Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)            First | 1 2 3 | Last

Showing 201 - 400 of 480 Journals sorted alphabetically
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media & Jornalismo     Open Access  
Media & Viestintä     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mediaciones     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Metaphor and the Social World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Narrative Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
NAUS : Revista Lusófona de Estudos Culturais e Comunicacionais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Netcom     Open Access  
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Journal of Media Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Journal of Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Norsk medietidsskrift     Open Access  
Nueva Revista del Pacífico     Open Access  
Observatorio (OBS*)     Open Access  
Oficios Terrestres     Open Access  
Open Medical Informatics Journal     Open Access  
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
post(s)     Open Access  
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
PragMATIZES : Latin American Journal of Cultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PRISMA.COM     Open Access  
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Public Journal of Semiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Punto Cero     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Question     Open Access  
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
REDD : Revista de estudios del discurso digital     Open Access  
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Revista ECO-Pós     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica de Comunicação, Informação & Inovação em Saúde     Open Access  
Revista Mediação     Open Access  
Revue de recherches en littératie médiatique multimodale     Open Access  
Revue française des sciences de l’information et de la communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RIHC : Revista Internacional de Historia de la Comunicación     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal  
Schermi. Storie e culture del cinema e dei media in Italia     Open Access  
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Scientific Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Semiotika     Open Access  
Sensorium Journal     Open Access  
Seton Hall Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIGDOC Communication Design Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Interaction : Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sound Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Speech, Language and Hearing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Post     Open Access  
Tic & société     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Medier, Erkendelse og Formidling     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Trípodos     Open Access  
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
University of Sindh Journal of Information and Communication Technology     Open Access  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Vivat Academia     Open Access  
Wacana : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ZER : Revista de Estudios de Comunicación = Komunikazio Ikasketen Aldizkaria     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 | Last

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Media International Australia
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.29
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1329-878X - ISSN (Online) 2200-467X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Mermaids and bin chickens: Australian teenagers’ engagement with screen
           stories in the on-demand age

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      Authors: Anna Potter, Clare Archer-Lean, Phoebe Macrossan, Harriot Beazley
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Australian teenagers have grown up with abundant choices in digital screen entertainment including social media, gaming, and global streaming video services such as Netflix. This participatory audience study investigates how, why and to what extent Australian teenagers engage with drama and movies in their daily lives, including Australian stories. The research findings show that Australian teens enjoy watching long-form screen stories on their favourite streaming services and that on-demand delivery is critical to their viewing preferences. Although many remember with affection the Australian drama they watched as children, teens now place a low priority on a screen story being Australian. A sophisticated audience that particularly values diverse and inclusive representation, teens’ deprioritising of Australian content – and linear television – has profound implications for policy, for Australian screen production and for public service broadcasters the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and the Special Broadcasting Service.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-05-28T07:28:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241254234
       
  • Playful rehearsals of animal subjugation: The naturalization of animal
           labour in videogames

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      Authors: Sebastian Morrison
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      In videogames, players commonly encounter virtual animals who perform labour for human benefit. Animal labour is not only physical, but increasingly involves labours of bonding and love which invest the player in the animal's liveliness alongside their utility. This article analyses Stardew Valley, interrogating the ways in which the player encounters and builds relationships with labouring virtual animals. It argues that, through these player-animal relationships, the player rehearses orientations towards animal life which take for granted their subjugation. In Stardew Valley, animals express love in ways which not only obscure their subjugated position, relative to humans, in relationships of domination, but also encourage the player to reproduce those relationships on an expanding scale. This is a naturalization of animal subjugation which, in part, justifies real practices of industrial animal agriculture which lead not only to constant cycles of mass animal death, but also contribute to climate disaster.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-05-22T12:55:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241254577
       
  • Learning the art of Scholarly Peer-Review: Insights from the Communication
           Discipline

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      Authors: TJ Thomson, Lesley Irvine, Glen Thomas
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Many scholars find the peer-review process to be a puzzling, non-transparent, and subjective exercise. Many emerging scholars also learn about the peer-review and publishing process through painful and time-consuming trial and error while still students or as early-career researchers rather than through formal training or guided supervision. Yet many pitfalls exist in this process for new and veteran scholars alike. With this study, grounded in the communication field, we aim to pull back the curtain on this opaque process and assist scholars in their publishing ambitions while also providing suggestions, primarily for journal editors and those who train future reviewers, about how the peer-review process can be improved for collective benefit. To do so, this grounded theory study reviews a year's worth of reviews from a communication journal to explore which issues reviewers identify within the submitted research, to explore how the reviewer feedback reveals their implicit understanding of their role in the peer-review process, and to identify how clear reviewers and editors are regarding which feedback is most important. Taken together, this allows for an understanding of how reviewers and editors engage in the social construction of research. The results inform the training of communication scholars, reviewers, and editors.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-05-16T07:26:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241254568
       
  • A Sociotechnical Approach to Smartphone Research: Outline for a Holistic,
           Qualitative Mobile Method

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      Authors: Stephanie Ketterer Hobbis, Geoffrey Hobbis
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Smartphones have become crucial for understanding how digital technologies are adopted and adapted into people's lives, while also emerging as tools for studying social phenomena more broadly. Drawing on insights from our own longitudinal work in Solomon Islands, this article details a sociotechnical approach to smartphone research that combines both potentialities. It distinguishes itself from other smartphone-based methods by connecting media-centric perspectives with non-media-centric approaches through an additional focus on body techniques. The approach is centered on object-centric, semi-structured interviews embedded in longitudinal participant observation and theoretically informed by anthropologies of technologies. Emphasizing a holistic perspective and the diversity of human experiences, this approach allows for generating material evidence of contextually-embedded mediations of social relationships through the hardware and software of the phones themselves.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-05-16T05:11:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241253011
       
  • Amplifying victim–survivor voices: media power, collective action, and
           ultra-Orthodox Jewish identity in the Leifer case

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      Authors: Mona Chatskin
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article underscores the transformative impact of victim–survivor voices in reshaping public discourse on child sexual abuse (CSA). The research project took as the backbone for analysis the Malka Leifer case that spanned 15 years and is linked to the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse's report of Case Study 22, which examined responses in ultra-Orthodox Jewish schools to child sexual abuse. Adopting a mixed methods research approach, this study combines qualitative media analysis of 102 news articles and 8 in-depth focus groups to investigate the impact of media outlets in amplifying victim voice and influencing public discourse, and how this impacts the subjects of mediatised public crises. Drawing on the theorising of Couldry and Cottle, the article considers the capacity and limitations of survivor-advocates to leverage media power in the contemporary media system. By exploring the ‘Privileging Victim Voice’ frame, this paper sheds light on how victim–survivor advocates utilised mainstream, local religious, and social media to solidify their central place in the narrative and its reportage. The media analysis served as the foundation for a ‘peer conversation’ style of focus groups with Jewish community members to investigate local impacts of the case's media reportage. The focus group methodology sought to represent this diverse community as wholly as possible. Findings reveal the significant power of journalists’ framing and sourcing practices, and how Jewish institutional child sexual abuse is framed by media outlets within the Australian media landscape. Further, it showcases the broader implications of public inquiries, such as Australia's Royal Commission, in empowering victim–survivors and centreing their narratives in media reportage.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-05-07T05:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241251497
       
