Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 480 Journals sorted by number of followers
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 495)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 86)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
e-learning and education (eleed)     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Medical Internet Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Discourse, Context & Media     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Canadian Journal of Communication     Partially Free   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Advanced Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Information & Communications Technology Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Framework : The Journal of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Language and Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
ACM Transactions on Information Systems (TOIS)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Science Fiction Film and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Science Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Communication Booknotes Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for the History of Rhetoric     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Society, Culture & Language     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Writing in Creative Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Communications of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Computer Science and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communications in Mobile Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Design Ecologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Media Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Chinese Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
IEICE - Transactions on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
IET Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Technical Writing and Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMCCAP)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Business Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Electronics and Communications in Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Informal Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Communication & Language at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Interaction Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Language and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fibreculture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Islamic Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Electronics and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Design Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Black Camera     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intelligent Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Metaverse Creativity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
China Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Radio & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Radio Journal : International Studies in Broadcast & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Foundations and Trends® in Communications and Information Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professional Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Graph Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Explorations in Media Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Global Advances in Business Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Review in Electronics & Communication Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advertising Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cooperative Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Arts & Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Location Based Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Etudes de communication     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communicatio : South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Language, Interaction and Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Kaleidoscope : A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Community Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interactions : Studies in Communication & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Performing Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intelligence Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Interdisciplinary Telecommunications and Networking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Monitoring and Surveillance Technologies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nordicom Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Language Problems & Language Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Área Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y Medios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digithum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TELKOMNIKA (Telecommunication, Computing, Electronics and Control)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Poster     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latina de Comunicacion Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Trust Management in Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
La Trama de la Comunicación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Communication et organisation     Open Access  
Avatares de la Comunicación y la Cultura     Open Access  
La Mirada de Telemo     Open Access  
International Journal of Telework and Telecommuting Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Historia y Comunicación Social     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Comunicació. Revista de recerca i d'anàlisi     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Informacion     Open Access  
Ubiquity     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Tic & société     Open Access  

        1 2 3 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health Information Management Journal
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.268
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1833-3583 - ISSN (Online) 1833-3575
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Work-integrated learning for health information management students:
           Lessons learned from literature, and experiences of supervisors and
           students on virtual or remote placements

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natasha Prasad, Madeleine Maloof, Stephanie Gjorgioski, Merilyn Riley
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Traditionally, health placements have required practical in-person learning, including placements completed by health information management (HIM) students. COVID-19 made in-person healthcare placements largely unviable. Alternative virtual/remote placements were required.Aims:(1) Explore the experiences of virtual/remote placements for HIM students and their supervisors; (2) Compare these experiences to the literature on barriers and facilitators for virtual/remote placement and (3) Develop best practice guidelines for the delivery of virtual/remote placements for HIM students.Method:A cross-sectional survey asked final-year HIM placement students and their supervisors about their virtual/remote placement experiences in 2021. Survey findings were compared to 10 barriers and facilitators for remote/virtual placements identified in the literature.Results:Students were challenged by autonomous virtual/remote placements but enjoyed their flexibility. A work schedule provides placement structure to students. The use of technology was embraced although unfamiliarity with video-conferencing software prior to placement was an issue for some students. The most common method of student–supervisor communication was email. However, students missed casual corridor conversations. The importance of maintaining a community of practice was reported in the literature and confirmed by students. Most students preferred undertaking a virtual/remote placement rather than delaying graduation. The majority of supervisors reported complete satisfaction with the placement students’ performance.Conclusion:Virtual/remote placements were a viable option for HIM students when in-person placements were impossible. Students required a work-based schedule, appropriate information technology, a dedicated workspace, familiarity with communication technologies, good communication channels with their supervisors and a supportive ‘community of practice’. HIM supervisors were satisfied with virtual/remote methods of placement delivery.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2024-01-27T06:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583241227002
       
  • Clinical documentation integrity: Its role in health data integrity,
           patient safety and quality outcomes and its impact on clinical coding and
           health information management

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jenny Davis, Jennie Shepheard
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-12-11T08:57:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231218029
       
  • Special Issue of the Health Information Management Journal IFHIMA 20th
           International Congress and HIMAA 40th National Congress: Advancing global
           health in pursuit of high-quality digital information

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Catherine Garvey, Vicki Bennett, Joan Henderson
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-11-02T05:17:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231205468
       
  • Telepsychiatry readiness assessment at the Department of Psychiatry, Dr.
           Soeharto Heerdjan Hospital, Indonesia

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      Authors: Ifah Muzdalifah, Hosizah Markam
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: The Dr. Soeharto Heerdjan Hospital, Jakarta, Indonesia, has deployed telepsychiatry since May 2022 to ensure continuity of care for its psychiatric patients. This model of service has not functioned optimally, owing to obstacles, including the absence of a registration officer, no designated consultation room, scheduling issues and challenges for patients or their representatives in using the telepsychiatry application. Objective: This study aimed to assess telepsychiatry readiness at Dr. Soeharto Heerdjan Hospital. Method: An observational survey was conducted in April–May 2022, with a sample of 40 members of the telepsychiatry workforce, using the Telehealth Readiness Assessment (TRA) tool. Five key domains of the TRA tool are associated with the successful implementation of telehealth, including core readiness, financial considerations, operations, staff engagement and patient readiness. This tool includes a questionnaire, scoring sheet, supporting guidance and additional resources. The overall readiness score is a weighted average of the concept scores included within each of the five domains. Results: Of 40 respondents, 72.5% were females and 42.5% were between 31 and 40 years. From the total of five domains of telepsychiatry readiness, the level of telepsychiatry readiness at Dr. Soeharto Heerdjan Hospital was 70.05% or a moderate level. Conclusion: Aspects of readiness that need to be improved include providing a workforce for telepsychiatry patient registration; drug delivery; scheduling; designated consultation rooms; user-friendly telepsychiatry applications and electronic media for information on telepsychiatry services.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T12:38:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231205975
       
  • Challenges and successes in implementing an integrated electronic patient
           record (HIVE) at the Manchester University National Health Service
           Foundation Trust, England: 1000+ legacy systems, 10 hospitals, one
           electronic patient record

