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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Society and Mental Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.692
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2156-8693 - ISSN (Online) 2156-8731
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The Work/Care Interface and Parents’ Mid-pandemic Mental Health:
           

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      Authors: Sylvia Fuller, Manlin Cai, Donna Lero
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic generated mental health stressors for parents as they faced new health risks and navigated disruptions to employment, schooling, and care arrangements. Drawing on 2021 survey data from Canadian parents of children 10 years old and younger, we describe the relationship between work/care pandemic stressors and mental health, and employ Kitagawa-Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions to examine how these contribute to mental health gaps by gender and its intersection with having household members perceived to be at high risk in relation to COVID-19. We find that mothers’ mental health was more negatively affected than fathers’. Differences in exposure to work/care stressors help explain this gap, with the “mental load,” perceptions of inequity in how households responded to pandemic care demands, and greater reported deterioration in work-family balance and career prospects particularly salient. Mothers, but not fathers, with high-risk household members were also more exposed to key work/care stressors, contributing to the worst pandemic mental health for this group. While the relationship between stressors and mental health was similar for mothers and fathers overall, high-risk status moderated this relationship, with employment or care disruptions that reduced COVID-19 exposure less likely to be associated with poorer mental health for parents in high-risk families.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T06:53:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231223549
       
  • The Mental Health of Essential Workers during the COVID-19 Pandemic: The
           Role of U.S. State-level Policies

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      Authors: Rachel Donnelly, Adam K. Schoenbachler
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Emerging research documents concerning mental health outcomes among essential workers at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, mental health outcomes may have varied across states in the United States, as state-level policies differed. Questions also remain about the mental health of workers during the second year of the pandemic. Using nationally representative data from the U.S. Household Pulse Survey (April–July 2021), we documented the mental health of essential workers and tested whether state-level policies (e.g., mask mandates) reduced mental health disparities for essential workers. Results show that food and beverage essential workers experienced heightened anxiety and depression relative to nonessential workers. Moreover, for food and beverage workers, disparities in mental health were smaller in states with mask mandates, expanded paid leave, and higher minimum wage compared to states without these policies. The present study points to the potential for state-level policies to protect the mental health of essential workers.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T11:48:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693241226979
       
  • Acculturation, Depressive Symptoms, and Friendship Instability among
           Immigrant Adolescents

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      Authors: Yezhen Li, Alyssa W. Goldman
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Recent scholarship suggests that personal tie instability, that is, the dissolution of old ties and the formation of new ties, may lead to psychological distress. However, this association remains understudied among the immigrant population, for whom acculturation may present unique challenges to both personal tie stability and psychological well-being. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we investigate the mental health implications of instability in immigrant adolescents’ same-sex best friends, and how it explains the association between acculturation and depressive symptoms. We find that friendship instability was associated with higher depressive symptoms only among immigrant adolescents with a low level of acculturation. For more acculturated adolescents, replacing their original friendship with an interracial friend predicted lower depressive symptoms. These findings imply that friendship instability constitutes a dimension of acculturative stress, with detrimental effects unique to immigrant adolescents in the early stages of acculturation.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-02-01T11:55:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231221513
       
  • Impostorization in Academia, Psychological Distress, and Class
           Reproduction

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      Authors: Jo Phelan
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Might “impostor syndrome” be more than the private trouble it is often described to be' Instead, might it be deeply rooted in sociological processes' I explore this possibility drawing on my personal experience and Pearlin’s insistence that much that distresses us in our personal lives originates in social structures. I use Bourdieu’s theory to conceptualize the processes that may instill the “syndrome,” and once in place, surreptitiously recreate inequality. I test this conceptualization, using new sociologically relevant measures, in a stratified sample of over 2,000 American college students. Experiencing impostor concerns in college was significantly related to low parental income. Results were consistent with a model in which impostor concerns mediate the association of low parental income to depression/anxiety and low college persistence. Cultural aspects of impostorization played a larger role than the intellectual aspects emphasized in the traditional conceptualization of impostor syndrome. I advocate the replacement of the within-the-person term “impostor syndrome” with the sociological term “impostorization.”
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T12:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231222626
       
  • A Relational Approach to Understanding Psychosocial Wellbeing, Including
           Suicidal Ideation, among MENA-background Adolescents

