A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
The end of the list has been reached or no journals were found for your choice.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.209
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 44  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1471-7794 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8766
Published by Emerald Homepage  [360 journals]
  • An international qualitative feasibility study to explore the process of
           using social innovation (co-production) strategies with older people: the
           SAIL project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Holly Louise Crossen-White , Ann Hemingway , Adele Ladkin , Andrew Jones , Amanda Burke , Olaf Timmermans
      Abstract: This paper aims to present the feasibility study findings from a four-year project funded by the European Union Commission (the SAIL project, Staying Active and Independent for Longer). The funding stream was Interreg 2Seas which offers opportunities for coastal areas on both sides of the English Channel to work together on complex practical issues. The project focused on enabling older people to stay active and independent for longer using social innovation (co-production) approaches. Ten pilot projects were developed, and each of the pilots worked with an academic partner to undertake a feasibility study that included 10 pilots across the four countries involved, France, Belgium, Holland and England. This paper presents barriers and facilitators (using logic models) to the social innovation process with older people, which has wider relevance in terms of social innovation and its application. The findings which inform this paper are extensive, and this is a longitudinal qualitative study with much of the data collection being done using an online wiki (complemented by interviews and documentary analysis) which is a relatively new method for data collection. However, the consistency of the findings when analysed by three researchers was clear and pragmatically this complex method was required to examine complexity in the process of implementing social innovation in practice. This project has enabled greater understanding of how social innovation can be applied and has highlighted contextual issues that can undermine or enable attempts to adopt the approach. For the 10 pilot projects generated, there were obviously important cultural and geographical differences in terms of engagement and practical implementation of social innovation. Some of which, as mentioned in this paper, are very important for the successful implementation of social innovation in a particular setting and indeed may be a strength or a barrier in terms of engaging with local people and agencies. The development of logic models is a useful approach when the topic under study is complex and likely to produce a diverse set of process outcomes. The logic model focuses upon the relationships between the resources that are used to create the intervention and what is produced in terms of outcomes. Ultimately, this enables the identification of the factors that contribute to a successful intervention. Thus, in relation to this study, logic models have helped to provide an evidence-based framework that can support decision-making regarding the most effective use of limited resources to support successful social innovation processes in the future. The logic model for each area of the findings presented here can in the future be used to help implement social innovation; also, to consider how it can be improved in future research.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-09-27
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-02-2022-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Aging all over the place: a multidisciplinary framework that considers
           place and life trajectories of older adults within their communities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melanie Levasseur , Daniel Naud , Nancy Presse , Nathalie Delli-Colli , Patrick Boissy , Benoît Cossette , Yves Couturier , Julien Cadieux Genesse
      Abstract: This conceptual paper aims to describe aging all over the place (AAOP), a federative framework for action, research and policy that considers older adults’ diverse experiences of place and life trajectories, along with person-centered care. The framework was developed through group discussions, followed by an appraisal of aging models and validation during workshops with experts, including older adults. Every residential setting and location where older adults go should be considered a “place,” flexible and adaptable enough so that aging in place becomes aging all over the place. Health-care professionals, policymakers and researchers are encouraged to collaborate around four axes: biopsychosocial health and empowerment; welcoming, caring, mobilized and supportive community; spatiotemporal life and care trajectories; and out-of-home care and services. When consulted, a Seniors Committee showed appreciation for flexible person-centered care, recognition of life transitions and care trajectories and meaningfulness of the name. Population aging and the pandemic call for intersectoral actions and for stakeholders beyond health care to act as community leaders. AAOP provides opportunities to connect environmental determinants of health and person-centered care. Building on the introduction of an ecological experience of aging, AAOP broadens the concept of care as well as the political and research agenda by greater integration of community and clinical actions. AAOP also endeavors to avoid patronizing older adults and to engage society in strengthening circles of benevolence surrounding older adults, regardless of their residential setting. AAOP’s applicability is evidenced by existing projects that share its approach.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-09-01
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-07-2021-0057
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Use and perception of gerontechnology: differences in a group of Spanish
           older adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alicia Murciano-Hueso , Judith Martín-Lucas , Sara Serrate González , Patricia Torrijos Fincias
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to understand the profile of use of gerontechnology in Spanish older adults considering their age group (60–70; 71–80 and over 80 years) and to discern whether groups of subjects with similar characteristics can be established to ascertain which factors are behind the profile of frequent gerontechnology use. A quantitative study is presented to understand the profile of use of gerontechnology in Spanish older adults. The sample comprised 497 participants (aged between 60 and 94 years). The results show that, even though most participants consider technology to be useful in their daily lives, there is still a lack of knowledge on how to use it, especially among older subjects. This highlights the importance of promoting technological cocreation initiatives such as senior living labs. Other researchers are encouraged to include the voices of older adults using gerontechnology in further studies. If we want to increase the acceptance of technology by older adults, we must first let them take part in the design of the technologies they will use. This research provides promising data that should merit attention to contribute to the well-being and quality of life of older adults in a society where currently technology is a key part in every sphere of our daily life. The value of this research lies in the implications of “aging in place” studies today.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-08-16
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-02-2022-0010
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mixed methods evaluation on village neighborhood social cohesiveness and
           quality of life