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mandy Burns
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Manchester University National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust (MFT) is one of the largest NHS Trusts in England. Historically, the Trust has had very mixed clinical record keeping, including over 1000 individual information systems. None of these health information technology systems had the full functionality of an integrated electronic patient record (EPR). MFT evolved to its current size and complexity with a vision to improve patient care in Greater Manchester by adopting a Trust-wide EPR. The EPR “Go Live” occurred in September 2022.Aim:To describe the process of EPR integration as it reflected and impacted upon MFT’s health information management (HIM) teams.Method:MFT worked through a 2-year readiness program of work. This included technical readiness, software development and migration planning. Migration of data from the approximately 1000 systems was a major undertaking, during which access to the clinical history and ongoing operational reporting needed to be maintained. Pre-implementation requirements were outlined, a change management program was implemented, and the overall implementation was managed to tight timelines.Discussion:“Go Live” was achieved for the EPIC EPR product (HIVE) within MFT. Legacy systems are still in the process of being decommissioned and staff are transacting within HIVE. Significant changes in processes and reporting continue to be made, despite some challenges.Conclusion:The Trust delivered the single largest EPIC European “Go live.” Lessons learnt continue to be identified. The impact of what the EPR means for the HIM function is described.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T10:58:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231200417
       
  • Designing a comprehensive minimum dataset for patients with COVID-19 in
           Iranian hospital information systems

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      Authors: Hosna Salmani, Sadegh Sharafi, Ahlam Almanie, Fatemeh Niknam, Zeynab Naseri, Sara Mobarak, Saeed Jelvay
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The Minimum Data Set (MDS) plays a vital role in data exchange, collection and quality improvement. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a need for a tailored MDS that aligns with the specific information needs of the Iranian community and integrates seamlessly into the country’s Hospital Information Systems (HIS).Objective:The study aimed to develop a comprehensive MDS for COVID-19 patients in Iran, with objectives to identify essential data elements and integrate the MDS into HIS, enhancing data exchange and supporting decision-making.Method:This study employed a comparative-descriptive approach to design COVID-19 patient data elements based on World Health Organisation and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. The Delphi technique involved 35 experts in two rounds for checklist refinement. The finalised MDS consisted of 9 main terms and 80 sub-terms, analysed using descriptive statistics and IBM SPSS software.Results:Of 35 experts involved with the study, 69% were male and 31% female, and Health Information Management experts were the majority (34%). The refined MDS for COVID-19 in Iran comprises 50 data elements, while 30 elements were excluded. The MDS includes 8 main terms and 80 sub-terms, with unanimous approval for identity, underlying disease, and treatment sections.Conclusion:The customised MDS for COVID-19 patients in Iran addresses data collection challenges and supports effective disease prevention and management. By providing comprehensive and reliable information, the MDS enhances healthcare quality, facilitates timely access to medical records, and fosters integrated health services.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T10:55:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231199879
       
  • Erratum to “A documentary analysis of Victorian Government health
           information assets’ websites to identify availability of documentation
           for data sharing and reuse in Australia”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T10:31:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231208191
       
  • Workforce survey of Australian health information management graduates,
           2017–2021: A 5-year follow-on study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephanie Gjorgioski, Merilyn Riley, Jenn Lee, Natasha Prasad, Melanie Tassos, Abbey Nexhip, Sally Richardson, Kerin Robinson
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Employment outcomes of La Trobe University’s 2012–2016 health information manager (HIM) graduate cohort were reported previously. Objectives: To identify the 2017–2021 Australia-based, graduate HIMs’ early career employment experiences; identify employment roles and destinations; investigate knowledge and skill sets utilised in professional performance; and compare outcomes with the previous study. Method: A cross-sectional design was utilised. An online survey elicited: demographic data, position-related details and knowledge–skills applied in the workplace. Inter- and intra-cohort comparisons were calculated. Results: Of contactable graduates, 75% (n = 150) completed the survey; 90% (n = 132) had held at least one profession-related position postgraduation; 51% gained employment before final examinations and 92% within 6 months. In their first role, 87% joined the public healthcare sector, 47% had worked in two or more positions and 12.3% in three or more positions. Categorisation of position titles showed that 40% had undertaken “health information management” roles, 14.9% “health classification,” 16.6% “data management and analytics,” 17.4% “health ICT” and 11.1% “other,” roles. Almost two-thirds (64.1%) had utilised three or four of the four professional knowledge–skill domains. There was an increase, from the 2012 to 2016 cohort, in those undertaking “data management and analytics” and “health ICT” roles, and a decrease in “health classification” role uptake. Conclusion: Early-career HIMs have very high employability. They engage throughout health care, predominately in the public health sector. Their mobility reflects national workforce trends. The majority utilise all or most of the professional knowledge–skill domains studied at university.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-27T10:14:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231197936
       
  • The applications of Australian-coded ICD-10 and ICD-10-AM data in
           research: A scoping review of the literature

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      Authors: Merilyn Riley, Jenn Lee, Sally Richardson, Stephanie Gjorgioski, Kerin Robinson
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Australia uses the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) for mortality coding and its Australian Modification, ICD-10-AM, for morbidity coding. The ICD underpins surveillance (population health, mortality), health planning and research (clinical, epidemiological and others). ICD-10-AM also supports activity-based funding, thereby propelling realignment of the foci of clinical coding and, potentially, coded data’s research utility. Objective: To conduct a scoping review of the literature exploring the use of ICD-10 and ICD-10-AM Australian-coded data in research. Research questions addressed herein: (1) What were the applications of ICD-10(-AM) Australian-coded data in published peer-reviewed research, 2012–2022' (2) What were the purposes of ICD-10(-AM) coded data within this context, as classified per a taxonomy of data use framework' Method: Following systematic Medline, Scopus and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature database searches, a scoping literature review was conducted using PRISMA Extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines. References of a random 5% sample of within-scope articles were searched manually. Results were summarised using descriptive analyses. Results: Multi-stage screening of 2103 imported articles produced 636, including 25 from the references, for extraction and analysis; 54% were published 2019–2022; 50% within the largest five categories were published post-2019; 22% fell within the “Mental health and behavioural” category; 60.3% relied upon an ICD-10 modification. Articles were grouped by: research foci; relevant ICD chapter; themes per the taxonomy; purposes of the coded data. Observational study designs predominated: descriptive (50.6%) and cohort (34.6%). Conclusion: Researchers’ use of coded data is extensive, robust and growing. Increasing demand is foreshadowed for ICD-10(-AM) coded data, and HIM-Coders’ and Clinical Coders’ expert advice to medical researchers.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T04:40:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231198592
       
