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Visual Communication
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1470-3572 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3214
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1175 journals]
  • Typicality effect in data graphs

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      Authors: Daniel Reimann, Marie Struwe, Nilam Ram, Robert Gaschler
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Some types of data graphs are more easily understood than others. Following the suggestion that typically encountered graphs may activate individuals’ cognitive schema quickly, this study investigated prior exposure to and typicality of three common graph types: vertical bar graphs, horizontal bar graphs and line graphs; and three common data patterns: rising, neutral and falling. Results from two samples (N = 57 and N = 30) suggest that vertical bar graphs are encountered more frequently, are rated as more typical and are identified more quickly than horizontal bar graphs and line graphs; also that rising data patterns are more typical than falling and neutral data patterns. The findings contribute new knowledge about the hierarchical structure of graph schema and can inform design choices about which graph types might best facilitate viewers’ understanding of data visualizations.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T04:42:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221130445
       
  • Applying health design thinking to uncover actors in the sustenance of
           health and wellbeing during hotel quarantine in Kuwait

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      Authors: Juhri Selamet
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This visual essay centers on the author’s hotel quarantine experience in Kuwait. While many quarantine stories have been recorded, personal stories involving the relationship between human and non-human actors within a quarantined space are still overlooked. By focusing on the maintenance of health and wellness during quarantine, this essay visually communicates the hotel quarantine experience by using a health design thinking approach. By presenting a series of photographs, actors’ interactions, and journey maps, the author attempts to convey a connection between human and non-human actors during quarantine, and prompts a discussion on what can be done to improve hotel quarantine systems in the future.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221126514
       
  • Resemiotization: tracing the movement of resources in landscape
           architectural design trajectories

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      Authors: Christine Price, Arlene Archer
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      University students in landscape architecture need to mobilize a range of resources in their design trajectories in order to resolve their designs. Often design education settings are influenced by design traditions of the global north, and thus may favour particular ways of knowing. This article aims to contribute to a multimodal pedagogy for diversity exploring the ways in which diverse students mobilize resources to move between spatial, verbal and visual modes in a landscape architectural design trajectory. It specifically traces the resources that one student brings to her learning environment in a university in South Africa, and identifies the experiential, social, semiotic, interactive and pedagogical resources she deploys. The authors demonstrate how these resources shape and prompt the student’s meaning-making processes, and how she mobilizes these resources to move her design trajectory forward. They do this by building on Kress and Van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006) model of visual grammar, adapted for three-dimensional space, and Kress’s notions of design in Multimodality (2010). The concept of resemiotization is key here to recognizing and understanding the meaning-making potential of modes. The authors argue that the affordances of different modes prompt resemiotization of resources at different times in the design trajectory, moving between material expression and nonmaterial (re)conceptualization. The processes of resemiotization can thus generate emergent meanings and transform them within the student’s landscape design trajectories. This approach to pedagogy can valorize the agency, identity, ways of knowing and resourcefulness of diverse meaning-makers.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221118583
       
  • Michel Pastoureau and the history of visual communication

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      Authors: Giorgia Aiello, Theo Van Leeuwen
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Despite early and ongoing calls for a systematic engagement with history, social semiotics has largely emphasized research on the synchronic rather than diachronic dimensions of meaning-making. And while the ‘instability’ of semiotic practices (see Kress’s Multimodality: A Social Semiotic Approach to Contemporary Communication, 2010) and the importance of semiotic change (see Van Leeuwen’s Introducing Social Semiotics, 2005) have become key themes in semiotics, there is still a need for a dynamic approach to the study of visual and multimodal communication, focusing not only on describing how meaning-making resources and their uses are changing, but also on why they are changing. In this article, the authors focus on the importance of the work of medieval historian Michel Pastoureau for the social semiotic study of visual communication, highlighting that this work can help us further refine and even rethink key social semiotic concepts such as modes and media, provenance, and context. Pastoureau’s work shows how we can make theoretical statements about instability, change and innovation more concrete and, ultimately, empirically based. His approach can also help us understand semiotic change and its relation to social and cultural (and also economic and technological) change more broadly, often with the aid of the (crucial) normative discourses that shape semiotic practices over time.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221126517
       
