Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)            First | 1 2 3 | Last

Showing 201 - 400 of 480 Journals sorted alphabetically
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Biocommunication     Open Access  
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chinese Writing Systems     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Journal of Communication and Innovation NIDA     Open Access  
Journal of Communications Software and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Community Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Development and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Digital Media & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Media     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of European Periodical Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Graph Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Greek Media & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Information and Organizational Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Information and Telecommunication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Voice Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of International Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Islamic Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Language and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Language and Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Location Based Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media and Communication Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Media Business Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Media Innovations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Media Literacy Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Medical Internet Research     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Organizational Knowledge Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Professional Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Public Interest Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Radio & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Science & Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Science Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Selcuk Communication     Open Access  
Journal of Technical Writing and Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Writing in Creative Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journalism Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Aspikom : Jurnal Ilmu Komunikasi     Open Access  
Jurnal Dakwah dan Komunikasi     Open Access  
Jurnal Dakwah Risalah     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmu Komunikasi     Open Access  
Jurnal Media dan Komunikasi Indonesia     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jurnal MEKOM (Media Komunikasi Pendidikan Kejuruan)     Open Access  
Jurnal Representamen     Open Access  
Jurnal Simbolika : Research and Learning in Communication Study     Open Access  
Kaleidoscope : A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Komunika     Open Access  
Komuniti : Jurnal Komunikasi dan Teknologi Informasi     Open Access  
La Mirada de Telemo     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
La Trama de la Comunicación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Language and Dialogue     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Language and Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Language Problems & Language Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Language, Interaction and Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Lingue e culture dei media     Open Access  
Llengua, societat i comunicació     Open Access  
Logos : Comunicação e Universidade     Open Access  
Lumina     Open Access  
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medea     Open Access  
Media & Jornalismo     Open Access  
Media & Viestintä     Open Access  
Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Mediaciones     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Mediterranea : International Journal on the Transfer of Knowledge     Open Access  
MEDIUM (Jurnal Ilmiah Fakultas Ilmu Komunikasi Universitas Islam Riau)     Open Access  
Metaphor and the Social World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Metaverse Creativity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Moment Dergi     Open Access  
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Narrative Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
NAUS : Revista Lusófona de Estudos Culturais e Comunicacionais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Netcom     Open Access  
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Journal of Media Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nordic Journal of Media Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nordicom Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Norsk medietidsskrift     Open Access  
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Novos Olhares : Revista de Estudos Sobre Práticas de Recepção a Produtos Midiáticos     Open Access  
Nueva Revista del Pacífico     Open Access  
Obra Digital     Open Access  
Observatorio (OBS*)     Open Access  
Oficios Terrestres     Open Access  
Open Medical Informatics Journal     Open Access  
Openings : Studies in Book Art     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Organicom     Open Access  
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Passagens     Open Access  
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Performing Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Porn Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
post(s)     Open Access  
Pozo de Letras     Open Access  
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
PragMATIZES : Latin American Journal of Cultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
PRISMA.COM     Open Access  
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Profetik : Jurnal Komunikasi     Open Access  
Public Journal of Semiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Publicitas : Comunicación y Cultura     Open Access  
Punto Cero     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Quality and User Experience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Quantitative Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Queer Studies in Media & Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Question     Open Access  
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Questões Transversais - Revista de Epistemologias da Comunicação     Open Access  
Radio Journal : International Studies in Broadcast & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
REDD : Revista de estudios del discurso digital     Open Access  
Res Rhetorica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research on Education and Media     Open Access  
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Revista Competência     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Revista ECO-Pós     Open Access  
Revista Eletrônica de Comunicação, Informação & Inovação em Saúde     Open Access  
Revista ICONO14. Revista científica de Comunicación y Tecnologías emergentes     Open Access  
Revista Latina de Comunicacion Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Mediação     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Opinión Pública     Open Access  
Revista Nexus Comunicación     Open Access  
Revista Observatório     Open Access  
Revista Panorama : Revista de Comunicação Social     Open Access  
Revista UNINTER de Comunicação     Open Access  
Revue de recherches en littératie médiatique multimodale     Open Access  
Revue française des sciences de l’information et de la communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RIHC : Revista Internacional de Historia de la Comunicación     Open Access  
Russian Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal  
RUTA Comunicación     Open Access  
Schermi. Storie e culture del cinema e dei media in Italia     Open Access  
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scientific Bulletin     Open Access  
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Semiotika     Open Access  
Sensorium Journal     Open Access  
Seton Hall Journal of Sports and Entertainment Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sexualization, Media, & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
SIGDOC Communication Design Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sign Systems Studies     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Signs & Media : A Journal of Semiotics in China and the World     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Social Imaginaries     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Social Interaction : Video-Based Studies of Human Sociality     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Social Networking     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Sociologia della Comunicazione     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sound Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal  
South African Journal of Communication Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Speech, Language and Hearing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)

