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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Disability Policy Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.65
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 29  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1044-2073 - ISSN (Online) 1538-4802
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Exploring the Truth of Michael Yudin’s Claim: The More Time Students
           With Disabilities Spend in General Classrooms, the Better They Do
           Academically

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Douglas Fuchs, Hilary C. Mirowitz, Jennifer K. Gilbert
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Many K-12 students with disabilities (SWDs) spend a large portion of their school day in general classrooms because of a prevailing view that they are more appropriately challenging and beneficial than other educational placements. We questioned this belief by exploring a “dosage” hypothesis: The more time SWD are in general classrooms the better they do academically. We assembled a database spanning 1998 to 2015, inclusive. For nine of these years, we found both Office of Special Education Program’s placement data and National Center for Education Statistics’ reading data. We ran multilevel growth models to describe trends across time for the placement and reading data. Findings indicated a steadily increasing trend for general class placement and a positive but decelerating trend for reading performance, which together produced a widening placement–performance gap after 2007. Among 10 states/jurisdictions with the strongest positive trends for general class placement, there was no uniform pattern of reading performance across years. In short, we found little corroboration of a dosage hypothesis.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T10:02:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221097713
       
  • Developing Implementation Capacity of a State Education Agency to Improve
           Outcomes for Students With Disabilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eric Kloos, Ellen Nacik, Caryn Ward
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      The federal Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs has adopted a Results Driven Accountability (RDA) framework to support State Education Agencies (SEAs) in improving results for students with disabilities. RDA directed SEAs to focus on measurable outcomes. A leadership team in a large mid-western state in the United States partnered with an Institute of Higher Education implementation science purveyor team to systematically apply a particular approach, the Active Implementation Frameworks (AIFs), to build capacity, effectively implement, and scale an evidence-based program, Check & Connect, to improve statewide graduation rates for Black and American Indian students with disabilities. The presented case example illustrates how the SEA partners with local education agencies’ district teams to continuously measure and manage changes in (a) system capacity and (b) practice fidelity to improve graduation rate outcomes. Application of the AIFs in education, measured implementation progress and preliminary outcome data, and implications for policy for individuals with disabilities are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T06:10:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221096393
       
  • Issues of Confidentiality and Potential Disability Discrimination in
           Behavior Intervention Team Responses to College Student Suicidality

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emily M. Lund
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      In response to concerns about liability and safety, many colleges and universities have instituted Behavior Intervention Teams (BITs) to help assess and intervene with students who may pose a risk of harm to self or others. Students, lawyers, and advocates have raised concerns about some aspects of the implementation of BITs and related institutional policies, particularly with regard to students who are suicidal and those who engage in self-injurious behavior. Specifically, BITs are on complicated legal ground regarding confidentiality, disability civil rights law, and potential discriminatory or disparate treatment of students with psychiatric disabilities. In addition to reviewing the nature and background of BITs, this article reviews the professional, ethical, and legal issues surrounding confidentiality in the context of university intervention with students who are at risk for harm to self and the potentially applicable of disability civil rights law to BIT intervention with students who are suicidal. Suggestions for alternative and supplemental interventions, especially widespread use of suicide gatekeeping, are provided. Finally, the need for advocates who are knowledgeable in disability civil rights law is highlighted.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T10:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094808
       
  • Self-Report and Administrative Data on Disability and IEP Status:
           Examining Differences and Impacts on Intervention Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karrie A. Shogren, Jesse R. Pace, David C. Wittenburg, Sheida K. Raley, Tyler A. Hicks, Graham G. Rifenbark, Kathleen Lynne Lane, Mark H. Anderson
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Differences in perceptions of disability between students and administrators can play a role in youth’s educational experience. This study used data from a cluster randomized controlled trial (C-RCT) of the Self-Determined Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) to first compare student self-report of disability status to matched administrative data and second to examine the impact of the data source utilized on trial outcomes. The findings demonstrate substantive gaps between self-reports and administrative reports of disability. While some differences might be expected, the size of the differences is notable, especially given that many students identified as having an Individualized Education Program in administrative data did not self-identify as receiving services or having a disability. The findings advance understanding of discrepancies in self-reported disability and administrative data in secondary intervention research. We also found the interpretation of group differences (students with vs. without disabilities) on trial outcomes was sensitive to the source of the data (self vs. administrative) used to establish disability status. This finding can inform future research and policy, as the data source selected to define disability populations across research studies likely has substantive impacts on conclusions drawn about the impact of interventions on students with disabilities. We cannot identify all the factors driving these differences. Nonetheless, the findings underscore the importance of providing clarity about decisions made in defining disability populations in intervention research.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T10:06:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094811
       