  • ‘We’re in this together’ – COVID-19 statements by Boris Johnson: A
           discourse analysis

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      Authors: Muhammad Asim Imran, Zehra Ahmed
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents a discursive analysis of crisis communication strategies employed by British Prime Minister Boris Johnson during the first 2 years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Utilising critical discourse analysis, the study examined official communications from March 2020 to January 2022. While Johnson's communication style encompassed empathy, assertiveness, and a focus on vaccination efforts, enhancing specificity, transparency, addressing potential inequalities, as well as prioritising community building, could have heightened the impact of his messages during the COVID-19 pandemic. By examining Boris Johnson's speeches as a case study, the research adds depth to the discourse on effective communication strategies employed by world leaders. The findings underscore the significance of clarity, adaptability, empathy, and reliance on scientific evidence in navigating the complexities of crisis communication.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-04-23T08:31:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241248264
       
  • ERRATUM to “Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and nonbinary
           representation on Australian scripted television in the 2000s and 2010s”
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-04-22T08:07:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241249812
       
  • ‘Oh my god this is happening’: how Our Flag Means Death staged an
           empathic mutiny against the labour of queer reading practices

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      Authors: Briony Luttrell, Hannah Joyce Banks
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Our Flag Means Death (OFMD) premiered to critical acclaim and unprecedented audience engagement. It can be argued that it is a romantic queer reading of historical facts. In this article, we reflect on the social function of storytelling and audience labour within the context of queer screen representations. We theorise queer reading as a practice of learning to recognise, identify and create patterns of semiotic resources. This practice is a reaction to a history of being erased or relegated to subtext. We argue queer reading is a particular form of audience labour, in that readers are asked to do extra work. This is especially important in cases where identities and communities are regularly symbolically annihilated. Season One of OFMD is a unique case study where we explore how the show achieves a low/easy labour environment for a vulnerable viewer and how this is an act of care and empathy.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-04-11T09:34:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241245785
       
  • Exploring the role of political elites in post-truth communication on
           social media

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      Authors: Timothy Graham, Katherine M. FitzGerald
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates post-truth messaging and participatory disinformation on Twitter, focusing on the activities of Craig Kelly, a former Australian member of parliament and a key figure previously accused of spreading health misinformation in Australia during the COVID-19 pandemic. We draw on Harsin's conceptualisation of post truth communication to analyse 4317 tweets and 5.2 million interactions with Kelly's account and his network of followers over a six-month period. Our novel empirical approach, combining coordination network analysis with a forensic qualitative approach, explores the participatory nature of online interaction, where fringe actors mobilise around Kelly's tweets. The findings demonstrate how political figures have a privileged and outsized role in public discourse, undermining scientific institutions and promoting anti-deliberative politics. This research underscores the role of participatory disinformation in the post-truth era and suggests that regulators, governments, and social media platforms work collaboratively to develop a whole-of-society framework to tackle misinformation.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-04-04T07:13:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241244919
       
  • The long now and liminality: Will we create communitas' A macro-social
           perspective of COVID-19

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      Authors: Jim Macnamara
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      The ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has changed society are the source of widespread discussion. But references to a ‘new normal’ are mostly confined to hybrid working and a possible four-day working week. Should future-scoping remain so narrow, a major opportunity for fundamental rethinking will be lost. This commentary seeks to take up and expand the argument of a 2021 article on the effects of COVID-19 by exploring the wider social implications and the opportunity presented by this existential crisis. Specifically, this critical analysis explores whether COVID-19 and its impacts have created a moment of liminality – a time of “transition during which the normal limits to thought are relaxed, opening the way to novelty and imagination, construction, and destruction” potentially leading to what Victor Turner refers to as communitas in which we can rethink the issues of our time and in which new social structures and understandings can form.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-04-02T06:58:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241243093
       
  • Spiritual opium and the spiritual opium war: a cultural history of arcade
           games and console games in 1990s China

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      Authors: Nansong Zhou
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      In the 1990s, in China, arcade and console games were called “spiritual opium.” Why were video games labeled spiritual drugs, specifically opium, as opposed to other types of drugs' How did the mainstream media gradually depict video games as spiritual opium' The term “spiritual opium” carries profound historical and political connotations and is skillfully employed by media entities to disparage video games, fostering adverse perceptions among the populace. This scholarly inquiry delves into the cultural history of arcade and console games during this era. Historical and cultural methods were used to meticulously trace the genesis and evolution of the “spiritual opium” metaphor in the 1990s, scrutinizing the process through which video games were ensnared by this pejorative label. In addition, the paper also elucidates the “spiritual opium war,” a series of government-led campaigns against arcade and console games, including investigations, crackdowns on arcades, and reminiscent of Mao-era mobilizations. By doing so, this research fills a critical gap in the historiography of Chinese gaming, thereby enriching studies of the regional game industry and contributing to a broader understanding of the global gaming landscape. This article also shows how postsocialist states such as China navigate the challenges posed by the influx of video games and their perceived political threats and provides a nuanced understanding of state–media dynamics and cultural policy in postsocialist contexts.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-03-15T10:15:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241239454
       
  • Labelling, shadow bans and community resistance: did meta's strategy to
           suppress rather than remove COVID misinformation and conspiracy theory on
           Facebook slow the spread'

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      Authors: Amelia Johns, Francesco Bailo, Emily Booth, Marian-Andrei Rizoiu
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we ask how effective Meta's content moderation strategy was on its flagship platform, Facebook, during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyse the performance of 18 Australian right-wing/anti-vaccination pages, posts and commenting sections collected between January 2019 and July 2021, and use engagement metrics and time series analysis to analyse the data, mapping key policy announcements against page performance. We combine this with content analysis of comments parsed from two public pages that overperformed in the time period. The results show that Meta's content moderation systems were partially effective, with previously high-performing pages showing steady decline. Nonetheless, some pages not only slipped through the net but overperformed, proving this strategy to be piecemeal and inconsistent. The analysis identifies trends that content labelling and ‘shadow banning’ accounts was resisted by these communities, who employed tactics to stay engaged on Facebook, while migrating some conversations to less moderated platforms.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T12:38:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241236984
       
  • Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and nonbinary representation on
           Australian scripted television in the 2000s and 2010s

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      Authors: Damien John O’Meara, Whitney Monaghan
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Over the past few decades, there has been significant industry and scholarly interest in diversity, equity, and inclusion in television. Alongside this, attention has been paid to the politics of queer representation in screen and media contexts. Providing much-needed data on these issues, this article catalogues the representation of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and nonbinary characters in Australian scripted television since 2000. We highlight the inclusion of more queer characters onscreen and situate this in the context of two significant decades of change in the Australian television industry and the broader socio-political context. In teasing out recent trends around gender and sexually diverse representation, we identify shifts toward representing more complex and inclusive queer story worlds on Australian television. We also note significant tensions in these representations, highlighting how Australian television remains quite conservative in depicting queer sex, intersections between sexualities and gender identities, and bisexual identities.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-03-06T07:22:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241236990
       
