Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 253)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Gambling Studies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.969
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3602 - ISSN (Online) 1050-5350
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Suicidal Behaviors and Associated Factors Among Individuals with Gambling
           Disorders: A Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract The risk for suicidal behaviors including suicide ideations and attempts among individuals with gambling disorder (IWGDs) is high compared to the general population. Little is known about the interplay of mood disorders, alcohol use disorders, and suicidal behaviors among IWGDs. The study aimed to determine the prevalence, sociodemographic characteristics, risky behaviors, mental health disorders, and alcohol use disorders associated with suicide behaviors among IWGDs. Studies published between January 1 1995 and September 1 2022 were obtained from following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science and Cochrane Library databases. PECOS (population, exposures, comparison, outcome, and study design) criteria were used for selecting studies. The Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS) was used for assessing risk of bias and rated each study in terms of exposure, outcome, and comparability. After initial assessment of 10,243 papers, a total of 39 studies met the eligibility criteria. Among IWGDs, the findings indicated a life-time pooled prevalence rate of 31% for suicide ideations (95% CI, 23–39%), 17% for suicide plans (95% CI, 0–34%), and 16% for suicide attempts (95% CI, 12–20%). Generally, suicide ideations among IWGDs were associated with having any financial debt and having chronic physical illnesses, as well as experiencing depression, mood disorders, and alcohol use disorders. Suicide attempts among IWGDs were associated with being older and having a childhood history of sexual abuse, as well as experiencing depression, mood disorders and alcohol use disorders. Interventions can help to facilitate seeking support among IWGDs by de-stigmatizing mental health disorders as well as improving the quality of care presented to individuals with psychiatric conditions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • Psychosocial Perspective on Problem Gambling: The role of Social
           Relationships, Resilience, and COVID-19 Worry

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      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified several psychosocial risks and problem behaviors among vulnerable individuals. Given that gambling has high addictive potential, it is important to consider the underlying mechanisms of problem gambling. This study examined psychosocial factors associated with pandemic-time problem gambling. Cross-sectional data were gathered via an online survey of 18–75-year-old Finnish, Swedish, and British respondents (n = 2,022) who reported having gambled at least occasionally during the pandemic. Measures included problem gambling, loneliness, COVID-19 worry, social support, and psychological resilience. Control variables included gender, age, and education. Structural equation modeling was used as an analytical technique. Loneliness was found to be associated with problem gambling. While COVID-19 worry was not directly associated with problem gambling, it predicted higher loneliness, which in turn was associated with problem gambling. Evidence was not found regarding the protective role of resilience or social support in problem gambling. However, social support was found to be associated with higher problem gambling severity. Male gender and younger age were associated with problem gambling. The results bring insight into underlying vulnerabilities regarding problem gambling during the pandemic. More focus should be placed on the quality and sources of social support, as well as on how psychosocial risk and protective factors might work differently among different populations of gamblers.
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • Applying the Canadian Low-Risk Gambling Guidelines to Gambling Harm
           Reduction in England

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      Abstract: Abstract There is a need for evidence-based guidelines for gamblers who wish to reduce their risk of harm by setting self-directed limits on their gambling. Recognizing this, the Canadian Low-Risk Gambling Guidelines were developed using data from 8 countries to establish the relationship between gambling behaviour and harm. The guidelines include recommended limits on gambling spending as a percentage of income, gambling frequency, and number of types of games played. However, the developers of the LRGG’s did not include UK data in their analysis. This study analyzes data from Health Survey England to assess the applicability of the Canadian Low-Risk Gambling Guidelines to gamblers in England. Using HSE data from 2016 to 2018, we generated risk curves for the relationship between 2 dimensions of gambling behaviour—frequency of gambling sessions and number of types of games played—and gambling harm. We defined harm as a score of 1 or above on the Problem Gambling Severity Index. HSE does not include questions on gambling spending, therefore this was not assessed. The relationship observed between frequency and types of gambling and harm among HSE respondents was similar to the risk curves generated for the development of the Canadian LRGG’s. Gamblers in England who gambled twice weekly or more, or who played 3 or more types of games, were significantly more likely to experience harm from gambling than those who gambled below these limits. The Canadian LRGG’s may potentially be applied to gambling harm reduction efforts in England. More research is needed to determine the acceptability of these guidelines to people who gamble in England.
      PubDate: 2023-01-08
       
  • Clinical Differences of mild, Moderate, and Severe Gambling Disorder in a
           Sample of Treatment Seeking Pathological Gamblers in Sweden