  • Visual communication and mental health

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      Authors: Jill Bennett
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article conceptualizes the field of ‘visual communication and mental health’, prioritizing the question of how visual imagery is experienced. Taking as its starting point the challenge of overcoming stigma and the limitations of visual clichés of depression and mental illness, the author argues for a dynamic, relational model of communications, foregrounding lived experience. To illuminate the psychosocial impacts and potential benefits of creative engagement with visual media, she draws on understandings of symbolic communication, derived in particular from the work of DW Winnicott and the British Independent tradition of psychoanalysis. The imagery discussed includes stock and campaign imagery, conceptual/expressive artwork and a virtual reality (VR) production that extends an innovative approach to mental health literacy by First Nations artists.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221130451
       
  • Alien domesticity: representing home during a pandemic

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      Authors: Brent Luvaas
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Cultural geography and the related disciplines of urban sociology and anthropology have long focused their theoretical lenses on the city as a space of lived multiplicity. This photographic essay focuses its lens on the home as such a space. During the pandemic lockdown of 2020–2021, many of us spent more time in our homes than we ever had before, working, teaching, schooling, shopping, and barricading ourselves from the outside world. This essay borrows from the often ambiguous and anonymizing aesthetics of street photography to depict the multiple, overlapping worlds of home during a pandemic. Home, as depicted here, is an always unfinished process of affective assemblage and dissolution. The images featured seek to capture that lack of resolution, the messy emotional texture of home life under lockdown.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221089012
       
  • Generational differences in viewing behaviors: an eye-tracking study

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      Authors: Eva Brumberger
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Many scholars over the past two decades have contended that constant exposure to visually-oriented technologies makes younger individuals inherently more visually skilled than previous generations. The study presented here investigates this claim by using eye tracking to examine patterns in the ways in which individuals interact with visual stimuli, specifically journalistic photographs. Study participants included 29 college students aged 18–22 (mean = 19), and 20 non-student members of the university and surrounding community, aged 40–63 (mean = 50). Eye movements were recorded using a TobiiPro x2-60 eye tracker connected to a 17-inch gaming laptop. If younger individuals and older individuals have different levels of visual ability, there should be observable differences between the eye movements of the two groups. However, the differences observed between the two groups of participants were very limited and did not point to any consistent patterns that would suggest differing levels of skill at reading images.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221117839
       
  • Matter, meaning and semiotics

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      Authors: Kay L O’Halloran
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      We inhabit two worlds – the world of matter and the world of meaning (see Halliday, ‘On matter and meaning: The two realms of human experience, 2005). In this article, these two worlds and the physical, biological, social and semiotic systems that connect them are investigated. In this respect, semiotic systems are the most complex because they involve physical systems (the material sign), biological systems (human beings), social systems (society and culture) and meaning itself. Semiotic frameworks need to take into account these various dimensions as changes in one system reverberate across the meta-system as a whole. With this in mind, the interplay between material and semiotic worlds from a social semiotic perspective, are explored with a focus on meaning and its significance in relation to human existence. Using examples from various industrial ages, the article explores how semiotic resources (in this case, in mathematics, science and computer programming languages) are organized to structure reality in specific ways, and how semiotic combinations and the technologies arising from those constructions have changed the course of human history. In this discussion, attention is paid to the role of visual communication, both in terms of visual semiotic resources (e.g. graphs, digital images) and visual aspects of multimodal texts. It thus becomes evident that the functionalities of any one semiotic resource (including language) must be viewed in relation to its collective co-deployment with other semiotic resources. Lastly, the author examines semiosis in the digital age and considers the social implications of the current digital ecosystem. In doing so, she conceptualizes digital technologies as a one-way mirror where members of society use digital media for every facet of their lives while being watched, analysed and manipulated by those who have designed and own the digital platforms. It is apparent that semiotics has a major role to play in terms of design, policymaking and activism around future digital technologies.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221128881
       
  • Celebrating 20 Years of Visual Communcation

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      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-10T11:41:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221136948
       
  • Design and repair: from object conservation to material transformation

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      Authors: Kate Scardifield, Megan Hall
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This visual essay utilizes a series of images from Make Do and Mend, a participatory workshop that brought together designers, a museum conservator and the general public to explore design for repair as part of Sydney Craft Week in 2019. The photographs capture objects and materials in various states of transformation, bringing to light the aesthetic politics at play that often underpin acts of repair. The essay is a visual re-framing of repair as a form of design practice, revealing objects in various states of transformation and our changing attitudes towards them over time. As a visual narrative, the essay demonstrates the value of material knowledge exchange in shaping new aesthetic registers for object conservation and approaches to repair.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T05:28:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221082114
       