  • Popular Environmental Media in Australia: Reflections on Audience
           Engagement and Impact

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      Authors: Aneta Podkalicka, Danie Nilsson, Simon Troon
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Proliferating media content is key to public understanding and discussions about the environment and climate change. While scholarly interest in mediated environmental communication has been ample and multi-directional, the questions around media's impacts remain pressing and largely under-theorised. This paper uses an example of popular environmental media in Australia – i.e. media aimed at attracting wide audiences – to discuss how impact is perceived and pursued in the distinctive Australian context, and what can be inferred from this study about environmental media and its impact more generally. Drawing on 28 interviews with media-makers and practitioners, conducted between 2022 and 2023, we catalogue common creative/narratives strategies used to engage audiences, noting a diversity of views and approaches for creating and measuring impact. The paper contributes to theoretical debates on media impact and encourages active academic research-media industry collaborations as part of initiatives aimed at meeting the challenges of climate change.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-02-29T07:53:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241232167
       
  • Book Review: Journalism, Technology and Cultural Practice: A History by
           Martin Conboy

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      Authors: Jane B Singer
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-02-27T07:24:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241234983
       
  • ‘Everyone keeps telling us it's going to die’: A close examination of
           ‘myths’ clouding local newspaper futures in Australia

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      Authors: Kristy Hess, Alison McAdam
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Digital adaptation is often considered the panacea to the local journalism crisis in Australia. As a result, this digital first agenda has perpetuated ‘death and doom’ narratives about some traditional strategies and practices, especially in regards to the future of printed local newspapers. This paper draws on interviews and focus groups with local news owners, journalists, editors, advertising staff and managers who work for small independently owned titles in rural and regional Australia to suggest there are three key myths which are deeply interwoven and impact perceptions of local news media realities: that print is dead, the traditional advertising model has collapsed and there are no jobs in journalism. We suggest these myths can cloud discussions around the targeted and systemic solutions needed to secure local news futures.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-02-13T06:44:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241230380
       
  • Book Review: Public Relations and Neoliberalism: The Language Practices of
           Knowledge Formation by Kristin Demetrious

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      Authors: Deborah Wise
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:05:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231221301
       
  • Book Review: The Near-Death of the Author: Creativity in the Internet Age
           by John Potts

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      Authors: Sebastian F. K. Svegaard
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:04:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X241229264
       
  • Thinking about the ‘silent readers’: a regional digital ethnographic
           case study exploring motivations and barriers to participation in public
           debate on Facebook

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      Authors: Angela Ross
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      There is increasing evidence fewer people are willing to discuss and debate issues of common concern on social media with their feeds becoming more conflict-laden and toxic. A more nuanced understanding is needed of the motivations and deterrents for individual participation, in different contexts. This article provides a unique perspective from regional Australia by considering the conditions under which a group of social media users in Launceston, Tasmania were more likely to participate in discussion on Facebook and the factors that encouraged participants to present a constructed version of themselves. In doing so, this digital ethnographic case study contributes to evidence about the limitations of Facebook as a place for democratic public debate and may have practical application by helping identify spaces on social media that are more likely to prompt open and honest discussion.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T05:43:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231226355
       
  • Infrastructural insecurity: Geopolitics in the standardization of
           telecommunications networks

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      Authors: Niels ten Oever, Christoph Becker
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article argues that the production and maintenance of “infrastructural insecurity” is an inherent part of the process of the standardization of telecommunication networks. Infrastructural insecurity is the outcome of intentional practices during the production, standardization, and maintenance of communication infrastructures that leave end-users vulnerable to attacks that benefit particular actors. We ground this analysis in the qualitative and quantitative exploration of the responses to the disclosure of three fundamental security vulnerabilities in telecommunications networks. To research the shaping of communication and infrastructure architectures in the face of insecurities, we develop a novel approach to the study of Internet governance and standard-setting processes that leverages web scraping and computer-assisted document set discovery software tools combined with document analysis. This is an important contribution because it problematizes the process of standardization and asks fundamental questions about the adequacy and legitimacy of the process and procedures of standardization, its participants, and its institutions.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T03:52:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231225748
       
  • Protecting Public Figures Online: How Do Platforms and Regulators Define
           Public Figures'

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      Authors: Rob Cover, Nicola Henry, Joscelyn Gleave, Sharon Greenfield, Viktor Grechyn, Thuc Bao Huynh
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Public figures are subject to higher rates of online abuse than other users in part because many digital platforms have significantly higher thresholds for intervening in cases of public figure abuse. Internationally, this higher rate of abuse has led to substantial impacts on public figures’ wellbeing and withdrawal from public life. This article presents findings from a study of platform policies to understand how platforms and policy stakeholders define public figures. Key findings included (a) public figures are ill-defined in platform policies, (b) policies often collapse distinctions between traditional public figures such as politicians and entertainers, emerging public figures such as influencers, and involuntary public figures such as a celebrity's family members; and (c) policies fail to acknowledge the diverse resources and institutional support enjoyed by different types of public figure. The article draws on applied cultural theory to unpack the challenges and consequences of inadequately defining public figures.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T07:46:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231225745
       
  • Jelena Dokic's suicide-related social media post and the worldwide media's
           portrayal of a story of survival: a natural experiment

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      Authors: Daniella Ekstein, Amy Posel, Sarina Rain, Angela Nicholas, Jane Pirkis, Thomas Niederkrotenthaler, Ayal Schaffer, Mark Sinyor
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Coverage and public communication about suicide represent a major public health concern given the potential for identification and imitation. Yet when celebrities survive a suicidal crisis, it presents an opportunity to model adaptive coping. Tennis star Jelena Dokic's June 2022 Instagram post recounting her experience overcoming suicidal thoughts represents a unique natural experiment to characterize media coverage of a celebrity survival event. Methods: We searched Google News and the entire University of Toronto library catalogue for articles about Dokic's post. We divided articles according to world region of publication: (a) Australia & New Zealand, (b) United States & Canada, and (c) United Kingdom & Ireland. We coded articles for content and used Chi-squared analyses to identify differences including adherence to responsible media reporting guidelines. Results: We identified 73 articles of which 71 were available for coding. Almost all articles positioned Dokic's story as one of survival and conveyed alternatives to suicide (94%). However, 56 (79%) highlighted a suicide method that Dokic mentioned in her post and 18 (25%) inaccurately described Dokic as disclosing that she had attempted suicide when her post only conveyed suicidal thoughts. In general, adherence to responsible reporting guidelines appeared stronger in articles published in Australia & New Zealand. Conclusions: We found that the international media extensively covered Dokic's story of survival including substantial helpful information but also some misinformation and content that violates responsible reporting guidelines. Greater adherence by media in Australia & New Zealand may be due to more robust implementation of responsible media guidelines in the region.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-12-22T02:59:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231221347
       