  • Exploring maturity of electronic medical record use among allied health
           professionals

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      Authors: Maria Schwarz, Elizabeth C Ward, Anne Coccetti, Joshua Simmons, Sara Burrett, Philip Juffs, Kristy Perkins
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Electronic medical records (EMRs) have the potential to improve and streamline the quality and safety of patient care. Harnessing the full benefits of EMR implementation depends on the utilisation of advanced features, defined as “mature usage.” At present, little is known about the maturity of EMR usage by allied health professionals (AHPs).Objective:To examine current maturity of EMR use by AHPs and explore perceived barriers to mature EMR utilisation and optimisation.Method:AHPs were recruited from three health services. Participants completed a 27-question electronic questionnaire based on the EMR Adoption Framework, which measures clinician EMR utilisation (0 = paper chart, 5 = theoretical maximum) across 10 EMR feature categories. Interviews were conducted with both clinicians and managers to explore the nature of current EMR utilisation and perceived facilitators and barriers to mature usage.Results:Questionnaire responses were obtained from 192 AHPs. The majority of questions (74%) showed a mean score of
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T10:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231198100
       
  • A documentary analysis of Victorian Government health information
           assets’ websites to identify availability of documentation for data
           sharing and reuse in Australia

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Merilyn F. Riley, Kerin Robinson, Monique F Kilkenny, Sandy G. Leggat
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      This content has been temporarily removed for correction
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T10:45:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231197756
       
  • Health information management and physiotherapy faculty collaboration to
           discover the use of health informatics hiding in plain sight in an
           entry-level DPT program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Gibbs, Karen Gibbs, Barbara Hewitt
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Many educational disciplines, especially in health professions, are required by accrediting bodies to introduce or include health informatics (HI); however, faculty (academics) teaching this content may not be well prepared. Objective: The aim of this project was to explore how a doctoral physical therapy (DPT) program could more accurately represent compliance with HI accreditation requirements by identifying hidden instances of relevant content within the curriculum. Method: This exploratory, mixed methods, action research study utilised document review, questionnaires and interviews in the collection of quantitative and qualitative data to enable assessment of knowledge about HI, to determine if HI content was already incorporated in current courses, and, whether the content was accurately reflected in course student learning objectives (SLOs). Change in faculty understanding of HI as a result of this study was also assessed. Results: Of 16 DPT faculty, 13 participated in the pre-interview questionnaire; 8 (50%) representing 22/39 courses participated in the full study. Most were unfamiliar with HI and had unrecognised HI already incorporated in their courses leading to several SLO revisions and additions. Interview and post-interview questionnaire results documented significant increases in HI understanding among faculty. Conclusion: Physical therapy and HIM collaboration was successful in identifying HI content hiding in plain sight. Results revealed multiple instances of unrecognised HI content across the DPT curriculum. Revised and newly added SLOs, with others likely to follow due to this study, will assist faculty with future reaccreditation and in preparing graduates to more fully utilise HI in today’s digital healthcare environments.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-06T09:39:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231194750
       
  • Attaining consensus on a core dataset for upper limb lymphoedema using the
           Delphi method: A foundational step in creating a clinical support system

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      Authors: Robyn Sierla, Elizabeth Dylke, Simon Poon, Tim Shaw, Sharon Kilbreath
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Lymphoedema is a condition of localised swelling caused by a compromised lymphatic system. The protein-rich fluid accumulating in the interstitial tissue can create inflammation and irreversible changes to the skin and underlying tissue. An array of methods has been used to assess and report these changes. Heterogeneity is evident in the clinic and in the literature for the domains assessed, outcomes and outcome measures selected, measurement protocols followed, methods of analysis, and descriptors used to report change. Objective: This study seeks consensus on the required items for inclusion in a core data set for upper limb lymphoedema to digitise the monitoring and reporting of upper limb lymphoedema. Methods: The breadth of outcomes and descriptors in common use were captured in prior studies by this research group. This list was refined by frequency and proposed to experts in the field (n = 70) through a two-round online modified Delphi study. These participants rated the importance of each item for inclusion in the dataset and identified outcomes or descriptors they felt were missing in Round 1. In Round 2, participants rated any new outcomes or descriptors proposed and preference for how numeric data is displayed. Results: The core dataset was confirmed on completion of Round 2. Interlimb difference as a percentage, and limb volume were preferred for graphed display over time; and descriptors for observed and palpated change narrowed from 42 to 20. Conclusion: This dataset provides the foundation to create a clinical support system for upper limb lymphoedema.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-09-01T03:58:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231188396
       
  • Adoption of electronic patient medication records in community pharmacies
           in the United Arab Emirates: A cross-sectional survey