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Su-I Hou , Esteban Santis , Anna V. Eskamani , Khristen Holmes
      Abstract: The “Village” model has become an emerging, community-based, social initiative to help older adults age in place. This study aims to examine neighborhood social cohesion (NSC), or social connectedness and quality of life, from the perspective of village members. A mixed-method evaluation was used to examine two Florida villages, a master-planned village (FV1) and a diverse neighborhood village (FV2). Both are full members of the National Village to Village Network. The quantitative and qualitative data provided complementary and deeper understanding. Quantitative findings showed that FV1 members scored higher at NSC, and qualitative findings further confirmed that village program social activities were critical to building connections, especially for those who have lost loved ones and were single. Findings should be interpreted considering the predominantly white racial makeup and affluence of village participants. Findings point to the importance of NSC as older adults age and suggest that programs should prioritize activities that strengthen social connectiveness. This is one of the first mixed-methods evaluations examining NSC and quality of life among village participants.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-06-09
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-05-2021-0044
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print , No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Guest editorial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anne Killett , Fiona Poland
      Abstract: Guest editorial
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-06-2022-085
      Issue No: Vol. 23 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Intergenerational living during the pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rachel Stevenson , Jean Atkinson
      Abstract: This is an opinion piece provided by Rachel, 31, and her grandmother, Jean, 97, who have been living together for two and a half years, since Rachel became unwell with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Each author shares their experiences of intergenerational living through the pandemic. What each of them has learned about intergenerational living during the COVID pandemic and mutual support and what has surprised them, including how it has improved quality of life for both of them. This is an unusual intergenerational first-person account of intergenerational mutually supportive living during the pandemic, with insider insights.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-05-2022-0029
      Issue No: Vol. 23 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Internet use among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex, and
           queer+ older adults during COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Trevor G. Gates , Mark Hughes , Jack Thepsourinthone , Tinashe Dune
      Abstract: This brief paper aims to examine the extent to which lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and queer (LGBTIQ+) older adults in Australia used the internet for social, informational and instrumental needs, including how internet use changed during COVID-19. The authors used a survey advertised to LGBTIQ+ older adults (N = 394), recruited as a sample of convenience, on social networking sites and via LGBTIQ+ and aged care organizations. Self-reported internet use decreased during COVID-19, with various significant between-group differences in purposes of internet use and sexuality, gender, living arrangements and time. The internet can be a critical form of social contact for LGBTIQ+ older adults, and this is among the first studies in Australia about their internet use during COVID-19. Findings from the study suggest patterns of internet use may be decreasing among LGBTIQ+ older adults during the pandemic.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-05-19
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-10-2021-0083
      Issue No: Vol. 23 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 and “ageing well” for the older migrants and refugees in
           rural Australia: the case of Bhutanese elders in Albury, New South Wales

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nichole Georgeou , Spyros Schismenos , Nidhi Wali , Karin Mackay , Elfa Moraitakis
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to highlight the challenges and opportunities for the well-being of older migrants and refugees in rural Australia by learning from the example of the Bhutanese community in Albury, New South Wales. This viewpoint focusses on health and aged care barriers that affect the well-being of older migrants and refugees in Australia. It also demonstrates how these can be intensified due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Engagement though agriculture, and a sense of “belonging” strengthen the cultural well-being of the Bhutanese older adults in Albury. However, major issues remain as health-related resources and information are lacking in rural Australia. How this group’s meaningful activities in Albury enabled collaborations to be built is shown in this working example and can provide lessons for other communities that experience similar problems of disconnection as they get older. The information regarding the Bhutanese older adults in Albury is primarily based on the authors’ personal communication with the General Secretary of the Bhutanese Australian Community Support Group in Albury Wodonga Inc. Australia’s older population is growing rapidly, and older adults from culturally and linguistically diverse migrant and refugee backgrounds face numerous barriers such as limited linguistic, health and digital literacy. The authors describe common health and aged care issues that affect the well-being of older adults in rural Australia. They particularly emphasize those that occurred or intensified due to the COVID-19 pandemic. This novel information is now especially relevant to the health and aged care sectors in changing and diverse communities not only in Australia but also overseas.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-05-17
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2021-0068
      Issue No: Vol. 23 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Older adults’ experiences of social distancing and the role of the
           community center during COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren Wolman , Lynda Atack , Sanjana Khan , Sarah Zwicker , Czarielle Dela Cruz , Lisa Roy , Esther Arbeid
      Abstract: Although very much needed from an infection control perspective, there is deep concern about the impact of social distancing during COVID-19, particularly on older adults. A phenomenological design was used to gain insight into older adults’ experiences of living with social distancing during the first wave of COVID-19. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight older adults. Six themes were identified: a smaller life, feelings of unease, resilience, connection to the community centre, technology: a boon, but one with limitations, and the way through social distancing. This study captures older adults’ experiences early in COVID-19. Findings indicate that there is much we can learn from these older adults regarding social isolation that could apply to other older adults and potentially other age groups during the time of pandemic and beyond.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2022-02-04
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-01-2021-0005
      Issue No: Vol. 23 , No. 2 (2022)
       
  • Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 100.25.42.211
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-