  • Sino-futurism and alternative imaginaries of Digital China

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      Authors: Xinyang Zhao, Michael Keane
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates the role of digital technologies in transforming China's self-image. It focuses on the use of extended reality (XR) in ceremonial events and art exhibitions. The paper offers two case studies. The first study, Beijing 8-Minute Show (2018), a multimedia performance at the closing ceremony of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games, set the scene for what was called the Science and Technology Winter Olympics in 2022. The second study, Blueprints (2020), was a multimedia exhibition in the UK by the artist Cao Fei, which drew attention to a future of increased alienation, loss of privacy and digital surveillance. In the paper, the framework of a ‘techno-cultural imaginary’ shows how China's self-image is increasingly tied to modernisation. The paper demonstrates how the ‘two cultures’, science and the arts, have converged in policy thinking. In this reset, China's so-called cultural confidence is re-energised by digital platforms, echoing the description of Digital China. Sino-futurism, originally used in relation to Chinese sci-fi literature, provides a stepping-off point to imagine the future, which is alternatively characterised as techno-utopian (within China) and dystopian (in the West). Drawing on the qualitative analysis of publicly available interviews, media reports, online comments and close reading of the art content, the paper argues that XR allows the government to present Digital China as a positive blueprint for human progress. Meanwhile, XR is capable of generating critical stories about China, which contradict the message the government seeks to cultivate with its public diplomacy and propaganda campaigns.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T05:59:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231215108
       
  • Book Review: Middle Eastern Diasporas and Political Communication: New
           Approaches by Ehab Galal, Mostafa Shehata and Claus Valling Pedersen

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      Authors: Ayesha Jehangir
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T05:59:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231214352
       
  • The effect of trust in media and information sources on coronavirus
           disease 2019 prevention behaviors in Lebanon

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      Authors: Jad Melki
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      The study examines the effect of trust in media and information sources about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on adopting prevention measures, and whether fear and perceived knowledge mediate this relationship. It focuses on Lebanon during a period of political and economic crises and prevalent public distrust in government and the media. Through a cross-sectional survey and a nationally representative probability sample, data collection from 1536 participants took place between March 27 and April 23, 2020. The findings establish a direct relationship between trust and adopting prevention measures, but only partial mediation of fear and perceived knowledge. This suggests that media trust has a strong independent effect on prevention measures and is only partially mediated by fear and to a lesser extent by perceived knowledge. These findings highlight the importance of trust in media, government, and public health information sources, even during chaotic economic and political circumstances common in the Global South.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-13T11:10:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231214351
       
  • Agile producers and consumer-saviours: Discourses of resilience and
           responsibility in Australian media coverage of artisanal food and craft

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      Authors: Michelle Phillipov, Susan Luckman, Jessica Loyer
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19's supply chain disruptions saw small-scale, artisanal food and craft producers experience surges in demand from consumers seeking locally made goods. This article analyses Australian news coverage promoting this ‘turn to the local’, with a focus on mainstream news outlets from March 2020 to February 2023. We identify two dominant narratives: the ‘producer pivot’ and the ‘consumer-saviour’. Using Rosalind Gill and Shani Orgad’s (2018) work on resilience as a regulatory ideal of neoliberalism, we argue that both narratives focus on individual responsibility in ways that make invisible structural and economic impediments to change. The consistent ways in which buying and producing local small-scale goods were presented and understood in the news coverage – across different products, places and stages of the pandemic – highlights the persistent ways in which neoliberal values perform particular kinds of work for capitalism by asserting the necessity of local ‘resilience’ and ‘positivity’ in times of crisis.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T06:57:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231213448
       
  • ‘Downright dangerous’: Citizen reactions to media diversity
           issues in public submissions

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      Authors: Timothy Koskie
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Despite its prominence in societal and scholarly discourse, a consistent definition and scope for media diversity remains elusive. This leaves ambiguous its characteristics, concerns, and impacts and complicates efforts to achieve its benefits. This study sought a new approach to identifying its role that leverages lived experiences of the public interacting with their media ecosystem. Public submissions to the Media diversity in Australia inquiry presented a unique opportunity to pursue this goal. The 5068 texts were dominated by citizens perspectives that went beyond reframing and redefining media diversity to explain how they saw it affecting their daily lives, families, and communities. Using multi-stage thematic analysis, this study worked to consolidate these diverse and grounded views into the shared themes that confronted citizens, finding concerns about the diminishing reliability of media functions, with losses in media diversity leading to unsatisfactory media performance, media avoidance, and harms for communities and individuals.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:50:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231212945
       
  • Book Review: The Cambridge History of the Australian Novel by David Carter

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      Authors: Mark Piccini
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231212944
       
  • Redefining older Australians: moving beyond stereotypes and consumer
           narratives in print media representations

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      Authors: Muhammad Asim Imran
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This paper investigates how Australian print media shape the identities of older individuals through their use of language and reporting techniques. By examining newspaper articles published between 2011 and 2021 through the lens of critical discourse analysis, the study highlights the societal, economic, and journalistic factors that influence the media's portrayal of older persons. The findings reveal that economic discourses dominate the construction of identities, with the financial reliance of older individuals on the government being a significant factor in their representation. The study demonstrates how newspapers create and disseminate narratives that appear to exonerate the government of accountability for providing aged care. Through the application of Fairclough's three-dimensional approach, this study shows how media constructs older individuals as either consumers or a burden in Australia. This study emphasises the need for print media to reflect critically on their representations of older people, avoiding harmful stereotypes and promoting positive and diverse images of ageing.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-11-01T07:53:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231208788
       
  • Deplatforming sex education on Meta: sex, power, and content moderation

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      Authors: Joanna Williams
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Public health research has heralded social media as a space where sex education can be delivered to young people. However, sexual health organisations are increasingly concerned that restrictive content moderation practices impede their ability to distribute sex education content on social media platforms. To better understand these experiences, this article uses an autoethnographic case study of my experience navigating Meta's content moderation policies and practices when I promoted the Bits and Bods sex education web series. Using conjunctural analysis, I contextualise Bits and Bods's two experiences of content moderation (when our account was deleted from Instagram and advertising was rejected by Facebook) through policy analysis of Meta's content moderation policies. I then conclude by questioning whether public health practitioners should still be conceiving Meta's platforms as a space where they can deliver sex education to young people.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-10-30T07:01:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231210612
       
  • First Nations media in the Closing the Gap era: Navigating the new
           self-determination