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      Authors: Ahmad Z Al Meslamani, Anan S. Jarab, Derar H Abdel-Qader, Osama Mohamed Ibrahim, Nadia Al Mazrouei
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Access to accurate and relevant patient health information is crucial for community pharmacists to deliver high-quality care. The use of electronic patient medication records (e-PMR) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) is currently limited to hospital settings, and community pharmacists do not have access to patient records.Objective:To evaluate the perceptions of community pharmacists regarding the potential benefits, barriers, and concerns associated with the implementation of the e-PMR system in community pharmacies in the UAE.Method:A validated questionnaire was administered to a sample of licensed community pharmacists using proportionate random sampling. The survey was structured and consisted of 40 questions in four sections: characteristics of community pharmacists and pharmacies; perceived usefulness of e-PMR; perceived barriers; and concerns about the use of e-PMR.Results:In total, 552 pharmacists filled out the questionnaire (82.1% response rate). The majority of participants somewhat or strongly agreed that e-PMR would reduce drug abuse (71.6%), dispensing errors (64.4%) and prescribing errors (69.0%), and believed that e-PMR would enhance pharmacists’ ability to perform medication reviews (76.0%). Pharmacists in charge (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.5; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6–3.6), facing difficulty tracking the medical history of patients (AOR = 3.2; 95% CI: 2.8–3.9) and working in pharmacies providing telepharmacy services (AOR = 3.4; 95% CI: 2.7–3.8) were more likely to consider e-PMR useful.Implications:The implementation of the e-PMR system in community pharmacies has potential benefits for patient safety and medication therapy management in the UAE.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T12:05:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231190744
       
  • Comparison of the accuracy of inpatient morbidity coding with ICD-11 and
           ICD-10

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      Authors: Javad Zarei, Reza Golpira, Nasim Hashemi, Zahra Azadmanjir, Zahra Meidani, Akram Vahedi, Hooman Bakhshandeh, Esmaeil Fakharian, Abbas Sheikhtaheri
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:One of the challenges when transitioning from International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th Revision (ICD-10) to International Classification of Diseases, 11th Revision (ICD-11) is to ensure clinical coding accuracy.Objective:To determine the accuracy of clinical coding with ICD-11 in comparison with ICD-10 and identify causes of coding errors in real clinical coding environments.Method:The study was conducted prospectively in two general hospitals. Medical records of discharged inpatients were coded by hospital clinical coders with both ICD-11 and ICD-10 on different days. These medical records were recoded by five mentors. Codes assigned by mentors were used as the gold standard for the evaluation of accuracy.Results:The accuracy of ICD-10 and ICD-11 coding for 1578 and 2168 codes was evaluated. Coding accuracy was 89.1% and 74.2% for ICD-10 and ICD-11. In ICD-11, the lowest accuracy was observed in chapters 22 (injuries), 10 (ear) and 11 (circulatory) (51.1%, 53.8% and 62.7%, respectively). In both ICD-10 and ICD-11, the most important cause of the coding errors was clinical coders’ mistakes (79.5% and 81.8% for ICD-10 and ICD-11, respectively).Conclusion:Accuracy of clinical coding with ICD-11 was lower relative to ICD-10. Hence, it is essential to carry out initial preparations, particularly the training of clinical coders based on their needs, as well as the necessary interventions to enhance the documentation of medical records according to ICD-11 before or simultaneous with the country-wide implementation.Implications:Clinical coders need complete training, especially in using extension codes and post-coordination coding. Local ICD-11 guidelines based on the needs of local users and reporting policies should be developed. Furthermore, documentation guidelines based on ICD-11 requirements should be developed.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T05:34:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231185355
       
  • Defining career success: A cross-sectional analysis of health information
           managers’ perceptions

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      Authors: Abbey Nexhip, Merilyn Riley, Kerin Robinson
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Career success can be defined as the accomplishment of desirable outcomes in an individual’s work experiences. It can be divided into objective and subjective career success. Objective success refers to tangible and measurable outcomes such as promotions and position titles. Subjective career success relates to an individual’s interpretations of their success or accomplishments. The career success of health information management professionals has not been explored in the literature.Aim:To determine the indicators of career success as reported by health information managers (HIMs) and identify whether there are any differences based on length of time in the profession.Methods:Using a cross-sectional study design, an online survey was administered to a sample of La Trobe University and Lincoln Institute of Health Sciences Medical Record Administration and Health Information Management graduates from 1985, 1995, 2005 and 2015, which included the following question: “How would you define success in your career'”Results:Almost 88% (n = 63) of overall participants in the study responded to this item. Subjective factors (n = 77) of career success, compared to objective factors (n = 22), were more common. The categories of recognition (feeling valued/appreciated), job satisfaction and feelings of accomplishment/sense of achievement were commonly reported.Discussion:Subjective factors of an individual’s career success were deemed to be more significant than objective factors among HIMs.Conclusion:Factors such as recognition and appreciation at work, job satisfaction, fostering high-quality work outputs and creating a sense of achievement should be the major foci for managers, organisations and individuals.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T05:30:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231184903
       
  • Digital health care and data work: Who are the data professionals'

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      Authors: Claus Bossen, Pernille Scholdan Bertelsen
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This article reports on a study that investigated data professionals in health care. The topic is interesting and relevant because of the ongoing trend towards digitisation of the healthcare domain and efforts for it to become data driven, which entail a wide variety of work with data.Objective:Despite an interest in data science and more broadly in data work, we know surprisingly little about the people who work with data in healthcare. Therefore, we investigated data work at a large national healthcare data organisation in Denmark.Method:An explorative mixed method approach combining a non-probability technique for design of an open survey with a target population of 300+ and 11 semi-structured interviews, was applied.Results:We report findings relevant to educational background, work identity, work tasks, and how staff acquired competences and knowledge, as well as what these attributes comprised. We found recurring themes of healthcare knowledge, data analytical skills, and information technology, reflected in education, competences and knowledge. However, there was considerable variation within and beyond those themes, and indeed most competences were learned “on the job” rather than as part of formal education.Conclusion:Becoming a professional working with data in health care can be the result of different career paths. The most recurring work identity was that of “data analyst”; however, a wide variety of responses indicated that a stable data worker identity has not yet developed.Implications:The findings present implications for educational policy makers and healthcare managers.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T05:27:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231183083
       
  • Are clinical registries an effective tool for hospital health services to
           address unwarranted clinical variation'

