood

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      Authors: R. Kyle Saunders, Amy M. Burdette, Dawn Carr, Terrence D. Hill
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Given that sexual minorities have been historically stigmatized within institutions of religion, they may be less likely to exhibit any health benefits from religious participation. In this article, we use data from Waves I and IV of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health to test whether the effects of religious affiliation (becoming affiliated with a religious group) and disaffiliation (no longer affiliating with a religious group) on depressive symptoms are moderated by sexual minority status from adolescence to early adulthood. In regression models adjusted for selection effects, we observed that, compared to respondents who were consistently unaffiliated, becoming affiliated was associated with more depressive symptoms from baseline to follow-up among lesbian, gay, and bisexual respondents, but not among heterosexual respondents. We conclude with the implications of our results as they relate to understanding the health impacts of marginalized groups in social institutions and the importance of selection effects.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T10:33:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221111847
       
  • Parent and/or Grandparent Attendance at Residential School and Dimensions
           of Cultural Identity and Engagement: Associations with Mental Health and
           Substance Use among First Nations Adults Living off Reserve

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      Authors: Tara Hahmann, Amanda Perri, Huda Masoud, Amy Bombay
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Limited studies have assessed how parent and/or grandparent attendance at residential schools is associated with mental health and substance use among First Nations peoples living off reserve, while also considering how cultural dimensions relate to these outcomes. Analyses of the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey revealed that the odds of self-reported diagnosed mood and anxiety disorders, past-year heavy drinking, and frequent marijuana use were significantly higher among First Nations adults living off reserve who had either a parent and/or grandparent who attended residential schools, even when controlling for covariates. In predicting diagnosed mood disorder, positive cultural identity affect and cultural engagement moderated the effect of parent residential school attendance while cultural exploration moderated the effect of two generations of attendance. Cultural exploration was a protective factor for grandparent residential school attendance in relation to past-year frequent marijuana use. Interventions that are trauma-informed and culturally-based should be considered for this population.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221108766
       
  • Vicarious Experiences of Major Discrimination and Psychological Distress
           among Black Men and Women

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      Authors: Myles D. Moody, Courtney S. Thomas Tobin, Christy L. Erving
      First page: 175
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Racism-related stress frameworks posit that the discriminatory experiences of one’s loved ones may threaten one’s well-being, but relatively few studies have examined how they may impact mental health beyond childhood and adolescence. Using data from the Nashville Stress and Health Study (N = 1,252), the present study assessed the prevalence of vicarious experiences of discrimination among subsamples of Black men (n = 297) and women (n = 330), examined the association between vicarious experiences of discrimination and psychological distress among Black men and women, and evaluated the impact of vicarious discrimination on psychological distress in the context of other stressors. Results suggest that Black women report more vicarious exposure to specific types of discrimination. Furthermore, vicariously experienced discrimination was associated with higher levels of psychological distress among Black women, but not among Black men. Our findings extend the literature on racism-related stress and offer new insights for interventions aimed at reducing racial disparities in mental health.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-19T07:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221116631
       
  • Workplace Age Discrimination and Social-psychological Well-being

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      Authors: Vincent J. Roscigno, Hui Zheng, Martha Crowley
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The research literature on workplace inequality has given comparatively little attention to age discrimination and its social-psychological consequences. In this article, we highlight useful insights from critical gerontological, labor process, and mental health literatures and analyze the patterning of workplace age discrimination and its implications for sense of job insecurity, job-specific stress, and the overall mental health of full-time workers 40 years old and above, covered by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA). Our analyses, which draw on two decades and five waves of the General Social Survey (2002–2018), reveal (1) the prevalence of self-reported workplace age discrimination and growing vulnerability particularly for those 60 years and above, (2) clear social-psychological costs when it comes to job insecurity, work-specific stress, and overall self-reported mental health, and (3) dimensions of status and workplace social relations that offer a protective buffer or exacerbate age discrimination’s corrosive effects. Future research on age as an important status vulnerability within the domain of employment and the implications of unjust treatment for well-being and mental health are clearly warranted.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T09:35:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221116139
       