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      Authors: Archie Thomas, David Nolan, Kerry McCallum, Lisa Jane Waller, Magali McDuffie
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      In 2020, a new Closing the Gap Agreement and an associated Joint Communications Strategy committed the Australian Government and state and territory governments to working with First Nations media to advance Closing the Gap aims, after lobbying by First Nations Media Australia. The new attention to First Nations media occurs after two decades of government disregard. We observe how First Nations media organisations have consistently advocated for a form of self-determination through First Nations-controlled communications, laying the groundwork for this shift. In doing so, they strategically adopt a political discourse to critique and promote reform of policy frameworks in their interests, highlighting tensions around the conceptualisation and practice of self-determination. We consider what may be required for a revised (re)adoption of self-determination as a policy to shift state-led governance, and to overcome the significant failures and limitations of policy processes.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T06:32:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231209599
       
  • News portals as a gateway to civic engagement: the case of South Korea

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      Authors: Dam Hee Kim, Joshua von Herrmann, Seungahn Nah
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Applying the communication mediation model and the communication infrastructure theory in the Korean news media environment, the current study investigates the potential of news portals as a gateway to civic engagement through online discussion. Specifically, this study distinguishes the active use of news portals for information about community issues and public affairs (e.g. commenting, passing along and searching for information) from the passive use of news portals (i.e. simple reception of information). An analysis of a national survey of 1294 Korean adults shows that active, not passive, use of news portals positively predicts online community discussion to subsequently increase cognitive, psychological, and behavioral dimensions of civic engagement: neighborhood belonging, collective efficacy, and civic participation. Importantly, active portal use's indirect positive relationship with civic engagement through online community discussion is stronger among people with higher news portal credibility. Implications are further discussed in the context of Korean news portals.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-10-27T06:31:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231206643
       
  • Book Review: Curating the Moving Image by Nash Mark

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      Authors: Phoebe Hart
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T04:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231210022
       
  • Online harassment of journalists in Nigeria: audience motivations and
           solutions

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      Authors: Temple Uwalaka, Azubuike Fred Amadi, Bigman Nwala, Peter Wokoro
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the motivations for the hostility towards the press by the audience and how to control online harassment of journalists in Nigeria. Data for this study are from online and face-to-face semi-structured interviews of 54 Nigerians in Nigeria. Finding shows that perceived journalistic malpractice and unethical behaviour motivate Nigerians to engage in online harassment of journalists in Nigeria. The study also uncovers what the audience in Nigeria offer as preventive measures to online harassment of journalists. These include (i) improved transparency, (ii) improved ethical conduct by journalists, and (iii) procedural and prosecutorial measures (e.g. implementation of a robust professional code of conduct and enacting safety laws for journalists) as ways of eradicating online harassment of journalists in Nigeria. Suggestions for future research areas were delineated.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-10-12T07:02:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231206840
       
  • Media International Australia

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      Authors: Rodney G. Miller
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      PubDate: 2023-10-06T06:08:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231206841
       
  • Platform capitalism and place relations in social movements:
           Environmentalism and Extinction Rebellion in Western Australia

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      Authors: Raymond Grenfell
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates spatial aspects of contemporary protest as a form of performative spectacle for platform capitalism. Discussing literature on and around platform capitalism and social movements it seeks to examine the Extinction Rebellion protest movement in its relationship to platform capitalism. Drawing on observations of the Western Australian Extinction Rebellion group from September 2019 to March 2022 as well as interviews with participants in the movement in November 2021 and previous experience in environmental movements, the article argues that a problematic relationship has developed between the movement and platform capitalism. Critically comparing Extinction Rebellion with the Occupy! Movement, one of the first to utilise platforms, this article reflects on the movements’ different modes of engagement with platforms and the resulting geographical shifts in activism. In doing so, it asks how platform capitalism has influenced place relations in contemporary Western Australian environmentalism and how activists may navigate this changing reality.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-09-26T07:59:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231202273
       
  • Book Review: Memetic War: Online Resistance in Ukraine by Munk Tine

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      Authors: Khrystyna Monastyrska
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T06:46:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231203014
       
  • Book Review: Gaza on Screen by Nadia Yaqub

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      Authors: Dina Matar
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-09-08T06:35:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231199830
       
  • News frames for COVID-19 – A comparison of Australian (Australian
           Broadcasting Corporation) and Vietnamese (Tuoi Tre Online) online news
           services in two key weeks in 2020

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      Authors: Viet Tho Le, Lelia Green
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the differences and similarities between the news frames used by online mainstream media in Vietnam and Australia when reporting COVID-19 in the early waves of the pandemic. The project uses constant comparative analysis to interrogate data gathered from two online news sources: ABC Online (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) in Australia, and Tuoi Tre Online in Vietnam. The article concludes that the Australian Broadcasting Corporation coverage focuses more on social, political and economic factors than is the case with Tuoi Tre Online, which foregrounds civic responsibility in response to the COVID-19 epidemic. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation highlights how COVID-19 amplifies the long-term consequences of social disadvantage while Tuoi Tre Online, in contrast, emphasises the short-term, acute community impacts of outbreaks, given that these require rapid identification and control. It is argued that differences between the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's and Tuoi Tre Online's framings of the pandemic reflect national differences in governance of disasters. Tuoi Tre Online perceives healthy citizenry as soldiers, and constructs the vulnerable and infected as challenges to the biological safety of the whole: the majority social collective. In contrast, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation frames vulnerable and infected individuals as important, focussing on their rights and on the responsibilities of mainstream society towards those who are at risk.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-09-06T08:31:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231198317
       
  • Health tracking media and the production of operational space: A critical
           analysis of Qantas Wellbeing App

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      Authors: Wilfred Yang Wang, Pengfei Fu
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the production of operational space amidst the rise of self- and data-tracking media, through the case study of the Qantas Wellbeing App. We draw on the operational paradigm in media studies to envisage how the Qantas Wellbeing App is embedded in the social-material relations between its users and the app, and the broader data-platform economy. By conceptualising the Qantas Wellbeing App as an operational media, the inquiry focuses on its designs and techniques that prompt users to fulfil prescribed tasks and follow instructions. We follow Lefebvre's conceptualisation of the production of space to evaluate three sets of social relations reconfigured by the Qantas Wellbeing App: human-to-human, human-to-machine, and data-to-data. By relying on qualitative evidence collected from an auto-ethnographic approach, our analyses focus on (1) spatial practices and (2) social relations constructed around the Qantas Wellbeing App between the authors to argue that social space is becoming a programmed reality that adheres to the logic of technological automation. Our analysis here affirms the app's capacity and objective to modify human behaviours and to evaluate how the app has recalibrated the authors’ respective and shared social spaces to create the needed condition of behaviour changes among the users. As social space is centred around human relations and activities, human agency and lives become secondary in an operational regime, which relies on data synchronisation to prosecute for the operational space and life.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-18T08:00:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231194803
       
  • Images of China in the Australian press: Time for new frames and new
           readings of old frames to broaden the horizons of framing analysis'

