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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 101)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 84)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access  
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 92)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Working with Older People
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.162
Number of Followers: 40  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1366-3666 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8790
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • Economic, social and cultural concepts for building a healthy community
           among residents of a Japanese shopping street

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      Authors: Yuki Ohashi , Sanae Sugawara , Akiko Ozaki
      Abstract: This study aims to highlight the value of economics, social relations and culture in building a healthy community by interpreting qualitative data. A qualitative descriptive approach was used between June 2016 and May 2017 and interviews were analysed inductively. Twenty residents of a shopping street in Tohoku, a rural town in north-eastern Japan, participated in this survey. This study focused on the residents’ value of economics, social relations and culture in building a healthy community. People acquired economic benefits in the hope of gaining irreplaceable relationships with customers and residents, including memorable stories and heart-to-heart satisfaction. The narratives reflected not only the ideal aspects of social relations but also realistic and complex aspects, such as feelings of being uncomfortable with strangers, whether they were long-term residents or newcomers. The daily life of the town is a story, which is built based on customs fostered and strengthened through capital bonds. To build a healthy community, people residing on shopping streets have unique care systems in which multiple glass shop windows make it easier to tell narrative stories, communicate or request assistance, which is very different from knocking on doors in suburban neighbourhoods.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-05-12
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-08-2021-0041
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • No fuss please! I’m deafblind: a personal point of view and some
           friendly suggestions

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      Authors: Roger Wilson-Hinds
      Abstract: This paper aims to offer practical suggestions as to factors needing consideration when meeting, interacting with or assessing the needs of an older person living with acquired deafblindness. The paper’s author draws on his personal experience of living with acquired deafblindness to offer practical suggestions. This paper offers an experiential definition of acquired deafblindness, before providing practical suggestions related to engaging with deafblind people, distinguishing between acquired deafblindness and cognitive decline, and assessing hearing and sight levels. There is a paucity of literature on the lived experience of older people living with acquired deafblindness. This paper offers both a unique insight into this experience combined with practical suggestions for those in contact with older deafblind people.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-27
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-03-2022-0013
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mental health status and factors related on mental health status of the
           older adults living alone

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      Authors: Sarinrut Juntapim , Ampornpun Theranut
      Abstract: This study aims to describe the mental health status and factors related to the mental health status of older adults living alone. This is a descriptive correlational study. Older adults living alone from the urban area of the Northeast of Thailand were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame and received a questionnaire. Data were collected using a demographic form, way of coping, social support, family relationship, and Thai Mental Health Indicator-15 (TMHI-15). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, and Chi-square test. The mental health status related to personal factors at p < 0.05 including gender, education level, income, health status, coping strategies, social support and family relationship are related to mental health status. This study provides further empirical support for older adults who are living alone, especially females who have low income and have a disease. Consequently, policy on social support in older adults should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies. This study requires some form of long-term care as well as utilization of treatment and support services, enhanced quality of life for older adults living alone. This study requires some form of long-term care as well as utilization of treatment and support services, enhanced quality of life for older adults living alone. This study provides further empirical support for older adults who are living alone.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-25
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-08-2021-0045
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • What determines the willingness of older Polish employees to learn'

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      Authors: Karolina Pawłowska-Cyprysiak , Katarzyna Hildt-Ciupińska
      Abstract: The issue of educational activity of elderly people is very important. It is an area not only closely related to the productivity of the employees in the company and their retention but also to the broadly understood quality of life of the elderly. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of conditions for the willingness to learn in the case of older employees. The study group consisted of employees aged 50+, the so-called older employees. The selection of the group was intentional. The questionnaires were completed by employees of companies that agreed to participate in the survey. To identify the direct predictors of the willingness to participate in training, a logistic regression analysis was carried out. The model allows to explain 19.1% of the variance of the dependent variable. Higher age value reduces the chance that a person will want to participate in training, while higher number of employees in the company, the need to learn new things at work, greater emotional demands and a greater sense of effectiveness increase these chances. Research on training and the willingness to learn is more often carried out among younger employees than the group of employees 50+. Defining what influences the willingness to learn among this group allows to design activities aimed on development and satisfying needs of older employees in this area.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-20
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0060
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Broadcasting, through TV, social services information to older persons

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      Authors: Telmo Silva
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to depict the field trial to evaluate the usability and usefulness of an Interactive TV platform that aims to promote the info-inclusion and quality of life of Portuguese older adults by delivering informative content about public and social services. The present paper reports the process of a field trial conducted to test an iTV platform’s usability and user experience along with 21 senior users. A high-fidelity prototype was tested with potential users for two weeks to collect data in a “real life” background to gather valuable information to refine the solution according to the target public needs. The results revealed positive usability levels and overall satisfaction of the users in interacting with the system, yet not stopping them from giving their inputs and feedback. The informative videos sent to the platform were considered adequate, the remote control was simple and caused no problems, the video library and the splash screen were both positively reviewed. This original research offers insights on how valuable is making field trial in the development of an innovative technology regarding this target population. Also, it was possible to understand that older adults want to be informed. Despite this, most of the time, they are unable to find the information efficiently. These results also supported the usefulness of the +TV4E platform.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-01-2022-0001
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Decent work in care homes: lessons and implications of the pandemic
           experience from Scotland

