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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access  
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Journal for Healthcare Quality
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.633
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1062-2551 - ISSN (Online) 1945-1474
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [297 journals]
  • Utilization of Improvement Methodologies by Healthcare Quality
           Professionals During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pesch; Lucie; Stafford, Terry; Hunter, Jaclyn; Stewart, Glenda; Miltner, Rebecca
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: This study describes the work of healthcare quality professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic, highlighting the successes and challenges they faced when applying their expertise in performance and process improvement (PPI) to help manage the crisis.Methods: The researchers performed a descriptive analysis of anonymous survey data collected from members of the National Association for Healthcare Quality professional community who were asked about their improvement work during the pandemic response.Results: Most survey respondents used improvement methods to a great or moderate extent to measure what was happening (83%), rapidly review processes and practice (81%), and decide where to focus effort (81%). Fewer respondents used PPI methods to engage with patients and families (58% to a great or moderate extent). Looking to the future, respondents indicated that embedding systematic approaches to improvement within healthcare organizations (59%) and working in a more integrated way across teams (48%) should be prioritized in the post-pandemic recovery.Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate why healthcare leaders should recognize the value that performance improvement approaches provide to everyday operations. They must empower PPI experts to lead this critical work and continue building workforce capacity in PPI methods to strengthen staff engagement and achieve better outcomes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Methods of Capturing Process Outcomes in Quality Improvement Trials: A
           Systematic Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Radisic; Gorjana; de la Perrelle, Lenore; Laver, Kate
      Abstract: imageHealthcare quality can be measured by studying structure, processes, and outcomes. This study examines how trialists capture process outcomes in implementation trials to provide guidance for researchers and health professionals. Electronic databases were searched, and two researchers performed the title, abstract, and full-text selection. Only implementation studies involving nonpharmacological approaches were included. Data were extracted by one reviewer and checked for accuracy and completeness by a second reviewer. Study quality was independently assessed by two reviewers. Of the 3,186 articles screened, 24 studies matched our inclusion criteria. Most studies were cluster randomized control trials, followed by interrupted time series studies and stepped wedge studies. The population in the studies was diverse and settings included hospitals, community centers, residential aged care facilities, and primary care. The reporting of process measures across the included studies varied, and there was limited information about the mechanisms of data collection procedures. Nineteen studies extracted information about processes from electronic medical records, patient records, or chart reviews. The remaining five studies used staff surveys. Challenges remain in the practical aspect of data collection for measuring process outcomes, particularly outside of hospital settings or where processes are hard to capture in patient records.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • 30-Day Readmission Reduction in a Skilled Facility Population Through
           Pharmacist-Driven Medication Reconciliation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Phillips; Marc; Dillaman, Megan; Matuga, Rebekah; Sweet, Michael; Lerfald, Nathan; Krupica, Troy; Briggs, Frank
      Abstract: imageBackground: Transitions of care can be difficult to manage and if not performed properly, can lead to increased readmissions and poor outcomes. Transitions are more complex when patients are discharged to skilled nursing facilities.Purpose: We assessed the impact of pharmacist-led initiatives, including medication reconciliation, on readmission rates between an academic medical center and a local skilled nursing facility (SNF).Methods: We conducted a two-phase quality improvement project focusing on pharmacist-led medication reconciliation at different points in the transition process. All-cause 30-day readmission rates, medication reconciliation completion rates, and total pharmacist interventions were compared between the 2 groups.Results: The combined intervention and baseline cohorts resulted in a 29.8% relative reduction (14.5% vs. 20.6%) in readmission rates. Medication reconciliation was completed on 93.8% of SNF admitted patients in the first phase and 97.7% of patients in the second phase. Pharmacist interventions per reconciliation were 2.39 in the first phase compared with 1.82 in the second phase.Conclusion: Pharmacist-led medication reconciliation can contribute to reduction of hospital readmissions from SNFs and is an essential part of the SNF transition process.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • REadmission PREvention in SepSis: Development and Validation of a
           Prediction Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Grek; Ami A.; Rogers, Emily R.; Peacock, Sarah H.; Hartjes, Tonja M.; White, Launia J.; Li, Zhuo; Naessens, James M.; Franco, Pablo M.
