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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 114 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 89)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
ALTER - European Journal of Disability Research / Revue Européenne de Recherche sur le Handicap     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
American Journal on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Audiology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 350)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 87)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 90)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Inclusion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Indian Journal of Cerebral Palsy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
International Journal of Disability Management Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal on Disability and Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 94)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 95)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Pró-Fono Revista de Atualização Científica     Open Access  
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Brasileira de Educação Especial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Médica Internacional sobre el Síndrome de Down     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription  
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Aid to the Disabled Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.209
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 47  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1471-7794 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8766
Published by Emerald Homepage  [364 journals]
  • Making personalised short breaks meaningful: a future research agenda to
           connect academia, policy and practice

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Diane Seddon, Emma Miller, Louise Prendergast, Don Williamson, Joyce Elizabeth Cavaye
      Abstract: There is a growing policy impetus to promote carer well-being through the provision of personalised short breaks. However, understanding of what makes for a successful personalised short break is limited. This paper aims to identify key evidence gaps and considers how these could be addressed. A scoping review mapping the evidence base relevant to respite and short breaks for carers for older people, including those living with dementia, was completed. National and international literature published from 2000 onwards was reviewed. The scoping review focused on well-being outcomes, identified by previous research, as being important to carers. Most studies investigating the outcomes of short breaks for carers supporting older people focus on traditional day and residential respite care. Although there have been developments in more personalised break options for carers, research exploring their impact is scarce. There is limited knowledge about how these personalised breaks might support carers to realise important outcomes, including carer health and well-being; a life alongside caring; positive caregiving relationships; choices in caring; and satisfaction in caring. Three priority lines of inquiry to shape a future research agenda are identified: understanding what matters – evidencing personalised short break needs and intended outcomes; capturing what matters – outcomes from personalised short breaks; and commissioning, delivering and scaling up personalised short breaks provision to reflect what matters. This paper contributes to the development of an outcome-focused research agenda on personalised short breaks.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2021-06-02
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-10-2020-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Aging researchers in early stages (ARIES): a model for career development
           collaboration of researchers in aging

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kei Ouchi, Shalender Bhasin, Ariela R. Orkaby
      Abstract: Individuals over age 65 represent the fastest-growing segment of the population, yet they are also the least studied group and are most likely to be excluded from research most likely to apply to them. A significant reason for this deficit has been a dearth of scientists and clinicians to care for and study the many diseases that impact older adults. The purpose of this manuscript is to help early-stage clinician-scientists develop local forums fostering their career developments. In this manuscript, the difficulties associated with raising new generations of researchers in aging and offer suggestions for how early-stage clinician-scientists can foster career development in aging are discussed. This paper draws upon a local example, ARIES, to explain how early-stage investigators can be brought together with the goal of creating a pipeline of future leaders in aging research. The model may empower more early-stage clinicians to successfully pursue aging research. The current success of aging researchers in the early stages serves as a model for creating similar career development programs designed for early-stage researchers in aging.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2021-03-22
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-01-2021-0012
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2021)
       
  • Improving emotional well-being for hospital-based patients with dementia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Petty, Amanda Griffiths, Donna Maria Coleston, Tom Dening
      Abstract: Improving hospital care for people with dementia is a well-established priority. There is limited research evidence to guide nursing staff in delivering person-centred care, particularly under conditions where patients are emotionally distressed. Misunderstood distress has negative implications for patient well-being and hospital resources. The purpose of this study is to use the expertise of nurses to recommend ways to care for the emotional well-being of patients with dementia that are achievable within the current hospital setting. A qualitative study was conducted in two long-stay wards providing dementia care in a UK hospital. Nursing staff (n = 12) were asked about facilitators and barriers to providing emotion-focused care. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Nursing staff said that resources existed within the ward team, including ways to gather and present personal information about patients, share multidisciplinary and personal approaches, work around routine hospital tasks and agree an ethos of being connected with patients in their experience. Staff said these did not incur financial cost and did not depend upon staffing numbers but did take an emotional toll. Examples are given within each of these broader themes. The outcome is a short-list of recommended staff actions that hospital staff say could improve the emotional well-being of people with dementia when in hospital. These support and develop previous research. In this paper, frontline nurses describe ways to improve person-centred hospital care for people with dementia.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-12-18
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-05-2020-0019
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2020)
       
  • Tracking the inequitable impacts of COVID to make a new, more
           interconnecting normal'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...
      Tracking the inequitable impacts of COVID to make a new, more interconnecting normal?
      Anne Killett, Fiona Poland
      Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, Vol. 21, No. 4, pp.205-207Quality in Ageing and Older Adults2020-12-12
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-12-2020-070
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Covid-19 and inequality: developing an age-friendly strategy for recovery
           in low income communities

