Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 480 Journals sorted by number of followers
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 493)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 86)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
e-learning and education (eleed)     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Medical Internet Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Discourse, Context & Media     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Canadian Journal of Communication     Partially Free   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Advanced Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Information & Communications Technology Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Framework : The Journal of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Language and Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
ACM Transactions on Information Systems (TOIS)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Science Fiction Film and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Science Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Communication Booknotes Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for the History of Rhetoric     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Society, Culture & Language     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Writing in Creative Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Communications of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Computer Science and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communications in Mobile Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Design Ecologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Media Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Chinese Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
IEICE - Transactions on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
IET Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Technical Writing and Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMCCAP)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Business Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Electronics and Communications in Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Informal Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Communication & Language at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Interaction Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Language and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fibreculture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Islamic Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Electronics and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Design Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Black Camera     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intelligent Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Metaverse Creativity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
China Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Radio & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Foundations and Trends® in Communications and Information Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professional Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Radio Journal : International Studies in Broadcast & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Graph Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Explorations in Media Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Global Advances in Business Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Review in Electronics & Communication Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advertising Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cooperative Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Arts & Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Location Based Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Etudes de communication     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communicatio : South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Language, Interaction and Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Kaleidoscope : A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Community Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interactions : Studies in Communication & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Performing Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intelligence Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Interdisciplinary Telecommunications and Networking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Monitoring and Surveillance Technologies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nordicom Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Language Problems & Language Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Área Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y Medios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digithum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TELKOMNIKA (Telecommunication, Computing, Electronics and Control)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Poster     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latina de Comunicacion Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Trust Management in Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
La Trama de la Comunicación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Communication et organisation     Open Access  
Avatares de la Comunicación y la Cultura     Open Access  
La Mirada de Telemo     Open Access  
International Journal of Telework and Telecommuting Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Historia y Comunicación Social     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Comunicació. Revista de recerca i d'anàlisi     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Informacion     Open Access  
Ubiquity     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Tic & société     Open Access  

        1 2 3 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Language and Speech
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.739
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0023-8309 - ISSN (Online) 1756-6053
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Asymmetries in Infants’ Vowel Perception: Changes in Vowel
           Discrimination in German Learning 6- and 9-Month-Old Infants

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Antonia Götz, Anna Krasotkina, Gudrun Schwarzer, Barbara Höhle
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Infants’ speech perception is characterized by substantial changes during the first year of life that attune the processing mechanisms to the specific properties of the ambient language. This paper focuses on these developmental changes in vowel perception. More specifically, the emergence and potential cause of perceptual asymmetries in vowel perception are investigated by an experimental study on German 6- and 9-month-olds’ discrimination of a vowel contrast that is not phonemic in German. Results show discrimination without any asymmetry in the 6-month-olds but an asymmetrical pattern with better performance when the vowel changes from the less focal to the more focal vowel than vice versa by the 9-month-olds. The results concerning the asymmetries are compatible with the Natural Referent Framework as well as with the Native Language Magnet model. Our results foster two main conclusions. First, bi-directional testing must be mandatory when testing vowel perception. Second, when testing non-native vowel perception, the relation of the stimuli to the native language vowel system has to be considered very carefully as this system impacts the perception of non-native vowels.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T04:24:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309241228237
       
  • Relating Tabooness to Humor and Arousal Ratings in American English: What
           the F*** Is so Funny'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Meredith A. Shafto, Lise Abrams, Lori E. James, Pengbo Hu, Genevieve Gray
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Emotion can have a profound effect on language processing, and taboo words have been increasingly used in research as highly emotional, negatively valenced stimuli. However, because taboo words as a lexical category are socially constructed and semantically idiosyncratic, they may also have complex emotional characteristics. This complexity may not be fully considered by researchers using taboo words as research stimuli. This study gathered tabooness, humor, and arousal ratings to provide a resource for researchers to better understand the sources and characteristics of the strong emotions generated by taboo words. A total of 411 participants aged 18–83 were recruited via online platforms, and all participants rated the same 264 words on tabooness, humor, and arousal. Analyses indicated that tabooness and humor ratings were positively related to each other, and both were predicted by arousal ratings. The set of ratings included here provides a tool for researchers using taboo stimuli, and our findings highlight methodological considerations while broadening our understanding of the cognitive and linguistic nature of highly emotional language.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2024-02-15T12:50:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309241228863
       
  • Learnability Advantage of Segmental Repetitions in Word Learning

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johanna Basnak, Mitsuhiko Ota
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      To date, research on wordform learning biases has mostly focused on language-dependent factors, such as the phonotactics and neighborhood density of the language(s) known by the learner. Domain-general biases, by contrast, have received little attention. In this study, we focus on one such bias—an advantage for string-internal repetitions—and examine its effects on wordform learning. Importantly, we consider whether any type of segmental repetition is equally beneficial for word recall, or whether learning is favored more or only by repeated consonants, in line with previous research indicating that consonants play a larger role than vowels in lexical processing. In Experiment 1, adult English speakers learned artificial consonant-vowel-consonant-vowel words containing either a repeated consonant (e.g., /sesu/, “c-rep”), a repeated vowel (e.g., /sepe/, “v-rep”), or dissimilar consonants and vowels (e.g., /sepu/, “no-rep”). Recall results showed no advantage for v-reps but higher accuracy for c-reps compared with no-reps. In Experiment 2, participants performed a label preference task with the same stimuli. The results showed dispreference for both c-reps and v-reps relative to no-reps, indicating that the results of Experiment 1 are independent of wordlikeness effects. These outcomes reveal that there is a form-learning bias for words with identical consonants but not for words with identical vowels, suggesting that a domain-general advantage for repetitions within strings is modulated by a language-specific processing bias for consonants.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T08:53:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231223909
       
  • Lexical Stress Identification in Cochlear Implant-Simulated Speech by
           Non-Native Listeners

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marita K. Everhardt, Anastasios Sarampalis, Matt Coler, Deniz Bașkent, Wander Lowie
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates whether a presumed difference in the perceptibility of cues to lexical stress in spectro-temporally degraded simulated cochlear implant (CI) speech affects how listeners weight these cues during a lexical stress identification task, specifically in their non-native language. Previous research suggests that in English, listeners predominantly rely on a reduction in vowel quality as a cue to lexical stress. In Dutch, changes in the fundamental frequency (F0) contour seem to have a greater functional weight than the vowel quality contrast. Generally, non-native listeners use the cue-weighting strategies from their native language in the non-native language. Moreover, few studies have suggested that these cues to lexical stress are differently perceptible in spectro-temporally degraded electric hearing, as CI users appear to make more effective use of changes in vowel quality than of changes in the F0 contour as cues to linguistic phenomena. In this study, native Dutch learners of English identified stressed syllables in CI-simulated and non-CI-simulated Dutch and English words that contained changes in the F0 contour and vowel quality as cues to lexical stress. The results indicate that neither the cue-weighting strategies in the native language nor in the non-native language are influenced by the perceptibility of cues in the spectro-temporally degraded speech signal. These results are in contrast to our expectations based on previous research and support the idea that cue weighting is a flexible and transferable process.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2024-01-29T08:24:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231222207
       
  • The Attractiveness of Average Speech Rhythms: Revisiting the Average
           Effect From a Crosslinguistic Perspective

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      Authors: Constantijn Kaland, Marc Swerts
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The current study investigates the average effect: the tendency for humans to appreciate an averaged (face, bird, wristwatch, car, and so on) over an individual instance. The effect holds across cultures, despite varying conceptualizations of attractiveness. While much research has been conducted on the average effect in visual perception, much less is known about the extent to which this effect applies to language and speech. This study investigates the attractiveness of average speech rhythms in Dutch and Mandarin Chinese, two typologically different languages. This was tested in a series of perception experiments in either language in which native listeners chose the most attractive one from a pair of acoustically manipulated rhythms. For each language, two experiments were carried out to control for the potential influence of the acoustic manipulation on the average effect. The results confirm the average effect in both languages, and they do not exclude individual variation in the listeners’ perception of attractiveness. The outcomes provide a new crosslinguistic perspective and give rise to alternative explanations to the average effect.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T10:21:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231217689
       