  • Visually informed accounts: instructed achievements during planetarium
           visits and sky observations

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      Authors: Ricardo Moutinho, Andrew P Carlin, Joana BV Marques
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the authors explore participants’ accounts of visual scenes produced during the instructed work of observing celestial bodies at planetarium sessions and star-parties. They use as examples some interactions in which participants (i.e. guides and visitors) are giving/following instructions and exchanging descriptions about the observed object based on their (in)direct access to the matter at hand and also on their orientation to the world shared in common. According to the materials analyzed, the authors found that the descriptions of participants’ observations produced and complemented each other’s accounts of the object under scrutiny. This phenomenon helps us understand how instructed observation work is locally and collaboratively managed, which in turn opens the possibility for us to explore how visual accounts are produced through the sequential and categorial aspects of talk. Such enterprise gives guides and trainers a better picture of how visitors make sense of the contents delivered.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T05:23:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221130441
       
  • ‘Foodstagramming’ in Early 20th-Century Postcards: A
           Transhistorical Perspective

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      Authors: Lauren Alex O’Hagan
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Introduced in 1907, the ‘real photo’ postcard destabilized the boundaries between private and public life, enabling people to perform identity in ways that anticipate contemporary social media practices. In this visual essay, the author explores one particular phenomenon – the sharing of food – drawing comparisons with ‘foodstagramming’ in terms of its compositional structure, social objectives and communicative functions. In doing so, she challenges the supposed novelty of modes of self-presentation on social media, embedding them in a broader historical trajectory.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T05:39:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221096715
       
  • Imaging cancer: image-based diagnostic communication in
           radiologists’ embodied cognition

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      Authors: Mindaugas Briedis
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article thematizes the specific process of cancer detection in radiology, which presupposes a delicate synthesis of the specifics of oncoradiology images and the skilful actions performed by the radiologist. The enactment of cancer via meaningful action rather than recognizing static depiction puts the structures of image consciousness into the wider context along with memory, free imagination and amodal completion, among others. Hence, by way of reinterpreting phenomenological projects via enactivism and incorporating them into the radiologist’s work (cases, radiograms), medical diagnostics in general and oncoradiology in particular presuppose a multimodal categorial structuring (of meaning) that goes far beyond direct sensory givens. In most branches of radiology, we cannot tell what the cancer is without attending to the multitude of its appearance and the perceptual and imaginative strategies of those who make it appear. As such, this article also considers the wider problem of how knowledge is related to the (embodied) subjectivity in a particular social setting.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-13T06:39:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221101205
       
  • Female archetypes in car advertising: the case of Audi

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      Authors: María del Mar Rubio-Hernández, Ángeles Martínez-García
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The representation of women in advertising is based on constructs that have become consolidated in Western culture, giving rise to different archetypes that express the values and ways of thinking of each age. As in other media discourses, advertising resorts to elements, such as archetypes and myths, which shape the collective imaginary and are very effective devices, for they are recognizable to viewers and help to engage them. Specifically, this article focuses on car advertising, whose significance lies in the fact that it has traditionally been a sphere of male domination. In recent years, there has been a positive evolution towards more independent and autonomous female characters. Accordingly, this article analyses two of Audi’s most recent campaigns from 2016 and 2017 in order to observe how women are represented in car ads according to three fundamental aspects: visual semiotics (Arnheim’s Arte y percepción visual. Psicología del ojo creador, 2008; Casetti and Di Chio’s Cómo analizar un film, 1994; Van Leeuwen’s ‘Semiotics and iconography’, 2001), iconography (Cassirer’s Filosofía de las formas simbólicas, 1998); Panofsky’s ‘Iconografía e iconología: introducción al estudio del arte del Renacimiento, 1987) and symbolism grounded in a myth analysis of advertising (León’s Mitoanálisis de la publicidad, 2001).
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-09-03T04:30:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221116126
       
  • Drawn into the future: The epistemic work of visual scenarios in the
           configuration of human–robot encounters

