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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
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Tizard Learning Disability Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.347
Number of Followers: 49  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1359-5474 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8782
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • A STOMP-focused evaluation of prescribing practices in one assessment and
           treatment unit for people with intellectual disabilities

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Jon Painter, Winola Chio, Liam Black, David Newman
      Abstract: This study aims to understand whether psychotropic prescribing practices for people with intellectual disabilities are in keeping with best practice guidelines. This service evaluation project was a retrospective analysis of routinely collected data from the care records of all 36 people with intellectual disability discharged from an intellectual disability assessment and treatment unit during the first five years of the Stop Over medicating People with Intellectual Disabilities and/or autistic people (STOMP) initiative. Data were gathered at four time points (pre-admission, discharge, 6- and 12-month follow-up) before being analysed to understand whether psychotropic prescribing differed among people with different clinical characteristics/traits/diagnoses. Changes over time were also explored to ascertain whether and how prescribing altered from admission to discharge, and over the subsequent year of community living. Most people with intellectual disabilities left the assessment and treatment unit on fewer regular psychotropic medications and at lower doses than at admission. These optimised regimes were still apparent 12 months post-discharge, suggesting effective discharge planning and community care packages. Inpatients with severe intellectual disabilities generally received more anxiolytics and hypnotics, at higher doses. Autistic people tended to receive more psychotropics in total and at higher cumulative doses, a pattern that persisted post discharge. A third of the sample were admitted on regular anti-psychotic medications despite having no corresponding psychotic diagnosis, a proportion that remained relatively stable through discharge and into the community. This study highlights subsets of the intellectual disability population at particular risk of receiving high doses of psychotropics and a feasible template for providers intending to undertake STOMP-focused evaluations.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-12-14
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2022-0008
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Commentary on “A STOMP-focused evaluation of prescribing practices in
           one assessment and treatment unit for people with intellectual
           disabilities”

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      Authors: Dave Gerrard, Jen Rhodes
      Abstract: This commentary aims to define STOMP and STAMP, describes its history and evolution and the authors’ thoughts about future directions given the lack of clear evidence base for prescribing and deprescribing psychotropic medication given for behaviour thought to be challenging. This commentary defines the authors’ clinical experience and personal thoughts about STOMP achievements and challenges for the future delivery. This commentary details STOMP development to date and highlights the potential areas for further study and research to grow understanding, professional confidence and delivery. This commentary highlights much of the currently accepted research and areas that have poor quality evidence or are of interest for future study. STOMP definition, especially of inappropriate prescribing, is key to redefining the work. This commentary highlights the potential impact of STOMP and STAMP on prescribing rates and the need for better definition, processes and education for workforce development. There is a major need to understand the benefit of behavioural intervention to support the optimisation of medication. This commentary builds on personal experience and current understanding to postulate considerations to further the delivery of STOMP and STAMP.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-09-19
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-08-2022-0017
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Commentary on “Status quo bias and resistance to positive behaviour
           support: implications for leaders”

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      Authors: Paddy Behan
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Status quo bias and resistance to positive behaviour support: implications for leaders” and to extend the conversation regarding potential change agents to address resistance. This commentary provides discussion stimulated by the Ntinas’s (2022) paper regarding resistance to the implementation of positive behaviour support (PBS). Contextual fit is highlighted as a consideration related to the implementation of PBS, with a view to mitigating resistance. A range of factors linked to supporting good contextual fit are discussed. This paper provides the perspective of a PBS practitioner with experience of implementing PBS across a range of settings. Recognition is given that further empirical evidence is required to confirm the utility of contextual fit to address resistance.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2022-0021
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
  • Commentary on “Developing and refining a process to improve teacher
           engagement with the performance management system in a school setting”

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      Authors: Manuel Rodriguez
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on “Developing and Refining a Process to Improve Teacher Engagement with the Performance Management System in a School Setting” and to extend the conversation around the use of organisational behavioural management in services. This commentary focuses on the work conducted by Hawkins et al. (2022) in a school for autistic students who are also diagnosed with a learning disability. The strengths and limitations of this research study are highlighted, and some suggestions are provided for future research. This paper offers a valuable account of how organisational behavioural management can be used to help educational services produce better outcomes for the students while also empowering teachers.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-11-28
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2022-0022
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
  • Commentary on “Vocational training for livelihood and rehabilitation of
           persons with intellectual disabilities”