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      Authors: Taryn Bessen, Gerry O’Callaghan
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Objective:To map clinical registries within the Central Adelaide Local Health Network (CALHN); and to identify how these registries were currently used for addressing unwarranted clinical variation in care.Method:An online survey was sent to all Heads of Units (HoUs) within CALHN. The survey addressed participation, type of data, reporting processes and use of the clinical registries for research, quality assurance (QA), quality improvement (QI) and clinical variation in health care.Results:Twenty-six HoUs responded (26%); 25 contributed to a clinical registry (96%); all provided data to more than one registry, but only 34.6% had an existing financial and governance arrangement with the network. Health outcomes were the most common datapoints; 77% of all data were collected manually; and 38.5% of data analysis was risk adjusted. Access to aggregated data varied across the registries; and 65.4% of reports included benchmarks and outliers. Clinical registries were used for research in 65.4%, and QA and QI in 73.1 and 69.2%, respectively. Most used external comparators and measured clinical variation, but there was marked inconsistency in the exploring clinical variation, improving care and reporting activities.Conclusion:Based on this sample, clinical registries within CALHN did not currently appear to be a reliable resource to consistently address unwarranted clinical variation but were shown to be valuable resources for research and quality initiatives at a high level. Further research is required to facilitate effective integration of clinical registries with administrative and quality systems.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T11:56:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231175767
       
  • Perceptions of Portuguese medical coders on the transition to
           ICD-10-CM/PCS: A national survey

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      Authors: Filipa Santos Martins, Fernando Lopes, Júlio Souza, Alberto Freitas, João Vasco Santos
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:In Portugal, trained physicians undertake the clinical coding process, which serves as the basis for hospital reimbursement systems. In 2017, the classification version used for coding of diagnoses and procedures for hospital morbidity changed from the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) to the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification/Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-CM/PCS).Objective:To assess the perceptions of medical coders on the transition of the clinical coding process from ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM/PCS in terms of its impact on data quality, as well as the major differences, advantages, and problems they faced.Method:We conducted an observational study using a web-based survey submitted to medical coders in Portugal. Survey questions were based on a literature review and from previous focus group studies.Results:A total of 103 responses were obtained from medical coders with experience in the two versions of the classification system (i.e. ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM/PCS). Of these, 82 (79.6%) medical coders preferred the latest version and 76 (73.8%) considered that ICD-10-CM/PCS guaranteed higher quality of the coded data. However, more than half of the respondents (N = 61; 59.2%) believed that more time for the coding process for each episode was needed.Conclusion:Quality of clinical coded data is one of the major priorities that must be ensured. According to the medical coders, the use of ICD-10-CM/PCS appeared to achieve higher quality coded data, but also increased the effort.Implications:According to medical coders, the change off classification systems should improve the quality of coded data. Nevertheless, the extra time invested in this process might also pose a problem in the future.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-18T12:06:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231180294
       
  • The need for health information management professionals in Malawi health
           facilities

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      Authors: Teddie Chima, Esmie Mkwinda, Stephen Kumwenda
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Health information management (HIM) is at the core of health organisations, providing essential information. In Malawi, there is a substantial deficit of qualified personnel, specifically health information managers, who can properly manage health information in electronic and paper-based formats. The nation has no higher education institution offering an academic programme in HIM.Objective:To investigate the need for HIM professionals in Malawi government health facilities, to determine the kinds of data managed by data users; competencies of HIM workers and challenges associated with the current HIM system.Method:A cross-sectional research design was adopted, with a qualitative approach to gather data from data users and key informants, using two focused interview guides. Data were collected from 13 participants from 6 government health facilities representing the primary, secondary and tertiary healthcare delivery levels. Data were analysed thematically.Results:Data users handled a diverse range of data, the majority having moderate skills in HIM. Both data users and key informants reported experiencing challenges in dealing with the existing HIM system. Findings also revealed key challenges associated with the absence, or inadequacy, of a well-trained HIM professional workforce in Malawi health facilities.Conclusion:Introducing a training programme in HIM would improve data management in health facilities in Malawi. Well-managed data would improve the delivery of health care services.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-11T06:55:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231180772
       
  • Alpha NSW: What would it take to create a state-wide paediatric
           population-level learning health system'

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      Authors: Michael Hodgins, Nora Samir, Susan Woolfenden, Nan Hu, Francisco Schneuer, Natasha Nassar, Raghu Lingam
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:The health and well-being of children in the first 2000 days has a lasting effect on educational achievement and long-term chronic disease in later life. However, the lack of integration between high-quality data, analytic capacity and timely health improvement initiatives means practitioners, service leaders and policymakers cannot use data effectively to plan and evaluate early intervention services and monitor high-level health outcomes.Objective:Our exploratory study aimed to develop an in-depth understanding of the system and clinical requirements of a state-wide paediatric learning health system (LHS) that uses routinely collected data to not only identify where the inequities and variation in care are, but also to also inform service development and delivery where it is needed most.Method:Our approach included reviewing exemplars of how administrative data are used in Australia; consulting with clinical, policy and data stakeholders to determine their needs for a child health LHS; mapping the existing data points collected across the first 2000 days of a child’s life and geospatially locating patterns of key indicators for child health needs.Results:Our study identified the indicators that are available and accessible to inform service delivery and demonstrated the potential of using routinely collected administrative data to identify the gap between health needs and service availability.Conclusion:We recommend improving data collection, accessibility and integration to establish a state-wide LHS, whereby there is a streamlined process for data cleaning, analysis and visualisation to help identify populations in need in a timely manner.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T12:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231176597
       
  • Stroke clinical coding education program in Australia and New Zealand

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      Authors: Monique F Kilkenny, Ailie Sanders, Catherine Burns, Lauren M Sanders, Olivia Ryan, Carla Read, Miriam Lum On, Anna Ranta, Tara Purvis, Carys Inman, Dominique A Cadilhac, Helen Carter, Stella Rowlands, Lee Nedkoff, Muideen T Olaiya
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Accurate coded diagnostic data are important for epidemiological research of stroke.Objective:To develop, implement and evaluate an online education program for improving clinical coding of stroke.Method:The Australia and New Zealand Stroke Coding Working Group co-developed an education program comprising eight modules: rationale for coding of stroke; understanding stroke; management of stroke; national coding standards; coding trees; good clinical documentation; coding practices; and scenarios. Clinical coders and health information managers participated in the 90-minute education program. Pre- and post-education surveys were administered to assess knowledge of stroke and coding, and to obtain feedback. Descriptive analyses were used for quantitative data, inductive thematic analysis for open-text responses, with all results triangulated.Results:Of 615 participants, 404 (66%) completed both pre- and post-education assessments. Respondents had improved knowledge for 9/12 questions (p 
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T11:18:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231184004
       