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tine Buffel, Patty Doran, Mhorag Goff, Luciana Lang, Camilla Lewis, Chris Phillipson, Sophie Yarker
      Abstract: This paper aims to explore the social impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, focusing on issues facing older people living in urban areas characterised by multiple deprivation. The paper first reviews the role of place and neighbourhood in later life; second, it examines the relationship between neighbourhood deprivation and the impact of COVID-19; and, third, it outlines the basis for an “age-friendly” recovery strategy. The paper argues that COVID-19 is having a disproportionate impact on low-income communities, which have already been affected by cuts to public services, the loss of social infrastructure and pressures on the voluntary sector. It highlights the need for community-based interventions to be developed as an essential part of future policies designed to tackle the effects of COVID-19. The paper contributes to debates about developing COVID-19 recovery strategies in the context of growing inequalities affecting urban neighbourhoods.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-12-02
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0044
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Shining a light on care homes during the COVID 19 pandemic in the UK 2020

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Annie Stevenson
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to explore the link between age discrimination and the injustices that have taken place in our care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic in this country. It seeks to show how destructive age discrimination is to those who live in our care homes and attempts to shake up our attitudes to older people, as the pandemic continues. It is hoped that shifts in attitude would lead to a societal revolution in care and support for older people as the pandemic shows us how the current system is breaking down. This is a personal insight into the plight of the care home sector during the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. The writer has worked in the field of social care and older people’s services for many years and felt compelled to share her learning and observations. This led to venturing more deeply into understanding why those who live, work and visit care homes have been so neglected and “cast into the shadows” in the face of such desperate danger. Whilst tracking the media narrative during the first wave, she attempts to apply her knowledge, in particular gained from working for Help the Aged (now Age UK) as a policy manager for Quality Care, but also draws on experiences as a social worker, commissioner and care provider from the 1980’s to the present. By “shining a light” on care homes, revealing that the darker practices that have taken place contravene the Human Rights Act 1998, it is hoped that the recognition of age discrimination will happen at every level and become better known in its application. The paper observes how deeply rooted it is in us all. Having highlighted some shocking examples of bad practice from the authorities relating to care homes, the article concludes that Government policy on care homes from March to July 2020 was discriminatory and questions how far lessons have been learned. The legislation is in place in the form of the Human Rights Act 1998 to protect older people in care homes but is not being widely implemented at regional policy level. Government rhetoric remains far from reality Instead of redressing the gap and admitting mistakes, there is evidence at a high level of continued denial and the projection of blame on to the care homes themselves. The author’s professional background includes meeting the founder of the Gray Panthers, Maggie Kuhn, in the United States in the 1988. This was a defining moment that gave her an original insight into age discrimination and influenced her entire career. It eventually led to her working in national policy for one of the most influential charities for older people at the turn of the millennium, Help the Aged. Here, she co-founded the My Home Life Programme (promoting quality of life in care homes). The paper offers a unique insight into why it is so challenging to achieve quality of life for older people needing care and should be of interest to policymakers, clinical commissioning groups, local authorities, older people’s care providers and carer and user organisations.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-27
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-10-2020-0051
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19 and older adults in Israel – common challenges and
           recommendations

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      Authors: Jiska Cohen-Mansfield
      Abstract: The impact of COVID-19 has most dramatically affected the older population, and nursing homes have become infection hotspots. As a response, governments have ordered isolation of older adults in geriatric institutions owing to the high risk of critical illness and mortality. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the potential impact of current policies on nursing homes and community-based care and provide suggestions for improvement in care. Taking the situation in Israel as an example, the author discussed major systemic problems pertaining to long-term care facilities and to community based care; the neglect of mental health; systemic deficiencies in end of life care; and the need to revise communications concerning COVID-19. Within each of the identified areas, recommended changes in strategy, policy and practice can help mitigate the dramatic impact of COVID-19 on the living experience of the older population. Drawing on the Israeli experience, this paper presents current shortcomings in the policy response to COVID-19 regarding nursing homes and community-based care and provides recommendations that are applicable to other contexts as well. Although some of these have been suggested or even practiced in some locations, many continue to be neglected and have not been discussed even as COVID-19 continues to infect societies around the globe.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-26
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0043
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Pandemic policy making: the health and wellbeing effects of the cessation
           of volunteering on older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jurgen Grotz, Sally Dyson, Linda Birt
      Abstract: This policy-orientated commentary aims to provide a perspective on the effects of policy changes designed to reduce the risk of infection as a result of COVID-19. The example of the abrupt cessation of volunteering activities is used to consider the policy and practice implications that need to be acknowledged in new public service research to deal with the on-going implications of the COVID-19 pandemic and for future preparedness. The paper will provide a critical challenge to English pandemic health policy making, in particular, the national instruction “to stop non-essential contact with others” without a strategy on how to remedy the serious side effects of this instruction, in particular on older adults. The abrupt cessation of volunteering activities of and for older people because of the COVID-19 pandemic is highly likely to have negative health and wellbeing effects on older adults with long-term and far-reaching policy implications. The paper combines existing knowledge volunteering of and for older adults with early pandemic practice evidence to situate an emerging health and wellbeing crisis for older adults. It emphasises the importance of immediate further detailed research to provide evidence for policy and practice following the lifting of COVID-19 related restrictions and in preparation for future crises.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-26
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-07-2020-0032
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Stronger together' Intergenerational connection and Covid-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen Burke
      Abstract: This paper aims to review how intergenerational connections and relationships have been affected to date by COVID-19. It provides lessons for the future. This paper is a review of policy and practice. Although there are some excellent examples of creative approaches such as online strategies to bring generations together in the face of social distancing, there remain barriers to building stronger communities. Many people of all ages remain lonely and isolated. Community projects are under-funded and will struggle to maintain connections beyond the immediate crisis. Inequalities and the digital divide have been exacerbated by COVID-19. Intergenerational relations are likely to be further strained by the economic impact. None of us have known anything like COVID-19 and its impact on all aspects of our lives. It will continue to affect generations to come, and we need to learn the lessons as we move forward.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-17
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-07-2020-0033
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Adapting new strategies in dental care to help geriatric and special needs
           patients during COVID-19 pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Madhura Sen, Violet D’Souza, Shambhavi Sharma, Ramya Shenoy
      Abstract: This paper aims to discuss and urge further deliberation on possible strategies to help geriatric and special needs patients to receive dental care during the pandemic. This paper contains literature review of published research articles related to past epidemics, COVID-19 and older persons. Accurate prediction of adverse outcomes, detection of unidentified problems, improved estimation of residual life expectancy and appropriate use of geriatric interventions is required to understand the necessity of the treatment and effect of possible COVID-19 contraction during the treatment. The authors reviewed the only published literature and collated the lessons learnt from past epidemics, as the natural history of the COVID-19 is not known. Future dentists must be trained in crisis management to deal with pandemics more effectively. The dental fraternity should be equipped to provide some sort of “psychological counseling and reassurance” prior to dental care to vulnerable individuals with comorbidities and special needs. There are very few published articles focused on unique dental care plans for geriatric and special needs patients.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0045
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • COVID-19 and AgeTech