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      Authors: Stephen Gibb , Hartwig Pautz
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to identify lessons and implications on the theme of decent work in social care. This has long been highlighted as integral to improving social care for the elderly. The COVID-19 pandemic experience reveals lessons and implications about the systemic absence of decent work in one place, Scotland, in care homes. The main lesson and implication is a need for change beyond the focus on levels of pay and systemic advocacy of decent work as it is conventionally understood. Data was collected using qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 20 care workers in care homes.[AQ4] A range of care system institutional stakeholders was also interviewed. A range of care system institutional stakeholders was also interviewed. Decent work in social care may only be progressed to the extent that a culture change is achieved, transcending the institutional stasis about who owns and engages with progressing decent work. This is a study in one place, Scotland, with a small sample of frontline care workers in care homes and representatives from a range of institutions. Effective culture change for decent work in care homes needs to be a higher research priority. More explicit culture policies can be a mechanism by which overall decent work and system change may be catalysed and sustainably secured together. Explicit culture change is here set out with respect to operational, institutional and national domains. There needs to be social policy and political support for situating decent work to be part of a broader culture change around care work with the elderly. A culture-oriented change plan as well as new resourcing and structures can together ensure that the nadir of the pandemic experience was a historical turning point towards transformation rather than being just another low point in a recurring cycle. The situating of systemic decent work progress within a broader culture change, and modelling that culture change, are original contributions.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-06
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-02-2022-0007
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Family involvement in low-salt diet for hypertensive older adults

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      Authors: Suharno Usman , Andi Masyitha Irwan , Rosyidah Arafat
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of family involvement in the educational sessions and follow-up meetings on compliance with the low-salt diet for hypertensive older adults. Randomized controlled trial was used in this study with a total of 30 hypertensive older adults divided into two groups (n = 15). The intervention group involved one family member during the educational sessions and follow-up meetings. Conversely, no family member was involved in the control group. The intervention group showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in compliance level on the attitude (knowledge) and subjective norm (psychomotor and family support) subscales. The perceived obstacle subscale and the salt concentration in food and urine excretion significantly decreased both after educational sessions and follow-up meetings (p < 0.05). However, the control group did not. A relatively small number of samples would have affected the results, but in this study, randomization was applied in sample collection. By encouraging the involvement of family members in the educational sessions and follow-up meetings, it could enhance compliance of low-salt diet among hypertensive older adults. The findings and outputs provide a combination of family involvement and the Geragogy learning model through educational sessions and follow-up meetings that could enhance a low-salt diet adherence among older adults with hypertension in the community.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-04
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-05-2021-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Buffering role of positive religious coping against the helplessness of
           elderly people under Covid stress

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      Authors: M.J. Antony Wilson , Surendra Kumar Sia
      Abstract: This study aims to understand the relationship between Covid stress and helplessness among the elderly people in Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu, a southern state of India, and moreover, whether positive religious coping can have any influence on this relationship. Following a field study approach, data were collected from 187 elderly people aged more than 60 years in different parts of the Tirunelveli district. Moderated regression analysis was carried out to examine the moderating role of positive religious coping on the relationship between Covid stress and helplessness. In line with the formulated hypotheses, the findings reveal a significant positive contribution of Covid stress toward the helplessness of elderly people. However, despite Covid stress, the helplessness gets reduced for elderly people executing a higher level of positive religious coping. The findings substantiate the conservation of resources theory and suggest the role of positive religious coping as a personal resource against the stress experienced by the elderly. The findings of the present study indicate the responsibility of government agencies, community leaders, family members as well as religious leaders in providing the scope to the elderly for religious interactions as well as practices that may facilitate positive religious coping among them. The present study is one of its kind to be carried out among community-dwelling elderly under the pandemic crises. Moreover, the buffering role of positive religious coping as a personal resource to withstand the difficult situation has been examined in this study in an empirical manner.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-02-2022-0006
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Classifying elders neglect, insult and abuse through financial hardship
           and physical health

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      Authors: Naval Bajpai , Kushagra Kulshreshtha , Prince Dubey , Gunjan Sharma
      Abstract: Aging has detrimental effects on elders due to their physical health and financial hardship. Elders face neglect, insult and abuse in society due to causes related to physical health and financial issue from caregivers. This study aims to identify the measures of physical health and financial hardship and classifies elders under neglect, insult and abuse categories. The propositions of existence and classifying elders under neglect, insult and abuse categories were tested by using discriminant analysis and their profiling was done by perceptual mapping technique. The elder neglect category identified as a prominent category due to physical health while elder insult and abuse were caused by physical health and financial hardship both. The present study portrays the multi-dimensional facets related to elders’ ill-treatment. The elder’s ill-treatment categories were profiled to imply the measure of elevating elders’ dignity and care at a personal level and society at large. This study classifies elders under neglect, insult and abuse categories. This classification may facilitate the medical practitioners, academicians and government and non-government social welfare agencies in understanding elder abuse with new perspectives.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-03-2021-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Evaluating inconsistency in health responses: evidence from elderly in
           India