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      Authors: Christian Pentzold, Ingmar Rothe
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article looks at artistic impressions of future robotics and considers how they inspire research into human–machine interaction. Our analysis of visual scientific practices and the epistemic ramifications of these speculative drawings emerges from a long-term participant observation study in a multi-disciplinary project on smart and autonomous technologies in public spaces. We discuss the design, appropriation and modulation of visual scenarios, and scrutinize how these diegetic futurescapes are imaginatively engaging and suggestive of scientific progress and experimentation. The article argues that the future-oriented scenes defy common notions of post hoc scientific representations. Instead, they are ex ante presentations of the ambition to imagine human–machine relations in the future and to draw the large-scale research venture together. The register of evaluation thereby shifts from aesthetic criteria to scientific parameters. More than just visual tokens, the scenarios became a catalyst for collaboration.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T05:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221112676
       
  • Visual communication and the management of passenger conduct: A visual
           analysis of transit etiquette posters by Japanese railway companies

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      Authors: Christoph Schimkowsky
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The visual communication of behavioural expectations plays an important role in the management of contemporary urban spaces. This is evident in mass transit settings where posters and signage promoting good mobility practices are a common sight. Despite the prevalence of such semiotic interventions in passenger conduct in public transport environments globally (see Bissell’s Transit Life: How Commuting Is Transforming Our Cities, 2018; Moore’s ‘Preventing anti-social behaviour on public transport: An alternative route'’, 2010; and Ureta’s ‘Waiting for the barbarians: Disciplinary devices on Metro de Santiago, 2012), their visual structure has only received limited scholarly attention. This article seeks to address this oversight through a visual analysis of ‘manner posters’ issued by Japanese railway providers. Using a two-pronged content analysis approach, the author examines the design strategies employed to problematise passenger misconduct and solicit desirable mobility practices while simultaneously protecting customer sensibilities. Focusing on character figuration, image–viewer relations and the portrayal of misconduct, the article argues that manner posters inscribe behavioural expectations into the physical transport environment by modelling their narrative visual content after actual commuter experiences and using salience-increasing design techniques to highlight etiquette transgressions. As an in-depth visual analysis of transit manner posters, the article thus advances our understanding of the strategic use of visual communication for the management of everyday behaviour and the production and maintenance of public order in contemporary cities.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T04:33:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221109889
       
  • Book review: Kinesemiotics: Modelling How Choreographed Movement Means in
           Space

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      Authors: Joshua Han
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T04:49:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221112679
       
  • Book review: Women in Social Semiotics and SFL: Making a Difference

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      Authors: Ruijie Zhang
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T05:08:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221109902
       
  • Sculpting the interpersonal: towards a social semiotic framework for
           analysing interpersonal meaning in statues

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      Authors: Wendy L Bowcher, Jennifer Yameng Liang
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The underlying question of this article is ‘how do statues convey interpersonal meaning'’ To answer this question, the authors briefly critically examine the current social semiotic analytical framework for statues and develop a revised framework for analysing interpersonal meaning in which features from Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design (2006) and selected features from O’Toole’s framework from The Language of Displayed Art (2011) for analysing sculpture are integrated. These features are also extended and/or complemented by incorporating features obtained from research into the fields of gesture, body language and facial expression. Further, in keeping with Systemic Functional Linguistic-inspired research, system networks are used to map out the potential material and semantic (interpersonal) features for figurative statues and to present possible configurations among these features. Although the focus of this article is on interpersonal meaning, it is acknowledged that within a social semiotic approach, there is an interdependency among interpersonal, experiential (representational) and textual (compositional) meanings, and that these configure within a specific context of situation. This interdependency is only briefly attended to in the article itself, but the proposed framework provides a starting point for developing an account of the way that interpersonal features and their realizations in statues may configure with representational and compositional features and their realizations. With the current world focus on statues and their sometimes controversial social meanings, this article offers a timely opportunity for a range of users such as social semioticians or art educators and students to consider, through a systematic analytical framework, the way in which statues may relate interpersonally with viewers, and provides a key step towards accounting for the way that configurations of interpersonal, representational and compositional features may construe contextual tensions in relation to the overall message conveyed by a statue.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T12:50:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221094039
       
  • Book review: tumblr

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      Authors: Kendra Calhoun
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T06:25:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221109898
       
  • Rethinking visual criminalization: news images and the mediated spacetime
           of crime events

