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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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American Annals of the Deaf
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0002-726X - ISSN (Online) 1543-0375
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • The 175th Anniversary of the American Annals of the Deaf: Part
           I—1847 through 1900

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      Abstract: This issue is the first part of a celebration of the 175th anniversary of the American Annals of the Deaf. First published in 1847, the Annals is purported to be the oldest continuously published refereed education journal in North America—though there was about a 7-year interruption (1861–1868) due to the American Civil War and its aftermath. Regardless, this is a remarkable achievement. Donald F. Moores, the previous editor of the Annals, referenced a 1947 letter "from Leslie Dunlop of the Library of Congress, to Powrie Doctor, Assistant Editor of the Annals," stating that "at least 68 educational journals had been published in the United States prior to the first issue of the Annals. One survived the Civil War ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Miscellaneous

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      Abstract: Mr. Marius Dupont publishes in the Revue Internationale for August a report prepared for the faculty of the Paris Institution on the words and phrases to be taught the pupils during the first year of the course of instruction. It includes a list of about 120 substantives; a few other useful words, such as yes and no, good and bad, papa and mamma, good day, good evening, thanks; and a few directions, such as sit, stand, open the door, close the door, etc. He suggests 50 as the minimum, and 150 as the maximum number of words to be taught a class of ten pupils during the first year. The words chosen are, (1) those easiest to pronounce, and, (2) those that are indispensable and most useful. It is remarked that many ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The National College for Mutes

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      Abstract: The human mind is one of the most precious of all things with which man is endowed by his Maker. Its mysterious nature has through all ages been studied and explored by hosts of philosophers. It has been the grand theme of theoretical and hypothetical speculations—whether it be a pneumatic substance, either identical with or perfectly independent of the soul—whether it be, as the Materialists have professed to believe, nothing but an effect of the organic nerves—whether its conceptions be always a priori, as Plato, Kant and others asserted, or a posteriori, as Aristotle and others maintained—whether, as certain learned phrenologists have affirmed, its consciousness of anything whatever, be operated upon by the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Course of Instruction

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      Abstract: The question, what is the best method of teaching deaf-mutes, is one of very great importance, and yet one difficult to answer. It is important, inasmuch as the teacher has his pupils under his instruction but a short time comparatively, and in that time, he must teach them everything which it is desirable for them to know, without the opportunity of correcting his mistakes, if he have set out in a wrong direction, or have failed to adopt the best system of instruction. It is a difficult question to answer, because experience alone can qualify a person to decide whether this or that system is preferable, and few if any practical teachers of deaf-mutes, have been conversant with more than one mode of teaching. We ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Course of Instruction

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      Abstract: The character and long experience of Mr. Turner give to his article with this heading, in the last number of the Annals, (page 97 et Seq,) a certain importance, and entitle his views to a careful examination.It is to be regretted that "twenty-eight years" of experience in teaching language, should not have taught Mr. Turner the value of perspicuity and propriety of expression. For instance, the phrase, "a manual alphabet on one hand," is unnecessarily ambiguous, giving the reader the idea, not of a one-handed manual alphabet, but of a manual alphabet, set in contrast with something else. On page 101, near the middle, we find a verb and its dependent words without a nominative, (a contempt of grammar quite in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Course of Instruction

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      Abstract: It was our original intention as the conductors of the "American Annals" to avoid all controversies of a personal nature and carefully to exclude attacks upon individuals under whatever pretence they might be made. At the same time we felt ourselves bound to publish the views of others on all matters pertaining to the deaf and dumb, although differing from our own views on the same subjects. By pursuing this course, we hoped to elicit much important truth on the one hand, and on the other to do equal justice to all, and give cause of complaint to none. We supposed we had succeeded in carrying out this original design in a manner satisfactory to all interested, until; we received the communication from Dr. Peet of ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • An Important Distinction: Methodical Signs