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      Authors: Dona Ghosh
      Abstract: This paper explored the reliability of self-reported health and the impact of the social position in determining the inconsistent health response (IHR), in late life. Reliability of self-reported health is important to evaluate, as it is the primary step for asking health-care facility. As self-reported health is a subjective measure, elderly people might have a tendency of under-reporting the health problem because of lower socioeconomic status. This incidence can cause inaccurate estimate of the health problem of the aged at the time of formulating health policy or providing health-care infrastructure. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to explore the sources of inconsistent responses of self-reported health by comparing it with the existence of chronicle ailment and to identify the vulnerable group that health care supports. The study uses nationally representative unit-level data from the National Sample Survey of India. Using the bi-variate probit model, joint estimation of reported health and IHRs is determined. The study compares perceived and actual health status and explores how individual characteristics and socioeconomic position contributes to IHRs among the elderly population. Major findings of this study are as follows: firstly, self-reported health has little reliability, as it is compared with the existence of chronicle ailment. Older people in the rural areas have greater tendency to under-estimate the health problem, whereas urban elders tend to over-estimate it; and secondly, the inconsistency in health response is significantly associated with social caste, economic status and attainment of education. The results of this study from bivariate probit model offer deeper understandings about the reliability of self-reported health and provide further insights to improve policy design formulated to mitigate the health inequality among the elders. This study might be helpful to design an inexpensive and easily available health measure, which is very important for a highly populated aging country with limited health-care resources. To the best of author’s knowledge, it is the first study that has identified the sources of inconsistent health and direction of inconsistency that is where self-reported health over- or under-estimates the actual health response among the elderly in a developing country like India, where the growth rate of population aging is faster than the world.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-05-2021-0023
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Family caregivers’ experiences of providing care for hospitalized older
           people with a tracheostomy: a phenomenological study

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      Authors: Watchara Tabootwong , Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen , Pornchai Jullamate , Edwin Rosenberg , Hannele Turunen
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to describe family caregivers’ experiences of providing care for older people with a tracheostomy during hospitalization. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used in this study. A total of 40 family caregivers were interviewed face-to-face in medical-surgical wards. Data was analyzed using Giorgi’s phenomenological method. Family caregivers described meanings of providing care, learning how to provide care, caring activities, impacts of caregiving, support needs and qualities of being a caregiver. Meanings included filial responsibility, spousal attachment and end of life care. Caring activities were varied. Impacts experienced were reported as physical, psychological, social and financial. Caregivers expressed the need for information from the nursing team and assistance from their relatives. Positive caregiver qualities that were described included loving to provide care for older people and confidence and sincerity in caregiving. Although caring for older people with a tracheostomy was difficult and came with challenging impacts, family caregivers were willing to support their loved ones due to feelings of family responsibility. The paper addresses family participation in providing care for people with a tracheostomy. They experience physical, psychological, social and financial consequences of caregiving. Therefore, health-care professionals should support family caregivers with education, training and awareness of supports and resources for dealing with problematic impacts and other expressed needs.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-25
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-08-2021-0043
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 outbreak in India: age-wise analysis of patients

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      Authors: Rajan Kumar
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to indicate the current situation of the COVID-19 outbreak in India, the world's second-most populous country. India reported its first COVID-19 case in the southern province of Kerala in late January 2020. Since then, the outbreak has spread to other provinces and union territories, with the highest number of cases reported in Maharashtra province as of 24 May 2020. This paper presents the age- and gender-wise analysis of COVID-19 patients in Maharashtra province and the whole nation. It shows that 75% of them belong to the age group of 21–60 years and the age above 50 years has a very high fatality rate of 14.52% in Maharashtra. This analysis also shows that 76% of COVID-19 cases are in males in the nation. The data indicates that in the nation, 75.3% of the deaths are in the age group over 60 years and 86% of cases of death had diabetes-related comorbidity, hypertension, chronic kidney problems and heart problems. In India, the case-fatality rate, which estimates the proportion of deaths among identified confirmed cases, is 2.93% as of 24 May, which is significantly less than that many countries. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this is the first attempt to indicate the current situation of the COVID-19 outbreak in India based on age and gender.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-21
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-05-2020-0022
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Loneliness and psychological well-being among community-dwelling elderly
           people: the mediating role of death anxiety

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      Authors: N. Sreelekha , Surendra Kumar Sia
      Abstract: The present study aims to investigate the relationship between loneliness and psychological well-being and examine whether death anxiety mediates the association between loneliness and psychological well-being among community-dwelling elderly people in the Kerala state of India. A total of 209 participants (125 males and 84 females) were selected for this study through the convenience sampling method. SPSS (version 22) was used to estimate descriptive and correlational indices. Mediation analysis was conducted using Hayes Process macro-Version 3.5 and 5,000 bootstrapped sample-based analysis. Results indicate the significant indirect effect of loneliness on psychological well-being through the influence of death anxiety. It was thus concluded that lonely feelings among elderly people lower psychological well-being and death anxiety partially mediates the relationship of loneliness and psychological well-being. The cross-sectional study with the use of questionnaires might not be adequate to establish causal links. All the participants were from community-dwelling. So it reduces the possibility of generalizing the findings to institutional settings. The study recommends the need and importance of mental health support for elderly people through community intervention programs to reduce their feeling of loneliness. The present study contributes to the existing body of knowledge by substantiating the mediating role of death anxiety in the relationship between loneliness and the psychological well-being of elderly people staying at home.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-18
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-08-2021-0042
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The contribution effect of learning experience on financial well-being of
           government retirees in North-Central Nigeria