  • A holistic view of facilitators and barriers of electronic health records
           usage from different perspectives: A qualitative content analysis approach
           

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      Authors: Anna Griesser, Sonja Bidmon
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Electronic health records (EHR) are seen as a promising endeavour, in spite of policies, designs, user rights and types of health data varying across countries. In many European countries, including Austria, EHR usage has fallen short when compared to the deployment plans.Objective:By adopting a qualitative approach, this research aimed to explore facilitators and barriers experienced by patients and physicians across the entire EHR usage process in Austria.Method:Two studies were conducted: In Study 1, discussions were held with four homogeneously composed groups of patients (N = 30). In Study 2, eight expert semi-structured interviews were conducted with physicians to gain insights into potential facilitators and barriers Austrian physicians face when utilising personal EHR.Results:A wide range of barriers and facilitators were identified along the entire EHR usage spectrum, emerging on three different levels: the micro-level (individual level), the meso-level (level of the EHR system) and the macro-level (level of the health system). EHR literacy was identified as a booster to support EHR adherence. Health providers were identified as crucial gatekeepers with regard to EHR usage.Conclusion:The implications for mutual benefits arising out of EHR usage among the triad of health policymakers, providers and patients for both theory and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T10:21:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231178611
       
  • Analysis of data items and gaps in Australia’s national mental health
           services activity and capacity data collections for integrated regional
           service planning

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      Authors: Claudia Pagliaro, Arabella Mundie, Harvey Whiteford, Sandra Diminic
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Services data are an important source of information for policymakers and planners. In Australia, significant work has been undertaken to develop and implement collections of mental health services data. Given this level of investment, it is important that collected data are fit for purpose. Objective: This study aimed to: (1) identify existing national mandated and best endeavours collections of mental health services activity (e.g. occasions of service) and capacity (e.g. full-time equivalent staff) data in Australia; and (2) review the content of identified data collections to determine opportunities for data development. Method: A grey literature search was conducted to identify data collections. Where available, metadata and/or data were analysed. Results: Twenty data collections were identified. For services that received funding via multiple funding streams, data were often captured across several collections corresponding with each funder. There was significant variability in the content and format of collections. Unlike other service sectors, there is no national, mandated collection for psychosocial support services. Some collections have limited utility as they do not include key activity data; others do not include descriptive variables like service type. Workforce data are often not collected, and where data are collected, they are often not comprehensive. Conclusion: Findings are an important source of information for policymakers and planners who use services data to inform priorities. Implications: This study provides recommendations for data development, including mandating standardised reporting for psychosocial supports, filling workforce data gaps, streamlining data collections and including key missing data items in some collections.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T05:07:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231175770
       
  • Impact of clinical note format on diagnostic accuracy and efficiency

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      Authors: Evita M Payton, Mark L Graber, Vasil Bachiashvili, Tapan Mehta, P Irushi Dissanayake, Eta S Berner
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundClinician notes are structured in a variety of ways. This research pilot tested an innovative study design and explored the impact of note formats on diagnostic accuracy and documentation review time.ObjectiveTo compare two formats for clinical documentation (narrative format vs. list of findings) on clinician diagnostic accuracy and documentation review time.MethodParticipants diagnosed written clinical cases, half in narrative format, and half in list format. Diagnostic accuracy (defined as including correct case diagnosis among top three diagnoses) and time spent processing the case scenario were measured for each format. Generalised linear mixed regression models and bias-corrected bootstrap percentile confidence intervals for mean paired differences were used to analyse the primary research questions.ResultsOdds of correctly diagnosing list format notes were 26% greater than with narrative notes. However, there is insufficient evidence that this difference is significant (75% CI 0.8–1.99). On average the list format notes required 85.6 more seconds to process and arrive at a diagnosis compared to narrative notes (95% CI -162.3, −2.77). Of cases where participants included the correct diagnosis, on average the list format notes required 94.17 more seconds compared to narrative notes (75% CI -195.9, −8.83).ConclusionThis study offers note format considerations for those interested in improving clinical documentation and suggests directions for future research. Balancing the priority of clinician preference with value of structured data may be necessary.ImplicationsThis study provides a method and suggestive results for further investigation in usability of electronic documentation formats.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-04-27T10:05:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231151979
       
  • Medical and nursing clinician perspectives on the usability of the
           hospital electronic medical record: A qualitative analysis

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      Authors: Sheree Lloyd, Karrie Long, Yasmine Probst, Josie Di Donato, Abraham Oshni Alvandi, Jeremy Roach, Christopher Bain
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundElectronic medical records (EMRs) have been widely implemented in Australian hospitals. Their usability and design to support clinicians to effectively deliver and document care is essential, as is their impact on clinical workflow, safety and quality, communication, and collaboration across health systems. Perceptions of, and data about, usability of EMRs implemented in Australian hospitals are key to successful adoption.ObjectiveTo explore perspectives of medical and nursing clinicians on EMR usability utilising free-text data collected in a survey.MethodQualitative analysis of one free-text optional question included in a web-based survey. Respondents included medical and nursing/midwifery professionals in Australian hospitals (85 doctors and 27 nurses), who commented on the usability of the main EMR used.ResultsThemes identified related to the status of EMR implementation, system design, human factors, safety and risk, system response time, and stability, alerts, and supporting the collaboration between healthcare sectors. Positive factors included ability to view information from any location; ease of medication documentation; and capacity to access diagnostic test results. Usability concerns included lack of intuitiveness; complexity; difficulties communicating with primary and other care sectors; and time taken to perform clinical tasks.ConclusionIf the benefits of EMRs are to be realised, there are good reasons to address the usability challenges identified by clinicians. Easy solutions that could improve the usability experience of hospital-based clinicians include resolving sign-on issues, use of templates, and more intelligent alerts and warnings to avoid errors.ImplicationsThese essential improvements to the usability of the EMR, which are the foundation of the digital health system, will enable hospital clinicians to deliver safer and more effective health care.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-03-03T11:10:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231154624
       
