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  Subjects -> DISABILITY (Total: 103 journals)
Showing 1 - 200 of 310 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advances in Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 85)
Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Aequitas : Revue de Développement Humain, Handicap et Changement Social     Full-text available via subscription  
African Journal of Disability     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Aphasiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Assistive Technology: The Official Journal of RESNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Audiology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Autism in Adulthood     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Learning Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 102)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Disability Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Deafness & Education International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Disability and Health Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Disability Compliance for Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Disability Studies Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Distúrbios da Comunicação     Open Access  
Early Popular Visual Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health Expectations     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Hearing, Balance and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Intellectual Disability Australasia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Audiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Orthopaedic and Trauma Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Assistive Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Disability & Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Disability Policy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Disability Studies in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Enabling Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Integrated Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Intellectual & Developmental Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Intellectual Disability - Diagnosis and Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Intellectual Disability Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Literary & Cultural Disability Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Occupational Therapy, Schools, & Early Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Policy and Practice In Intellectual Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Science Education for Students with Disabilities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 93)
Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness     Hybrid Journal  
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Learning Disability Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Mental Health Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Music and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Physical Disabilities : Education and Related Services     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Research and Practice in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Revista Espaço     Open Access  
Revista Española de Discapacidad     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue francophone de la déficience intellectuelle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Sexuality and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Siglo Cero. Revista Española sobre Discapacidad Intelectual     Open Access  
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Speech Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Stigma and Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Stress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Technology and Disability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Topics in Language Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Visual Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Visual Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Visual Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Visual Communication
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.281
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1470-3572 - ISSN (Online) 1741-3214
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Rethinking visual criminalization: news images and the mediated spacetime
           of crime events

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn Claire Higgins
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the mediated spacetime of crime events to reconsider how criminalization works through visual journalism. Drawing on close analysis of 45 images from Australian newspaper reports about so-called ‘African gang crime’ events in the city of Melbourne, it develops a typology of five distinct ‘ways of looking’ at crime that news images can open for their viewers. Each extends unique imaginative demands and so conditions perceptual relationships of spatial, historical and political significance between crime events and those who watch them unfold through the news in distinct ways. Together, these ways of looking constitute an intertextual representational mechanism that the author calls kaleidoscopic visuality, holding fixed the ‘who’ and ‘what’ of crime events while endlessly shifting and destabilizing the ‘where’ and ‘when’. The concept of kaleidoscopic visuality helps clarify how and why hypermediated crime events and phenomena resist discrete and/or desecuritized interpretations of their political significance, and thus broadens existing accounts of how news images criminalize.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T01:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102547
       
  • Exploring the contemporary Moon Under Water through illustration:
           nostalgia and the power of the image

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Black
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article uses images from the visual essays produced for Plume of Feathers, an audio-visual project, to examine the notion of ‘reflective nostalgia’ as an attitude towards meaning-making within image creation, in particular illustration that can counter certain political uses of images that present a restorative–nostalgic world view. The project at the core of the article is concerned with the decline of public houses and their social function in the UK. However, the image of the pub is embroiled within the visual rhetoric related to the UK’s (2016) Brexit referendum. This article explores the ways in which the illustrated image can provide a different view of the pub that reveals the conceptual construction of the notion of ‘pub’ and offers a critical alternative. The constructed nature of the illustrated image is then explored for its potential to visualize the past differently, following Svetlana Boym’s proposal of reflective nostalgia in The Future of Nostalgia (2001) in order to address problems in the present.The article proposes that reflective nostalgia’s utility as a critical tool lies in its consideration of the key role played by the surface of the image, through the material signifiers of age. As illustrators, embracing these nostalgic triggers when making images allows the viewer to reconnect to the past with critical distance, thereby returning politics to the surface of the image, something that Fredric Jameson saw in Postmodernism, Or the Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism (1991) as recuperated and rendered politically neutral. Illustration is therefore cast as a meaning-making practice that shapes the world it operates within, with the article suggesting that by making nostalgic images, illustrators can exercise their agency as agitators.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-28T05:52:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221101130
       