  • Gestural Timing Patterns of Nasality in Highly Proficient Spanish Learners
           of English: Aerodynamic Evidence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ander Beristain
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Segment-to-segment timing overlap between Vowel-Nasal gestures in /VN/ sequences varies cross-linguistically. However, how bilinguals may adjust those timing gestures is still unanswered. Regarding timing strategies in a second language (L2), research finds that native (L1) strategies can be partially transferred to the L2, and that higher L2 proficiency promotes a more successful phonetic performance. My goal is to answer whether bilingual speakers can adjust their L1 coarticulatory settings in their L2 and to observe whether their L2 accentedness plays a role in ultimate attainment. Ten native speakers of Spanish (L1Sp) who were highly proficient L2 English speakers participated in Spanish and English read-aloud tasks. A control group of 16 L1 English speakers undertook the English experiment. Aerodynamic data were collected using pressure transducers. Each participant produced tokens with nasalized vowels in CVN# words and oral vowels in CV(CV) words. Four linguistically trained judges (two per target language) evaluated a set of pseudo-randomized sentences produced by the participants containing words with nasalized vowels and rated the speech on a 1 (heavily accented) to 9 (native-like) Likert-type scale. Measurements for onset and degree of overall nasality were obtained. Results indicate the L1Sp group can accommodate gestural timing strategies cross-linguistically as they exhibit an earlier nasality onset and increment nasality proportion in L2 English in a native-like manner. In addition, a positive correlation between greater vowel nasality degree and native-like accentedness in the L2 was found, suggesting L2 timing settings might be specified in higher spoken proficiency levels.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T10:04:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231215355
       
  • Phonetic Effects of Tonal Crowding in Persian Polar Questions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Vahid Sadeghi
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Persian polar questions are characterized by a rise-fall followed by a low F0 plateau and a final rise. A production experiment was designed which systematically manipulated question length and the position of stress in the nuclear accented word in the question. Results revealed that distances between tones can strongly affect their scaling and alignment in predictable manner. With respect to scaling, our data show that the postnuclear low F0 target is realized considerably higher in short questions in which tonal crowding is more acute. This scaling adjustment of the L affects the following H tone, such that the final H is realized higher in tonal space, relative to the other crowding contexts. The results for duration show that in short questions, syllable duration is significantly lengthened so that there is room for tonal targets to be realized. In addition, the alignment data in this study suggest that crowding contexts incrementally affect the temporal adjustment of tonal targets. In some circumstances, tonal crowding results in anticipatory retraction of tones, while in others it results in carry-over tonal displacement depending on the direction of the prosodic pressure. These results can best be explained in an auto-segmental approach to intonational phonology in which intonation contours are treated as strings of distinct high and low tones associated with specific elements in the segmental string.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-12-29T09:56:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231213580
       
  • The Language-Specificity of Phonetic Adaptation to Talkers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anne Cutler, L. Ann Burchfield, Mark Antoniou
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Listeners adapt efficiently to new talkers by using lexical knowledge to resolve perceptual uncertainty. This adaptation has been widely observed, both in first (L1) and in second languages (L2). Here, adaptation was tested in both the L1 and L2 of speakers of Mandarin and English, two very dissimilar languages. A sound midway between /f/ and /s/ replacing either /f/ or /s/ in Mandarin words presented for lexical decision (e.g., bu4fa3 “illegal”; kuan1song1 “loose”) prompted the expected adaptation; it induced an expanded /f/ category in phoneme categorization when it had replaced /f/, but an expanded /s/ category when it had replaced /s/. Both L1 listeners and English-native listeners with L2 Mandarin showed this effect. In English, however (with e.g., traffic; insane), we observed adaptation in L1 but not in L2; Mandarin-native listeners, despite scoring highly in the English lexical decision training, did not adapt their category boundaries for /f/ and /s/. Whether the ambiguous sound appeared syllable-initially (as in Mandarin phonology) versus word-finally (providing more word identity information) made no difference. Perceptual learning for talker adaptation is language-specific in that successful lexically guided adaptation in one language does not guarantee adaptation in other known languages; the enabling conditions for adaptation may be multiple and diverse.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T12:11:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231214244
       
  • Front Is High and Back Is Low: Sound-Space Iconicity in Finnish

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lari Vainio, Markku Kilpeläinen, Alexandra Wikström, Martti Vainio
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Previous investigations have shown various interactions between spatial concepts and speech sounds. For instance, the front-high vowel [i] is associated with the concept of forward, and the back-high vowel [o] is associated with the concept of backward. Three experiments investigated whether the concepts of forward/front and backward/back are associated with high- and low-pitched vocalizations, respectively, in Finnish. In Experiments 1 and 2, the participants associated the high-pitched vocalization with the forward-directed movement and the low-pitched vocalizations with the backward-directed movement. In Experiment 3, the same effect was observed in relation to the concepts of front of and back of. We propose that these observations present a novel sound-space symbolism phenomenon in which spatial concepts of forward/front and backward/back are iconically associated with high- and low-pitched speech sounds. This observation is discussed in relation to the grounding of semantic knowledge of these spatial concepts in the movements of articulators such as relative front/back-directed movements of the tongue.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-12-06T12:08:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231214176
       
  • Articulatory Insights into the L2 Acquisition of English-/l/ Allophony

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Colantoni, Alexei Kochetov, Jeffrey Steele
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      In many English varieties, /l/ is produced differently in onsets and codas. Compared with “light” syllable-initial realizations, “dark” syllable-final variants involve reduced tongue tip-alveolar ridge contact and a raised/retracted tongue dorsum. We investigate whether native French and Spanish speakers whose L1 lacks such positionally conditioned variation can acquire English-/l/ allophony, testing the hypotheses that (1) the allophonic pattern will be acquired by both groups but (2) learners will differ from native speakers in their phonetic implementation, particularly in codas; and (3) French-speaking learners will outperform their Spanish-speaking counterparts. The production of syllable-initial and -final /l/ (singletons and clusters) in words read in isolation and a carrier sentence by 4 French- and 3 Spanish-speaking learners as well as three native English speakers was analyzed via electropalatography and acoustic analysis. While some learners produced distinct onset and coda variants and all learners had moved away to some extent from their L1 production, they differed from the native speakers in certain ways. Moreover, between- and within-group variability was observed including greater target-like anterior and posterior contact reduction in codas in the L1 French versus L1 Spanish group and generally higher F2 values in both learner groups compared with their native speaker peers. A comparison of the learners’ L1 and L2 production revealed L1-based patterns of positional reduction of the tongue tip and dorsum gestures. We conclude by addressing the contributions of EPG to our understanding of L2 speech and highlight avenues for future research including the study of both linguistic and speaker variables.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T06:53:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231200629
       
  • Does Orkish Sound Evil' Perception of Fantasy Languages and Their Phonetic
           and Phonological Characteristics

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      Authors: Christine Mooshammer, Dominique Bobeck, Henrik Hornecker, Kierán Meinhardt, Olga Olina, Marie Christin Walch, Qiang Xia
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Constructed languages, frequently invented to support world-building in fantasy and science fiction genres, are often intended to sound similar to the characteristics of the people who speak them. The aims of this study are (1) to investigate whether some fictional languages, such as Orkish whose speakers are portrayed as villainous, are rated more negatively by listeners than, for example, the Elvish languages, even when they are all produced without emotional involvement in the voice; and (2) to investigate whether the rating results can be related to the sound structure of the languages under investigation. An online rating experiment with three 7-point semantic differential scales was conducted, in which three sentences from each of 12 fictional languages (Neo-Orkish, Quenya, Sindarin, Khuzdul, Adûnaic, Klingon, Vulcan, Atlantean, Dothraki, Na’vi, Kesh, ʕuiʕuid) were rated, spoken by a female and a male speaker. The results from 129 participants indicate that Klingon and Dothraki do indeed sound more unpleasant, evil, and aggressive than the Elvish languages Sindarin and Quenya. Furthermore, this difference in rating is predicted by certain characteristics of the sound structure, such as the percentage of non-German sounds and the percentage of voicing. The implications of these results are discussed in relation to theories of language attitude.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-11-29T10:59:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231202944
       