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      Authors: Sarah R. Meyer, Alli Gillespie, Ilana Seff, Cyril Bennouna, Najat Qushua, Iulia Tothezan, Baffour Boaten Boahen-Boaten, Carine Allaf, Lindsay Stark
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescent refugees from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region face significant acculturation challenges and stressors in the United States. This qualitative study draws upon the integrated motivational-volitional model to understand MENA-background adolescents’ psychosocial wellbeing and suicide risk in three U.S. cities. Local service providers served as key informants (n = 27), sharing in-depth reflections on supporting newcomer students in education, mental health, and refugee services. Analysis also includes focus group discussions with MENA-background adolescents (n = 11) who participated in a photovoice activity. Four key themes emerged: (1) acculturation stressors; (2) influence of family contexts; (3) community belonging, expectations, and support; and (4) school belonging. Service providers and students described adolescents’ challenges in navigating dual identities, conflicting expectations, and strong cultural norms surrounding gender and mental health. Implementation and evaluation of interventions to address both systemic and identity-based acculturative challenges are central to improving mental health and reducing suicide risk among this population.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T12:47:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231218264
       
  • Social Change in the Turbulent Times of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Impacts of
           Work-related Demands on Work-to-family Conflict, Mastery, and
           Psychological Distress

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      Authors: Shirin Montazer, Laura Pineault, Krista M. Brumley, Katheryn Maguire, Boris Baltes
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines whether (and why) the accumulation of perceived work-related demands associated with social change in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic relates to psychological distress among a sample of employed adults in dual-earning relationships living in the United States. Using data from a cross-sectional online survey (N = 418) administered during the early months of the pandemic, multivariate results indicate a positive association between demands of social change and distress, net of other factors. This association is due to an increase in work-to-family conflict and a decrease in mastery, and it does not vary by the gender or parental status of the respondent. According to the findings, part of the COVID-19 pandemic’s negative impact on the distress of the employed occurred through its translation into more negative proximal opportunity structures in the context of work, where it confronted individuals with different demands, comprising new uncertainties and new expectations.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2024-01-12T07:05:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231218256
       
  • Subjective Social Status as a Predictor of Physical and Mental Health
           among Early Midlife Adults in the United States: Appraising the Role of
           Gender

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      Authors: Carlyn Graham, Gabriele Ciciurkaite
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Literature indicates that subjective social status (SSS) is a robust predictor of health outcomes net of objective social status (OSS). However, research that has considered gender in the relationship between SSS and health is limited. Using 2016–2018 data from the Wave V biomarker sample of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we investigate the relationship between SSS and two health outcomes—allostatic load and depressive symptoms—and the moderating role of gender in these relationships among a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (ages 33–44 years) (n = 5,269). We find that SSS is inversely associated with both allostatic load and depressive symptoms, net of OSS. Moreover, we find that gender significantly moderates the SSS-allostatic load relationship but not the SSS-depressive symptoms relationship. Specifically, SSS has a greater impact on allostatic load among women than men. Future research should explore the underlying psychosocial mechanisms that contribute to these gender differences.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-09T05:56:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231213094
       
  • Identity Nonverification, Coping, and Depression and Anxiety during the
           Pandemic

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      Authors: Jan E. Stets, Emily Angelo, Benjamin C. Fields, Peter J. Burke
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 marked a change in social life that disrupted interaction, including people’s ability to verify their identities. We examine how identity nonverification associated with COVID-19 exposure helps us understand some of the psychological distress individuals experienced. We assess the relationship between identity nonverification and depression and anxiety, controlling for respondents’ prior depression and anxiety and prior nonverification (both retrospectively obtained), their background characteristics, COVID-19 exposure, and coping strategies during the pandemic. We analyzed a U.S. sample of 620 respondents one year into the pandemic. Respondents indicated the identity they felt was most negatively affected by the pandemic. We studied the four most frequently mentioned identities (friend, romantic, family, and worker identities) across respondents and across four racial/ethnic groups (Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians). We found that exposure to COVID-19 was positively associated with (1) identity nonverification based on self-appraisals, (2) the coping strategy of disengagement, and (3) depression and anxiety. Unexpectedly, COVID-19 was negatively associated with identity nonverification based on reflected appraisals. In turn, identity nonverification based on self- and reflected appraisals was positively related to depression and anxiety, as was the disengagement coping strategy. There was little variation in the results across the four identities or the racial/ethnic groups.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T10:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231213089
       