  • School Shootings: Learning to Look for the Right Signals

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      Authors: Hill M. Walker, Gary Brown
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This commentary addresses the justification provided by the Michigan school superintendent for returning Ethan Crumbley, of Oxford High School, to his classroom following some red flag warnings about him from two of his teachers prior to the school shootings. It suggests warning signs and prevention strategies that could be used to reduce school violence in the future. The commentary argues that extreme behavioral events rather than the frequency of disciplinary problems are more likely harbingers of school violence tragedies.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T10:02:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094796
       
  • Effective Implementation Capacity to Impact Change Within State Education
           Systems to Support Students With Disabilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caryn Ward, Tanya Ihlo, Kathleen Ryan Jackson, Sophia Farmer
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      There is a continued call for the use of practices supported by evidence to improve the quality and effectiveness of services provided for students with disabilities. Despite best intentions, our education systems continue to struggle to adopt these practices and transfer them into consistent, sustained use by practitioners. Implementation science, the multi-disciplinary study of methods and strategies to promote use of research findings in practice, seeks to address this by providing frameworks to guide creation of conditions that facilitate use of evidence-based practices. The present article describes how an implementation science approach, Active Implementation Frameworks, was used by a national technical assistance center to cultivate systemic change and create improved outcomes for students with disabilities within several state, regional, and local education agencies. A summary of the lessons learned thus far and resulting considerations for practice and policy are presented. A key lesson was that state education agencies (SEAs) supporting districts and schools in implementation of a specific, educator-student-level practice realized improved outcomes for their students with disabilities. SEAs implementing frameworks or processes without an operationalized and measurable educator-student level practice had limited or no evidence of improved student outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T09:04:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221096392
       
  • The Evolution of Access to Education Through Landmark Legislation, Court
           Cases, and Policy Initiatives Setting Precedent for The Gary B. Court
           Decision

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah A. Nagro, Andrew Markelz, Richelle Davis, Anna Macedonia, Kevin Monnin
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Access to education for all students has been long sought. Once defined as physical access a school building, the concept of access has evolved since Brown v. Board of Education. The purpose of this policy review, conducted through archival research, is to examine the evolution of access to K–12 education for all students, with an emphasis on students with disabilities who are general education students first, to understand the implications of the 2020 U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals Gary B. vs. Whitmer decision. For the first time, a federal court ruled that the constitution affords all students “a fundamental right to a basic minimum education.” Specifically, the evolving concept of access to education for all students including students with disabilities across (a) the school building, (b) curricular opportunities, (c) education outcomes, and (d) a college- and career-ready curriculum is outlined using landmark K–12 federal education legislation, court cases, and policy initiatives. Taken together, a basic minimum education includes access to challenging academic learning objectives, an emphasis on literacy, provision of educational materials of sufficient quantity and quality, and an adequate teacher workforce. Meeting these expectations assures genuine access to a public education for all students.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T09:03:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094806
       