  • English Vowel Discrimination and Perceptual Assimilation by Japanese
           Listeners

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      Authors: Yasuaki Shinohara, Chao Han, Arild Hestvik
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined whether the discrimination accuracy of nonnative vowels could be predicted by how listeners assimilate nonnative phones into their L1. The results demonstrated that Japanese listeners discriminated between English /æ/ and /ʌ/ better than they did between /ɑ/ and /ʌ/, although they categorized all those stimuli as the Japanese /a/. Given that the acoustic distance between stimuli was controlled to be identical, this result was attributed not to the acoustic difference but to the category-goodness difference. The goodness-of-fit to the Japanese /a/ phoneme differed between the English /æ/ and /ʌ/ but not between the English /ɑ/ and /ʌ/, suggesting that it is more difficult to discriminate between vowels when the category-goodness difference between two nonnative stimuli is smaller. In addition, this study examined the relationship between perceptual assimilation and the focalization effect. Focalization affects directional asymmetry in a manner that renders detecting a sound change from a more-focal to a less-focal vowel more difficult than detecting a change in the opposite direction. The results demonstrated that this directional asymmetry is only observed when listeners assimilate two nonnative phones into a single L1 phonemic category, with no category-goodness difference between the two nonnative phones.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T12:41:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231209311
       
  • Contrastive Alveolar/Retroflex Phonemes in Singapore Mandarin Bilinguals:
           Comprehension Rates for Articulations in Different Accents, and Acoustic
           Analysis of Productions

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      Authors: Hannah L. Goh, Fei Ting Woon, Scott R. Moisik, Suzy J. Styles
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The standard Beijing variety of Mandarin has a clear alveolar–retroflex contrast for phonemes featuring voiceless sibilant frication (i.e., /s/, /ʂ/, /ʈs/, /ʈʂ/, /ʈsʰ/, /ʈʂʰ/). However, some studies show that varieties in the ‘outer circle’, such in Taiwan, have a reduced contrast for these speech sounds via a process known as ‘deretroflexion’. The variety of Mandarin spoken in Singapore is also considered as ‘outer circle’, as it exhibits influences from Min Nan varieties. We investigated how bilinguals of Singapore Mandarin and English perceive and produce speech tokens in minimal pairs differing only in the alveolar/retroflex place of articulation. In all, 50 participants took part in two tasks. In Task 1, participants performed a lexical identification task for minimal pairs differing only the alveolar/retroflex place of articulation, as spoken by native speakers of two varieties: Beijing Mandarin and Singapore Mandarin. No difference in comprehension of the words was observed between the two varieties indicating that both varieties contain sufficient acoustic information for discrimination. In Task 2, participants read aloud from the list of minimal pairs while their voices were recorded. Acoustic analysis revealed that the phonemes do indeed differ acoustically in terms of center of gravity of the frication and in an alternative measure: long-term averaged spectra. The magnitude of this difference appears to be smaller than previously reported differences for the Beijing variety. These findings show that although some deretroflexion is evident in the speech of bilinguals of the Singaporean variety of Mandarin, it does not translate to ambiguity in the speech signal.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T11:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231205012
       
  • Processing of English Coda Laterals in L2 Listeners: An Eye-Tracking Study

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      Authors: Yizhou Wang
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores speech processing of English coda laterals (dark L’s) in second language (L2) listeners whose native language does not permit laterals at syllable coda positions. We tested L2 listeners’ (native Mandarin) perception of coda laterals following three Australian English vowels differing in phonological backness, including /iː/, /ʉː/, and /oː/, which represent a front vowel, and central vowel, and a back vowel, respectively. L2 listeners first completed an AX task which tested their ability to discriminate between /iː/-/iːl/, /ʉː/-/ʉːl/, and /oː/-/oːl/, and then they completed an identification task with eye-tracking which tested their ability to distinguish vowel–lateral sequences and bare vowel categories using explicit phonological–orthographical labels. The results show that vowel backness plays a key role in L2 listeners’ perceptual accuracy of English coda laterals, whereas the eye-tracking and identification data suggest some paradigmatic differences between the two tasks. Mandarin listeners show excellent discrimination and identification of coda laterals following a front vowel and poor performance following a back vowel, whereas the central vowel has led to intermediate patterns.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-10-28T10:37:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231203899
       
  • Sensorimotor Adaptation to Formant-Shifted Auditory Feedback Is Predicted
           by Language-Specific Factors in L1 and L2 Speech Production

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      Authors: Xiao Cai, Mingkun Ouyang, Yulong Yin, Qingfang Zhang
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Auditory feedback plays an important role in the long-term updating and maintenance of speech motor control; thus, the current study explored the unresolved question of how sensorimotor adaptation is predicted by language-specific and domain-general factors in first-language (L1) and second-language (L2) production. Eighteen English-L1 speakers and 22 English-L2 speakers performed the same sensorimotor adaptation experiments and tasks, which measured language-specific and domain-general abilities. The experiment manipulated the language groups (English-L1 and English-L2) and experimental conditions (baseline, early adaptation, late adaptation, and end). Linear mixed-effects model analyses indicated that auditory acuity was significantly associated with sensorimotor adaptation in L1 and L2 speakers. Analysis of vocal responses showed that L1 speakers exhibited significant sensorimotor adaptation under the early adaptation, late adaptation, and end conditions, whereas L2 speakers exhibited significant sensorimotor adaptation only under the late adaptation condition. Furthermore, the domain-general factors of working memory and executive control were not associated with adaptation/aftereffects in either L1 or L2 production, except for the role of working memory in aftereffects in L2 production. Overall, the study empirically supported the hypothesis that sensorimotor adaptation is predicted by language-specific factors such as auditory acuity and language experience, whereas general cognitive abilities do not play a major role in this process.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T09:52:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231202503
       
  • Sociophonetic Variation in Vowel Categorization of Australian English

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      Authors: Debbie Loakes, Josh Clothier, John Hajek, Janet Fletcher
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study involves a perceptual categorization task for Australian English, designed to investigate regional and social variation in category boundaries between close-front vowel contrasts. Data are from four locations in southeast Australia. A total of 81 listeners from two listener groups took part: (a) so-called mainstream Australian English listeners from all four locations, and (b) L1 Aboriginal English listeners from one of the locations. Listeners heard front vowels /ɪ e æ/ arranged in 7-step continua presented at random. Varied phonetic contexts were analyzed, with a focus on coda /l/ because of a well-known prelateral merger of /e æ/ through mid-vowel lowering (e.g., celery-salary) reported to occur in some communities in this part of Australia. The results indicate that regional variation in Australian English is evident in perception. In particular, merging of /el/-/æl/ is shown to occur in the southernmost regions analyzed, but rarely in the northern regions of the geographical area under investigation. Aside from regional variation observed, age was also a factor in how participants responded to the task: older speakers had more merger than younger speakers in many locations, which is a new finding—previously, the merger was thought to be increasing in frequency over time, yet here we see this in only one location. Aboriginal English listeners also responded differently when compared with mainstream Australian English listeners. By analyzing the perception results across a variety of regional locations, with data from two different Australian social groups in the same location, this study adds a new dimension to our understanding of regional and social variations in Australian English.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-10-13T09:47:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231198520
       