  • The Roots of Social Trauma: Collective, Cultural Pain and Its Consequences

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      Authors: Seth Abrutyn
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Since Kai Erikson’s landmark study of the devastation of five communities in West Virginia, sociology has leveraged the concept of trauma to describe certain social phenomena. Collective trauma came to refer to the destruction of social infrastructure and the ensuing negative mental health outcomes, while cultural trauma has come to describe the imposition of historical and ongoing attacks by a dominant group on the culture (broadly defined) of a group of people sharing a collective identity. The following article sketches out a theory of social trauma designed to bring these two types of sociological trauma together, highlight their similarities and differences, and unite them by grounding them in the neuroscience of (social) pain. The term trauma, borrowed from medical and psychological study, implies pain, but the sociological version of trauma is best understood as the collectivization and enculturation of social pain, or the evolved negative affective response to separation, rejection, exclusion, and isolation from cherished social objects including statuses. The article concludes by modeling the process by which an event transforms individual social pain into collective social trauma as well as the pathways through which social trauma becomes enculturated in a collective identity. Implications for the sociology of mental health follow.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T10:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231213088
       
  • Mismatch of Educational Expectations, Unequal Friendships, and Depression
           Symptoms of Adolescents

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      Authors: Zhonghao Wang
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous studies have explored the links between expectations and the mental health of young people. However, they mainly focus on personal expectations and rarely consider the expectations of connected others. Using data from Waves I and II of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, this study fills this gap by investigating how ego-friends differences in educational expectations are associated with adolescents’ depression symptoms. Results show that there was no significant difference in depressive levels between adolescents who had similarly high expectations like their friends and those with similarly low-expectation friends. However, when a mismatch exists, low-expectation adolescents had more depression symptoms than high-expectation ones. Teenagers who had low personal expectations and high-expectation friends reported higher depression scores than high-expectation ones. High-expectation adolescents with low-expectation friends felt less depressed than low-expectation individuals. This study advances our understanding of associations among expectations, friendship networks, and mental health.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T10:34:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231198861
       
  • The Nature of Power: Elaborating the Association between Divine Control
           and Mental Health

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      Authors: Laura Upenieks, Christos Orfanidis, Terrence D. Hill
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last decade, we have witnessed a resurgence of research on religious cognitions and mental health, including, most notably, perceptions of divine control. Although prior work on divine control tends to assume a loving or benevolent image of God, this is only one potential representation. Using nationwide data from the 2017 Baylor Religion Survey (n = 999), we test whether the mental health benefits of perceived divine control vary according to various images of God (authoritative, benevolent, critical, and distant) and educational attainment. Results suggest that individuals with a college degree tend to report worse mental health if they also exhibit high levels of divine control beliefs and authoritative or critical God images. For those without a college degree, mental health was optimal when perceived divine control beliefs were low and their images of God were either authoritative or critical. For those with a college degree, the best mental health profiles were observed among those who reported high levels of divine control and a benevolent God image. By exploring the intersection of perceived divine control and God imagery, we may gain greater insight into novel processes related to religious cognitions and mental health.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-04T10:32:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231201990
       
  • When Change and Stability in Work Location Matter for Psychological
           Distress: A Study of Workers Before and During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Deniz Yucel, Beth A. Latshaw, Jaeseung Kim
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has explored the consequences of the sudden transition to remote work during the pandemic. Less is known, however, about how the mental distress of individuals who changed work locations during the pandemic differed from that of those who consistently worked from home or consistently worked on-site, nor to what extent these differences varied across worker characteristics, such as gender and caregiving obligations. This study addresses these gaps using data from the Pew Research Center’s American Trends Panel survey and a Stress Process Model framework. Results show that those who transitioned into working from home during the pandemic reported greater mental distress than those who consistently worked from home or on-site. This association was larger among women with school-aged children. These findings suggest that structural changes in work location during the pandemic were more strongly related to mental distress. Moreover, the finding that this distress was unevenly distributed by gender and caregiving obligations has important implications.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T11:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231200037
       
  • Associations between Configurations of Childhood Adversity and Adult
           Mental Health Disorder Outcomes

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      Authors: Christina Kamis, Scott M. Lynch, William E. Copeland
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The life course perspective and cumulative inequality theory suggest that childhood adversity, occurring during a sensitive period of the life course, can have long-term consequences for adult mental health and well-being. Yet, the long-term influence of adversity on adult outcomes may depend on both the features of adverse childhood experiences (e.g., the number, type, and co-occurrence of adversities) as well as the outcome assessed. Using latent class analysis applied to several waves of prospective data from the Great Smoky Mountains Study (GSMS; N = 1,420), we identify subpopulations that are similar in their adversity experiences before age 18. We then predict adult internalizing and substance use disorder diagnoses by adversity experience. Results reveal five distinct classes of adversity, with unique risks for specific diagnoses in adulthood.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-10-19T12:05:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231197746
       