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      Authors: Benard Alkali Soepding
      Abstract: This study aims to determine the contribution effect of learning experience on the financial well-being of government retirees in North-Central Nigeria. Special emphasis was placed on the contribution effect of the elements of the learning experience. This study used correlational and cross-sectional research designs based on a questionnaire survey of 376 retirees drawn from North-Central Nigeria. A confirmatory factor analysis was used to identify the factors of learning experience using the Analysis of Moments of Structures (AMOS) software, version 23. The contributory effect of the confirmed sub-domains of learning experience on the financial well-being of retirees was established using hierarchical regression. Confirmatory factor analysis results confirmed that financial knowledge, financial planning and financial self-efficacy are factors of learning experience. Although the sub-domains of the learning experience are significant predictors of financial well-being, financial knowledge has a significant effect on financial well-being, followed by financial planning and financial self-efficacy. The sub-domains of learning experience collectively explain about 46.5% of the variance in the financial well-being of retirees in North-Central Nigeria. Unlike most other documentation on financial well-being, which has focused on the general effect of the learning experience as a global variable, this study explores the role played by the three dimensions of learning experience and methodologically isolates the contribution of each dimension with respect to retirees in developing countries. As such, we uncover the reality that all the sub-domains of the learning experience are significant for the financial well-being of retirees in a developing country context, though in varying effects.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-07-2021-0037
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ageing perception and social functioning in older adults: a narrative
           review

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      Authors: Elaheh Shoushtari-Moghaddam , Mohammad Hossein Kaveh , Mahin Nazari
      Abstract: Older people have a different perception of ageing and different factors can influence this perception. Among the factors influencing the perception of ageing are various functions including physical, mental and social functioning of the elderly. Therefore, in this study, the authors intend to investigate the relationship between the perception of ageing and social functioning. A systematic search was conducted of four electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus). Citations within identified reports were also searched. Studies were included if they included perceptions of ageing and social functioning measures involving older participants. Study selection and data extraction were conducted using predefined criteria. Older adults’ perceptions of ageing and social functioning were assessed with a variety of measures. From a total of 79 articles, eight reports met the criteria for inclusion. In these studies, the positive and negative aspects of ageing perception and various social functions of the elderly in society such as economic, political, social activities; social support; and formal and informal participation have been raised. The results of this narrative review demonstrate that there is a two-way relationship between the perception of ageing and social functioning. Therefore, it is suggested that appropriate practical and educational interventions be taken to increase the positive perception of ageing in the elderly and increase the social performance of the elderly in society.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-09-2021-0051
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Attitudes toward and willingness to work with older people and its
           predicting factor among medical science students in Iran

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      Authors: Fatemeh Rashidi , Arman Azadi
      Abstract: As the aging population increases steadily, the demands for specialized nurses and geriatricians willing to work in geriatric settings will probably explode. Accordingly, the medical sciences students’ attitude toward older adults and their willingness to work with them must be determined. This study aims to determine the medical sciences students’ attitude toward older people and its relationship with their willingness to work with this population. In addition, it sought to determine the variables that could predict students’ attitudes toward the elderly. A cross-sectional design using a stratified random sampling method was used to recruit a sample of 305 Iranian medical sciences students with a response rate of 97.4%. The instruments for data collection were composed of three parts: socio-demographic characteristics of participants, Kogan’s Attitudes toward Old People Scale and the Willingness to Work with Elderly People Scale (WEPS). Data were analyzed in SPSS version 23 (IBM SPSS statistics 23.0). The participants’ mean (SD) age was 22.95 (2.53). Most of them (69%) were women, and 51% were nursing students. The findings showed that 70% of students had a slightly positive attitude toward the elderly and only 12.8% of them declared geriatric setting as their workplace preference in the future. Experience of volunteering activities with elders, WEPS score, workplace preference after graduation and gender were the predictors of medical science students’ attitudes toward the elderly. This paper further develops previous research on the attitudes of Iranian medical sciences students toward older adults.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-16
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0054
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Differentials and predictors of hospitalisation among the elderly people
           in India: evidence from 75th round of National Sample Survey (2017-2018)

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      Authors: Saddaf Naaz Akhtar , Nandita Saikia
      Abstract: There is limited evidence on the determinants of hospitalisation and its causes in India. This study aims to examine the differential in the hospitalisation rates and its socioeconomic determinants. This study also examines the causes of diseases in hospitalisation among the elderly (≥60 years) in India. This study used data from the 75th round of the National Sample Survey Organizations, collected from July 2017 to June 2018. The elderly samples in this survey are 42,759, where 11,070 were hospitalised, and 31,689 were not hospitalised in the past year or 365 days. This study estimated hospitalisation rates and carried out binary logistic regression analysis to examine the associations of hospitalisation with the background variables. The cause of diseases in hospitalisations was also calculated. The hospitalisation rate was lower among elderly female compared to elderly male. Elderly who belongs to middle-old aged groups, non-married, North-Eastern region, Southern region, general caste, health insurance, partially and fully economically dependent have a higher chance of being hospitalised. About 38% elderly were hospitalised due to communicable diseases (CDs), 52% due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and 10% due to injuries and others (IO). Nearly 40% elderly were hospitalised in public hospitals due to CDs, whereas 52% were hospitalised in private hospitals due to NCDs and 11% due to IO. Firstly, this study is based on cross-sectional survey due to which temporal ambiguity averted to draw causal inferences. Secondly, other significant factors can also predict hospitalisations and provide insightful results, such as lifestyle factors, behavioral factors, obesity, mental state and several personal habits such as smoking cigarettes, drinking alcohol, consuming tobacco or other harmful substances. But this information was not available in this study. Even with these limitations, the hospitalisation issues among the elderly are beneficial to understand the current circumstances of CDs, NCDs and injury and other diseases for India and its states to formulate health policy. Early screening and early treatment for NCDs are needed, which are non-existent in almost all parts of India. It is essential to necessitate and identify the important factors that best predict hospitalisation or re-visit of hospital admission. Although, the medical advances in India have made rapid strides in the past few decades, it is burdened none the less, as the doctor–patient ratio is very low. It is important to develop preventive measures to minimize the accidents and causalities to avoid substantial cost associated with elderly health care. Raising awareness, promotion of healthy life style and improving the quality of good health-care provisions at primary level is a necessity. The findings, practical and social implications provide a way forward for the health policymakers to potentially alter the future research to reduce associated comorbidities, unnecessary hospitalisations and other medical complications.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-15
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0055
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Effect of second wave COVID 19 pandemic on anxiety level of senior
           citizens: a case study