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      Abstract: In the report of the Conferences of British Instructors, Dr. Scott of the Exeter Institution said, "The earlier teachers produced a system of methodical signs so perfect, that each word had its equivalent sign, and the education of the pupil was to be accomplished by his learning to associate both of these together. When he could translate the signs of the master into proper language, his education was considered complete. This was a grievous error no doubt, and productive of more evils than one. In such a system, storing the pupil's mind with facts, or in other words, giving him information in the different branches of knowledge, is altogether lost sight of, while we do not really give him that acquirement we most ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The "Experiment" Explained

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      Abstract: Mr. Jacobs "does not see the point of the objection" to his theory, founded on the comparative slowness of reading by signs. I will explain.I understand Mr. Jacobs to deny, or at least to doubt, the possibility of written words becoming for a deaf mute the direct object and instrument of thought. In the preface to the volume of lessons published by him in 1834 or 1835, he says of written words, "They can only become the signs of signs; to us, the signs of words; to the deaf and dumb, the signs of gestures." In his article in the last number of the ANNALS, he however admits that words representing visible objects may become directly the signs of the things they stand for.I supposed from the preface just cited, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • "The Experiment Explained": Importance of Preceding Examples

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      Abstract: In the last number of the ANNALS, Mr. Burnet has explained his "experiment;" but I must confess, with all respect, that the explanation has not made the matter clearer to my mind, and if anything, has only rendered his position more obscure. Mr. Burnet affirms, "that written words can be retained in the memory of a deaf mute, though not associated with any signs or even with any ideas." Unquestionably they may be. He further asks in confirmation of this position, which needed none, if I have not "been applied to, by many of my pupils, for the explanation of words and phrases which they had committed to memory for the express purpose of asking their meaning, and which of course, they could remember and repeat ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Necessity of Methodical Signs Considered: Further Experiments

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      Abstract: THERE is, perhaps, no topic pertaining to the instruction of the deaf and dumb, on which there is a wider diversity of opinion, than on the use of methodical signs. Mr. Jacobs thinks them indispensable; others admit them to be somewhat useful; others again reject them as useless or worse.To cite authorities: the successors in the Institution at Paris, of De l'Epee and Sicard, with whom this system of signs originated, have formally discarded and denounced them. In this country, where their use was once universal, or nearly so, they have been disused wholly in some schools, partially in others, and in some cases, after being denounced, again taken into partial favor. Mr. Stone thinks that they "should be dispensed ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Natural Method of Teaching Language

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      Abstract: In a late number of the Annals, in a review of Mr. Keep's "First Lessons for Deaf-Mutes," the editor says that although that imitation of nature's method by which it is proposed to present words and sentences to the deaf-mute beginner in the same way they are uttered in the presence of the hearing child, viz., without any pre-arranged plan, system, or order, has seemed attractive in theory to many persons, [the editor himself included! see his article in the Annals, vol. xiv, page 193,] yet he will venture to say that it has never really been practised in any institution for the deaf and dumb.I submit to the editor that if a method is attractive in theory, and has never been tried, this is not a reason why it ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Methods of Deaf-Mute Instruction—III

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      Abstract: In articles I and II of the present series,* the initial stages only of a method of language instruction were briefly outlined, the pupils being conducted to a point where all the essential elements of the simple sentence should be, in their simplest form at least, within his clear comprehension and ready use; and the claim was made that the pupil thus taught has at his command, even at this early period of his course, (reached usually at the end of his first year,) a language apparatus reasonably adequate to his absolute need. It will be the aim of the present article to continue t.he development of the same method through the second year of the course; by hint and illustration, indeed, rather than in minute ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Language Sense

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      Abstract: There seems to be a sense of language, just as there is a sense of music, acute to a degree in certain individuals and dulled to a state wherein only the commonest and most oft-repeated words produce a sensation in others. Between these two extremes there is a wide range, just as wide among the hearing as among the deaf, although this· fact is not so apparent to people interested in the deaf, perhaps.Teachers of the deaf often know too little and think too little about so-called "normal children," and so fail to learn many lessons which would aid them in dealing with the children under their care. The chances are that the hearing children in whom they are personally interested, relatives and friends, represent one ... Read More
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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