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      Authors: Runping Zhu, Wei Hou, Richard Krever
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Central to the study of the persuasive powers of media messaging is framing theory, an explanation of how the press presents stories through specific frames to both present information and influence readers' views on the subject matter. Drawing on a case study of news reports in the Australian press of China's one-child policy, this article shows how two additions to traditional news frame analysis drawn from related disciplines may contribute to our understanding of the impact of journalism on Australians’ views of the world and themselves. The first is a consideration of the ‘self-reflective’ frames embedded in frames of other countries that deliberately imply the presumed superiority of Australian culture. The second is the addition of a new ‘social and cultural attributes’ issue frame used in news to ascribe factual news events in another country to supposed social or cultural attributes of the society in which the stories arise.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-14T07:15:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231193906
       
  • Book Review: Mediatised Terrorism: East-West Narratives of Risk by Saira
           Ali

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      Authors: Nadia Jude
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-08T06:24:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231193903
       
  • Book Review: International Broadcasting and Its Contested Role in
           Australian Statecraft: Middle Power, Smart Power by Geoff Heriot

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      Authors: Benjamin Kooyman
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T07:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231193918
       
  • Book Review: Deepfakes by Graham Meikle

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      Authors: Anand Badola
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T07:18:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231193909
       
  • Listening for the local: Australian community radio and climate change
           communication

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      Authors: Bridget Backhaus, Kerrie Foxwell-Norton, Anne Leitch
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Climate change is most acutely experienced at the local level so conversations and action must be locally relevant. Australia's community radio sector is uniquely positioned – both as hyperlocal media and a platform for diverse voices – to facilitate these conversations. Drawing on research conducted with 12 community radio stations, this article enlists Dreher and de Souza’s idea of community radio as community ‘listening posts’: spaces for communities to engage with external groups as well as those within. Community radio stations present opportunities for political leaders and policymakers to access community sentiment and experiences of climate change. The role of listening in community radio also speaks to the relationships between communicative justice and climate justice – the politics of who speaks and who is heard. The findings suggest that the Australian sector and its global contemporaries could embrace the role of listening with community radio to support community resilience to climate change.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-08-04T05:47:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231193182
       
  • Book Review: Investigating Google’s Search Engine: Ethics, Algorithms,
           and the Machines Built to Read Us by Rosie Graham

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      Authors: Mohammed Foysal Chowdhury
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T08:07:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231191302
       
  • Book Review: Media Monsters: The Transformation of Australia’s Newspaper
           Empires by Sally Young

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      Authors: Astrid Edwards
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T08:06:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231191301
       
  • Book Review: Hyperconnectivity and its Discontents by Rogers Brubaker

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      Authors: Katharina Esau
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T08:06:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231191300
       
  • Practising citizenship through online media: An interpretive case study of
           Chinese New Zealanders’ civic engagement online

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      Authors: Yu Du
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Civic engagement is vital for a functioning democracy. Digital media broadens avenues of civic engagement, allowing people to practise various forms of citizenship. This article explores Chinese New Zealanders’ civic engagement on various digital media platforms. The findings result from an interpretive analysis of 38 Chinese New Zealanders’ in-depth interviews. I found that interviewees practised engaged and flexible citizenship through digital media activities. These two forms of citizenship enable Chinese New Zealanders to negotiate multilayered identities and disclose internal diversity. They also used social media to develop essential skills to address everyday concerns. The research enriches the knowledge of the Chinese diaspora's online media practices and deepens the understanding of digital media's democratic potential.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T02:33:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231185563
       
  • Book Review: Emotions and Virtues in Feature Writing: The Alchemy of
           Creating Prize-Winning Stories by Jennifer Martin

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      Authors: Cheryl O’Byrne
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-10T02:24:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231183289
       
  • ‘What if it rains' What if there are bushfires'’: Extreme weather,
           climate change and music festivals in Australia

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      Authors: Ben Green, Catherine Strong
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Increasingly, music festivals in Australia are being cancelled, postponed or otherwise impacted by extreme weather events, including floods throughout 2022 and bushfires in 2018–2019. These and other forms of extreme weather, such as dangerous heat and drought, are predicted to increase in frequency and severity due to climate change. However, relative to the size of the problem, there is a lack of attention in both public discussion and scholarly literature to the impacts of extreme weather and climate change on the festival sector, and the need to adapt in response. This study explores this issue in the context of Australian music festivals. The threat of extreme weather to the Australian music festival sector and its benefits is outlined, with reference to climate science predictions as against known festival activity, as well as a detailed overview of recent impacts. This is followed by an examination of how music festival stakeholders in industry and government are responding to this challenge, through the analysis of policy submissions, media comments and changes of practice. This article concludes by proposing a set of questions and issues for research, policy and action concerning the escalating impact of extreme weather on music festivals in Australia, with relevance to other places.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-05T05:49:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231184913
       
  • A series of lively impressions: Quality narration and the rise of audio
           description

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      Authors: Gwyneth Peaty, Kathryn Locke, Kai-Ti Kao, Katie Ellis, Hersinta
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the multiple values of audio description (AD) across an increasingly discerning, broad and multi-platform audience of video consumers. While other accessibility features, such as closed captions, are an established aspect of accessible video consumption, AD has more recently emerged as a socially and culturally significant feature for audiences, both with and without vision-based disabilities. This article offers a review of historical accounts of AD and current discussions around both the quality and provision of AD for video. This discussion is presented alongside the findings from our three-way review of the accessibility of the video on demand landscape in Australia. We identify that AD is at a critical juncture, popularised by the rise in audio content and audience demands for personalised viewing options, thus becoming a mainstream entertainment issue as well as an accessibility issue.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T10:39:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231183286
       
  • ‘Te Taonga – a significant contribution to the Māori screen
           industry’: Profiling Desray Armstrong, contemporary New Zealand film
           producer

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      Authors: Tom Boniface-Webb
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Desray Armstrong is one of the most prolific producers working in the Aotearoa New Zealand screen industry. As a wahine (woman/female) Māori, Armstrong's presence counters the traditional domination of white male screen professionals, yet her aim is to support writers and directors from all backgrounds who have a story to tell. Beginning as a production manager, she worked her way up over a career spanning twenty years, and in December 2021 the New Zealand Film Commission (NZFC) awarded her the Māori Screen Excellence Award. However, Armstrong gained her first producer credit only after employing a non-traditional financing model for the artistically ambitious Stray, which was considered outside the remit of the more commercially minded NZFC. Since Stray, and with the support of the NZFC, she has produced films that are challenging and topical, including the noir thriller Coming Home in the Dark, the family saga Juniper and the social media satire Millie Lies Low. This article demonstrates how the onerous public film funding model in New Zealand and the wider market can affect the ability of filmmakers to tell stories that sit outside the narratives acceptable to New Zealand's pākehā-dominated culture. It exposes the mismatch between Armstrong's view that her work is seen by some, as pākehā focussed and the NZFC's idea of the ‘Māori screen industry’. It concludes that despite the drive toward a more accessible industry, led by the NZFC, filmmakers like Armstrong challenge traditional views about how New Zealand should be represented on screen, choosing to position the story and the storyteller as the chief focus, and not where the story originates from.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-06-28T06:38:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231183283
       