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      Authors: Ajay Kumar Behera
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to explore the effect on distress of senior citizen’s anxiety levels in quarantine during the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic. This is a descriptive study, in which data were collected using the online survey method, a sociodemographic form, a semi-structured data form for second wave COVID-19, the anxiety-level scale and the distress scale. Data were collected during the period when a curfew was imposed for the senior citizen. Data were analyzed using a structural equation model. According to the structural equation model, anxiety was determined as a predictor of distress. The anxiety levels of the senior citizen who were 60–69 years old, female, single; had inadequate knowledge about the pandemic; and had not encountered a similar pandemic before considered that family bonding was affected negatively, so they became alone and reported that they became bored, exhausted and distressed during the pandemic, which increased their distress levels. Anxiety affects distress in the senior citizens. One of the policy implications of this study is that governments should provide behavioral support to citizens during a pandemic. For example, short-term home-based psychological interventions should be developed to reduce the negative effects of the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health. The anxiety levels increased distress levels for those senior citizens who considered their information about the second wave of COVID-19 insufficient; had hyper-emotionality; longed for their families; and felt tense, overwhelmed and lonely during the pandemic. In addition, factors such as constraints of flexibilities, prevention of socialization and decreased physical movements also affect distress in senior citizens.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-05-2021-0024
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Life under COVID-19 lockdown: an experience of old age people in India

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      Authors: Anuj Kumar , Nishu Ayedee
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to highlight the pain and suffering of elderly age people during the COVID-19 lockdown. It was an unpleasant experience for old age people. In this paper, primarily, the information has been collected through interviews and observation. The researchers interviewed the older people and discussed their experience during the lockdown, and they also observed their activities during that period. The main results of this paper suggested that lockdown appeared as double-edge sword for old age and elderly people. They are not allowed to go outside to safeguard their lives, and inside the home, they are facing issues of anxiety, fear and mental trauma. They are not able to complete their daily routine, and it is hampering their mental strength. The paper is based on firsthand information received from an old-age couple.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-06-2020-0027
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Ageing in the unusual times and adapting to the new normal – an
           Indian perspective

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      Authors: Munmun Ghosh
      Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way of our living. Social and physical distancing has become an inevitable part of our life. Although the younger counterpart can adapt to the situation quickly, it is extremely difficult for the elderly (60 years and above) who are locked in their homes to manage this situation on their own, especially those who live alone. In this scenario, how can we help the elderly who are caught at home' How will they again fight with social and physical distancing and the pandemic' The purpose of the study is to acknowledge the fact that the elderly need urgent consideration and attention and suggested ways to adapt to the “new normal.” The viewpoint discussed the diverse ways through which the elderly can be motivated to adapt in the current situation in a pandemic hit environment. The viewpoint highlighted in detail the prospects, challenges and considerable steps that need to be taken by the important stakeholders (practitioners and policymakers) in our society to support the elderly. The viewpoint emphasised on the need of creating separate policies and implementation of the same at various levels. Although the government does have acts and policies for the welfare and maintenance of the elderly, they should now also re-think of a more concrete and sustainable policy to take care of the elderly, especially during a crisis. Ageing is inevitable, the reflections of this study will also allow the families and the society to cushion the elderly in their families and around them. This work will also create an opportunity for the practitioners to work for this under-explored community and look forward to catering to their needs.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-14
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-07-2020-0034
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Depression and anxiety in patients with heart failure: contributing
           factors, consequences and coping mechanisms: a review of the literature

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      Authors: Yasmeen Abu Sumaqa , Ferial A. Hayajneh
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to integrate evidence on contributing factors, consequences, in addition to coping mechanisms of depression and anxiety in patients with heart failure. An integrative review was conducted by searching three main electronic databases: Web of Sciences, MEDLINE and Science Direct. Twenty-four studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in the final review process. The review identified the most common contributing factors, consequences and coping mechanisms of depression and anxiety in patients with heart failure. Patients with heart failure have high anxiety and depression prevalence rates. It is recommended to include routine assessment and management of anxiety and depression in heart failure protocols to improve clinical outcomes.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-11
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-12-2021-0061
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Traditional dance “Molong Kopi” for maintaining of health status among
           older adults in long-term care of Indonesia

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      Authors: Kholid Rosyidi Muhammad Nur , Tantut Susanto , Rismawan Adi Yunanto , Latifa Aini Susumaningrum , Hanny Rasni
      Abstract: This study examined the influence of traditional dance “Molong Kopi” for maintaining health status of older adult (OA) in long-term care of Indonesia. A randomized control trial study conducted 21 of OA intervention group and 20 of OA control group. Molong Kopi dance intervention was carried out for eight weeks. Health status was measured on blood pressure, risk for fall, balance and quality of sleep of OA. There was a significant differences between the intervention group and the control group on systole blood pressure, fall risk and sleep quality (p < 0.05). The number of OA who were not at risk for fall after the intervention were increased from 14 to 38%. The quality of sleep of OA was also changed to good sleep quality from 43 to 90%. Molong Kopi dance in OA can reduce systolic blood pressure, reduce the risk of falls and improve sleep quality better.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-04-2021-0017
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Neurological music therapy for physical and psychological well-being among
           older people in the USA