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Similar Journals
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Language and Speech
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.739
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0023-8309 - ISSN (Online) 1756-6053
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Assessing the Specificity and Accuracy of Accent Judgments by Lay
           Listeners

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natalie Braber, Harriet Smith, David Wright, Alexander Hardy, Jeremy Robson
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Historically, there has been less research carried out on earwitness than eyewitness testimony. However, in some cases, earwitness evidence might play an important role in securing a conviction. This paper focuses on accent which is a central characteristic of voices in a forensic linguistic context. The paper focuses on two experiments (Experiment 1, n = 41; Experiment 2, n = 57) carried out with participants from a wide range of various locations around the United Kingdom to rate the accuracy and confidence in recognizing accents from voices from England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Ireland as well as looking at specificity of answers given and how this varies for these regions. Our findings show that accuracy is variable and that participants are more likely to be accurate when using vaguer descriptions (such as “Scottish”) than being more specific. Furthermore, although participants lack the meta-linguistic ability to describe the features of accents, they are able to name particular words and pronunciations which helped them make their decision.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T06:48:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221101560
       
  • Exploring Variability in Compound Tensification in Seoul Korean

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      Authors: Hae-Sung Jeon
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      In Korean noun-noun compounds, the lenis onset consonant in the second noun is often realized as a tense consonant. Although extensive work has been carried out to clarify its causes and relevant phonological processes, this tensification is deemed not entirely predictable. This paper presents a speech production experiment that confirms the existing findings that the variability in tensification is predictable to a certain extent. The experimental results also showed that the relationship between the predictors and the variability is not linear and that tensification mirrors the cognitively determined boundary strength. Native Korean speakers calibrate the boundary strength by incorporating complex information, such as the word’s length, segment type, frequency, and plausibility of the compound. While a “tight” boundary led to high tensification probability, it was not affected by speaking-rate variation. Furthermore, the perceived compound’s plausibility directly affected the duration of the tensified consonant. Importantly, the findings suggest that speakers’ calibration of the boundary strength is fluid and changeable over time and it affects both phonological and phonetic outputs. Finally, variability in data was reduced for the experimental conditions leading to either extremely high or low tensification probability, and there seemed to be lexicalized exceptions to the general trends.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T02:28:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221095479
       
  • Factors Affecting the Writing Performance in Hearing and Deaf Children: An
           Insight into Regularities and Irregularities of the Arabic Orthographic
           System