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      Authors: Kathryn Claire Higgins
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the mediated spacetime of crime events to reconsider how criminalization works through visual journalism. Drawing on close analysis of 45 images from Australian newspaper reports about so-called ‘African gang crime’ events in the city of Melbourne, it develops a typology of five distinct ‘ways of looking’ at crime that news images can open for their viewers. Each extends unique imaginative demands and so conditions perceptual relationships of spatial, historical and political significance between crime events and those who watch them unfold through the news in distinct ways. Together, these ways of looking constitute an intertextual representational mechanism that the author calls kaleidoscopic visuality, holding fixed the ‘who’ and ‘what’ of crime events while endlessly shifting and destabilizing the ‘where’ and ‘when’. The concept of kaleidoscopic visuality helps clarify how and why hypermediated crime events and phenomena resist discrete and/or desecuritized interpretations of their political significance, and thus broadens existing accounts of how news images criminalize.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T01:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102547
       
  • Exploring the contemporary Moon Under Water through illustration:
           nostalgia and the power of the image

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      Authors: Stephanie Black
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses images from the visual essays produced for Plume of Feathers, an audio-visual project, to examine the notion of ‘reflective nostalgia’ as an attitude towards meaning-making within image creation, in particular illustration that can counter certain political uses of images that present a restorative–nostalgic world view. The project at the core of the article is concerned with the decline of public houses and their social function in the UK. However, the image of the pub is embroiled within the visual rhetoric related to the UK’s (2016) Brexit referendum. This article explores the ways in which the illustrated image can provide a different view of the pub that reveals the conceptual construction of the notion of ‘pub’ and offers a critical alternative. The constructed nature of the illustrated image is then explored for its potential to visualize the past differently, following Svetlana Boym’s proposal of reflective nostalgia in The Future of Nostalgia (2001) in order to address problems in the present.The article proposes that reflective nostalgia’s utility as a critical tool lies in its consideration of the key role played by the surface of the image, through the material signifiers of age. As illustrators, embracing these nostalgic triggers when making images allows the viewer to reconnect to the past with critical distance, thereby returning politics to the surface of the image, something that Fredric Jameson saw in Postmodernism, Or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (1991) as recuperated and rendered politically neutral. Illustration is therefore cast as a meaning-making practice that shapes the world it operates within, with the article suggesting that by making nostalgic images, illustrators can exercise their agency as agitators.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T05:52:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221101130
       
  • From researchers to academic entrepreneurs: a diachronic analysis of the
           visual representation of academics in university annual reports

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      Authors: Yi Deng, Dezheng (William) Feng
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Influenced by the global neoliberalization of higher education, academic entrepreneurialism has become a new paradigm of university development and has brought about profound changes in various types of university discourse. Against this backdrop, this study investigates the transformations in the visual depiction of academics in the annual reports of six major universities in Hong Kong during the past two decades. Drawing on critical visual analysis, the study shows that the communicative purposes of the images have shifted from reporting the research process to promoting research outcomes. The visual identities of academics have shown clear transformations of becoming increasingly individualized, entrepreneurial and self-promotional. With a higher degree of social interaction and closer social distance with viewers, they are playing an increasingly important role in building public relations. The study enriches the social analysis of neoliberalization as a process through the quantitative and diachronic lens. It demonstrates how a visual analytical method applied to the critical analysis of identity construction and university discourse can provide an explicit understanding of the visual manifestations of neoliberalism in higher education and its diachronic change.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:27:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102180
       
  • Book review: Empirical Multimodality Research: Methods, Evaluations,
           Implications

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      Authors: Alex Christiansen
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:26:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221099606
       
  • Book review: Beyond the Visual: An Introduction to Researching Multimodal
           Phenomena

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      Authors: Charles Forceville
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:39:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102531
       
  • Understanding emotional responses to visual aesthetic artefacts: the
           SECMEA mechanisms

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      Authors: Chris Van Der Lee, Renske Van Enschot
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      While many models attempt to explain the aesthetic experience, most limit themselves to art as their focal point and only a few look into why we arrive at a certain response to a visual aesthetic object. This article attempts to offer an extension to the current models by focusing on the mechanisms that induce emotions in relation to visual aesthetic objects. It takes Juslin’s (2013) BRECVEM mechanisms – developed for the domain of music – as its basis. In this article, Juslin’s mechanisms are adapted to the visual domain, resulting in six different emotion-evoking mechanisms: startle reflex, evaluative conditioning, emotional contagion, mental imagery, syntactic expectancy and external appraisal. The authors give an overview of frameworks and empirical studies, demonstrating each of these mechanisms in relation to visual aesthetic objects (visual art as well as advertising and product design). The article’s focus on emotion-inducing mechanisms and existing empirical research provides a basis for improving empirical testing of emotional responses to a broad range of visual aesthetic objects.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T05:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221090536
       