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      Authors: Maanas Sharma
      Abstract: In the USA, the well-being of older people is increasingly precarious. There is a paucity of research into methods of care outside of traditional, costly, intensive methods. Moreover, any literature that does so fails to connect different fields of study or aspects of well-being. This paper aims to identify alternate, cheaper methods to traditional care methods that also take a more holistic approach to older peoples’ lives. Connecting research conducted by gerontologists, psychologists and neurologists, and framing the results through Census data and economic research, the author proposes music therapy interventions for older people. Music therapy has significant benefits on physical, cognitive and psychological well-being. Moreover, these treatment methods are significantly cheaper than traditional methods and are even more effective in specific cases. Specifically, though, the research methods reveal that music therapy that engages participants formally, is group-based and uses participants’ preferred music is the most potent form of therapy to achieve the stated goals. Implementing such interventions across the country could be easily done by coordinated efforts by legislatures, administrative agencies, community groups and health-care infrastructure. As opposed to varied methods used, which undermine the broad application of results, research should primarily use the proposed three-pronged approach as “music therapy” in future investigation. Moreover, proposing music therapy as a valuable alternative in some cases of elderly care may alleviate some stress on future American health-care resources.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-08
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-05-2021-0026
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Physical health, access to health services and quality of life of older
           Thai adults working in fruit orchards

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      Authors: Sutham Nanthamongkolchai , Supaporn Tanta-Au , Pimsurang Taechaboonsermsak , Wanich Suksatan
      Abstract: Improving people’s quality of life (QoL) has become a prominent policy goal. However, nothing is known about how QoL evolves as people age, especially for those working in fruit orchards. This study aims to determine the associations of physical health and access to health services with QoL, and the factors predicting the QoL of older Thai adults working in fruit orchards. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 255 adults aged 60–69 years recruited through stratified random sampling. Data were collected through questionnaires. The collected data were then analyzed using the Chi-square test, Pearson’s correlation coefficient and stepwise multiple regression analysis. It was found that the study participants were generally physically healthy (36.5% at the “good” level and 56.5.5% at the moderate level) and generally had access to health services when they were most ill (78.2% at the “good” level and 21.8% at the moderate level). The overall QoL was good for 56.3% of the participants. The factors associated with and predicting the QoL of the participants were found to be social support, self-esteem and access to health services (p < 0.05), which were found to be capable of predicting the QoL of the participants with 35.1% accuracy. On the basis of this study’s findings, it is suggested that agencies providing care for older adults organize activities to promote the good health and self-esteem of older adults, obtain social support for them and provide them with convenient access to health-care facilities to improve their QoL.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0058
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The role of environmental design in enabling intergenerational support for
           people with dementia – what lessons can we learn from Japan

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      Authors: Grant Gibson , Martin Quirke , Melanie Lovatt
      Abstract: Japan, the world’s “oldest” society, has adopted intergenerational care programmes as one solution to the challenges of caring for its growing population of people living with dementia. Many countries are drawing inspiration from these intergenerational programmes, but research exploring factors influencing intergenerational care practice and how far these programmes can be translated in other countries is more limited. This paper aims to explore how environmental design features are used to support intergenerational initiatives in Japan. By examining four case studies, the paper illustrates how intergenerational engagement can be enabled and supported through environmental design. The research adopts a qualitative methodology, using observations, workshops and photographic elicitations within four case study sites: two residential care facilities, a community centre and supported housing scheme and a restaurant staffed by people with dementia. Two key themes emerge: encouraging community engagement through intergenerational shared spaces, and the role of intergenerationality in supporting social and economic participation. The paper concludes with a discussion of some of the key principles through which other countries can translate lessons gained from the Japanese experience of intergenerational programmes into their own health and social care systems. This paper provides international evidence of the role environmental design plays in supporting the development of intergenerational relationships among people with dementia and the wider community. Intergenerational engagement is community engagement; therefore, promoting community engagement is essential to promoting intergenerational care practice. Environmental design can play a key role in providing affordances through which such relationships can develop.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-12-2021-0064
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Perception of barriers in physical activity participation among
           middle-aged adults: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Shivangi Sharma , Ammar Suhail
      Abstract: This study aims to explore perceived barriers to participating in regular physical activity (PA) among middle-aged adults in Una, Himachal Pradesh, India. This study used qualitative methodology. The authors conducted face-to-face semi-structured interviews among adults between 40 and 60 years of age. Eleven interviews were conducted in participants’ vernacular language and were audio-recorded. The recordings were transcribed, and emergent findings were evaluated and interpreted using an open-ended method. PA was mostly related to household chores by female participants. Male participants considered their daily tasks synonymous with PA. The main barriers identified were lack of enthusiasm/time, advancing age and declining health status, misperceptions of being physically active, lack of skill/knowledge, family responsibilities, lack of social support, lack of open spaces, parks and other facilities, and social restrictions due to the pandemic. The findings of this study will aid in designing better interventions targeted at promoting PA. Identification of the existing modifiable barriers can be a target source for most public health programs. The barriers existing among the community must be addressed to achieve the recommended level of PA. The promotional strategies should focus on individual factors, such as increasing self-efficiency and knowledge about recommended levels of PA. The social barriers must also be addressed through peer support and group-based activities. Health policies should emphasize making societies more active by ensuring more open spaces and parks. Barriers to PA may differ among the socioeconomic strata and geographical locations. The present study explored barriers among working adults in an urban Indian setting.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-04
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-12-2021-0063
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Spreading the word: enablers and challenges to implementing a nature-based
           intervention for people living with dementia