  • From researchers to academic entrepreneurs: a diachronic analysis of the
           visual representation of academics in university annual reports

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      Authors: Yi Deng, Dezheng (William) Feng
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Influenced by the global neoliberalization of higher education, academic entrepreneurialism has become a new paradigm of university development and has brought about profound changes in various types of university discourse. Against this backdrop, this study investigates the transformations in the visual depiction of academics in the annual reports of six major universities in Hong Kong during the past two decades. Drawing on critical visual analysis, the study shows that the communicative purposes of the images have shifted from reporting the research process to promoting research outcomes. The visual identities of academics have shown clear transformations of becoming increasingly individualized, entrepreneurial and self-promotional. With a higher degree of social interaction and closer social distance with viewers, they are playing an increasingly important role in building public relations. The study enriches the social analysis of neoliberalization as a process through the quantitative and diachronic lens. It demonstrates how a visual analytical method applied to the critical analysis of identity construction and university discourse can provide an explicit understanding of the visual manifestations of neoliberalism in higher education and its diachronic change.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:27:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102180
       
  • Book review: Empirical Multimodality Research: Methods, Evaluations,
           Implications

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alex Christiansen
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T06:26:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221099606
       
  • Book review: Beyond the Visual: An Introduction to Researching Multimodal
           Phenomena

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles Forceville
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T06:39:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221102531
       
  • Understanding emotional responses to visual aesthetic artefacts: the
           SECMEA mechanisms

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      Authors: Chris Van Der Lee, Renske Van Enschot
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      While many models attempt to explain the aesthetic experience, most limit themselves to art as their focal point and only a few look into why we arrive at a certain response to a visual aesthetic object. This article attempts to offer an extension to the current models by focusing on the mechanisms that induce emotions in relation to visual aesthetic objects. It takes Juslin’s (2013) BRECVEM mechanisms – developed for the domain of music – as its basis. In this article, Juslin’s mechanisms are adapted to the visual domain, resulting in six different emotion-evoking mechanisms: startle reflex, evaluative conditioning, emotional contagion, mental imagery, syntactic expectancy and external appraisal. The authors give an overview of frameworks and empirical studies, demonstrating each of these mechanisms in relation to visual aesthetic objects (visual art as well as advertising and product design). The article’s focus on emotion-inducing mechanisms and existing empirical research provides a basis for improving empirical testing of emotional responses to a broad range of visual aesthetic objects.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-10T05:43:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221090536
       
  • Book review: Seeing Justice: Witnessing, Crime, and Punishment in Visual
           Media

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Courtney D Tabor
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T09:37:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221099611
       
  • Book review: Smartphone Communication: Interactions in the App Ecosystem

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Charles Forceville
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T11:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221094041
       
  • Drone views: a multimodal ethnographic perspective

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      Authors: Elisa Serafinelli, Lauren Alex O’Hangan
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Drone visuals are rapidly becoming part of our sociocultural imaginaries, generating distinct images that differ from traditional visual conventions and producing unexpected perspectives of the world that reveal hidden aspects of our surroundings. Despite the growing use of camera-laden drones in a range of commercial and non-commercial activities, to date, little scholarly attention has been paid to the semiotics of drone visuals. This article is the first to draw specific attention to the compositional structure of drone visuals, combining social semiotic analysis with ethnographic insights to assess how they are changing the way we think about the world. Exploring drone hobbyists’ and developers’ perspectives on drone usage and the visuals they generate, the authors identify and examine three frequently occurring characteristics of drone visuals: top-down views, 360-degree panoramic views and ‘classic’ landscape perspectives. The critical analysis of these peculiarities leads them to argue for the potential of these innovative visions to reshape our visual culture. In their conclusion, the authors aim to open a conversation about the way technological advancements mark important sociocultural changes in sense-making processes, geographical imaginations and everyday life experiences.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T05:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211065093
       
  • Book review: Animating Truth: Documentary and Visual Culture in the 21st
           Century

