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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Topics in Language Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.442
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0271-8294 - ISSN (Online) 1550-3259
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Considering Personal Variables as Predictors of Aphasia Rehabilitation
           Outcomes

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Considering Personal Variables as Predictors of Aphasia Rehabilitation
           Outcomes

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Is There a Relationship Between Cortisol and Treatment Response in Chronic
           Aphasia'

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      Authors: Gravier; Michelle L.; Hula, William D.; Johnson, Jeffrey P.; Autenreith, Alyssa; Dickey, Michael Walsh
      Abstract: imagePurpose: To evaluate whether levels of cortisol, a stress-related hormone, predicted response to intensive speech–language intervention for individuals with chronic aphasia (IWA). Secondary analyses explored baseline cortisol levels, change following intervention, association between cortisol levels and aphasia severity, self-reported communicative distress, and chronic stress.Method: Afternoon salivary cortisol levels were measured in 14 IWA during the first and last weeks of a 4-week intensive speech–language intervention epoch. Behavioral outcome measures were collected pre- and postintervention.Results: Cortisol levels did not significantly predict treatment response in this sample of IWA, although a positive trend was present. Baseline cortisol levels were not abnormally elevated, did not change from pre- to postintervention, and were not significantly correlated with any of the behavioral outcome measures.Discussion: Although afternoon salivary cortisol levels did not robustly predict treatment response in this participant sample, future studies may be warranted that include IWA with elevated levels of cortisol at pretreatment.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Scoping Review of the Relationship Between Nonlinguistic Cognitive
           Factors and Aphasia Treatment Response

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      Authors: Diedrichs; Victoria A.; Jewell, Courtney C.; Harnish, Stacy M.
      Abstract: imagePurpose: The purpose of this article was to explore the extent to which nonlinguistic cognitive factors demonstrate a relationship with aphasia treatment outcomes. To that end, we conducted a scoping review to broadly characterize the state of the literature related to this topic.Methods: Reporting guidelines from the PRISMA extension for scoping reviews were used to conduct our study, which queried two common databases used in the health science literature, PubMed and Web of Science. Search terms and eligibility criteria are provided. Results are organized by the four nonlinguistic domains of cognition explored across the included studies (i.e., attention, memory, executive functioning, and visuospatial skills).Results: Of 949 unique articles identified from our database searches, 17 articles with 18 distinct studies were included in the final scoping review. Notably, most studies included in the scoping review targeted impairment-based aphasia treatments. Most studies also examined multiple domains of nonlinguistic cognition. A relationship between cognition and poststroke aphasia therapy outcomes was identified in nine of 15 studies addressing executive functioning, four of nine studies examining memory, four of eight studies examining visuospatial skills, and two of five studies exploring attention.Discussion: The results among included studies were mixed, with few discernible patterns within each of the four cognitive domains, though it appears that the influence of nonlinguistic cognition may depend on the timing (i.e., immediate vs. delayed post-treatment) and type (i.e., trained vs. untrained, generalized) of aphasia therapy outcomes. Future study designs should address maintenance, by including outcome measures at follow-up, and generalization, by including measures of performance on either untrained stimuli or trained stimuli in untrained contexts. Future work should also strive for larger sample sizes, perhaps through collaborations, or prioritize replicability to produce more reliable conclusions.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Characterizations of Resilience in Poststroke Aphasia: A Scoping Review
           and Considerations for Treatment and Research

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      Authors: Hunting Pompon; Rebecca; Mach, Helen
      Abstract: imageThe definitions and features of resilience, the process and outcome of successfully responding to adversity, are variable across the disability and rehabilitation literatures, and its influence on aphasia treatment and outcomes is as of yet unknown. This scoping review identified and thematically categorized characterizations and descriptions of resilience and the similarly used terms adaptation, adjustment, and coping in the aphasia research literature. Frequently noted features of resilience included internal/cognitive emotional responses, such as positive self-concept, attitude/outlook, and psychological function, as well as external/behavioral responses, such as engaging in new activities and opportunities for social connection. These general features align with a definition of resilience recently developed for individuals with chronic impairment. And, although little information about the influence of resilience on treatment engagement and outcomes emerged from the reviewed literature, a number of clinical considerations and research directions are suggested.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Motivation as a Predictor of Aphasia Treatment Outcomes: A Scoping Review

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      Authors: Weatherill; Maryanne; Tibus, Elizabeth O.; Rodriguez, Amy D.
      Abstract: imagePurpose: Motivation is a complex phenomenon that can influence a person's ability to make progress in treatment. We sought to understand how motivation is currently measured and utilized in aphasia rehabilitation by identifying treatment studies that (1) include measurement of motivation and (2) use motivation to predict treatment response.Method: A scoping review was conducted by systematically searching PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCO, Ovid MEDLINE, and APA PsycInfo using the following search terms: (measurement OR treatment OR rehabilitation OR predict*) AND (motiv* OR engagement OR adherence OR compliance) AND (aphasia OR dysphasia).Results: Two studies met our inclusion criteria. Motivation was measured differently across studies. No studies used motivation to predict treatment outcomes.Discussion/Conclusions: Despite the importance of motivation in aphasia rehabilitation success, studies that include its measurement are sparse. Additional research is needed and should include development of measurement tools and evaluation of the predictive value of motivation on treatment outcomes.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Respondent Burden and Readability of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures for
           People With Aphasia

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      Authors: Engelhoven; Amy E. R.; Bislick, Lauren; Gray, Sara; Pompon, Rebecca Hunting
      Abstract: imagePurpose: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for persons with aphasia (PWA) are commonly used to measure various outcomes. Persons with aphasia commonly present with language deficits that can likely increase respondent burden. Elements that contribute to respondent burden include readability, design, and formatting methods. The aims of this study were to determine how PROMs for PWA rate in level of respondent burden and on readability levels.Method: Irwin's 2012 review of PROMs for PWA was used for inclusion criteria and additional PROMs developed after 2012 were identified. This method resulted in 14 PROMs, which were rated on proposed respondent burden criteria and also underwent a readability analysis.Results: Six PROMs achieved a 7 or higher with the proposed 10-point respondent burden measure, indicating lower respondent burden. Eight PROMs met the nationally recommended reading level of sixth grade.Conclusions: Results indicated that the several PROMs available for PWA fail to minimize respondent burden.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Continuing Education Instructions and Questions

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      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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