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      Abstract: Abstract Introduction: Gambling disorder (GD) is classified among the addictive disorders in the DSM-5 and the severity of the diagnosis can be specified as mild, moderate and severe. It has been seen that individuals with more severe gambling problems have a higher rate of comorbid disorders and other health problems compared to individuals with a milder clinical picture. Aims: The aim of this study was to explore clinical psychiatric differences related to the severity of disorder in treatment-seeking patients with GD. Method: A sample of 163 patients with GD seeking treatment at an outpatient clinic was diagnosed using the SCI-GD, screened for comorbid diagnoses using the MINI, and further completed a range of self-report questionnaires measuring alcohol-, and drug-problems, symptoms of depression and anxiety, emotion regulation, cognitive distortions, and quality of life. Results: Greater severity was associated to more problems with alcohol and illicit drugs. Severe gamblers were more likely to gamble to “escape”, and had more symptoms of depression and anxiety. Participants with moderate and severe gambling disorder had more difficulties with emotion regulation. Cognitive distortions were the same between severities. All groups had Quality-of-Life problems at a clinical level. Discussion: There are some distinctive differences between GD of different severities. The features shown by patients with severe GD indicates a more emotionally vulnerable group with increased symptom severity. Further knowledge about the features of GD severity levels is important for treatment planning in the clinic.
      PubDate: 2023-01-07
       
  • Behavioral Responses to Losses Disguised as Wins: A Field Study of Slot
           Machine Players

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      Abstract: Abstract We present the results of a field study examining the effect of losses disguised as wins (LDWs) on subsequent slot machine gambler betting behavior. An LDW occurs when the amount won is less than the amount bet. Using non-experimental, individual transaction gambling data, we examine post LDW betting behavior in a panel of 42,669 gamblers and 17 million slot machine plays. The primary empirical findings include: (1) streaks of three LDWs greater than 75% of the original amount bet lead slot gamblers to increase the amount bet on the next spin; (2) streaks of three LDWs less than 25% of the original amount bet results in gamblers decreasing their bet size on the next spin; (3) slot machine gamblers play faster following streaks of three LDWs compared to losses. We interpret these behavioral findings of differing outcomes associated with small versus large LDWs as consistent with a cognitive dissonance effect (Festinger, 1957). Specifically, the disconnect between the amount “won” (actually lost) and the audio and video stimulus produced by the slot machine highlighting the LDW, produces a dissonance-related arousal that players seek to avoid or reduce leading to changes in betting behavior. Our results complement the experimental findings on LDWs and suggest that the size of the LDW matters in examining the impact on gambling behavior.
      PubDate: 2023-01-07
       
  • Trajectory Classes of Externalizing and Internalizing Symptoms to
           Adolescent Gambling Participation: An Exploratory Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Engagement in underage gambling remains a public health concern. Risk factors for the development of gambling behaviours in adolescence include the presence of externalizing and/or internalizing problems. This study aims to better understand the role of co-occurrence between externalizing and internalizing symptoms from childhood to adolescence in adolescent gambling. Participants were drawn from an ongoing longitudinal study of children with and without early conduct problems. Externalizing and internalizing problems were measured annually using teacher and parent reports. Gambling behaviours were measured using self-report when participants were approximately 15 years old. Latent class growth trajectory analyses identified five mental health trajectory classes: (1) a co-occurring trajectory characterized by stable clinical levels of both externalizing and internalizing problems, (2) an externalizing trajectory characterized by stable high clinical levels of externalizing problems, (3) an internalizing trajectory characterized by stable at-risk levels of internalizing problems, (4) an at-risk externalizing trajectory characterized by decreasing levels of externalizing problems, and (5) a non-clinical trajectory. Invariance analyses suggested that this model remained valid in both boys and girls. Logistic regression analyses suggested that youth who belonged in the externalizing trajectory reported a greater likelihood of past-year gambling behaviours when compared to youth who belong in the comorbid trajectory. No other mental health trajectory was significantly associated with adolescent gambling. Stable high externalizing behaviours in development appear to increase one’s risk of gambling behaviours in adolescence. Efforts to target these throughout development could help decrease one’s future risk of engaging in these behaviours.
      PubDate: 2023-01-07
       
  • The Mediating Effect of Danger Invulnerability in the Relationship Between
           Sensation Seeking and Gambling Among University Students

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      Abstract: Abstract The association between sensation-seeking and gambling is well established, yet the research on mediators of this relationship is limited. The proposed model of the present study includes sensation seeking as an antecedent variable, danger invulnerability as a mediator, and gambling frequency as an outcome variable.Self-report data obtained from a convenient sample of 641 university students aged 18–40 years (Mage = 21.25; F = 52.7%, M = 47.3%) were analysed. This study supported proposed hypothesis that both sensation seeking and danger invulnerability are in significant positive relation with the frequency of gambling. Moreover, the results show that tested mediation model fit the data well, and that danger invulnerability completely mediates the relationship between sensation seeking and gambling frequency, such that higher sensation seeking is related to higher danger invulnerability and higher danger invulnerability is related to higher gambling frequency. The model explained 42.4% of the variance in danger invulnerability and 32.7% of the variance in gambling frequency. This study underscores the importance of examining both the direct and indirect effects of different variables on gambling behaviour.
      PubDate: 2023-01-03
       