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      Authors: Hashemiah Almusawi
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to account for the underlying causes of spelling errors in hearing and deaf children who speak a dialectal form of Arabic that substantially differs from the standard written one. It presents a general overview of the spoken Arabic language and its written system, drawing attention to some of the phonological and orthographic regularities and irregularities used in constructing and decoding Arabic words and sentences. It also accounts for the diglossic factors that interfere with the process of phoneme-to-grapheme mapping. The spelling outcomes of a group of hearing children are compared with another group of orally educated deaf children, who in addition to the complexity and diglossity of Arabic, have limited hearing abilities. Both groups performed two written tasks, one representing the standard form and the other representing the dialect. These tasks identified the types of spelling and segmentation errors and the effects of the committed errors on children’s awareness of the concept of word and word boundaries. Analysis of the results reveals their spelling errors’ nature and frequencies, and progressively categorizes the most prominent errors in practicing each language form. The deaf group (n = 30) produced significantly more errors than the hearing group (n = 36) in the dysphonetic errors and the word omission categories. The findings indicate that the sociolinguistic context of the Arabic language and the orthographic nature of the Arabic script are both important factors affecting hearing and deaf children’s awareness of the concept of word as well as their spelling performance. These results may enable educators to understand the underlying factors of Arabic spelling and produce targeted error correction strategies to maximize children’s learning outcomes.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T10:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221097714
       
  • Processing of Grammatical Agreement in the Face of Variation in Lexical
           Stress: A Mismatch Negativity Study

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      Authors: Cas W. Coopmans, Marijn E. Struiksma, Peter H. A. Coopmans, Aoju Chen
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Previous electroencephalography studies have yielded evidence for automatic processing of syntax and lexical stress. However, these studies looked at both effects in isolation, limiting their generalizability to everyday language comprehension. In the current study, we investigated automatic processing of grammatical agreement in the face of variation in lexical stress. Using an oddball paradigm, we measured the Mismatch Negativity (MMN) in Dutch-speaking participants while they listened to Dutch subject–verb sequences (linguistic context) or acoustically similar sequences in which the subject was replaced by filtered noise (nonlinguistic context). The verb forms differed in the inflectional suffix, rendering the subject–verb sequences grammatically correct or incorrect, and leading to a difference in the stress pattern of the verb forms. We found that the MMNs were modulated in both the linguistic and nonlinguistic condition, suggesting that the processing load induced by variation in lexical stress can hinder early automatic processing of grammatical agreement. However, as the morphological differences between the verb forms correlated with differences in number of syllables, an interpretation in terms of the prosodic structure of the sequences cannot be ruled out. Future research is needed to determine which of these factors (i.e., lexical stress, syllabic structure) most strongly modulate early syntactic processing.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T09:31:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221098116
       
  • Focus Effects on Immediate and Delayed Recognition of Referents in Samoan

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      Authors: Sasha Calhoun, Mengzhu Yan, Honiara Salanoa, Fualuga Taupi, Emma Kruse Va’ai
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This paper looks at the effect of focus-marking on the immediate and delayed recognition of referents in Samoan. Focus-marking on a word can imply the presence of alternatives to that word which are relevant to the interpretation of the utterance. Consistent with this, psycholinguistic evidence is growing that alternatives to focus-marked words are selectively activated in the immediate processing of an utterance and longer term memory. However, most of this research is on Western Germanic languages which primarily use prosodic prominence to mark focus. We explore this in two experiments using immediate and delayed probe recognition tasks in the under-studied language Samoan, which primarily uses syntactic focus-marking. Participants heard short narratives ending in a critical sentence in which the object word was either focused or not, using a cleft-like construction. In the first experiment, probe recognition, alternatives to the object word which were either mentioned or unmentioned in the narrative were responded to more slowly if the object was focus-marked. In the second experiment, delayed recognition, participants were faster to correctly recognize mentioned alternatives, and slower to reject unmentioned, if the object was focus-marked. Both results are consistent with immediate and longer-term activation of focus alternatives. There was no significant effect of focus-marking on recognition of the object word itself.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T09:27:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221101396
       
  • Using Network Science and Psycholinguistic Megastudies to Examine the
           Dimensions of Phonological Similarity