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Georgia Aitaki
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-12T12:50:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221094042
       
  • The rhythms of cancer survivorship

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      Authors: Stefanie Plage
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This visual essay incorporates photographs from a research project on the changing landscapes of cancer survivorship in Australia. Study participants were asked to tell the story of what cancer looks and feels like and what it means to them. The photographs were captioned and discussed during a follow-up interview. Employing Henri Lefebvre’s rhythmanalysis, these photographs, captions and narrations show how the routines and expectations arising in cancer survivorship reorient life around movement in time and place. They provide insights into the unfolding of cancer survivorship in the ebb and flow of lived experience.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T07:14:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078040
       
  • The mediatic dimension of images: visual semiotics faced with Gerhard
           Richter’s artwork

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      Authors: Enzo D’armenio
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, the author endeavours to analyse Gerhard Richter’s photo-paintings for the way they build an intersemiotic dialogue between photography and painting. On the one hand, he tries to characterize the modalities of this dialogue and to provide an original interpretation of Richter’s work. On the other hand, he uses the special case of Richter’s work as a starting point for a conceptual renewal in the analysis of visual languages, notably with regard to semiotic approaches. In particular, the author aims to define the mediatic dimension of images, which is concerned with the substances, substrates and devices through which images are produced. He does this in order to integrate the achievements of visual semiotics in regard to the compositional dimension of colours, shapes and figures. He takes into account the way in which the material and the substances of expression of images impact the construction of meaning, in accordance with the hypothesis of a superposition of technical and semantic aspects. The confrontation with Richter’s production leads him to go beyond plastic and figurative readings as he proposes the concepts of technical formats and techno-perceptions of images. While the former concern the historical recognition of images on the basis of the devices having produced their substance – leading to identifications such as ‘early cinema images’, ‘smartphone images’, ‘surveillance camera images’, etc. – the latter concern the perceptive configurations resulting from the formative work of the technical devices.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T01:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221080529
       
  • Book review: Flags, Color and the Legal Narrative: Public Memory, Identity
           and Critique

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jody Watts
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T01:09:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221088918
       
  • Visual narratives of environmental change: collective memory and identity
           at New Zealand heritage sites

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      Authors: Olli Hellmann
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article interrogates historical photographs exhibited at public heritage sites in Aotearoa New Zealand. The analysis reveals that – by portraying 19th-century environmental change as a ‘heroic’ narrative of ‘progress’ – the photographs construct New Zealand national identity in opposition to nature, rather than promote a sense of connectedness with the natural environment. The article thus makes three important contributions to the literature on the visualization of environmental and climate change. First, the empirical case study demonstrates that visual narratives shape our social identities in relation to nature. Second, the article adds a rare socio-semiotic analysis to the environmental communication literature, highlighting that photographs have to be examined through multimodal methods and in relation to wider discursive processes of meaning making. Third, by borrowing ideas from the literature on collective memory, the article shows that, even though they depict scenes that are set in the distant past, historical photographs can still influence environmental attitudes and behaviours in the present.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T01:21:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078974
       
  • Rhythm in literary apps

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      Authors: Anette Hagen, Kathy A Mills
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses how rhythm may function in literary apps. The article has two aims: increasing the knowledge of how literary apps work as texts, by exploring their aspects of rhythm, and developing the understanding of the theoretical term of rhythm. The authors propose a rhythmanalysis in which two different types of rhythm – reading rhythm and narrative rhythm – are taken into account. The two types of rhythm may both occur at different structural levels in the text. This approach is applied to the analysis of rhythm in the popular literary app, Florence (Wong et al., 2018, Florence Tablet application software), drawing on concepts from multimodal social semiotics (Van Leeuwen, Introducing Social Semiotics, 2005), although leaning towards a more reception-oriented approach than the traditional text-oriented analysis in social semiotics. Literary apps are defined in this context as multimodal fictional narratives that can lead to an aesthetic experience for the reader (Iser, 1984, Der Akt des Lesens); however, non-narrative apps, such as poetry, may also be defined as literary apps. These apps may be read on a tablet or a smartphone. This article elucidates some of the many facets of rhythm related to the multimodal design of a literary app, which invites different forms of interactivity than the linear reading and page-turning of print-based picture books. The findings of the analysis show how rhythm not only contributes to the multimodal cohesional aspects of literary apps, but is fundamental to the meaning potential of the literary app.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-18T01:21:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221078038
       