  • Prevalence of Problem Gambling: A Meta-analysis of Recent Empirical
           Research (2016–2022)

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      Abstract: Abstract Gambling is widely considered a socially acceptable form of recreation. However, for a small minority of individuals, it can become both addictive and problematic with severe adverse consequences. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to provide an overview of prevalence studies published between 2016 and the first quarter of 2022 and an updated estimate of problem gambling in the general adult population. A systematic review and a meta-analysis were carried out using academic databases, Internet, and governmental websites. Following this search and utilizing exclusion criteria, 23 studies on adult gambling prevalence were identified, distinguishing between moderate risk/at risk gambling and problem/pathological gambling. This study found a prevalence of moderate risk/at risk gambling to be 2.43% and of problem/pathological gambling to be 1.29% in the adult population. As difficult as it may be to compare studies due to different methodological procedures, cutoffs, and time frames, the present meta-analysis highlights the variations of prevalence across different countries, giving due consideration to the differences between levels of risk and severity. This work intends to provide a starting point for policymakers and academics to fill the gaps on gambling research—more specifically in some countries where the lack of research in this field is evident—and to study the effectiveness of policies implemented to mitigate gambling harm.
      PubDate: 2022-12-31
       
  • Power and Gambling: Dispositional Power Predicts Persistence on a
           Computerized Scratchcard Task

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      Abstract: Abstract In gambling contexts, near-misses tend to be perceived as more aversive yet elicit greater motivation to continue playing than clear losses. The current research aimed to examine these effects in the context of situational and dispositional social power. In a pre-registered online study, Hong Kong Chinese undergraduate students (N = 238) with varying levels of gambling involvement completed a measure assessing their general beliefs about their ability to influence others and were then randomly assigned to imagine themselves in a position of high or low power. Participants subsequently played a computerized scratchcard task that delivered wins, near-misses, and clear losses and took trial-by-trial ratings of valence, arousal, and motivation. Following a mandatory phase, persistence was measured via the number of additional scratchcards participants chose to purchase. The results generally corroborated previous findings of different subjective appraisals to near-misses vs. clear losses, but surprisingly found that near-misses were considered to be more pleasant than clear losses. Situational power did not differentially modify these responses. Nevertheless, a main effect of dispositional power emerged in that participants who felt chronically high in power were twice as likely to purchase additional scratchcards compared to their low dispositional power counterparts. This study suggests that a generalized sense of power but not situational power triggers approach motivation in the form of prolonged gambling play.
      PubDate: 2022-12-30
       
  • Mediating Role of Rumination Between Anger and Anxious-Depressive
           Symptomatology in Family Members of People with Gambling Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract Gambling disorder is characterized by a behavioural pattern of dysfunctional gambling that persists despite its negative implications in different areas of people’s daily life. One of the most negatively affected areas is the one related to family members. This study aimed, firstly, to study the differences between family members of people with gambling disorder and a general population sample in anger (state, trait, expression-out, expression-in. control-out and control-in), rumination (brooding, reflection and total), and anxiety and depression. The second aim was to analyse the correlation between these variables in the family members of people with gambling disorder, and thirdly, to analyse the mediating role of rumination between anger, anxiety and depression. This study consisted of 170 people, of whom 87 were family members of people with a gambling disorder, and 83 were from the general population. Instruments measuring anger, anxiety, depression, and ruminative responses were administered. Results showed that family members had significantly higher scores in anger (state), depression, anxiety, rumination (total and brooding). Also, results showed that anger correlated positively and significantly with rumination, depression and anxiety, which also correlated positively and significantly with each other. Third, rumination mediated the relationship between the following variables: anger (state) and depression; anger (trait) and anxiety and depression; anger (external expression) and anxiety and depression. A complete mediating effect was found in the latter case and a partial mediating effect in the first two cases. In conclusion, it is found that having a family member with a gambling disorder may increase levels of anger, anxiety, depression and rumination. Furthermore, it is shown that working on rumination may reduce depression and anxiety in family members of gamblers.
      PubDate: 2022-12-26
       