  • Book review: Seeing Justice: Witnessing, Crime, and Punishment in Visual
           Media

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      Authors: Courtney D Tabor
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221099611
       
  • Book review: Smartphone Communication: Interactions in the App Ecosystem

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      Authors: Charles Forceville
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T11:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221094041
       
  • Drone views: a multimodal ethnographic perspective

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      Authors: Elisa Serafinelli, Lauren Alex O’Hangan
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Drone visuals are rapidly becoming part of our sociocultural imaginaries, generating distinct images that differ from traditional visual conventions and producing unexpected perspectives of the world that reveal hidden aspects of our surroundings. Despite the growing use of camera-laden drones in a range of commercial and non-commercial activities, to date, little scholarly attention has been paid to the semiotics of drone visuals. This article is the first to draw specific attention to the compositional structure of drone visuals, combining social semiotic analysis with ethnographic insights to assess how they are changing the way we think about the world. Exploring drone hobbyists’ and developers’ perspectives on drone usage and the visuals they generate, the authors identify and examine three frequently occurring characteristics of drone visuals: top-down views, 360-degree panoramic views and ‘classic’ landscape perspectives. The critical analysis of these peculiarities leads them to argue for the potential of these innovative visions to reshape our visual culture. In their conclusion, the authors aim to open a conversation about the way technological advancements mark important sociocultural changes in sense-making processes, geographical imaginations and everyday life experiences.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211065093
       
  • Book review: Animating Truth: Documentary and Visual Culture in the 21st
           Century

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      Authors: Georgia Aitaki
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:50:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221094042
       
  • The mediatic dimension of images: visual semiotics faced with Gerhard
           Richter’s artwork

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      Authors: Enzo D’armenio
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the author endeavours to analyse Gerhard Richter’s photo-paintings for the way they build an intersemiotic dialogue between photography and painting. On the one hand, he tries to characterize the modalities of this dialogue and to provide an original interpretation of Richter’s work. On the other hand, he uses the special case of Richter’s work as a starting point for a conceptual renewal in the analysis of visual languages, notably with regard to semiotic approaches. In particular, the author aims to define the mediatic dimension of images, which is concerned with the substances, substrates and devices through which images are produced. He does this in order to integrate the achievements of visual semiotics in regard to the compositional dimension of colours, shapes and figures. He takes into account the way in which the material and the substances of expression of images impact the construction of meaning, in accordance with the hypothesis of a superposition of technical and semantic aspects. The confrontation with Richter’s production leads him to go beyond plastic and figurative readings as he proposes the concepts of technical formats and techno-perceptions of images. While the former concern the historical recognition of images on the basis of the devices having produced their substance – leading to identifications such as ‘early cinema images’, ‘smartphone images’, ‘surveillance camera images’, etc. – the latter concern the perceptive configurations resulting from the formative work of the technical devices.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T01:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221080529
       
  • Book review: Flags, Color and the Legal Narrative: Public Memory, Identity
           and Critique

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      Authors: Jody Watts
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:09:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221088918
       
  • Visual narratives of environmental change: collective memory and identity
           at New Zealand heritage sites

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      Authors: Olli Hellmann
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article interrogates historical photographs exhibited at public heritage sites in Aotearoa New Zealand. The analysis reveals that – by portraying 19th-century environmental change as a ‘heroic’ narrative of ‘progress’ – the photographs construct New Zealand national identity in opposition to nature, rather than promote a sense of connectedness with the natural environment. The article thus makes three important contributions to the literature on the visualization of environmental and climate change. First, the empirical case study demonstrates that visual narratives shape our social identities in relation to nature. Second, the article adds a rare socio-semiotic analysis to the environmental communication literature, highlighting that photographs have to be examined through multimodal methods and in relation to wider discursive processes of meaning making. Third, by borrowing ideas from the literature on collective memory, the article shows that, even though they depict scenes that are set in the distant past, historical photographs can still influence environmental attitudes and behaviours in the present.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T01:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078974
       