  • How Complex Verbs Acquire Their Idiosyncratic Meanings

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      Authors: Sergei Monakhov
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Complex verbs with the same preverb/prefix/particle that is both linguistically productive and analyzable can be compositional as well as non-compositional in meaning. For example, the English on has compositional spatial uses (put a hat on) but also a non-spatial “continuative” use, where its semantic contribution is consistent with multiple verbs (we played / worked / talked on despite the interruption). Comparable examples can be given with German preverbs or Russian prefixes, which are the main data analyzed in the present paper. The preverbs/prefixes/particles that encode non-compositional, construction-specific senses have been extensively studied; however, it is still far from clear how their semantic idiosyncrasies arise. Even when one can identify the contribution of the base, it is counterintuitive to assign the remaining sememes to the preverb/prefix/particle part. Therefore, on one hand, there seems to be an element without meaning, and on the other, there is a word sense that apparently comes from nowhere. In this article, I suggest analyzing compositional and non-compositional complex verbs as instantiations of two different types of constructions: one with an open slot for the preverb/prefix/particle and a fixed base verb and another with a fixed preverb/prefix/particle and an open slot for the base verb. Both experimental and corpus evidence supporting this decision is provided for Russian data. I argue that each construction implies its own meaning-processing model and that the actual choice between the two can be predicted by taking into account the discrepancy in probabilities of transition from preverb/prefix/particle to base and from base to preverb/prefix/particle.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:17:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231199994
       
  • Social Priming: Exploring the Effects of Speaker Race and Ethnicity on
           Perception of Second Language Accents

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      Authors: Drew J. McLaughlin, Kristin J. Van Engen
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Listeners use more than just acoustic information when processing speech. Social information, such as a speaker’s perceived race or ethnicity, can also affect the processing of the speech signal, in some cases facilitating perception (“social priming”). We aimed to replicate and extend this line of inquiry, examining effects of multiple social primes (i.e., a Middle Eastern, White, or East Asian face, or a control silhouette image) on the perception of Mandarin Chinese-accented English and Arabic-accented English. By including uncommon priming combinations (e.g., a Middle Eastern prime for a Mandarin accent), we aimed to test the specificity of social primes: For example, can a Middle Eastern face facilitate perception of both Arabic-accented English and Mandarin-accented English' Contrary to our predictions, our results indicated no facilitative social priming effects for either of the second language (L2) accents. Results for our examination of specificity were mixed. Trends in the data indicated that the combination of an East Asian prime with Arabic accent resulted in lower accuracy as compared with a White prime, but the combination of a Middle Eastern prime with a Mandarin accent did not (and may have actually benefited listeners to some degree). We conclude that the specificity of priming effects may depend on listeners’ level of familiarity with a given accent and/or racial/ethnic group and that the mixed outcomes in the current work motivate further inquiries to determine whether social priming effects for L2-accented speech may be smaller than previously hypothesized and/or highly dependent on listener experience.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T10:13:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231199245
       
  • Often Overlooked Aspects of Sound Symbolism: The Influence of
           Participants’ Characteristics on Size Ratings

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      Authors: László Kovács, Renáta Németh, Hilke Elsen
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Sound symbolism is a non-arbitrary mapping between phonetic properties and meanings. The existence and nature of sound symbolism have long been the subject of empirical research. It is rarely recognized, however, that participants’ intrinsic characteristics (e.g., age, gender, language knowledge), in addition to the commonly studied phonetic features, may also influence size ratings. Our study aims to empirically investigate the impact of participant-specific characteristics on size ratings: It also aims to examine whether these characteristics have a direct impact when considering the impact of phonetic features or they rather modify the effects of phonetic features. The current research reports a novel analysis of a previously published dataset with new research questions and previously unused (participant-specific) data. We show that (a) the participants’ characteristics did not affect overall size ratings; however, (b) in some cases, they modify (intensify or weaken but do not reverse) the effect of phonetic features on size ratings. Our results emphasize a more comprehensive treatment of sound symbolism, one that considers not only phonetic but also non-phonetic factors in sound symbolism research.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-09-22T09:27:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231193631
       
  • The Effect of Distributional Restrictions in Speech Perception: A Case
           Study From Korean and Taiwanese Southern Min

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      Authors: Jiwon Hwang, Yu-An Lu
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      In Korean, voiced oral stops can occur intervocalically as allophones of their voiceless lenis counterparts; they can also occur initially as variants of nasal stops as a result of initial denasalization (e.g., /motu/→[bodu] “all”). However, neither [ŋ] nor [ɡ] (the denasalized variant of the velar nasal) is allowed in the initial position due to the phonotactic restriction against initial [ŋ] in Korean. Given the distribution of nasal and voiced stops in Korean, this study draws on the idea of cue informativeness, exploring (a) whether Korean listeners’ attention to nasality and voicing cues is based on the distributional characteristics of nasal and voiced stops, and (b) whether their attention can be generalized across different places of articulation without such linguistic experience. In a forced-choice identification experiment, Korean listeners were more likely than Taiwanese listeners to perceive items on the voiced oral-to-nasal stop continua as nasal when they occurred in the initial position than in the intervocalic position, with the exception of velar stops. The results demonstrate that the Korean listeners attended to the nasality cue more reliably in the medial position than in the initial position, since the nasality cue in this position is less informative due to initial denasalization. Two additional forced-choice identification experiments suggested that upon hearing initial velar nasal [ŋ], Korean listeners variably employed different perceptual strategies (i.e., vowel insertion and place change) to repair the phonotactic illegality. These findings provide support for exemplar models of speech perception in which cue attention is specific to the position of a word, and to segments rather than to features.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-09-15T11:02:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231195263
       
  • The Effect of Habitual Speech Rate on Speaker-Specific Processing in
           English Stop Voicing Perception

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      Authors: Connie Ting, Yoonjung Kang
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates listeners’ ability to track individual speakers’ habitual speech rate in a dialogue and adjust their perception of durational contrasts. Previous studies that found such adjustments are inconclusive as adjustments can be attributed to exemplars of target structures in the dialogue rather than perceptual calibration of habitual speech rates. In this study, English listeners were presented with a dialogue between a fast and slow speaker, containing no stressed syllable-initial voiceless stops. Listeners then categorized /pi/-/bi/ syllables differing along a voice onset time continuum. Results did not show conclusive evidence that listeners’ response differed systematically depending on speakers’ habitual speech rate.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-08-09T11:18:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231188078
       
  • Phonetic Dissimilarity and L2 Category Formation in L2 Accommodation

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      Authors: Grace Wenling Cao
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Many studies of speech accommodation focus on native speakers with different dialects, whereas only a limited number of studies work on L2 speakers’ accommodation and discuss theories for second language (L2) accommodation. This paper aimed to fill the theoretical gap by integrating the revised speech learning model (SLM) with the exemplar-based models for L2 speech accommodation. A total of 19 Cantonese–English bilingual speakers completed map tasks with English speakers of Received Pronunciation and General American English in two separate experiments. Their pronunciations of THOUGHT and PATH vowels, and fricatives [z] and [θ] were examined before, during, and after the map tasks. The role of phonetic dissimilarity in L2 accommodation and L2 category formation in the revised SLM (SLM-r) were tested. First, the results suggested that global phonetic dissimilarity cannot predict Hong Kong English (HKE) speakers’ accommodation patterns. Instead, the segment-specific phonetic dissimilarity between participants and interlocutors was found to be positively correlated with the participants’ degree of accommodation. In addition, HKE speakers who did not form a new L2 category of [z] were found to significantly accommodate toward their interlocutor, suggesting that L2 accommodation might not be constrained by phonological category. An integrated exemplar model for L2 accommodation is proposed to explain these findings.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-08-02T07:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231182967
       