  • Disability, Discrimination, and Mental Health during the COVID-19
           Pandemic: A Stress Process Model

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      Authors: Robyn Lewis Brown, Gabriele Ciciurkaite
      First page: 215
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Drawing on data from a community survey with a sizeable subsample of people with physical, intellectual, and psychological disabilities in the Intermountain West region of the United States (N = 2,043), this investigation examined the association of social stressors stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic with ableism or disability-related discrimination. We further assessed the significance of these associations for variation by disability status in psychological well-being with a moderated mediation analysis. Study findings provide clear evidence that greater pandemic-related stressor exposure was associated with greater discrimination, which in turn increased the psychologically distressing aspects of the pandemic for people with disabilities relative to people without disabilities. This set of findings challenges us to think about how we engage in research concerning ableism and the proliferation of macro-level stressors such as those associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The findings also support the application of a minority stress model in addressing mental health contingencies among people with disabilities—in this case, in examining the pandemic’s psychological impact.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-13T09:28:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221115347
       
  • Gendered Racial Microaggressions, Psychosocial Resources, and Depressive
           Symptoms among Black Women Attending a Historically Black University

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      Authors: Christy L. Erving, Tiffany R. Williams, Whitney Frierson, Megan Derisse
      First page: 230
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The current study integrates stress process model and intersectionality framework to explore psychological effects of an intersectional stressor experienced by black women: gendered racial microaggressions (GRMs). Prior research suggests GRMS negatively influence black women’s mental health. However, it is unclear whether specific dimensions of GRMS are more or less impactful to mental health. This study investigates: To what extent do black women experience GRMS overall and its specific dimensions: Assumptions of Beauty and Sexual Objectification; Silenced and Marginalized; Strong Black Woman Stereotype; Angry Black Woman Stereotype' What is the relationship between GRMS and depressive symptoms' Do psychosocial resources (i.e., social support, self-esteem, mastery) mediate the association between GRMS and depressive symptoms' We use data from black women attending a historically Black university in the Southeast (N = 202). We employed ordinary least squares regression analysis and performed mediation analysis. Study results revealed a positive association between GRMS and depressive symptoms; the Angry Black Woman Stereotype GRMS dimension had the most robust influence on depressive symptoms. Psychosocial resources partially mediated the relationship between GRMS and depressive symptoms. Study results suggest that sociological stress research underestimates the influence of stress on black women’s health when intersectional stressors like GRMS are not included in analytic models.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T09:24:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221115766
       
  • Psychosocial Coping Resources and the Toll of COVID-19 Bereavement

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      Authors: Matthew K. Grace, Jane S. VanHeuvelen
      First page: 248
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic ushered in a bereavement crisis unparalleled in a generation, with devastating consequences for the mental health of those who lost a loved one to the virus. Using national survey data (n = 2,000) containing detailed information about people’s experiences of pandemic-related stressors, coping resources, and mental health, in this study we examine whether and how three psychosocial coping resources—mastery, self-esteem, and social support—moderate the association between COVID-19 bereavement and psychological distress. We find that coping resources have both expected and unanticipated effects on the relationship between bereavement and mental health. Consistent with the stress process model, higher levels of mastery uniformly reduce the damaging effects of bereavement on depressive symptoms and anger, whereas self-esteem mitigates the positive association between losing a close tie to the virus and reports of anger. Contrary to the stress-buffering hypothesis, however, higher levels of perceived support exacerbate the positive associations between bereavement and each indicator of psychological distress. Our findings suggest that the putatively advantageous aspects of social support may be compromised, or even reversed, in the context of constrained social engagement. We discuss the theoretical implications of these findings for sociological research on the stress process.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T06:37:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693221113221
       
 
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