  • Rhythm in literary apps

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      Authors: Anette Hagen, Kathy A Mills
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses how rhythm may function in literary apps. The article has two aims: increasing the knowledge of how literary apps work as texts, by exploring their aspects of rhythm, and developing the understanding of the theoretical term of rhythm. The authors propose a rhythmanalysis in which two different types of rhythm – reading rhythm and narrative rhythm – are taken into account. The two types of rhythm may both occur at different structural levels in the text. This approach is applied to the analysis of rhythm in the popular literary app, Florence (Wong et al., 2018, Florence Tablet application software), drawing on concepts from multimodal social semiotics (Van Leeuwen, Introducing Social Semiotics, 2005), although leaning towards a more reception-oriented approach than the traditional text-oriented analysis in social semiotics. Literary apps are defined in this context as multimodal fictional narratives that can lead to an aesthetic experience for the reader (Iser, 1984, Der Akt des Lesens); however, non-narrative apps, such as poetry, may also be defined as literary apps. These apps may be read on a tablet or a smartphone. This article elucidates some of the many facets of rhythm related to the multimodal design of a literary app, which invites different forms of interactivity than the linear reading and page-turning of print-based picture books. The findings of the analysis show how rhythm not only contributes to the multimodal cohesional aspects of literary apps, but is fundamental to the meaning potential of the literary app.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T01:21:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078038
       
  • Computing colorism: skin tone in online retail imagery

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      Authors: Chelsea Butkowski, Lee Humphreys, Utkarsh Mall
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      A long legacy of media imagery persistently distorts, stereotypes, and ignores marginalized racial and ethnic groups despite widespread calls to diversify media representations. In particular, fashion and beauty media continue to feature light-skinned models and celebrities over dark-skinned individuals, even lightening dark skin with photo editing to achieve ideals of whiteness and lightness. This practice aligns with colorism, or the privileging of light skin tones for access to economic and social capital. This study examines colorism in a particular genre of digital photography, online retail images, as a problem of visual representation. The novel method of visual computational analysis is used to quantitatively compare how mainstream clothing retail brands represent model skin tones across still and video media modes. The findings suggest that analyzed retailers tended to favor light-skinned models on their websites and that model skin tones in product videos were significantly darker than in product photos. These findings are considered through research on race and technology, photographic manipulation, and media misinformation. Ultimately, the study suggests that visual (in)consistencies can reveal the role of structural biases in shaping media representations. The article also provides a methodological tool for conducting this work.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T05:26:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221077444
       
  • Book review: Communicating Knowledge Visually: Will Burtin’s Scientific
           Approach to Information Design

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      Authors: Steven Skaggs
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T06:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221077406
       
  • The Rijksmuseum’s Slavery exhibition, 5 June–29 August 2021

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      Authors: Pao-Yi Yang
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211063561
       
  • The politics of typographic placemaking: the cases of TilburgsAns and
           Dubai Font

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      Authors: Johan Järlehed, Maryam Fanni
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores typographic placemaking by comparing the design and public launch of two city fonts: TilburgsAns (2016) and Dubai Font (2017). Building on recent work on semiotic technology and graphic ideology, the authors examine how these fonts’ visual features and the promotional discourses surrounding their launch are utilized for placemaking, and how this is facilitated and constrained by technology and ideology. The results show that the two projects of typographic placemaking build on a similar repertoire of semiotic technology, but make different use of it. The authors sustain that this difference is explained by the political aims of the two projects, on the one hand, and their economic and organizational scale, on the other. A postcolonial perspective further underlines their geopolitically and historically different preconditions.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069612
       
  • Book review: Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design

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      Authors: Nataliia Laba
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069606
       
  • Tailings and tracings: using art and social science to explore the limits
           of visual methods at mining and industrial ruins

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      Authors: Kevin Walby, Ben Davis
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines a novel approach to visual methods that artist Ben Davis has developed based on sociologist Kevin Walby’s research into decommissioned industrial sites, which is referred to here as tracing. Disrupting the over-reliance on photographic representation in visual methods in the social sciences, the authors integrate audio recordings of interviews, as well as photos, maps, and building plans for pop-up mining communities into visual art works to provide a counter-visual analysis of the landscapes depicted in Kevin Walby’s photographs of Uranium City. After reviewing literature on environmental degradation and on visual methods, the article elaborates on Ben Davis’s practice of tracing as a technique representing the feeling of decomposition and decay generated by the harms of industrial resource extraction. The authors argue that the technique of tracing excavates layered histories of place, providing a way of creating new interpretations of social and environmental issues. They then discuss how this counter-visual analysis and approach to tracing enables a trans-disciplinary and dialogical space for engagement with academics, artists, and activists to explore issues centered on land, contamination, and justice.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T05:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211071117
       