  • Phrasal Synchronization of Gesture With Prosody and Information Structure

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      Authors: Olcay Türk, Sasha Calhoun
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the synchronization of manual gestures with prosody and information structure using Turkish natural speech data. Prosody has long been linked to gesture as a key driver of gesture–speech synchronization. Gesture has a hierarchical phrasal structure similar to prosody. At the lowest level, gesture has been shown to be synchronized with prosody (e.g., apexes and pitch accents). However, less is known about higher levels. Even less is known about timing relationships with information structure, though this is signaled by prosody and linked to gesture. The present study analyzed phrase synchronization in 3 hr of narrations in Turkish annotated for gesture, prosody, and information structure—topics and foci. The analysis of 515 gesture phrases showed that there was no one-to-one synchronization with intermediate phrases, but their onsets and offsets were synchronized. Moreover, information structural units, topics, and foci were closely synchronized with gesture phrase medial stroke + post-hold combinations (i.e., apical areas). In addition, iconic and metaphoric gestures were more likely to be paired with foci, and deictics with topics. Overall, the results confirm synchronization of gesture and prosody at the phrasal level and provide evidence that gesture shows a direct sensitivity to information structure. These show that speech and gesture production are more connected than assumed in existing production models.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T12:24:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231185308
       
  • Language Contact Within the Speaker: Phonetic Variation and
           Crosslinguistic Influence

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      Authors: Khia A. Johnson, Molly Babel
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      A recent model of sound change posits that the direction of change is determined, at least in part, by the distribution of variation within speech communities. We explore this model in the context of bilingual speech, asking whether the less variable language constrains phonetic variation in the more variable language, using a corpus of spontaneous speech from early Cantonese–English bilinguals. As predicted, given the phonetic distributions of stop obstruents in Cantonese compared with English, intervocalic English /b d g/ were produced with less voicing for Cantonese–English bilinguals and word-final English /t k/ were more likely to be unreleased compared with spontaneous speech from two monolingual English control corpora. Whereas voicing initial obstruents can be gradient in Cantonese, the release of final obstruents is prohibited. Neither Cantonese–English bilingual initial voicing nor word-final stop release patterns were significantly impacted by language mode. These results provide evidence that the phonetic variation in crosslinguistically linked categories in bilingual speech is shaped by the distribution of phonetic variation within each language, thus suggesting a mechanistic account for why some segments are more susceptible to cross-language influence than others.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T08:41:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231182592
       
  • Phonological Well-Formedness Constraints in Mandarin Phonotactics:
           Evidence From Lexical Decision

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      Authors: Shuxiao Gong, Jie Zhang, Robert Fiorentino
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This article investigates the role of phonological well-formedness constraints in Mandarin speakers’ phonotactic grammar and how they affect online speech processing. Mandarin non-words can be categorized into systematic gaps and accidental gaps, depending on whether they violate principled phonotactic constraints based on the Obligatory Contour Principle (OCP). Non-word acceptability judgment experiments have shown that systematic gaps received lower wordlikeness ratings than accidental gaps. Using a lexical decision task, this study found that systematic gaps were rejected significantly faster than accidental gaps, even after lexical statistics were taken into account. These findings thus provide converging evidence for the essential status of the OCP-based phonotactic constraints in Mandarin speakers’ phonological knowledge.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-07-27T05:52:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231182363
       
  • The Syntactic Pasts of Nouns Shape Their Prosodic Future: Lexico-Syntactic
           Effects on Position and Duration

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      Authors: Nicholas A. Lester, Argyro Katsika
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Phrasal prosody is often viewed as a level of linguistic representation at which the phonetic profile of an utterance varies independently of the lexical items it contains. For example, the same word, when produced at the edges of prosodic phrases, will take longer to produce than when it is produced within the edges of a phrase. Lengthening effects have also been found for words when placed in different syntactic or lexical contexts. Recent evidence suggests that lexico-syntactic information—for example, the global syntactic distributions of words—affects phonetic duration in production, irrespective of other factors. The present study asks whether these lexico-syntactic effects on duration interact with prosodic position within the phrase. Specifically, we ask whether (a) the lexico-syntactic information of a word determines its prosodic position, and (b) whether, beyond any categorical effects on positioning, lexico-syntactic factors affect duration within prosodic positions. We address these questions using the Santa Barbara Corpus of Spoken American English. We operationalize syntactic information as the diversity and the typicality of the syntactic distributions of nouns based on a dependency parse of the British National Corpus. We find that earlier positions in the prosodic phrase generally prefer words with higher syntactic diversity. In addition, diversity and typicality modulate duration more reliably in nonfinal positions. Together, our results point to an early influence of lexico-syntactic considerations on prosodic planning.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-07-05T05:53:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231177884
       
  • Bilingual Children Shift and Relax Second-Language Phoneme Categorization
           in Response to Accented L2 and Native L1 Speech Exposure

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      Authors: Margarethe McDonald, Margarita Kaushanskaya
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Listeners adjust their perception to match that of presented speech through shifting and relaxation of categorical boundaries. This allows for processing of speech variation, but may be detrimental to processing efficiency. Bilingual children are exposed to many types of speech in their linguistic environment, including native and non-native speech. This study examined how first language (L1) Spanish/second language (L2) English bilingual children shifted and relaxed phoneme categorization along the cue of voice onset time (VOT) during English speech processing after three types of language exposure: native English exposure, native Spanish exposure, and Spanish-accented English exposure. After exposure to Spanish-accented English speech, bilingual children shifted categorical boundaries in the direction of native English speech boundaries. After exposure to native Spanish speech, children shifted to a smaller extent in the same direction and relaxed boundaries leading to weaker differentiation between categories. These results suggest that prior exposure can affect processing of a second language in bilingual children, but different mechanisms are used when adapting to different types of speech variation.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-07-04T11:40:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231176760
       
  • A Corpus Study on the Difference of Turn-Taking in Online Audio, Online
           Video, and Face-to-Face Conversation

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      Authors: Ying Tian, Siyun Liu, Jianying Wang
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Daily conversation is usually face-to-face and characterized by rapid and fluent exchange of turns between interlocutors. With the need to communicate across long distances, advances in communication media, online audio communication, and online video communication have become convenient alternatives for an increasing number of people. However, the fluency of turn-taking may be influenced when people communicate using these different modes. In this study, we conducted a corpus analysis of face-to-face, online audio, and online video conversations collected from the internet. The fluency of turn-taking in face-to-face conversations differed from that of online audio and video conversations. Namely, the timing of turn-taking was shorter and with more overlaps in face-to-face conversations compared with online audio and video conversations. This can be explained by the limited ability of online communication modes to transmit non-verbal cues and network latency. In addition, our study could not completely exclude the effect of formality of conversation. The present findings have implications for the rules of turn-taking in human online conversations, in that the traditional rule of no-gap–no-overlap may not be fully applicable to online conversations.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-06-15T08:32:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231176768
       
  • Kinect-ing the Dots: Using Motion-Capture Technology to Distinguish Sign
           Language Linguistic From Gestural Expressions

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      Authors: Rose Stamp, David Cohen, Hagit Hel-Or, Wendy Sandler
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Just as vocalization proceeds in a continuous stream in speech, so too do movements of the hands, face, and body in sign languages. Here, we use motion-capture technology to distinguish lexical signs in sign language from other common types of expression in the signing stream. One type of expression is constructed action, the enactment of (aspects of) referents and events by (parts of) the body. Another is classifier constructions, the manual representation of analogue and gradient motions and locations simultaneously with specified referent morphemes. The term signing is commonly used for all of these, but we show that not all visual signals in sign languages are of the same type. In this study of Israeli Sign Language, we use motion capture to show that the motion of lexical signs differs significantly along several kinematic parameters from that of the two other modes of expression: constructed action and the classifier forms. In so doing, we show how motion-capture technology can help to define the universal linguistic category “word,” and to distinguish it from the expressive gestural elements that are commonly found across sign languages.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-06-14T10:31:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231169502
       