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      Authors: Nichol Castro, Michael S. Vitevitch
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Network science was used to examine different dimensions of phonological similarity in English. Data from a phonological associate task and an identification of words in noise task were used to create a phonological association network and a misperception network. These networks were compared to a network formed by a computational metric widely used to assess phonological similarity (i.e., one-phoneme metric). The phonological association network and the misperception network were topographically more similar to each other than either were to the one-phoneme metric network, but there were several network features in common between the one-phoneme metric network and the phonological association network. To assess the influence of network structure on processing, we compared the influence of degree (i.e., neighborhood density) from each of the networks on visual and auditory lexical decision reaction times obtained from two psycholinguistic megastudies. The effect of degree differed across network types and tasks. We discuss the use of each approach to determine phonological similarity and a possible direction forward for language research through the use of multiplex networks.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T06:33:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221095455
       
  • Echoes of Past Contact: Venetian Influence on Cretan Greek Intonation

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      Authors: Mary Baltazani, John Coleman, Elisa Passoni, Joanna Przedlacka
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Prosodic aspects of cross-linguistic contact are under-researched, especially past contact that has subsequently ceased. In this paper, we investigate declarative and polar question tunes of contemporary Cretan Greek, a regional variety of Greek whose speakers were in contact with Venetian speakers during the four and half centuries of Venetian rule on the island, from 1204 to 1669. The F0 contours of the Cretan tunes and alignment of peaks and troughs of interest with the nuclear vowel are compared to the corresponding tunes in Venetian dialect and Venetian Italian and to those in Athenian (Standard) Greek, which are used as control. The data (1610 declarative utterances and 698 polar questions) were drawn from natural speech corpora based on pragmatic criteria: broad focus for declaratives, broad focus, and information-seeking interpretation for polar questions. The pitch contour shapes of the tunes are modeled using polynomial basis functions, and the F0 alignment points are determined analytically. The results show the robustness of contact effects almost three and a half centuries after regular contact ceased and indicate that the shapes of the F0 contours of Cretan and Venetian declarative and polar question tunes are similar. In addition, Cretan alignment patterns are similar to Venetian and significantly different from Athenian. Insights are gained from research into how long prosodic characteristics may persist in a recipient language—decades or even centuries after the cessation of contact.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-05-13T09:56:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221091939
       
  • The Role of Prosody in Disambiguating English Indirect Requests

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      Authors: Sean Trott, Stefanie Reed, Dan Kaliblotzky, Victor Ferreira, Benjamin Bergen
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Ambiguity pervades language. The sentence “My office is really hot” could be interpreted as a complaint about the temperature or as an indirect request to turn on the air conditioning. How do comprehenders determine a speaker’s intended interpretation' One possibility is that speakers and comprehenders exploit prosody to overcome the pragmatic ambiguity inherent in indirect requests. In a pre-registered behavioral experiment, we find that human listeners can successfully determine whether a given utterance was intended as a request at a rate above chance (55%), above and beyond the prior probability of a given sentence being interpreted as a request. Moreover, we find that a classifier equipped with seven acoustic features can detect the original intent of an utterance with 65% accuracy. Finally, consistent with past work, the duration, pitch, and pitch slope of an utterance emerge both as significant correlates of a speaker’s original intent and as predictors of comprehenders’ pragmatic interpretation. These results suggest that human and machine comprehenders alike can use prosody to enrich the meaning of ambiguous utterances, such as indirect requests.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T06:34:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221087715
       
  • Intonational and Syntactic Innovations in a Language Contact Situation: An
           Explorative Study of Yes/No Questions in Paraguayan Guarani–Spanish
           Bilinguals