  • Computing colorism: skin tone in online retail imagery

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      Authors: Chelsea Butkowski, Lee Humphreys, Utkarsh Mall
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      A long legacy of media imagery persistently distorts, stereotypes, and ignores marginalized racial and ethnic groups despite widespread calls to diversify media representations. In particular, fashion and beauty media continue to feature light-skinned models and celebrities over dark-skinned individuals, even lightening dark skin with photo editing to achieve ideals of whiteness and lightness. This practice aligns with colorism, or the privileging of light skin tones for access to economic and social capital. This study examines colorism in a particular genre of digital photography, online retail images, as a problem of visual representation. The novel method of visual computational analysis is used to quantitatively compare how mainstream clothing retail brands represent model skin tones across still and video media modes. The findings suggest that analyzed retailers tended to favor light-skinned models on their websites and that model skin tones in product videos were significantly darker than in product photos. These findings are considered through research on race and technology, photographic manipulation, and media misinformation. Ultimately, the study suggests that visual (in)consistencies can reveal the role of structural biases in shaping media representations. The article also provides a methodological tool for conducting this work.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-14T05:26:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221077444
       
  • Book review: Communicating Knowledge Visually: Will Burtin’s Scientific
           Approach to Information Design

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Steven Skaggs
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T06:00:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221077406
       
  • The Rijksmuseum’s Slavery exhibition, 5 June–29 August 2021

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      Authors: Pao-Yi Yang
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-09T05:59:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211063561
       
  • The politics of typographic placemaking: the cases of TilburgsAns and
           Dubai Font

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johan Järlehed, Maryam Fanni
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores typographic placemaking by comparing the design and public launch of two city fonts: TilburgsAns (2016) and Dubai Font (2017). Building on recent work on semiotic technology and graphic ideology, the authors examine how these fonts’ visual features and the promotional discourses surrounding their launch are utilized for placemaking, and how this is facilitated and constrained by technology and ideology. The results show that the two projects of typographic placemaking build on a similar repertoire of semiotic technology, but make different use of it. The authors sustain that this difference is explained by the political aims of the two projects, on the one hand, and their economic and organizational scale, on the other. A postcolonial perspective further underlines their geopolitically and historically different preconditions.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069612
       
  • Book review: Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design

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      Authors: Nataliia Laba
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-12T11:49:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069606
       
  • Tailings and tracings: using art and social science to explore the limits
           of visual methods at mining and industrial ruins

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      Authors: Kevin Walby, Ben Davis
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines a novel approach to visual methods that artist Ben Davis has developed based on sociologist Kevin Walby’s research into decommissioned industrial sites, which is referred to here as tracing. Disrupting the over-reliance on photographic representation in visual methods in the social sciences, the authors integrate audio recordings of interviews, as well as photos, maps, and building plans for pop-up mining communities into visual art works to provide a counter-visual analysis of the landscapes depicted in Kevin Walby’s photographs of Uranium City. After reviewing literature on environmental degradation and on visual methods, the article elaborates on Ben Davis’s practice of tracing as a technique representing the feeling of decomposition and decay generated by the harms of industrial resource extraction. The authors argue that the technique of tracing excavates layered histories of place, providing a way of creating new interpretations of social and environmental issues. They then discuss how this counter-visual analysis and approach to tracing enables a trans-disciplinary and dialogical space for engagement with academics, artists, and activists to explore issues centered on land, contamination, and justice.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-02-10T05:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211071117
       