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      Authors: Andrew Sixsmith
      Abstract: This paper aims to provide an overview of the emerging AgeTech sector and highlight key areas for research and development that have emerged under COVID-19, as well as some of the challenges to real-world implementation. The paper is a commentary on emerging issues in the AgeTech sector, with particular reference to COVID-19. Information used in this paper is drawn from the Canadian AGE-WELL network. The COVID-19 pandemic has particularly impacted older adults. Technology has increasingly been seen as a solution to support older adults during this time. AgeTech refers to the use of existing and emerging advanced technologies, such as digital media, information and communication technologies (ICTs), mobile technologies, wearables and smart home systems, to help keep older adults connected and to deliver health and community services. Despite the potential of AgeTech, key challenges remain such as structural barriers to larger-scale implementation, the need to focus on quality of service rather than crisis management and addressing the digital divide. AgeTech helps older adults to stay healthy and active, increases their safety and security, supports independent living and reduces isolation. In particular, technology can support older adults and caregivers in their own homes and communities and meet the desire of most older adults to age in place. AgeTech is helpful in assisting older adults to stay connected. The COVID-19 pandemic has shown the importance of the informal social connections and supports within families, communities and voluntary organizations. The last months have seen a huge upsurge in COVID-19-related research and development, as funding organizations, research institutions and companies pivot to meet the challenges thrown up by the pandemic. This paper looks at the potential role of technology to support older adults and caregivers.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-11
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-07-2020-0029
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Building relational research capacity in care homes in the COVID-19 era:
           applying recognition theory to the research agenda

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      Authors: Gill Toms, Stephanie Green, Alison Orrell, Fiona Verity
      Abstract: Research can be an influential driver in raising care home standards and the well-being and human rights of residents. This paper aims to present a case for how a relational research capacity building programme could advance this agenda. This study uses Axel Honneth’s Recognition Theory as a lens through which to explore organisational and institutional factors (such as research capacity and investment) that can either enable or limit “recognition” in the context of research in care homes. This paper draws on recent evidence from the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK and worldwide, to argue that such a relational capacity building agenda is even more pressing in the current context, and that it resonates with evidence from existing relational capacity building initiatives. A lack of relevant research arguably contributed to the crisis experienced by the care home sector early in the pandemic, and there are only tentative signs that residents, care home providers and staff are now informing the COVID-19 research agenda. Evidence from pre COVID-19 and insights from Honneth’s Recognition Theory suggest that relational approaches to building research capacity within the care home sector can better generate evidence to inform practice. This is a novel application of recognition theory to research in the care home sector. Drawing on theory, as well as evidence, has enabled the authors to provide a rationale as to why relationship-based research capacity building in care homes warrants further investment.
      Citation: Quality in Ageing and Older Adults
      PubDate: 2020-11-05
      DOI: 10.1108/QAOA-09-2020-0042
      Issue No: Vol. 21, No. 4 (2020)
       
  • Quality in Ageing and Older Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

       
 
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