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      Authors: Ceridwen Evans
      Abstract: The purpose of this commentary is to reflect on some of the themes presented in the associated article “Vocational training for livelihood and rehabilitation of persons with intellectual disabilities” and provide considerations for future close-to-practice research in the area of vocational training models and rehabilitation provisions. This commentary considers the literature in relation to rehabilitation provisions centred around vocation, highlights the need for a person-centred focus and reiterates the potential of vocation as a route to social inclusion and wider social networks. The focus on adapting supports and vocational training programmes to fit within the context of low-income areas and country-specific legislation should be afforded particular consideration, alongside ways to achieve high-quality research rigour, which still puts the person supported at the centre of any outcome measures. This commentary is aimed in part at practitioners working in the field of learning disabilities and employment/vocation, who are keen to conduct close-to-practice research.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2022-0019
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
  • Vocational training for livelihood and rehabilitation of persons with
           intellectual disabilities

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      Authors: Chinchu Chithrangathan
      Abstract: Rehabilitation facilities available for persons with intellectual disabilities are low in India. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate an action research programme undertaken in Thrissur district, Kerala, India, to provide institution-based vocational training to selected beneficiaries of BUDS rehabilitation institutions. A total of 40 students were selected for the training programme. Different vocational activities were included according to criteria such as the abilities of students, sustainability and therapeutic value. The results of data analysis showed that fraternity, engagement and collectivism were the themes that emerged from the conversations with students, teachers and parents. Some students showed marked improvements in various areas of functioning. Larger replication studies could provide more evidence for wider implementation. There is a possibility of scaling up the model at the state or national level. This model could be adopted for providing better services to persons with intellectual disabilities in similar low- and middle-income settings. To the best of the author’s knowledge, this paper is the first known attempt at examining the utility of vocational activity training as therapeutic intervention for persons with intellectual disabilities in India.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-11-2021-0030
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
  • Developing and refining a process to improve teacher engagement with the
           performance management system in a school setting

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emma Hawkins, Kate Grant, Mariann Szabo, Kate Hewett
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to review and make changes to the performance management process in place for teachers in a school for autistic children with learning disabilities. The performance management process consisted of line managers setting targets for their staff and points were given for targets met. Targets were related to improving outcomes for the children in the school. Teacher engagement in the performance management process was measured by the number of teachers reporting their points monthly and the number of points earned monthly. The PDC (Austin, 2000) was conducted to determine changes to the process to improve teacher engagement with the performance management system. These changes to the performance management process consisted of an antecedent and information intervention (flowchart implemented summarising performance management process), equipment and processes interventions (change to graphing requirement, set rolling targets implemented) and consequence interventions (teachers set rolling targets to meet with their line manager regularly and to report on targets met monthly). The number of teachers completing and submitting monthly summary forms increased following the changes made to the performance management process. The average number of points received increased significantly during the intervention. The intervention implemented following the use of the PDC led to increased teacher engagement in the performance management process and thus potentially improved the outcomes for the children within the school. The PDC is a fairly simple tool to use to identify solutions to problems in the workplace. The procedure used herein is replicable across many settings and different workplace issues.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-10-10
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2022-0002
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
  • “Status quo bias and resistance to positive behaviour support:
           implications for leaders”

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      Authors: Konstantinos M. Ntinas
      Abstract: This paper aims to focus on why some practitioners in learning disability services resist implementing evidence-based approaches, such as positive behaviour support, despite its benefits. Status quo bias theory was used to explain why practitioners choose existing practices over evidence-based approaches despite the negative consequences to their well-being. Staff members’ decision to maintain the status quo should not be based solely on a cost–benefit analysis, as is commonly believed, as several factors influence it. This lies on the development of leadership action based on the factors that influence staff's decision making in favour of the status quo.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2022-09-14
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-11-2021-0033
      Issue No: Vol. 27, No. 3/4 (2022)
       
 
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