  • Book review: Shifts Toward Image-Centricity in Contemporary Multimodal
           Practices

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      Authors: Tuomo Hiippala
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069624
       
  • Analyzing picturebooks: semiotic, literary, and artistic frameworks

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      Authors: Frank Serafini, Stephanie F Reid
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      The multimodal and visual nature of children’s picturebooks has been documented in research emanating from multiple fields of inquiry. In this article, the authors present three types of analytical frameworks that are useful for conducting research on contemporary picturebooks as multimodal entities. Each framework draws upon different aspects of visual images, design features, and written language, and uses different theoretical lenses to call forth particular aspects of contemporary picturebooks. The three analytical frameworks are: (1) social semiotic frameworks, (2) literary frameworks, and (3) artistic frameworks. This article suggests that only through an orchestration of a range of analytical frameworks can scholars and educators begin to understand the complexity of contemporary picturebooks and their role in educational settings.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:51:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069623
       
  • Opening up semiotic spaces for gender expression: a case study of the
           construction of gender in Australian award-winning early childhood picture
           books

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      Authors: Helen Caple, Ping Tian
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the visual and verbal expressions of gender in Australian award-winning early childhood picture books. It brings together social semiotic analysis and the narratological concepts of narration and focalization to examine the extent to which one community of practice (authors, illustrators, publishers and awards council) reproduces symbolic manifestations of gender, or offers readers space to engage with alternatives. The authors’ findings suggest that, while the literary works produced by this community of practice mostly serve to reinforce hegemonic cultural attitudes of what constitutes desirable femininity and masculinity in Australia, there is ample opportunity for change.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-27T09:48:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211069604
       
  • Design timescapes: futuring through visual thinking

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      Authors: Clare M Cooper
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      Encouraging designers to think about the precedents and consequences of their designs is integral to generating a design ethic that respects both our past and future generations (see Escobar, ‘Sustainability: Design for the pluriverse’, 2011, and Fry, Design Futuring, 2009). Situating designs as interventions in time also clearly acknowledges our growing responsibilities as designers in the age of the Anthropocene. The visualization of these relationships serves not only the designer engaged in the research, but those from other disciplines seeking to understand what historical or sociopolitical contexts may have informed a particular design innovation at a particular moment in time.In this reflective practitioner piece, the author presents design timescapes, a novel visual thinking tool that not only challenges designers to visualize the relationships between design and societal shifts but encourages the development of visual argumentation for design proposals. This approach is also useful in introducing the concept of design futuring to students/designers unfamiliar with this emergent field. To illustrate the various manifestations of this tool, she shares examples of where she has applied design timescapes as part of her futuring practice, and as a pedagogical tool. She concludes by offering suggestions for how this tool, in combination with emerging design futuring practice, contributes to the expansion of the resources of visual communication, design practice, research, and education.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-17T08:11:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211065116
       
  • Walking through the city soundscape: an audio-visual analysis of sensory
           experience for people with psychosis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sara Merlino, Lorenza Mondada, Ola Söderström
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.
      This article discusses how an aspect of urban environments – sound and noise – is experienced by people walking in the city; it particularly focuses on atypical populations such as people diagnosed with psychosis, who are reported to be particularly sensitive to noisy environments. Through an analysis of video-recordings of naturalistic activities in an urban context and of video-elicitations based on these recordings, the study details the way participants orient to sound and noise in naturalistic settings, and how sound and noise are reported and reexperienced during interviews. By bringing together urban context, psychosis and social interaction, this study shows that, thanks to video recordings and conversation analysis, it is possible to analyse in detail the multimodal organization of action (talk, gesture, gaze, walking bodies) and of the sensory experience(s) of aural factors, as well as the way this organization is affected by the ecology of the situation.
      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-01-06T11:31:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572211052638
       
  • Editorial: in memoriam Martin Thomas

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      First page: 371
      Abstract: Visual Communication, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Visual Communication
      PubDate: 2022-03-21T06:12:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/14703572221086504
       
 
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