  • Impacts of the 2010 VA PTSD Rule Change on Participation in SSA Disability
           Programs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kara Contreary, Jennifer Tennant, Yonatan Ben-Shalom
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Veterans who could qualify for disability benefits from both the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA) might view them as complementary or as substitutes for each other. For example, people who earn above a certain income lose their Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, whereas VA Disability Compensation (DC) benefits do not change based on income. Veterans with disabilities who wish to work may therefore prefer to receive DC over SSDI, in effect treating the two programs as substitutes. We examined how an eligibility rule change in DC affected participation in DC, SSDI, and Supplemental Security Income to understand whether veterans with disabilities increase or reduce their take-up of SSA disability benefits when access to DC increases. Using Current Population Survey data from 2009 to 2016, we studied a 2010 DC rule change that made it easier for veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder to demonstrate eligibility. After the rule change, veterans with self-reported cognitive difficulties reported increased receipt of DC, reduced receipt of SSDI, and reduced rates of work-limiting disability, seeming to treat the two benefit programs as substitutes.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T12:20:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094812
       
  • United Kingdom’s Income Support Program for People With Disabilities:
           Redesign, Reform, and Policy Lessons for the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hande Inanc, David R. Mann
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      We reviewed the operational aspects of Employment and Support Allowance (ESA)—the income support program for people with disabilities in the United Kingdom—and its potential policy lessons for the United States’ Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program. ESA has a five-step eligibility determination process, and eligible beneficiaries receive either an unconditional cash benefit or payments conditional on participating in return-to-work activities. The United Kingdom has reformed ESA to better meet policy objectives. Both ESA and SSDI collect medical documentation, but ESA also requires face-to-face eligibility assessments for almost all claimants. ESA eligibility is based on functional limitations exclusively, whereas SSDI assesses the ability to perform substantial work. With its focus on helping some beneficiaries return to work, ESA differs from SSDI, which requires no return-to-work efforts to receive benefits. ESA might offer policy lessons for SSDI with regard to pilot testing, program reform, and accurate decision making.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-14T08:05:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094804
       
  • Law Enforcement Officers: A Call for Training and Awareness of
           Disabilities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lindsay L. Diamond, Lindsey B. Hogue
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Law enforcement officers (LEOs) are likely to encounter people with disabilities (PWD) during calls for service. These interactions sometimes escalate situations involving PWD and may result in arrest or death due to a lack of disability awareness among LEOs. The purpose of this study was to explore the current perspectives of LEOs regarding PWD and to identify the current training needs of LEOs regarding disability awareness and interactions with PWD. This study utilized two focus groups, consisting of participants representing seven law enforcement agencies across a large, Western state. Results indicate that the perceptions and needs of the LEOs regarding PWD are shaped by four themes: (a) personal connections, (b) job experience, (c) training opportunities, and (d) training needs. Implications for policy and practice to enhance the rigor of disability awareness training for LEOs are described.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T09:50:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094803
       
  • Boards of Disability Service Provider Organizations for Adults With
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Robyn Anne Wallace, Julie Rimes, Vicki Bitsika
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Provision of quality service by disability service providers for adults with intellectual disability is a core responsibility. It is central to access and participation in social, community goods, and services so that individuals are effectively supported in achieving their goals and aspirations and live a long life. Dimensions of quality service encompass how well the individual receives what they want, disability-related regulatory and legislative standards, kindness and professionalism, quality-of-life, and the extent of any breaches. Boards of disability service providers have ultimate responsibility for their organization’s service to ensure quality. They must appreciate and understand quality service dimensions in the context of the disability sector, collect and measure quality service data, hone their skills in weighing up and processing data, respond to user views, and enact improvement measures by way of directions to management. This article reviews board roles, membership, quality service dimensions, and mechanisms by which to obtain input data, process, and deliver outcomes contextualized to the requirements of boards of disability service providers for adults with intellectual disability. Furthermore, this article discusses a novel six-step implementation guide referred to as the SQUARE. That guide describes the functionary and cognitive elements required by boards to conduct effective quality service reviews.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T12:17:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094809
       
  • Effects of Medicaid Expansions 2001–2015 on Supplemental Security Income
           Program Participation Among Childless Adults