  • For-profit versus non-profit cybersecurity posture: breach types and
           locations in healthcare organisations

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      Authors: Martin Ignatovski
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe implementation of emerging technologies has resulted in an increase of data breaches in healthcare organisations, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health information and cybersecurity managers need to understand if, and to what extent, breach types and locations are associated with their organisation’s business type.ObjectiveTo investigate if breach type and breach location are associated with business type, and if so, investigate how these factors affect information systems and protected health information in for-profit versus non-profit organisations.MethodThe quantitative study was performed using chi-square tests for association and post-hoc comparison of column proportions analysis on an archival data set of reported healthcare data breaches from 2020 to 2022. Data from the Department of Health and Human Services website was retrieved and each organisation classified as for-profit or non-profit.ResultsFor-profit organisations experienced a significantly higher number of breaches due to theft, and non-profit organisations experienced a significantly higher number of breaches due to unauthorised access. Furthermore, the number of breaches that occurred on laptops and paper/films was significantly higher in for-profit organisations.ConclusionWhile the threat level of hacking techniques is the same in for-profit and non-profit organisations, certain breach types are more likely to occur within specific breach locations based on the organisation’s business type. To protect the privacy and security of medical information, health information and cybersecurity managers need to align with industry-leading frameworks and controls to prevent specific breach types that occur in specific locations within their environments.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-02-25T07:50:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583231158886
       
  • Unsupervised algorithms to identify potential under-coding of secondary
           diagnoses in hospitalisations databases in Portugal

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      Authors: Diana Portela, Rita Amaral, Pedro P Rodrigues, Alberto Freitas, Elísio Costa, João A Fonseca, Bernardo Sousa-Pinto
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundQuantifying and dealing with lack of consistency in administrative databases (namely, under-coding) requires tracking patients longitudinally without compromising anonymity, which is often a challenging task.ObjectiveThis study aimed to (i) assess and compare different hierarchical clustering methods on the identification of individual patients in an administrative database that does not easily allow tracking of episodes from the same patient; (ii) quantify the frequency of potential under-coding; and (iii) identify factors associated with such phenomena.MethodWe analysed the Portuguese National Hospital Morbidity Dataset, an administrative database registering all hospitalisations occurring in Mainland Portugal between 2011–2015. We applied different approaches of hierarchical clustering methods (either isolated or combined with partitional clustering methods), to identify potential individual patients based on demographic variables and comorbidities. Diagnoses codes were grouped into the Charlson an Elixhauser comorbidity defined groups. The algorithm displaying the best performance was used to quantify potential under-coding. A generalised mixed model (GML) of binomial regression was applied to assess factors associated with such potential under-coding.ResultsWe observed that the hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) + k-means clustering method with comorbidities grouped according to the Charlson defined groups was the algorithm displaying the best performance (with a Rand Index of 0.99997). We identified potential under-coding in all Charlson comorbidity groups, ranging from 3.5% (overall diabetes) to 27.7% (asthma). Overall, being male, having medical admission, dying during hospitalisation or being admitted at more specific and complex hospitals were associated with increased odds of potential under-coding.DiscussionWe assessed several approaches to identify individual patients in an administrative database and, subsequently, by applying HCA + k-means algorithm, we tracked coding inconsistency and potentially improved data quality. We reported consistent potential under-coding in all defined groups of comorbidities and potential factors associated with such lack of completeness.ConclusionOur proposed methodological framework could both enhance data quality and act as a reference for other studies relying on databases with similar problems.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-02-18T06:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583221144663
       
  • IPPASOS: The first digital forensic information system in Greece

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      Authors: Michael Kalochristianakis, Andreas Kontogiannis, Despoina E Flouri, Despoina Nathena, Katerina Kanaki, Elena F Kranioti
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThis article describes the first digital clinical information system tailored to support the operational needs of a forensic unit in Greece and to maintain its archives.MethodThe development of our system was initiated towards the end of 2018, as a close collaboration between the Medical School of the University of Crete and the Forensic Medicine Unit of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, where forensic pathologists assumed active roles during the specification and testing of the system.ResultsThe final prototype of the system was able to manage the life cycle of any forensic case by allowing users to create new records, assign them to forensic pathologists, upload reports, multimedia and any required files; mark the end of processing, issue certificates or appropriate legal documents, produce reports and generate statistics. For the first 4 years of digitised data (2017–2021), the system recorded 2936 forensic examinations categorised as 106 crime scene investigations, 259 external examinations, 912 autopsies, 102 post-mortem CT examinations, 804 histological examinations, 116 clinical examinations, 12 anthropological examinations and 625 embalmings.ConclusionThis research represents the first systematic effort to record forensic cases through a digital clinical information system in Greece, and to demonstrate its effectiveness, daily usability and vast potential for data extraction and for future research.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-02-18T05:35:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583221144664
       
  • Evaluation of Medical Certification of Cause of Death in Tertiary Cancer
           Hospitals in Northern India

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      Authors: Akash Anand, Divya Khanna, Payal Singh, Anuj Singh, Abhishek Pandey, Atul Budukh, Satyajit Pradhan
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundMedical certification of cause of death (MCCD) provides valuable data regarding disease burden in a community and for formulating health policy. Inaccurate MCCDs can significantly impair the precision of national health information.ObjectiveTo evaluate the accuracy of cause of death certificates prepared at two tertiary cancer care hospitals in Northern India during the study period (May 2018 to December 2020).MethodA retrospective observational study at two tertiary cancer care hospitals in Varanasi, India, over a period of two and a half years. Medical records and cause of death certificates of all decedents were examined. Demographic characteristics, administrative details and cause of death data were collected using the WHO recommended death certificates. Accuracy of death certification was validated by electronic medical records and errors were graded.ResultsA total of 778 deaths occurred in the two centres during the study period. Of these, only 30 (3.9%) certificates were error-free; 591 (75.9%) certificates had an inappropriate immediate cause of death; 231 (29.7%) certificates had incorrectly labelled modes of death as the immediate cause of death; and 585 (75.2%) certificates had an incorrect underlying cause of death. The majority of certificates were prepared by junior doctors and were significantly associated with higher certification errors.ConclusionA high rate of errors was identified in death certification at the cancer care hospitals during the study period. Inaccurate MCCDs related to cancers can potentially influence cancer statistics and thereby affect policy making for cancer control.ImplicationsThis study has identified the pressing need for appropriate interventions to improve quality of certification through training of doctors.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-01-21T12:09:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583221144665
       