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      Authors: Andrea Pešková
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Whereas the intonation of Spanish varieties has received considerable attention in the past few decades, the research has so far not included the variety of Spanish spoken in Paraguay, where intensive language contact between the Indigenous Guarani language and Spanish since the 16th century has led to widespread bilingualism. This study compares the F0 patterns of yes/no questions in Guarani-dominant bilinguals with those of Spanish-dominant bilinguals and Spanish monolinguals, formalized within the Autosegmental-Metrical model of intonation phonology. Results show no particular differences between the three groups, with all groups producing an H+L*LH% pattern in all types of yes/no questions, the exception being counter-expectational and echo yes/no questions, which were also realized with an L+¡H* L% contour. In spite of the fact that Guarani-dominant bilinguals exhibited more tonal variation in biased yes/no questions, the findings appear on the whole to support the convergence of two intonational systems due to the long period of contact. Furthermore, both bilingual groups made use of Guarani question particles and other Guarani expressions in their productions. Interestingly, across all groups, some speakers occasionally used the calque expression ¿Será que . . . (“Will it be that . . .'”) at the beginning of questions; this construction can be considered to have become grammaticalized as a question particle. Taken together, the intonational and syntactic innovations apparent in Paraguayan Spanish point toward language change brought about by intensive contact with Guarani and show how two levels of linguistic structure—intonation and syntax—may evolve differently.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T01:58:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221082940
       
  • Do Diacritics Entail an Early Processing Cost in the Absence of Abstract
           Representations' Evidence from Masked Priming in English

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      Authors: Manuel Perea, Pablo Gomez, Ana Baciero
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Using the masked priming technique, word recognition experiments in various languages have shown slower response times for a target word like NEVEU (nephew, in French) when preceded by a diacritical prime like néveu than by the identity prime neveu. The most common account of this effect is linguistic: diacritical and non-diacritical vowels (e.g., é and e) activate different letter representations (e.g., compare neveu /nə.vø/ vs. néveu /ne.vø/). However, another explanation is that the reduced effectiveness of the diacritical primes is merely due to the perceptual salience of accent marks in the first moments of word processing. Here, we designed a masked priming experiment that tested this perceptual salience account by comparing the effectiveness of diacritical versus non-diacritical primes in a language where diacritics have no linguistic value, namely, English (e.g., nórth-NORTH vs. north-NORTH). We found a small but reliable cost due to the diacritical primes, thus revealing that perceptual salience reduced the effectiveness of the primes. However, the effect sizes were substantially smaller than in the experiments in languages with diacritical marks, thus suggesting that the néveu-NEVEU versus neveu-NEVEU difference relies on both linguistic and perceptual sources.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-03-04T05:06:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221078321
       
  • Cross-Linguistic Trends in Speech Errors: An Analysis of Sub-Lexical
           Errors in Cantonese

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      Authors: John Alderete
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Though past research on the sound structure of speech errors has contributed greatly to our understanding of phonological encoding, most of this research comes from a small set of majority languages with similar linguistic structures. To increase the linguistic diversity of relevant evidence, a large collection of speech errors was investigated in Cantonese, an under-studied language with unique phonological structures. In particular, the Cantonese data were examined for nine psycholinguistic effects commonly used as a lens on word-form encoding. Detailed quantitative analysis found that Cantonese has eight of these effects, providing broader cross-linguistic support for models based on these patterns. Yet Cantonese also exhibited differences with well-known Indo-European languages by having a higher rate of errors involving whole syllables and sub-constituents inside the syllable rime. These differences can be accounted for by recognizing the primacy of the syllable and mora in encoding Cantonese words, following proposals that have been made for Mandarin Chinese and Japanese.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-02-09T04:39:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309211071045
       
  • Interaction between Phrasal Structure and Vowel Tenseness in German: An
           Acoustic and Articulatory Study