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marguerite Burns, Laura Dague, Elizabeth Wood, Jae Kennedy
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      Growing research indicates that Medicaid expansions reduce Supplemental Security Income (SSI) participation, although the magnitude of effects may vary with the presence of other health policy reforms. We examine how a series of Medicaid expansions for childless adults before and after implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) impact SSI participation among childless adults. We use the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to compare the change in SSI participation in states that expanded Medicaid coverage relative to those that did not during two time periods: 2001–2013 and 2001–2015. On average, SSI participation declined by a nonstatistically significant 0.10 percentage points (95% confidence interval [CI] = [−0.54, 0.32]) from a baseline SSI participation rate of 2.2% following Medicaid expansions implemented between 2001 and 2015. When restricted to the pre-ACA era, SSI participation declined by a nonstatistically significant 0.30 percentage points (95% CI = [−0.77, 0.16]). Although the direction of the point estimates suggests that Medicaid expansions before and after implementation of the ACA may be associated with reduced SSI participation, the imprecision of the estimates due in part to the sample size precludes this conclusion. To guide states in decision-making, it is essential to understand how increased Medicaid availability impacts SSI participation under different policy environments.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T03:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073221094807
       
  • Using Implementation Science Active Implementation Frameworks to Implement
           an Instructional Framework to Increase Teacher Capacity for Instructional
           Access for Students With Disabilities

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      Authors: Hardy Murphy, Sandi Cole, Lucy Fischman
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses the use of the Active Implementation Frameworks (AIF; Fixsen et al., 2005; Fixsen & Blasé, 2011) in a grant-funded project to implement the use of Universal Design for Learning as an instructional intervention to improve the access to quality instruction for students with disabilities. The discussion is based upon data specific to the AIF Implementation Drivers that facilitate and ensure the success of initiatives. The data illustrate the extent that characteristics of the respective schools and districts participating in the project impacted the fidelity of implementation processes and their associated outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T05:51:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073211066785
       
  • Schaffer v. Weast’s Effects on California Special Education Hearing
           Decisions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tiina Itkonen, Bryan Tomlin, Manuel G. Correia, Luis A. Sanchez, Tracie Schneider, Kellie Kooker
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      This research examined the associations between Schaffer v. Weast (2005) and special education due process hearing decisions in California. Using a database we coded from the state’s due process hearings for cases which reached a decision (years 1995–2019), this study analyzed (1) how legal representation and the filing party affected the probability of the student fully or partially prevailing in these cases, and (2) how Schaffer affected student representation and the prevailing party before and after this ruling. The results indicate that while students were statistically as likely to be plaintiffs and/or represented by an attorney before and after the 2005 time break in the study, the decision raised the bar for students as the likelihood of favorable outcomes for students fell significantly in the wake of the ruling.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T05:48:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073211066780
       
  • Mapping of Financial Support Programs for Children With Neurodisabilities
           Across Canada: Barriers and Discrepancies Within a Patchwork System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Caitlin Salvino, Connor Spencer, Angela M. Filipe, Lucyna M. Lach
      Abstract: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Ahead of Print.
      A cross-jurisdictional pan-Canadian environmental scan was conducted to identify provincial, territorial, and federal financial supports available to families with children living with neurodisabilities. In partnership with the organization Childhood Disability LINK, flowchart-styled pathway documents were developed for each financial support identified, mapping out the processes required to access each support. A critical analysis was completed as it relates to structural barriers, accessibility of program information and geographic discrepancies. The results revealed that, despite almost universal availability of programs to support families of children living with neurodisabilities, significant barriers and inequity remain. This included considerable variation in access to financial support based on geographic and jurisdictional discrepancies, absence of adequate and accurate information about programs, and minimal support provided to families in the application process. We argue that the barriers and discrepancies identified were an inherent result of the Canadian federalist fragmentation of the delivery of social care and financial support programs for children living with neurodisabilities. A more unified response by Canadian provincial, territorial, and federal governments is clearly needed to take positive steps to address the consequences of federalist fragmentation and respond to the structural barriers and geographic discrepancies identified by this study.
      Citation: Journal of Disability Policy Studies
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T05:44:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10442073211066776
       
 
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