  • Elliptical Responses to Direct and Indirect Requests for Information

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      Authors: Katherine Chia, Michael P. Kaschak
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      We present two studies examining the factors that lead speakers to produce elliptical responses to requests for information. Following Clark and Levelt and Kelter, experimenters called businesses and asked about their closing time (e.g., Can you tell me what time you close'). Participants provided the requested information in full sentence responses (We close at 9) or elliptical responses (At 9). A reanalysis of data from previous experiments using this paradigm shows that participants are more likely to produce an elliptical response when the question is a direct request for information (What time do you close') than when the question is an indirect request for information (Can you tell me what time you close'). Participants were less likely to produce an elliptical response when they began their answer by providing a yes/no response (e.g., Sure . . . we close at 9). A new experiment replicated these findings, and further showed that elliptical responses were less likely when (1) irrelevant linguistic content was inserted between the question and the participant’s response, and (2) participants verbalized signs of difficulty retrieving the requested information. This latter effect is most prominent in response to questions that are seen as very polite (May I ask you what time you close'). We discuss the role that the recoverability of the intended meaning of the ellipsis, the accessibility of potential antecedents for the ellipsis, pragmatic factors, and memory retrieval play in shaping the production of ellipsis.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T09:38:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231176526
       
  • Bridging Inferences and Reference Management: Evidence from an
           Experimental Investigation in Catalan and Russian

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      Authors: Daria Seres, Joan Borràs-Comes, M. Teresa Espinal
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This article focuses on the choice of nominal forms in a language with articles (Catalan) in comparison to a language without articles (Russian). An experimental study (consisting of various naturalness judgment tasks) was run with speakers of these two languages which allowed to show that in bridging contexts native speakers’ preferences vary when reference is made to one single individual or to two disjoint referents. In the former case, Catalan speakers chose (in)definite NPs depending on their accessibility to contextual information that guarantees a unique interpretation (or the lack of it) for the entity referred to. Russian speakers chose bare nominals as a default form. When reference is made to two disjoint referents (as encoded by the presence of an additional altre/drugoj “other” NP), speakers prefer an optimal combination of two indefinite NPs (i.e., un NP followed by un altre NP in Catalan; odin “some/a” NP followed by drugoj NP in Russian). This study shows how speakers of the two languages manage to combine grammatical knowledge (related to the meaning of the definite and the indefinite articles and altre in Catalan; and the meaning of bare nominals, odin and drugoj in Russian) with world knowledge activation and accessibility to discourse information.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-06-06T05:43:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231173337
       
  • Adaptation at the Syntax–Semantics Interface: Evidence From a
           Vernacular Structure

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      Authors: Frances Blanchette, Erin Flannery, Carrie Jackson, Paul Reed
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Expanding on psycholinguistic research on linguistic adaptation, the phenomenon whereby speakers change how they comprehend or produce structures as a result of cumulative exposure to less frequent or unfamiliar linguistic structures, this study asked whether speakers can learn semantic and syntactic properties of the American English vernacular negative auxiliary inversion (NAI) structure (e.g., didn’t everybody eat, meaning “not everybody ate”) during the course of an experiment. Formal theoretical analyses of NAI informed the design of a task in which American English-speaking participants unfamiliar with this structure were exposed to NAI sentences in either semantically ambiguous or unambiguous contexts. Participants rapidly adapted to the interpretive properties of NAI, selecting responses similar to what would be expected of a native speaker after only limited exposure to semantically ambiguous input. On a separate ratings task, participants displayed knowledge of syntactic restrictions on NAI subject type, despite having no previous exposure. We discuss the results in the context of other experimental studies of adaptation and suggest the implementation of top-down strategies via analogy to other familiar structure types as possible explanations for the behaviors observed in this study. The study illustrates the value of integrating insights from formal theoretical research and psycholinguistic methods in research on adaptation and highlights the need for more interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary work in both experimental and naturalistic contexts to understand this phenomenon.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T05:27:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231164972
       
  • Disentangling the Role of Biphone Probability From Neighborhood Density in
           the Perception of Nonwords

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      Authors: Jeremy Steffman, Megha Sundara
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      In six experiments we explored how biphone probability and lexical neighborhood density influence listeners’ categorization of vowels embedded in nonword sequences. We found independent effects of each. Listeners shifted categorization of a phonetic continuum to create a higher probability sequence, even when neighborhood density was controlled. Similarly, listeners shifted categorization to create a nonword from a denser neighborhood, even when biphone probability was controlled. Next, using a visual world eye-tracking task, we determined that biphone probability information is used rapidly by listeners in perception. In contrast, task complexity and irrelevant variability in the stimuli interfere with neighborhood density effects. These results support a model in which both biphone probability and neighborhood density independently affect word recognition, but only biphone probability effects are observed early in processing.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-05-10T05:26:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231164982
       
  • Playing With Fire Compounds: The Tonal Accents of Compounds in (North)
           Norwegian Preschoolers’ Role-Play Register

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      Authors: Bror-Magnus S. Strand
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Prosodic features are some of the most salient features of dialect variation in Norway. It is therefore no wonder that the switch in prosodic systems is what is first recognized by caretakers and scholars when Norwegian children code-switch to something resembling the dialect of the capital (henceforth Urban East Norwegian, UEN) in role-play. With a focus on the system of lexical tonal accents, this paper investigates the spontaneous speech of North Norwegian children engaging in peer social role-play. By investigating F0 contours extracted from a corpus of spontaneous peer play, and comparing them with elicited baseline reference contours, this paper makes the case that children fail to apply the target tonal accent consistent with UEN in compounds in role-play, although the production of tonal accents otherwise seems to be phonetically target like UEN. Put in other words, they perform in accordance with UEN phonetics, but not UEN morpho-phonology.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-04-28T06:19:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231161289
       
  • Perceptual Sensitivity to Tonal Alignment in Nuer

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      Authors: Siri Gjersøe, Bert Remijsen
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      This paper examines the perceptual threshold in patterns of tonal timing (alignment) of Falling versus Low tones. The results indicate a remarkable sensitivity among the listeners. In a perception experiment with 30 participants, we tested how native speakers of the West Nilotic language Nuer responded to stimuli in which the timing of the F0 fall that distinguishes Low versus Fall following a High target is manipulated. We measured the threshold for the responses to shift tone perception from 25% to 75%. The results show that listeners only needed an average of 19 ms to differentiate between the melodic shapes and as little as 13 ms for one item. Perceptual sensitivity this fine-grained is not expected based on what is known about the Just Noticeable Difference (JND) from previous studies. Results from non-tonal languages report a sensitivity threshold for tonal timing of at least 50 ms at category boundaries. This difference suggests that whether or not subjects speak a tone language may be a determining factor in their JND.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-04-25T11:51:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231162299
       
  • Predictability Associated With Reduction in Phonetic Signals Without
           Semantics—The Case of Glossolalia

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      Authors: Samantha Link, Fabian Tomaschek
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Glossolalia can be regarded as an instance of speech production in which practitioners produce syllables in seemingly random sequences. However, a closer inspection of glossalalia’s statistical properties reveals that sequences show a Zipfian pattern similar to natural languages, with some syllables being more probable than others. It is well established that statistical properties of sequences are implicitly learned, and that these statistical properties correlate with changes in kinematic and speech behavior. For speech, this means that more predictable items are phonetically shorter. Accordingly, we hypothesized for glossolalia that if practitioners have learned a serial pattern in glossolalia in the same manner as in natural languages, its statistical properties should correlate with its phonetic characteristics. Our hypothesis was supported. We find significantly shorter syllables associated with higher syllable probabilities in glossolalia. We discuss this finding in relation to theories about the sources of probability-related changes in the speech signal.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-04-18T06:17:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231163170
       
  • The Effects of Acoustic and Semantic Enhancements on Perception of Native
           and Non-Native Speech