      Abstract: imageHospital 30-day readmissions remain a major quality and cost indicator. Traditional readmission risk scores, such as LACE (length of stay, acuity of admission, Charlson comorbidity index, and emergency department visits), may be suboptimal in special patient populations, such as those with sepsis. As sepsis survivorship improves, there is a need to determine which variables might be associated with a decrease in 30-day readmission. We completed a retrospective analysis reviewing patients with sepsis who had unplanned 30-day readmissions. Multivariate regression analysis was performed for the REadmission PREvention in SepSis (REPRESS) model, which evaluated age, length of stay, Charlson disease count, Richmond Agitation–Sedation Scale score, discharge to a skilled nursing facility, and mobility for predictive significance in hospital readmission. Our REPRESS model performed better when compared with LACE for predicting readmission risk in a sepsis population.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Analysis of Readmissions in a Mobile Integrated Health Transitional Care
           Program Using Root Cause Analysis and Common Cause Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Buitrago; Ivan; Seidl, Kristin L.; Gingold, Daniel B.; Marcozzi, David
      Abstract: imageMobile integrated health and community paramedicine (MIH-CP) programs are gaining popularity in the United States as a strategy to address the barriers to healthcare access and appropriate utilization. After one year of operation, leadership of Baltimore City's MIH-CP program was interested in understanding the circumstances surrounding readmission for enrolled patients and to incorporate quality improvement tools to direct program development. Retrospective chart review was performed to determine preventable versus unpreventable readmissions with a hypothesis that deficits in social determinants of health would play a more significant role in preventable readmissions. In the studied population, at least one root cause that can be considered a social determinant of health was present in 75.8% of preventable readmissions versus only 15.2% of unpreventable readmissions. Root Cause Analysis highlighted health literacy, functional status, and behavioral health issues among the root causes that most heavily influence preventable readmissions. Common Cause Analysis results suggest our MIH-CP program should focus its resources on mitigating poor health literacy and functional status. This project's findings successfully directed leadership of the city's MIH-CP program to modify program processes and advocate for the use of these quality improvement tools for other MIH-CP programs.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Mitigating COVID-19 Vaccine Waste Through a Multidisciplinary Inpatient
           Vaccination Initiative

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Baumann; Natalie; Chen, Sara; McDonald, Jay R.; Davis, Matifadza Hlatshwayo; Petroff, Courtney; McKelvy, Patricia
      Abstract: imageA multidisciplinary team at a tertiary care Veterans Health Administration medical center created a standardized process to identify medically stable inpatients, to notify inpatient staff of available COVID-19 vaccine doses, and to coordinate inpatient vaccine administration. The team's goals were to mitigate vaccine waste while safely vaccinating as many patients as possible. Using a unique set of exclusion criteria and clinical judgment, a quality improvement team reviewed patients admitted to medicine teams to determine medical stability. Eligible, interested patients were listed in a secure shared file, and outpatient vaccine clinic staff communicated with inpatient nurse leaders regarding the availability of unadministered doses. Doses were transported to the hospital from the clinic and administered by inpatient nurses. Between January 8 and April 26, 2021, 105 patients were vaccinated with either the Moderna or the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine during admission. Sixty-nine percent of the patients received a first dose, 27% received a second dose, and 4% received both doses. Forty-two percent of the patients vaccinated while inpatient identified as Black or African American compared with 28% of the vaccinated outpatients. No vaccine-related safety events were reported. This process demonstrates a viable approach to mitigating waste of COVID-19 vaccines and safely, efficiently, and equitably vaccinating an inpatient population.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Opioid Prescribing Patterns Among Orthopedic Hand Surgeons After
           Implementation of a Divisional Protocol

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pflug; Emily M.; Huang, Shengnan; Haquebord, Jacques H.; Hutzler, Lorraine; Paksima, Nader
      Abstract: imageIntroduction: Overprescribing contributes to the misuse and overuse of narcotics. We hypothesized that implementation of postoperative prescribing guidelines would consistently reduce the amount of opioids prescribed after ambulatory hand surgery.Methods: A divisional protocol was instituted in November 2018. A retrospective cohort study was designed to examine the policy's effects on postoperative prescribing. Postoperative opioid prescriptions for patients undergoing ambulatory hand surgery were evaluated 1 year before and 1 year after policy initiation. All prescriptions were converted into the total oral morphine equivalent (OME) prescribed.Results: A total of 1,672 surgeries were included. Six hundred sixty-one cases were in preimplementation group, and 1,011 cases were in the postimplementation group. The median of total OME decreased significantly after distribution of prescribing guidelines from 75 in the preimplementation group to 45 in the postimplementation group (p < .001) with significant reductions seen for carpal tunnel release (p < .001), trigger finger release (p < .001), distal radius open reduction internal fixation (p < .001), and finger closed reduction and pinning (p < .001). When categorized by procedure type, the median of total OME decreased from 75 to 30 for soft tissue procedures (p < .001) and from 120 to 100 for bony procedures (p < .001).Conclusion: Divisional prescribing guidelines lead to consistent short-term to mid-term reductions in the amount of opioid medication prescribed postoperatively.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Association of Adverse Events in Opioid Addiction Treatment With Quality
           Measure for Continuity of Pharmacotherapy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Liu; Ying; Becker, Andrew; Mattke, Soeren
      Abstract: imageSeveral quality measures for continuity of substance use care are being used in accountability programs, but it is not known whether they are predictive of better patient outcomes. We analyzed whether opioid use disorder (OUD) patients in the care of clinicians and practices with higher rates on one of these measures—continuity of pharmacotherapy for OUD—have a lower risk of overdose and detox events using Medicare data. For a 10-percentage point increase in an individual clinician's measure rate, the estimated odds ratios of a patient experiencing each of these two events were 0.92 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85 to 0.99) for overdose and 0.83 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.92) for detox. The corresponding estimates at the practice level were 0.90 (95% CI 0.85 to 0.95) for overdose and 0.83 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.89) for detox. These results suggest that a clinician's or practice's higher measure rate for continuity of pharmacotherapy for OUD is predictive of their patients' lower likelihood of having an adverse event. The findings contribute to a growing body of evidence on the importance of treatment continuity for OUD and support the validity of measuring continuity in provider-level accountability programs.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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