  • A ‘Humanitarian Disaster’ or a ‘Liberation Struggle’: A
           comparative analysis of the coverages of The Independent and The New York
           

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      Authors: Ali Rabea
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the coverage by The Independent and The New York Times of the 2016 and the 2017 military operations in Aleppo and Al-Raqqa. It highlights the uneven reporting on the humanitarian crisis in the two cities. The analysis shows that the similarities in the coverage of the two newspapers were greater than the differences. The New York Times and The Independent (to a lesser extent) espoused a pro-US narrative of the Syrian conflict by framing Aleppo as a humanitarian ‘catastrophe’ and Al-Raqqa as a ‘liberation’ struggle. Biases were constructed out of several elements including (1) the dominance of US sources and selective use of UN and NGO sources; (2) the use of visual content quantitatively and qualitatively; (3) the use of graphic and emotive terms; (4) focus on the humanitarian crisis in Aleppo and the military operations in Al-Raqqa.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-06-08T06:13:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231179283
       
  • Broadcaster video-on-demand in Australia: Platforms, policy and local
           content

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      Authors: Alexa Scarlata, Ramon Lobato
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last decade Australia's free-to-air commercial networks Seven, Nine and Ten have undergone a protracted digital transformation with the development of their online, ad-supported broadcaster video-on-demand (BVOD) platforms 7Plus, 9Now, and 10Play. The present article considers some of the questions these commercial BVODs raise for television policy in Australia, with specific reference to local content regulation. Through content audits of 7Plus, 9Now and 10Play, we assess the localism of the BVODs’ catalogues in terms of the availability and discoverability of Australian titles. We find that these BVOD services – which are not presently regulated for local content – are less local in their programming than the networks’ free-to-air linear channels, but are more local than competing subscription video-on-demand services such as Netflix and Prime Video. We also reflect on how the networks position themselves in the newly expanded Australian television market, and how they reconcile their historical status as protected national broadcast institutions with their newer status as ‘just another app’ in the streaming ecosystem.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-05-29T07:45:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231177122
       
  • Journalism unions and digital platform regulation: a critical discourse
           analysis of submissions to Australia's News Media Bargaining Code

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      Authors: Tai Neilson, KB Heylen
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Journalism unions are among the chorus of voices advocating for digital platform regulation. Yet, despite the documented impacts of platformisation on working conditions and labour markets, few of the recent inquiries into platform power have addressed the impacts of platforms on labour. In this article, we ask: what is the role of labour unions in shaping digital platform regulation' As our case study, we analysed how Australia's journalism union (the MEAA) articulated the interests of news workers in submissions to the Digital Platform Inquiry and the resulting News Media Bargaining Code. Through a critical discourse analysis of the union's submissions, we found that the MEAA's lobbying efforts championed the interests of freelancers, advocated for a more inclusive Code, and sought guarantees that the revenue it generated would be used to pay for content creation. The MEAA used a range of discursive strategies, including seizing on ambiguity surrounding the definition of the policy problem and key actors. For the most part, the submissions aligned the union with the regulator, state and media companies in pursuit of platform regulation. However, the competing interests among this advocacy coalition became increasingly clear in the later stages of the policy-making process. Ultimately, the union's strategies were constrained by the hegemony of market-centric discourses that framed the inquiry and shaped the policy outcomes.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T09:10:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231176583
       
  • Ethnic Media, Diversity and Settlement: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: John Budarick
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This article examines the role of migrant media and communication in the long- and short-term settlement experiences of migrants through interviews with community leaders from seven migrant communities in South Australia. Bringing together literature on ethnic media and migrant settlement, multiple, interacting and overlapping forms of communication are incorporated into the analysis. These including traditional ethnic media, digital media and face-to-face communication. It is argued that the role of communication is best understood when migrants are taken as active ‘achievers and consumers’ who still face challenges to settlement. The results show the importance of migrant-controlled communication in providing a granular and tailored approach in which migrants are able to shape and determine the communication forms that best serve their needs. However, the paper also demonstrates the impact internal differences have on experiences of communication.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T11:31:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231176584
       
  • Book Review: Nationalism on the Internet: Critical Theory and Ideology in
           the Age of Social Media and Fake News by Christian Fuchs

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      Authors: Benjamin Hunt Pollock
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-04-04T06:33:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231167888
       
  • Book Review: Challenges of Reporting Africa for an International Audience
           by Levi Obijiofor & Richard Murray

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      Authors: Suzanne Franks
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-04-03T06:50:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231167889
       
  • Secondary, security threat, and sage: Eulogy effect and the framing of
           female politicians as political martyrs in the Elite press of South Asia

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      Authors: Azmat Rasul, Mcdowell D Stephen, Muhammad E Rasul
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      How do newspapers frame female politicians, and does this framing change after a female politician's death during an election campaign' Benazir Bhutto, who served two terms as prime minister of Pakistan, was assassinated in 2007 by a terrorist group. South Asian newspapers framed her as corrupt, inefficient, and a threat to national security before her death; however, the elite press characterized her as a martyr and sage posthumously. Using qualitative content analysis, this study examines the editorial coverage of two newspapers (The Hindu and The Times of India) in India and two newspapers (The News and The Dawn) in Pakistan to examine how these elite newspapers framed Benazir Bhutto before and after her tragic death. We found that the framing of the slain leader changed from negative to positive after her assassination. The study concludes that her assassination influenced the media coverage and produced a eulogy effect that helped her party stay in power after her assassination.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-03-23T05:26:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231163898
       
  • Social media: Connecting and sharing in a bushfire crisis

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      Authors: Susan Atkinson, Jee Young Lee
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Social media has become an integral channel for official agencies to communicate with citizens in a natural disaster crisis and increasingly time, effort and money are being spent on improving social media strategies and practices. However, there is much less research focused on understanding how people engage with official social media content, a significant piece of the crisis communication puzzle. As the use of social media for crisis communication in natural disasters is increasing and the amount of information threatens to overwhelm people, understanding how people engage with official social media content is vital. Using quantitative content analysis, this study examined the use of Facebook by two Australian emergency response agencies during a specific bushfire event and explored how the attributes of social media content are related to user engagement with the information. The findings show that the two agencies had markedly different approaches which resulted in differences in user engagement.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-03-14T07:48:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231163367
       
  • Studying the datafication of Australian childhoods: learning from a survey
           of digital technologies in homes with young children

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      Authors: Luci Pangrazio, Jane Mavoa
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      The home is a crucial site of young children's early encounters with digitally connected technologies. It is here that their emerging digital footprints are being formed and where digital data about them is being produced then collected, analysed and commodified in varying ways. While much is speculated about the rise of intelligent assistants, baby monitors, connected toys and goods, there is little quantitative information available about what sorts of devices households with children actually contain. This article reports on findings from an online survey of 504 Australian households with children aged 0–8 years. The survey was designed to capture a snapshot of internet connected devices and goods in households as a way of contextualising current discussions around the datafication of childhood. Results indicate that Australian households with young children are indeed highly connected, and this is primarily via devices already well domesticated into everyday family life such as TVs, computers and smartphones. We discuss several key points emerging from our findings, including: the safety and security of the household as a primary motivator for using smart home devices; the different rates of acceptance of the datafying objects in the home; and the Googlization of family life. We conclude the paper by outlining a research agenda that more accurately reflects the digital realities of Australian family life.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T07:31:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231162386
       