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      Authors: Misaki Kato, Melissa M. Baese-Berk
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has shown that native listeners benefit from clearly produced speech, as well as from predictable semantic context when these enhancements are delivered in native speech. However, it is unclear whether native listeners benefit from acoustic and semantic enhancements differently when listening to other varieties of speech, including non-native speech. The current study examines to what extent native English listeners benefit from acoustic and semantic cues present in native and non-native English speech. Native English listeners transcribed sentence final words that were of different levels of semantic predictability, produced in plain- or clear-speaking styles by Native English talkers and by native Mandarin talkers of higher- and lower-proficiency in English. The perception results demonstrated that listeners benefited from semantic cues in higher- and lower-proficiency talkers’ speech (i.e., transcribed speech more accurately), but not from acoustic cues, even though higher-proficiency talkers did make substantial acoustic enhancements from plain to clear speech. The current results suggest that native listeners benefit more robustly from semantic cues than from acoustic cues when those cues are embedded in non-native speech.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-03-27T05:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231156615
       
  • Violations of Lab-Learned Phonological Patterns Elicit a Late Positive
           Component

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      Authors: Claire Moore-Cantwell, Joe Pater, Robert Staubs, Benjamin Zobel, Lisa Sanders
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The experimental study of artificial language learning has become a widely used means of investigating the predictions of theories of language learning and representation. Although much is now known about the generalizations that learners make from various kinds of data, relatively little is known about how those representations affect speech processing. This paper presents an event-related potential (ERP) study of brain responses to violations of lab-learned phonotactics. Novel words that violated a learned phonotactic constraint elicited a larger Late Positive Component (LPC) than novel words that satisfied it. Similar LPCs have been found for violations of natively acquired linguistic structure, as well as for violations of other types of abstract generalizations, such as musical structure. We argue that lab-learned phonotactic generalizations are represented abstractly and affect the evaluation of speech in a manner that is similar to natively acquired syntactic and phonological rules.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-03-17T05:07:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231152492
       
  • Differential Cue Weighting in Mandarin Sibilant Production

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      Authors: Ivy Hauser
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Individual talkers vary in their relative use of different cues to signal phonological contrast. Previous work provides limited and conflicting data on whether such variation is modulated by cue trading or individual differences in speech style. This paper examines differential cue weighting patterns in Mandarin sibilants as a test case for these hypotheses. Standardized Mandarin exhibits a three-way place contrast between retroflex, alveopalatal, and alveolar sibilants with individual differences in relative weighting of spectral center of gravity (COG) and the second formant of the following vowel (F2). In results from a speech production task, cue weights of COG and F2 are inversely correlated across speakers, demonstrating a trade-off relationship in cue use. These findings are consistent with a cue trading account of individual differences in contrast signaling.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-03-08T05:33:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231152495
       
  • The Interaction Effect of Pronunciation and Lexicogrammar on
           Comprehensibility: A Case of Mandarin-Accented English

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      Authors: Yongzhi Miao, Heath Rose, Sepideh Hosseini
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Scholars have argued that comprehensibility (i.e., ease of understanding), not nativelike performance, should be prioritized in second language learning, which inspired numerous studies to explore factors affecting comprehensibility. However, most of these studies did not consider potential interaction effects of these factors, resulting in a limited understanding of comprehensibility and less precise implications. This study investigates how pronunciation and lexicogrammar influences the comprehensibility of Mandarin-accented English. A total of 687 listeners were randomly allocated into six groups and rated (a) one baseline and (b) one of six experimental recordings for comprehensibility on a 9-point scale. The baseline recording, a 60 s spontaneous speech by an L1 English speaker with an American accent, was the same across groups. The six 75-s experimental recordings were the same in content but differed in (a) speakers’ degree of foreign accent (American, moderate Mandarin, and heavy Mandarin) and (b) lexicogrammar (with errors vs. without errors). The study found that pronunciation and lexicogrammar interacted to influence comprehensibility. That is, whether pronunciation affected comprehensibility depended on speakers’ lexicogrammar, and vice versa. The results have implications for theory-building to refine comprehensibility, as well as for pedagogy and testing priorities.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-03-06T10:30:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231156918
       
  • The Temporal Dynamics of Stop Consonant Perception: Evidence from Context
           Effects

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      Authors: Wenli Liu, Xiaoguang Pan, Xiang Zhou
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Empirical evidence and theoretical models suggest that phonetic category perception involves two stages of auditory and phonetic processing. However, few studies examined the time course of these two processing stages. With brief stop consonant segments as context stimuli, this study examined the temporal dynamics of stop consonant perception by varying the inter-stimulus interval between context and target stimuli. The results suggest that phonetic category activation of stop consonants may appear before 100 ms of processing time. Furthermore, the activation of phonetic categories resulted in contrast context effects on identifying the target stop continuum; the auditory processing of stop consonants resulted in a different context effect from those caused by phonetic category activation. The findings provide further evidence for the two-stage model of speech perception and reveal the time course of auditory and phonetic processing.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-02-13T05:41:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309231153355
       
  • How Different Types of Linguistic Information Impact Voice Perception:
           Evidence From the Language-Familiarity Effect

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      Authors: Keke Yu, Yacong Zhou, Linjun Zhang, Li Li, Ping Li, Ruiming Wang
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Previous studies have suggested the effect of linguistic information on voice perception (e.g., the language-familiarity effect [LFE]). However, it remains unclear which type of specific information in speech contributes to voice perception, including acoustic, phonological, lexical, and semantic information. It is also underexamined whether the roles of these different types of information are modulated by the experimental paradigm (speaker discrimination vs. speaker identification). In this study, we conducted two experiments to investigate these issues regarding LFEs. Experiment 1 examined the roles of acoustic and phonological information in speaker discrimination and identification with forward and time-reversed Mandarin and Indonesian sentences. Experiment 2 further identified the roles of phonological, lexical, and semantic information with forward, word-scrambled, and reconstructed (consisting of pseudo-Mandarin words) Mandarin and forward Indonesian sentences. For Mandarin-only participants, in Experiment 1, speaker discrimination was more accurate for forward than reversed sentences, but there was no LFE in either sentence. Speaker identification was also more accurate for forward than reversed sentences, whereas there was an LFE for forward sentences. In Experiment 2, speaker discrimination was better for word-scrambled than reconstructed Mandarin sentences. Speaker identification was more accurate for forward and word-scrambled Mandarin sentences but less accurate for Mandarin reconstructed and forward Indonesian sentences. In general, the pattern of the results for Indonesian learners was the same as that for Mandarin-only speakers. These results suggest that different kinds of information support speaker discrimination and identification in native and unfamiliar languages. The LFE in speaker identification depends on both phonological and lexical information.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-01-21T10:18:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221143062
       
  • Relationships Between Acoustic Characteristics and Intelligibility Scores:
           A Reanalysis of Japanese Speakers’ Productions of American English
           Liquids

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      Authors: Katsura Aoyama, Lingzi Hong, James E. Flege, Reiko Akahane-Yamada, Tsuneo Yamada
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The primary purpose of this research report was to investigate the relationships between acoustic characteristics and perceived intelligibility for native Japanese speakers’ productions of American English liquids. This report was based on a reanalysis of intelligibility scores and acoustic analyses that were reported in two previous studies. We examined which acoustic parameters were associated with higher perceived intelligibility scores for their productions of /l/ and /ɹ/ in American English, and whether Japanese speakers’ productions of the two liquids were acoustically differentiated from each other. Results demonstrated that the second formant (F2) was strongly correlated with the perceived intelligibility scores for the Japanese adults’ productions. Results also demonstrated that the Japanese adults’ and children’s productions of /l/ and /ɹ/ were indeed differentiated by some acoustic parameters including the third formant (F3). In addition, some changes occurred in the Japanese children’s productions over the course of 1 year. Overall, the present report shows that Japanese speakers of American English may be making a distinction between /l/ and /ɹ/ in production, although the distinctions are made in a different way compared with native English speakers’ productions. These findings have implications for setting realistic goals for improving intelligibility of English /l/ and /ɹ/ for Japanese speakers, as well as theoretical advancement of second-language speech learning.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-01-21T10:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221140910
       