  • The importance of SNOMED CT concept specificity in healthcare analytics

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      Authors: Luke Roberts, Sadie Lanes, Oliver Peatman, Phil Assheton
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundHealthcare data frequently lack the specificity level needed to achieve clinical and operational objectives such as optimising bed management. Pneumonia is a disease of importance as it accounts for more bed days than any other lung disease and has a varied aetiology. The condition has a range of SNOMED CT concepts with different levels of specificity.ObjectiveThis study aimed to quantify the importance of the specificity of an SNOMED CT concept, against well-established predictors, for forecasting length of stay for pneumonia patients.MethodA retrospective data analysis was conducted of pneumonia admissions to a tertiary hospital between 2011 and 2021. For inclusion, the primary diagnosis was a subtype of bacterial or viral pneumonia, as identified by SNOMED CT concepts. Three linear mixed models were constructed. Model One included known predictors of length of stay. Model Two included the predictors in Model One and SNOMED CT concepts of lower specificity. Model Three included the Model Two predictors and the concepts with higher specificity. Model performances were compared.ResultsSex, ethnicity, deprivation rank and Charlson Comorbidity Index scores (age-adjusted) were meaningful predictors of length of stay in all models. Inclusion of lower specificity SNOMED CT concepts did not significantly improve performance (ΔR2 = 0.41%, p = .058). SNOMED CT concepts with higher specificity explained more variance than each of the individual predictors (ΔR2 = 4.31%, p < .001).ConclusionSNOMED CT concepts with higher specificity explained more variance in length of stay than a range of well-studied predictors.ImplicationsAccurate and specific clinical documentation using SNOMED CT can improve predictive modelling and the generation of actionable insights. Resources should be dedicated to optimising and assuring clinical documentation quality at the point of recording.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-01-21T02:16:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583221144662
       
  • Patient online access to general practice medical records: A qualitative
           study on patients’ needs and expectations

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      Authors: Rosa RLC Thielmann, Ciska Hoving, Esther Schutgens-Kok, Jochen WL Cals, Rik Crutzen
      Abstract: Health Information Management Journal, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundPatient online access to medical records is assumed to foster patient empowerment and advance patient-centred healthcare. Since July 2020, patients in the Netherlands have been legally entitled to electronically access their medical record in general practice. Experience from pioneering countries has shown that despite high patient interest, user rates often remain low. How to best support implementation depends on individual needs and expectations of patient populations, which are as yet unknown in the Dutch context.ObjectiveTo understand Dutch patients’ needs and expectations with regard to online access to their medical record in general practice.MethodTwenty participants completed semi-structured individual interviews via video or telephone call. Transcripts of interviews underwent template analysis combining deductive and inductive coding using Atlas.ti software.ResultsPatients’ needs and expectations ranged across three overlapping areas: (i) prerequisites for getting online access; (ii) using online access; and (iii) the impact on interaction with healthcare providers. Patients expected benefits from online access such as better overview, empowerment and improved communication with their general practitioner but identified needs regarding technological difficulties, data privacy and complex medical language in their record.ConclusionThe concerns and obstacles participants identified point towards the need for organisational changes in general practice, for example, adjusted documentation practices, and the key role of the general practitioner and staff in promoting and facilitating online access.ImplicationsImplementation strategies addressing needs identified in this study may help to unlock the full potential of online access to achieve desired outcomes of patient involvement and satisfaction.
      Citation: Health Information Management Journal
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T11:24:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/18333583221144666
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 480 Journals sorted by number of followers
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 495)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 86)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
e-learning and education (eleed)     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Medical Internet Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Discourse, Context & Media     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Canadian Journal of Communication     Partially Free   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Advanced Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Information & Communications Technology Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Framework : The Journal of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Language and Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
ACM Transactions on Information Systems (TOIS)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Science Fiction Film and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Science Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Communication Booknotes Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for the History of Rhetoric     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Society, Culture & Language     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Writing in Creative Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Communications of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Computer Science and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communications in Mobile Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Design Ecologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Media Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Chinese Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
IEICE - Transactions on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
IET Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Technical Writing and Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMCCAP)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Business Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Electronics and Communications in Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Informal Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Communication & Language at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Interaction Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Language and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fibreculture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Islamic Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Electronics and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Design Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Black Camera     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intelligent Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Metaverse Creativity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
China Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Radio & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Radio Journal : International Studies in Broadcast & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Foundations and Trends® in Communications and Information Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professional Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Graph Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Explorations in Media Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Global Advances in Business Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Review in Electronics & Communication Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advertising Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cooperative Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Arts & Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Location Based Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Etudes de communication     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communicatio : South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Language, Interaction and Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Kaleidoscope : A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Community Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interactions : Studies in Communication & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Performing Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intelligence Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Interdisciplinary Telecommunications and Networking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Monitoring and Surveillance Technologies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nordicom Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Language Problems & Language Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Área Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y Medios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digithum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TELKOMNIKA (Telecommunication, Computing, Electronics and Control)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Poster     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latina de Comunicacion Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Trust Management in Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
La Trama de la Comunicación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Communication et organisation     Open Access  
Avatares de la Comunicación y la Cultura     Open Access  
La Mirada de Telemo     Open Access  
International Journal of Telework and Telecommuting Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Historia y Comunicación Social     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Comunicació. Revista de recerca i d'anàlisi     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Informacion     Open Access  
Ubiquity     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Tic & société     Open Access  

        1 2 3 | Last

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School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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