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      Authors: Jennifer Bray , Simon Chester Evans , Teresa Atkinson
      Abstract: When new interventions are piloted, the implementation process often takes a back seat but can be key to ensuring that an intervention is successful. This paper aims to highlight the enablers and challenges encountered when implementing a nature-based intervention for people living with dementia. The evaluation adopted a mixed methods approach including case studies, telephone interviews with delegates and interviews with participants. Thematic analysis was used to identify overarching themes relating to the enablers and challenges of implementing the intervention. Challenges related to understanding how the intervention fitted with existing work and practicalities of what an organisation can offer to support the implementation process. A stable underlying support structure for delegates is required, along with suitable advertising, transport and facilities to support participants. While there is no “one size fits all” approach to implementing an intervention, these findings will help organisations to consider where to focus their support. The implementation of interventions is often poorly understood but is important when supporting the wider roll out of an intervention. While this paper reports on a nature-based intervention, the learning will be relevant and applicable more broadly for organisations aiming to implement a new intervention and complements previous work relating to the challenges of implementing arts activities.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Community makers: report on developing an online toolkit for supporting
           people with dementia to connect during the pandemic and beyond

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      Authors: Shirley Evans , Matthew Harrison , Natasha Morgan , Cat Kilkenny , Thomas Morton
      Abstract: Community Makers (https://communitymakers.co) is an active UK wide network that evolved rapidly in response to COVID-19 and the negative impact of social isolation and distancing on people and families affected by dementia. The network is led by the Alzheimer’s Society, UK Dementia Research Institute Care Research and Technology Centre and The Association for Dementia Studies, at the University of Worcester. This study aims to investigate what works for whom and why and in what circumstances as a basis for the development of an online toolkit for people supporting people affected by dementia to connect and reconnect during the pandemic and beyond. The development of the toolkit was informed by an iterative approach of engagement with people affected by dementia, learning from a network of community organisations and a rapid realist literature review. Four common factors that combine to make a successful support intervention, regardless of its type, size or location were identified: relationships, purpose, technology and community. The application of the factors, adopted as principles, is illustrated by applying them to three real-world examples. The main output was the online tool kit, which is a resource of creative ideas to inspire groups with different approaches to digital involvement and help reduce social isolation. This report offers new insight, based on identification of four principles, into how people affected by dementia can be supported online and offline during a pandemic and beyond.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-07
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Bringing children and older people together through food: the promotion of
           intergenerational relationships across preschool, school and care home
           settings

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      Authors: Mat Jones , Sanda Umar Ismail
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore how food-focused social activities are a route for promoting intergenerational relationships, well-being and dietary benefits among residents in care homes and children in preschool/schools. Using a case study methodology, this study undertook staff-focused research on a 26-month UK programme in 12 partnership clusters, involving a range of growing, cooking, eating and community activities. Staff reported benefits for older people, including improved mood, surfacing positive memories, new personal connections and relief from feelings of boredom and loneliness. Children were reported to develop in-depth relationships, greater empathy and overcame negative preconceptions. Food-based activities enabled all parties to express caring and nurturing in tangible and often non-verbal ways. Food-based activities appear to have specific material and emotive characteristics that resonate with the intergenerational interests of older people and children. Using mainly in-house resources, this study showed that it is feasible to generate novel food-based practices between children’s education and care home sectors. A “test-and-learn” programme model is recommended, given sensitivities and complexity associated with food-based activities and the limited organizational capacity of care home and early education service providers.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2022-03-02
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0059
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • The lived experience of patients suffering from stroke and their
           perception of palliative care needs: a literature review

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      Authors: Marwa Halabi , Inaam Khalaf , Salam Bani Hani
      Abstract: This study aims to review the lived experience of patients suffering from stroke and describe their perception of palliative care needs. A literature review search was conducted. Web of Sciences, SAGE, CINAHL, PubMed and Jordanian Database for Nursing Research databases were used to search the literature. The findings of 37 articles were address palliative care approaches for patients with stroke, lived experiences of patients suffering from stroke and the experience, barriers and facilitators related to health-care service for stroke survivors. This review indicated the importance of recognizing palliative care needs among patients suffering from stroke to improve post-stroke recovery. This study recommends further research, especially in low- and middle-income countries, to understand patients’ experiences and recognize the main palliative care needs that can be incorporated into interventions designed to improve the quality of life among them.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-12-20
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-08-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Risk factors for depression in older adults in Bogotá, Colombia

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      Authors: Ana María Salazar , María Fernanda Reyes , María Paula Gómez , Olga Pedraza , Angela Gisselle Lozano , María Camila Montalvo , Juan Camilo Rodriguez Fandiño
      Abstract: This paper aims to identify psychosocial, demographic and health risk factors associated with depression in older people. A correlational study with 281 independent and autonomous persons of the community over 60 years old from Bogotá was conducted. The three instruments used to measure the variables included in the data analyses were Demographic and Health Data Questionnaire, Short version of 15 items of Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS) and Montreal Cognitive Assessment Test (MoCA). Fifteen percent of the participants presented depression. Depression was associated with different demographic, low social support and health factors in this population group and was particularly high in women. Being a woman with poor social support networks and a previous history of depressive episodes should be considered as determining factors within a clinical risk profile for depression in older adulthood. It is essential to design prevention strategies focused on women and on the development of better social support in old age. Depression is a prevalent and highly disabling disease, when it is suffered by an older person it is associated with higher mortality, functional dependence, poor physical health, worse quality of life indicators and psychological well-being. In the elderly, the clinical diagnosis of depression is difficult, as it has a high comorbidity and is often confused with other health conditions prevalent during older adulthood.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-12-17
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-10-2021-0053
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • What do knee OA patients perceive about their disorder' A qualitative
           study