  • Phonetic and Phono-Lexical Accuracy of Non-Native Tone Production by
           English-L1 and Mandarin-L1 Speakers

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      Authors: Tim Joris Laméris, Katrina Kechun Li, Brechtje Post
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      Lexical tones are known to be a challenging aspect of speech to acquire in a second language, but several factors are known to affect tone learning facility, such as L1 tonal status (whether a learner’s L1 is tonal or not), tone type (the shape of the tones to be acquired), and individual extralinguistic factors (such as musicianship, pitch aptitude, and working memory). Crucially, most of our knowledge of the effect of these factors is based on evidence from perception. The production side of tone learning and the origins of individual variability in learning facility remain relatively understudied. To this end, this study investigated non-native tone production—both in terms of phonetic accuracy in a pseudoword imitation task and in terms of phono-lexical accuracy in a picture-naming task—by English-L1 and Mandarin-L1 speakers. Results show that L1 tonal status and tone type dynamically affected both imitation and picture-naming accuracy, as there were specific accuracy patterns for the English and Mandarin groups. Production accuracy was further facilitated by individual musical experience, working memory, and pitch aptitude. This study’s findings add to the currently limited literature on how both language-specific and individual extralinguistic factors modulate non-native tone processing in the speaking modality.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T04:50:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221143719
       
  • A Reanalysis of the Voicing Effect in English: With Implications for
           Featural Specification

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      Authors: Rebecca L. Morley, Bridget J. Smith
      Abstract: Language and Speech, Ahead of Print.
      The voicing effect is among the most studied and robust of phonetic phenomena. Yet there remains a lack of consensus on why vowels preceding voiced obstruents should be longer than vowels preceding voiceless obstruents. In this paper we provide an analysis of the voicing effect in a corpus of natural speech, and using production data from a metronome-timed word repetition study. From this evidence, as well as the existing literature, we conclude that vowel duration differences follow from consonant duration differences. The characteristic voicing effect in English is largely limited to words of especially long duration, and preceding vowel duration does not reliably cue obstruent voicing under the following circumstances: when obstruent voicing or duration cues conflict; for lax or unstressed vowels; and for most conversational speech. We show that this behavior can be modeled using a competing-constraints framework, where all segments resist expanding or compressing past a preferred duration. Inherent segment elasticity determines the degree of resistance, but segment duration is ultimately determined by the interaction of these segmental constraints with constraints on the distribution of the lengthening force within the syllable, and how closely target durations are matched. This account of the voicing effect has a number of implications for phonological theory, especially the central role that the concept of prominence plays in the analysis of underlying features.
      Citation: Language and Speech
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T11:43:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00238309221142526
       
 
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  Subjects -> COMMUNICATIONS (Total: 518 journals)
    - COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)
    - DIGITAL AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION (31 journals)
    - HUMAN COMMUNICATION (19 journals)
    - MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES (7 journals)
    - RADIO, TELEVISION AND CABLE (15 journals)

COMMUNICATIONS (446 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 480 Journals sorted by number of followers
Evidence Based Library and Information Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 493)
Information Technologies & International Development     Open Access   (Followers: 86)
Information, Communication & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Convergence The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Augmentative and Alternative Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
e-learning and education (eleed)     Open Access   (Followers: 40)
Communication Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
New Media and Mass Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 32)
Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Communication, Culture & Critique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
New Review of Film and Television Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Medical Internet Research     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Discourse, Context & Media     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Canadian Journal of Communication     Partially Free   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Advanced Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Information & Communications Technology Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Framework : The Journal of Cinema and Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journalism & Mass Communication Educator     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Quarterly Review of Film and Video     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of International and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Screen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Language and Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Media Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
ACM Transactions on Information Systems (TOIS)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journalism & Communication Monographs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Media and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Science Fiction Film and Television     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Science Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Human Communication Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Communication Booknotes Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal for the History of Rhetoric     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Society, Culture & Language     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Media Ethics : Exploring Questions of Media Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
PAJ: A Journal of Performance and Art     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Public Relations Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Quarterly Journal of Speech     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Writing in Creative Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Communications of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Computer Science and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Studies in Media and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Journal of the American College of Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communications in Mobile Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Journalism & Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Celebrity Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Design Ecologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Global Media Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Information and Communication Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Chinese Journal of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
MedieKultur. Journal of media and communication research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pragmatics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Qualitative Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Audiology - Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
IEICE - Transactions on Fundamentals of Electronics, Communications and Computer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
IET Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Technical Writing and Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
ACM Transactions on Multimedia Computing, Communications, and Applications (TOMCCAP)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Business Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Qualitative Research Reports in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of European Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Electronics and Communications in Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Informal Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Communication & Language at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Radiotherapy in Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Magnetic Resonance Imaging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Interaction Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Language and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fibreculture Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Islamic Manuscripts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Comedy Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Electronics and Telecommunications     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Communication & Sport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
tripleC : Communication, Capitalism & Critique. Open Access Journal for a Global Sustainable Information Society     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Ad Hoc and Ubiquitous Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Seminars in Interventional Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Information Design Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Myth & Symbol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Black Camera     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cross-cultural Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Investigative Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Pediatric Radiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Technical Communication     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Telecommunications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Intelligent Information Management     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Metaverse Creativity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
China Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Radio & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Review of Cognitive Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Foundations and Trends® in Communications and Information Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Professional Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
The Communication Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Radio Journal : International Studies in Broadcast & Audio Media     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Asian Pacific Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Graph Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sign Language Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Explorations in Media Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Italian Cinema and Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
CIC. Cuadernos de Informacion y Comunicacion     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Women's Studies in Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Global Advances in Business Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Review in Electronics & Communication Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transactions on Emerging Telecommunications Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Advertising Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Radiology Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Neuroimaging Clinics of North America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Telecommunication Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Terminology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Gesture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Review of Pragmatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Cooperative Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Arts & Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Information Communication Technologies and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Medical Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Interactional Research in Communication Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Autonomous and Adaptive Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Magnetic Resonance Materials in Physics, Biology and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor Communicatiewetenschappen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Location Based Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Etudes de communication     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Science China Information Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communicatio : South African Journal for Communication Theory and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Language, Interaction and Acquisition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Sign Language & Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Kaleidoscope : A Graduate Journal of Qualitative Communication Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pacific Asia Journal of the Association for Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Community Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Catalan Journal of Communication & Cultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Interactions : Studies in Communication & Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Performing Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Intelligence Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Interdisciplinary Telecommunications and Networking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
MediaTropes     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nonprofit Communications Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Monitoring and Surveillance Technologies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nordicom Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Imaging Decisions MRI     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Language Problems & Language Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Northern Lights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Information Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Área Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
MATRIZes : Revista do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Comunicação da Universidade de São Paulo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y Medios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Empedocles : European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of African Media Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Comunicación y sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Digithum     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Middle East Media Educator     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
TELKOMNIKA (Telecommunication, Computing, Electronics and Control)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Radioelectronics and Communications Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
The Poster     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
McMaster Journal of Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Palabra Clave     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambitos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Latina de Comunicacion Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Knowledge and Systems Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journalistica - Tidsskrift for forskning i journalistik     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Documentación de las Ciencias de la Información     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Trust Management in Computing and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
La Trama de la Comunicación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Questions de communication     Open Access  
Quaderni     Open Access  
Communication et organisation     Open Access  
Avatares de la Comunicación y la Cultura     Open Access  
La Mirada de Telemo     Open Access  
International Journal of Telework and Telecommuting Technologies     Full-text available via subscription  
Virtualidad, Educación y Ciencia     Open Access  
Revista Contracampo     Open Access  
Mediaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Historia y Comunicación Social     Open Access  
Revista Compolítica     Open Access  
Comunicació. Revista de recerca i d'anàlisi     Open Access  
Signo y Pensamiento     Open Access  
Pixel-Bit. Revista de Medios y Educacion     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Informacion     Open Access  
Ubiquity     Hybrid Journal  
Revista de Comunicación y Salud     Open Access  
Journal of Modern Periodical Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
Tic & société     Open Access  

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