  • Revisiting Durkheim: Social Integration and Suicide Clusters in U.S.
           Counties, 2006–2019

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      Authors: Jessica Brantez, Jason N. Houle
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Research dating back to Durkheim’s Suicide has linked high suicide rates to low social integration. Less research has examined community vulnerability to suicide clusters—characterized by an unusually high number of suicides in a time and place. In this study, we draw from recent qualitative research to hypothesize that social integration is positively associated with the emergence of suicide clusters, in contrast to the classic Durkheimian hypothesis. To test this hypothesis, we examine the association between three measures of social integration (divorce, Catholic adherence, and residential stability) and a novel measure of suicide clusters in 469 U.S. counties from 2006 to 2019 using data from the American Community Survey (ACS), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and Religious Congregations and Membership Study (RCMS). We find that while social integration is negatively associated with suicide rates, social integration is positively associated with the emergence of suicide clusters. These findings shed light on the dual nature of social integration as both potentially protective and harmful for suicide.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T10:04:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231195940
       
  • Prolonged Exposure to Intimate Partner Violence and Depressive Symptoms
           Among Korean Married Couples: The Intersection of Gender and Education

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      Authors: Kyungeun Song, Jinho Kim
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates whether there is a longitudinal association between prolonged exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) and depressive symptoms and whether this association differs depending on the intersection of gender and education. Using data collected from 3,285 individuals aged 30 to 49 across 12 waves of the Korean Welfare Panel Study (KoWePS) between 2009 and 2020, gender-by-education-stratified fixed-effects models were estimated. IPV victims continued to experience increased depressive symptoms for four or more consecutive years of exposure. However, gender-specific patterns were observed. Persistently victimized women continued to experience increased depressive symptoms for four or more years, whereas the levels of depressive symptoms among men with prolonged IPV exposure increased only until the second year of exposure. Gender-by-education stratified analyses suggested that low-educated women are the most vulnerable to prolonged IPV victimization. Only low-educated women experienced an increase in depressive symptoms for four or more consecutive years.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-29T12:30:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231185853
       
  • The Moderating Effect of Values on the Relationship between Subjective
           Social Status and Depression: Evidence from MIDUS

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      Authors: Emily A. Ekl, Benjamin Gallati
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between subjective social status (SSS) and mental health and its underlying mechanisms remain an area of interest in the social sciences. Using data from the Midlife in the United States 2 (MIDUS 2), we examine how individual differences in valuing achievement and autonomy moderate the relationship between SSS and symptoms of depression. We find evidence of a moderation effect; there is a weaker relationship between SSS and depression for individuals who strongly hold the values of achievement or autonomy. In addition, at low levels of SSS, there are significant differences in the number of depression symptoms depending on personal values which are not seen at higher rungs of the SSS ladder, indicating a difference in this relationship dependent on how strongly one holds values of achievement and autonomy. We conclude by speculating on the mechanisms by which values shape the link between SSS and mental well-being and suggest future directions in studying values.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T11:56:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231184282
       
  • Debt, Credit Payment Holidays, and their Relationship with Mental Health
           during the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Matthew Sparkes, Senhu Wang, Jacques Wels
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Although the relationship between debt and mental health is well documented, little is known about how changes in debt status and the specific policies implemented to assist borrowers during the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted the mental health of men and women. Particular attention is paid to the implementation of a non-neoliberal “credit payment holiday” scheme during the pandemic in the United Kingdom. Data come from three waves of the Understanding Society COVID-19 surveys. We use panel data models to assess the relationship between change in the presence of unsecured debt, credit payment holiday, and psychological distress (12-item General Health Questionnaire [GHQ-12] Likert score), controlling for confounders. The presence of debt is associated with significantly higher psychological distress, and the pattern is particularly pronounced for women than for men. Among the indebted population, the results show that credit payment holiday can significantly buffer the negative mental health effect of debt. While the buffering effect is larger for women, it is not significantly different across genders. The relationship between debt and mental health remains significant throughout the pandemic, but the credit payment holiday scheme has played a significant role in attenuating it and could be implemented as a policy tool outside the pandemic context.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T11:50:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231169783
       
  • Managing a Household during a Pandemic: Cognitive Labor and Parents’
           Psychological Well-being