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      Authors: Ammar Suhail
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to explore patient’s perception of their disorder. This study used a phenomenographical approach within a qualitative research paradigm. A total of 21 patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were recruited for the study, and data were collected through open-ended face-to-face interviews. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analyzed. The transcribed verbatim was analyzed for themes. The themes developed reflected the patients’ perceptions about the disease process. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: Knee OA is a degenerative disease, Knee OA is an age-related disease and Knee OA is caused by certain activities of daily living. The patient’s information varied and was limited to what had been provided by the health-care practitioner. The knowledge was more biomedical in orientation and was limited and not supported by the evidence. There is a need to provide evidence-based information that the patient must understand. Health-care providers must use a biopsychosocial framework to discuss the disease knowledge with patients. This study helps us in identifying disease perceptions that can be used to design education programs for knee OA patients. It also highlights the need for delivering educational programs to knee OA patients. This study lays a foundation for further research. To the author’s best knowledge, this is the first study to explore disease perceptions using a qualitative approach conducted among patients from a lower middle-income country.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-12-03
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-11-2021-0056
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate
           variability and change in rural Ghana

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      Authors: Divine Odame Appiah , Felix Asante , Lois Antwi-Boadi , Richard Serbeh
      Abstract: This paper aims to examine elderly smallholder farmers’ perceptions of and adaptation to climate variability and change in the Offinso Municipality, Ghana. This paper used quantitative and qualitative methods. Quantitative data were analyzed with frequencies and chi-square tests, whereas qualitative data were thematically analyzed. The results showed that elderly smallholder farmers’ knowledge of climate variability and climate change were based on their sex, level of formal education and experience in farming. Elderly smallholder farmers adopted both on-farm and off-farm strategies to cope with climate change and variability. The vulnerability of elderly smallholder farmers to climate change calls for social protection mechanisms such as a pension scheme that guarantees access to monthly cash transfers. Such a scheme will ease constraints to livelihood and ensure improved well-being. Elderly smallholder farmers have remained invisible in discourses on perceptions and adaptation to climate change despite the surge in number of this category of farmers. This paper therefore represents an attempt to highlight the experiences of elderly smallholder farmers with climate variability and change.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-11-25
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-09-2021-0052
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Designing inclusive environments for people living with dementia: how much
           do we really know'

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      Authors: Simon Chester Evans , Sarah Waller , Jennifer Bray
      Abstract: Recent years have seen a growing interest in and awareness of the importance of environmental design to the well-being of people living with dementia, in terms of both policy and practice. This trend has been accompanied by a plethora of advice, guidance and tools that aim to encourage and promote the development of inclusive environments. Not all of these are evidence-based, and even those that claim to be so are limited by a paucity of good quality, comprehensive research studies. This paper aims to consider the current state of knowledge in the field of dementia-friendly design and describes a project that refreshed and updated the suite of Environmental Assessment Tools originally developed by The Kings Fund and now managed by the Association for Dementia Studies. The mixed methods project reported on in this paper comprised a review of the literature, a survey of people who have used the five design assessment tools and an iterative process of updating the tools to make them as evidence-based and user-friendly as possible. The suite of five assessment tools was refreshed and updated to reflect the latest evidence and the views of professionals and others who use the tools. The authors conclude that while a focus on dementia-friendly design is to be welcomed, there remains a need for relevant high-quality evidence to inform such work. In particular, there is a lack of research within people’s own homes and studies that include the perspectives of people living with dementia. Few assessment tools and guidelines for dementia-friendly environments are truly evidence-based. This paper reports on a project that combined a comprehensive literature review with the views of practitioners to update a widely used suite of tools that aim to make a range of settings more suitable for people living with dementia.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-11-24
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-09-2021-0049
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
  • Female spouses lived experiences of living with a husband with dementia: a
           qualitative study on changes in everyday life

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      Authors: Barbara Egilstrød , Kirsten Schultz Petersen
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to gain a deeper understanding of female spouses’ lived experiences of changes in everyday life while living with a husband with dementia. Nine individual interviews of female spouses were conducted in 2017. A phenomenological narrative approach was applied during data collection, and the analysis was inspired by Amedeo Giorgi’s analytic steps. Female spouses experienced changes in their marital relationships, and found ways of managing these changes, although they realized life was marked by loneliness and distress. The identified themes reveal how female spouses experienced changes in everyday life as the disease progressed. Everyday routines gradually changed and they actively sought ways to uphold everyday life and a marital relationship. Research should focus on developing supportive interventions, where the people with the lived experiences in relation to dementia are involved in the research process, to better target the needs for support, when developing interventions. Insight into everyday life can help health-care service providers to better the support to female spouses and contribute with more individualized support, which may contribute to the quality of care. In this study, the authors disclose the invisible and silent work that takes place in an everyday life, when living with a husband with dementia during the time span of caregiving. Spouses’ experiences are important to include, when developing intervention to support spouses to better tailor the interventions.
      Citation: Working with Older People
      PubDate: 2021-10-29
      DOI: 10.1108/WWOP-09-2021-0048
      Issue No: Vol. 26 , No. 2 (2021)
       
 
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