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      Authors: Malte Belz, Oksana Rasskazova, Jelena Krivokapić, Christine Mooshammer
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Phrase-final lengthening affects the segments preceding a prosodic boundary. This prosodic variation is generally assumed to be independent of the phonemic identity. We refer to this as the ‘uniform lengthening hypothesis’ (ULH). However, in German, lax vowels do not undergo lengthening for word stress or shortening for increased speech rate, indicating that temporal properties might interact with phonemic identity. We test the ULH by comparing the effect of the boundary on acoustic and kinematic measures for tense and lax vowels and several coda consonants. We further examine if the boundary effect decreases with distance from the boundary. Ten native speakers of German were recorded by means of electromagnetic articulography (EMA) while reading sentences that contained six minimal pairs varying in vowel tenseness and boundary type. In line with the ULH, the results show that the acoustic durations of lax vowels are lengthened phrase-finally, similarly to tense vowels. We find that acoustic lengthening is stronger the closer the segments are to the boundary. Articulatory parameters of the closing movements toward the post-vocalic consonants are affected by both phrasal position and identity of the preceding vowel. The results are discussed with regard to the interaction between prosodic structure and vowel tenseness.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-01-13T09:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309211064857
       
  • Age of Acquisition and Spoken Words: Examining Hemispheric Differences in
           Lexical Processing

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      Authors: Julio González-Alvarez, Teresa Cervera-Crespo
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between the age of acquisition (AoA) of words and their cerebral hemispheric representation is controversial because the experimental results have been contradictory. However, most of the lexical processing experiments were performed with stimuli consisting of written words. If we want to compare the processing of words learned very early in infancy—when children cannot read—with words learned later, it seems more logical to employ spoken words as experimental stimuli. This study, based on the auditory lexical decision task, used spoken words that were classified according to an objective criterion of AoA with extremely distant means (2.88 vs. 9.28 years old). As revealed by the reaction times, both early and late words were processed more efficiently in the left hemisphere, with no AoA × Hemisphere interaction. The results are discussed from a theoretical point of view, considering that all the experiments were conducted using adult participants.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T09:22:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309211068402
       
  • Piecewise Structural Equation Modeling of the Quantity Implicature in
           Child Language

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      Authors: John Grinstead, Pedro Ortiz-Ramírez, Ximena Carreto-Guadarrama, Ana Arrieta-Zamudio, Amy Pratt, Myriam Cantú-Sánchez, Jonathan Lefcheck, David Melamed
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      We review an array of experimental methodological factors that either contribute to or detract from the measurement of pragmatic implicatures in child language. We carry out a truth value judgment task to measure children’s interpretations of the Spanish existential quantifier algunos in implicature-consistent and implicature-inconsistent contexts. Independently, we take measures of children’s inhibition, working memory, attention, approximate number ability, phrasal syntax, and lexicon. We model the interplay of these variables using a piecewise structural equation model (SEM), common in the life sciences, but not in the social and behavioral sciences. By 6 years of age, the children in our sample were not statistically different from adults in their interpretations. Syntax, lexicon, and inhibition significantly predict implicature generation, each accounting for unique variance. The approximate number system and inhibition significantly predict lexical development. The statistical power of the piecewise SEM components, with a sample of 64 children, is high, in comparison to a traditional, globally estimated SEM of the same data.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T09:21:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309211066086
       
  • Acoustic and Kinematic Correlates of Heterosyllabicity in Different
           Phonological Contexts

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      Authors: Chiara Celata, Chiara Meluzzi, Chiara Bertini
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      We investigate the temporal and kinematic properties of consonant gemination and heterosyllabic clusters as opposed to singletons and tautosyllabic clusters in Italian. The data show that the singleton versus geminate contrast is conveyed by specific kinematic properties in addition to systematic durational differences in both the consonantal and vocalic intervals; by contrast, tautosyllabic and heterosyllabic clusters differ significantly for the duration of the consonantal interval but do not vary systematically with respect to the vocalic interval and cannot be consistently differentiated at the kinematic level. We conclude that systematic variations in acoustic vowel duration and the kinematics of tongue tip gestures represent the phonetic correlates of the segmental phonological contrast between short and long consonants, rather than of syllable structure. Data are only partly consistent with the predictions of both moraic and gesture-based models of the syllable about the effects of syllable structure on speech production dynamics and call for a more gradient view of syllabification.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2022-01-08T09:16:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309211065789
       
 
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