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      Authors: Richard J. Petts, Daniel L. Carlson
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Rising domestic burdens for mothers fueled concerns that the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated gender inequalities in well-being. Yet, survey research has not considered whether and how cognitive labor—planning, organizing, and monitoring family needs—contributed to gendered health disparities during the pandemic. Using data from the Study on U.S. Parents’ Divisions of Labor during COVID-19 (SPDLC) and a stress process perspective, we examine the association between cognitive labor and parents’ psychological well-being, and whether this association (1) differs between mothers and fathers and (2) is moderated by employment status and telecommuting. Mothers performed more cognitive labor during the pandemic than fathers, and cognitive labor was negatively associated with mothers’ psychological well-being—particularly for mothers who never or exclusively telecommuted. Mothers’ psychological well-being was higher when fathers did more cognitive labor, especially among mothers who worked outside the home. Overall, cognitive labor appears to be another stressor that contributed to increased gender inequality.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T11:03:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231169521
       
  • Working Only for the Weekend' How Workplace Social Connections Impact
           Workers’ Sense of Mattering and Mental Health

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      Authors: Rebecca Bonhag, Laura Upenieks
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      The growing field of mattering has established that a sense that we matter is crucial to well-being and that it is informed by interactions with close others. However, few studies investigate how mattering may be shaped by our work relationships. Since many adults spend much of their time performing paid work, addressing this research gap may provide insights for enhancing employee well-being. This study uses data from the 2021 Baylor Religion Survey, collected during the early months of 2021, and a sample of employed U.S. adults (n = 564) to test how a worker’s perceived respect from their employer and their closeness to coworkers relate to their general sense of mattering, as well as whether mattering may act as a mediator between work relationships and psychological distress (assessed as symptoms of depression and anxiety). Results indicate that feeling highly respected by one’s employer and one’s perceived closeness to coworkers are positively linked with mattering among workers. Additional analyses also imply that mattering mediates a portion of the relationship between workplace relations and psychological distress. In total, this study suggests that further research into work relationships and mattering is warranted, especially since both factors seem tied to workers’ mental health.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T10:57:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231165786
       
  • “We’re Not Gonna Talk about This, It Didn’t Happen. You’re
           Confused”: Adverse Communication in Family Responses to Mental Health,
           Childhood Sexual Assault, and LGBTQ Identities

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      Authors: Armin A. Dorri, Amy L. Stone, Brooke Izzy Heffington, Pekkam Jenny Njowo, Guadalupe Rivera, Phillip W. Schnarrs, Robert Salcido
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) people disproportionately report high exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). In this study, we examine the ways that LGBTQ people with high ACEs also describe experiencing adverse communication with family systems about mental health, childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and their gender identity. From interviews with a racially diverse sample of 82 LGBTQ people in South Texas, we analyze how this adverse communication—including gaslighting, silence, denial and ignoring—is attentive to courtesy stigma dynamics. This adverse communication impacts transgender people, cisgender LGBTQ people, and Black or Latinx LGBTQ people differently; for example, Black and Latinx LGBTQ people discussed adverse communication about mental health and therapy within their families that prioritized the respectability of the family. These findings provide insight into family dynamics and communication practices in the lives of LGBTQ people, particularly at the intersections of multiple marginalized identities.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-09T10:31:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231170901
       
  • Cumulative Pandemic Stressors, Psychosocial Resources, and Psychological
           Distress: Toward a More Comprehensive Test of a Pandemic Stress Process

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      Authors: Patricia Louie, Laura Upenieks, Terrence D. Hill
      Abstract: Society and Mental Health, Ahead of Print.
      Although the mental health consequences of individual COVID-19 stressors (e.g., bereavement, job loss, or financial strain) have been well-documented, little is known about the cumulative toll of multiple pandemic stressors. Using national data from the Crime, Health, and Politics Survey (May–June 2021), we test whether the accumulation of pandemic stressors is associated with greater psychological distress. We also consider whether this association is moderated by psychosocial resources (i.e., mastery, self-esteem, and social support). Our findings suggest that individuals who report three or more pandemic stressors tend to exhibit greater psychological distress than those who report fewer pandemic stressors or no pandemic stressors. While mastery offsets the impact of pandemic stressors at higher levels of stress exposure (i.e., two or more COVID-19 stressors), social support and self-esteem played a stress-buffering role to a point, but became ineffective at the highest levels of pandemic stress. The current study provides new insights into the pandemic stress process by conceptualizing and operationalizing the cumulative impact of COVID-19 stressors. We also confirm the continued significance of traditional coping resources in the context of novel pandemic stressors.
      Citation: Society and Mental Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-02T09:22:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/21568693231165260
       
 
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