  • Media representations of China amid COVID-19: A corpus-assisted critical
           discourse analysis

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      Authors: Yating Yu, Dennis Tay, Qian Yue
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Although there has been an increasing number of studies investigating media representations of the COVID-19 outbreak around the world, less international attention has been given to Chinese media outlets’ coverage of the COVID-19 outbreak than that of their western counterparts. This study employs corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis to investigate how China is linguistically represented in a state-run English-language news media. The analysis reveals that China is respectively represented as a victim, a fighter, and a cooperative/supportive country with ideological implications for global solidarity and humanitarianism. This study sheds light on the effective use of discursive strategies in promoting international cooperation and building a national image amid a global health crisis. The value of using corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis to examine national image is also highlighted.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-03-10T05:29:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231159966
       
  • Entertaining information: Third-party influencers’ role in
           COVID-safety health communication

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      Authors: Rob Cover, Lukas Parker, Charlotte Young, Katia Ostapets
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      This paper discusses findings from a commissioned evaluation of an Australian government COVID-19 health campaign that utilised third-party influencers to increase the reach of health communication messages among culturally and linguistically diverse young people. Although the campaign was successful, interviews with select influencers and target audience members indicated that the ‘serious’ tone of the health messaging was less effective and less likely to be shared and that messages should be more ‘entertaining’. Analyses of data indicated three themes providing insights into how future campaigns may benefit from a focus that draws together health information and entertainment using models already constructed in the entertainment–education field: (1) Entertaining health messages have a stronger fit with influencers who are known for their entertainment value; (2) Entertaining messages are more memorable and more likely to be shared; (3) A balance between entertainment and the signifiers of trust and credibility such as government health authority logos overcomes trust issues in the context of current health disinformation and misinformation.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-02-22T06:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231158880
       
  • Book Review: Setting the Agenda by Maxwell McCombs & Sebastián
           Valenzuela

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      Authors: Phoebe Matich
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T07:56:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231154687
       
  • Connections, Community, Coconuts: Exploring the History of Regional
           Community Radio

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      Authors: Bridget Backhaus
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Regional community radio enriches and diversifies local media landscapes in Australia. It is also a space where communities isolated from mainstream processes of media production can actively participate and, subsequently, ‘see’ themselves reflected in their own media. While the importance of regional community radio generally is well-established, less explored is the history of regional stations. Most historical research on Australian community radio focusses on urban stations while regional and rural stations, which form the majority of the sector, are distinctly underrepresented. Exploring the history of regional community radio stations reveals the relationship between stations and how regional communities choose to represent themselves and construct their own mediatised identity. This article details the findings of a case study focussed on North Queensland station Triple T. One of the oldest regional community radio stations in Queensland, the history of Triple T offers rich insight into the mediatised identity of regional communities.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-02-09T05:17:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231154686
       
  • Book Review: TikTok: Creativity and Culture in Short Video by D. Bondy
           Valdovinos Kaye, Jing Zeng & Patrik Wikström

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      Authors: Kateryna Kasianenko
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T08:30:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X231155255
       
  • Book Review: Television in Post-Reform Vietnam: Nation, Media, Market by
           Giang Ngyuen-Thu

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      Authors: Zala Volcic
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T07:03:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X221148501
       
  • Pandemic impacts on cinema industry and over-the-top platforms in China

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      Authors: Muhammad Yaqoub, Zhang Jingwu, Suhas Suresh Ambekar
      Abstract: Media International Australia, Ahead of Print.
      Over-the-top platforms are increasingly being accepted by the younger generation. This study examines the different modes of watching films that have emerged due to the proliferation of over-the-top platforms, smartphones, and 5G technologies during the pandemic period in China. Using survey data, we examine the perception and behavior of 592 respondents. The top five factors in increasing over-the-top platforms to watch movies include easy access, various genres, no time to visit a cinema, pandemic, and new films. Findings also show that users tend to use smartphones to access over-the-top platforms. Bilibili, Tencent Video, and iQIYI are China's most popular over-the-top platforms among viewers. Increasing cinema ticket prices, pandemics, lack of quality content, and film stories are significant challenges for the cinema industry in the near future. These results suggest that the film industry should maintain the quality of the movies, especially those released on the cinema screen. These findings also designate significant substitution between the over-the-top platform and cinema and recommend that competition authorities widen market definitions. The cinema environment and IMAX/3D appear to have little incentive to degrade over-the-top platforms, despite over-the-top's films contributing to declining box office revenue.
      Citation: Media International Australia
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T07:25:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1329878X221145975
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)            First | 1 2 3 | Last

Showing 201 - 400 of 480 Journals sorted alphabetically
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media & Jornalismo     Open Access  
Media & Viestintä     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mediaciones     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Metaphor and the Social World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Narrative Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
NAUS : Revista Lusófona de Estudos Culturais e Comunicacionais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Netcom     Open Access  
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Journal of Media Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Journal of Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Norsk medietidsskrift     Open Access  
Nueva Revista del Pacífico     Open Access  
Observatorio (OBS*)     Open Access  
Oficios Terrestres     Open Access  
Open Medical Informatics Journal     Open Access  
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
post(s)     Open Access  
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
PragMATIZES : Latin American Journal of Cultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PRISMA.COM     Open Access  
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Public Journal of Semiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Punto Cero     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Question     Open Access  
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
REDD : Revista de estudios del discurso digital     Open Access  
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Revista ECO-Pós     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica de Comunicação, Informação & Inovação em Saúde     Open Access  
Revista Mediação     Open Access  
Revue de recherches en littératie médiatique multimodale     Open Access  
Revue française des sciences de l’information et de la communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
RIHC : Revista Internacional de Historia de la Comunicación     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal  
Schermi. Storie e culture del cinema e dei media in Italia     Open Access  
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Scientific Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Semiotika     Open Access  
Sensorium Journal     Open Access  
Seton Hall Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIGDOC Communication Design Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Social Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Interaction : Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sound Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Speech, Language and Hearing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Studies in Asian Social Science     Open Access  
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Post     Open Access  
Tic & société     Open Access  
Tidsskrift for Medier, Erkendelse og Formidling     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Trípodos     Open Access  
Turkish Review of Communication Studies     Open Access  
Ukrainian Information Space     Open Access  
University of Sindh Journal of Information and Communication Technology     Open Access  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Vivat Academia     Open Access  
Wacana : Jurnal Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ZER : Revista de Estudios de Comunicación = Komunikazio Ikasketen Aldizkaria     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 | Last

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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