  • Book review: Shifts Toward Image-Centricity in Contemporary Multimodal
           Practices

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      Authors: Tuomo Hiippala
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069624
       
  • Analyzing picturebooks: semiotic, literary, and artistic frameworks

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      Authors: Frank Serafini, Stephanie F Reid
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The multimodal and visual nature of children’s picturebooks has been documented in research emanating from multiple fields of inquiry. In this article, the authors present three types of analytical frameworks that are useful for conducting research on contemporary picturebooks as multimodal entities. Each framework draws upon different aspects of visual images, design features, and written language, and uses different theoretical lenses to call forth particular aspects of contemporary picturebooks. The three analytical frameworks are: (1) social semiotic frameworks, (2) literary frameworks, and (3) artistic frameworks. This article suggests that only through an orchestration of a range of analytical frameworks can scholars and educators begin to understand the complexity of contemporary picturebooks and their role in educational settings.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:51:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069623
       
  • Opening up semiotic spaces for gender expression: a case study of the
           construction of gender in Australian award-winning early childhood picture
           books

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      Authors: Helen Caple, Ping Tian
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the visual and verbal expressions of gender in Australian award-winning early childhood picture books. It brings together social semiotic analysis and the narratological concepts of narration and focalization to examine the extent to which one community of practice (authors, illustrators, publishers and awards council) reproduces symbolic manifestations of gender, or offers readers space to engage with alternatives. The authors’ findings suggest that, while the literary works produced by this community of practice mostly serve to reinforce hegemonic cultural attitudes of what constitutes desirable femininity and masculinity in Australia, there is ample opportunity for change.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:48:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069604
       
  • Design timescapes: futuring through visual thinking

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      Authors: Clare M Cooper
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Encouraging designers to think about the precedents and consequences of their designs is integral to generating a design ethic that respects both our past and future generations (see Escobar, ‘Sustainability: Design for the pluriverse’, 2011, and Fry, Design Futuring, 2009). Situating designs as interventions in time also clearly acknowledges our growing responsibilities as designers in the age of the Anthropocene. The visualization of these relationships serves not only the designer engaged in the research, but those from other disciplines seeking to understand what historical or sociopolitical contexts may have informed a particular design innovation at a particular moment in time.In this reflective practitioner piece, the author presents design timescapes, a novel visual thinking tool that not only challenges designers to visualize the relationships between design and societal shifts but encourages the development of visual argumentation for design proposals. This approach is also useful in introducing the concept of design futuring to students/designers unfamiliar with this emergent field. To illustrate the various manifestations of this tool, she shares examples of where she has applied design timescapes as part of her futuring practice, and as a pedagogical tool. She concludes by offering suggestions for how this tool, in combination with emerging design futuring practice, contributes to the expansion of the resources of visual communication, design practice, research, and education.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T08:11:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211065116
       
  • Walking through the city soundscape: an audio-visual analysis of sensory
           experience for people with psychosis

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      Authors: Sara Merlino, Lorenza Mondada, Ola Söderström
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses how an aspect of urban environments – sound and noise – is experienced by people walking in the city; it particularly focuses on atypical populations such as people diagnosed with psychosis, who are reported to be particularly sensitive to noisy environments. Through an analysis of video-recordings of naturalistic activities in an urban context and of video-elicitations based on these recordings, the study details the way participants orient to sound and noise in naturalistic settings, and how sound and noise are reported and reexperienced during interviews. By bringing together urban context, psychosis and social interaction, this study shows that, thanks to video recordings and conversation analysis, it is possible to analyse in detail the multimodal organization of action (talk, gesture, gaze, walking bodies) and of the sensory experience(s) of aural factors, as well as the way this organization is affected by the ecology of the situation.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T11:31:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211052638
       
  • The rhythms of cancer survivorship

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      Authors: Stefanie Plage
      First page: 607
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This visual essay incorporates photographs from a research project on the changing landscapes of cancer survivorship in Australia. Study participants were asked to tell the story of what cancer looks and feels like and what it means to them. The photographs were captioned and discussed during a follow-up interview. Employing Henri Lefebvre’s rhythmanalysis, these photographs, captions and narrations show how the routines and expectations arising in cancer survivorship reorient life around movement in time and place. They provide insights into the unfolding of cancer survivorship in the ebb and flow of lived experience.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T07:14:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078040
       
 
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