  • Cognitive Factors that Predict Gambling Fallacy Endorsement

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      Abstract: Abstract Gambling fallacies are a collection of error-stricken beliefs about gambling and how gambling works. Gambling fallacies, while common in the general public, appear to increase as a function of gambling severity. This being the case, many interventions have focused on reducing gambling fallacies as a means of treating problem-gambling. Less research, however, has investigated what factors contributes to gambling fallacy susceptibility in the first place. Available studies have identified associations between gambling fallacy susceptibility and isolated individual differences in, for example, statistical reasoning/understanding, intelligence, or cognitive ability. The current study aimed to assess these cognitive factors in conjunction, and their relative predictive potential for gambling fallacy susceptibility. In an Australian university student sample (n = 90) it was found that there were moderate to strong association between gambling fallacy endorsement and general intelligence, probabilistic reasoning ability, rational cognitive style and the ability to suppress intuitive thought, however, only probabilistic reasoning, rational cognitive style and the ability to suppress intuitive thinking contributed to the prediction of fallacy endorsement. Importantly, each of these factors are malleable. Interventions for the correction of gambling-specific fallacious beliefs should focus on these factors.
      PubDate: 2022-12-24
       
  • Brief Virtual Workshop on Gambling Disorder to Raise Knowledge and
           Awareness Among Health Service Providers

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      Abstract: Abstract Gambling disorder is a “hidden disease” due to the lack of visible markers. It often negatively affects multiple domains of a person’s life and predicts adverse physical, mental, social, and financial outcomes. Health service settings are suited for early detection of gambling disorder because of its comorbid medical conditions and due to the trust patients have in their health service providers (HSPs). However, HSPs often lack the knowledge needed to screen for this disorder and to make appropriate referrals. This paper reports a quasi-experimental wait-list control study (experimental group n = 18; wait-list control group n = 14), with cross-over and a twelve-week follow-up which assessed whether a brief virtual gambling disorder training entitled Gambling Know More could improve gambling disorder knowledge among HSPs. Results showed workshop participation caused a significant increase in gambling disorder knowledge immediately after the workshop and twelve weeks later. Participation in Gambling Know More bodes well for increasing early detection of gambling disorder and appropriate treatment referrals among HSPs. Findings have important policy implications for the training of HSPs.
      PubDate: 2022-12-20
       
  • A Longitudinal Examination of Young People’s Gambling Behaviours and
           Participation in Team Sports

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      Abstract: Abstract This paper develops and expands upon social identity theory as an explanation for gambling among youth engaged in team sport. Analysing longitudinal data for over 4500 20-year-olds from the Growing Up in Ireland study, reveals that online gambling increased from 2.6 to 9.3% between 17 and 20 years in the cohort, with the increase driven by males. A statistically significant positive association is uncovered between playing team sports and regularly gambling, as well as online gambling behaviour, independent of socio-demographic and other risk factors for males but not for females. The findings provide support for a dose–response like effect for males, where a longer period of participation in team sports is associated with a higher likelihood of engaging in gambling behaviour compared to shorter periods. Implications of the findings for policy and practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2022-12-17
       
  • Correction to: Gambling Disorder in Male Violent Offenders in the Prison
           System: Psychiatric and Substance‑Related Comorbidity

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      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10102-6
       
  • Clustering Treatment Outcomes in Women with Gambling Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract The rising prevalence of gambling disorder (GD) among women has awakened considerable interest in the study of therapeutic outcomes in females. This study aimed to explore profiles of women seeking treatment for GD based on a set of indicators including sociodemographic features, personality traits, clinical state at baseline, and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) outcomes. Two-step clustering, an agglomerative hierarchical classification system, was applied to a sample of n = 163 women of ages ranging from 20 to 73 years-old, consecutively attended to by a clinical unit specialized in the treatment of G. Three mutually exclusive clusters were identified. Cluster C1 (n = 67, 41.1%) included the highest proportion of married, occupationally active patients within the highest social status index. This cluster was characterized by medium GD severity levels, the best psychopathological functioning, and the highest mean in the self-directedness trait. C1 registered 0% dropouts and only 14.9% relapse. Cluster C2 (n = 63; 38.7%) was characterized by the lowest GD severity, medium scores for psychopathological measures and a high risk of dropout during CBT. Cluster C3 (n = 33; 20.2%) registered the highest GD severity, the worst psychopathological state, the lowest self-directedness level and the highest harm-avoidance level, as well as the highest risk of relapse. These results provide new evidence regarding the heterogeneity of women diagnosed with GD and treated with CBT, based on the profile at pre- and post-treatment. Person-centered treatments should include specific strategies aimed at increasing self-esteem, emotional regulation capacities and self-control of GD women.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10092-5
       
  • Applying the DSM-5 Criteria for Gambling Disorder to Online Gambling
           Account-Based Tracking Data: An Empirical Study Utilizing Cluster Analysis
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The emergence of online gambling has raised concerns about potential gambling-related harm, and various measures have been implemented in order to minimise harm such as identifying and/or predicting potential markers of harm. The present study explored how the nine DSM-5 criteria for gambling disorder can be operationalised in terms of actual online gambling behaviour using account-based gambling tracking data. The authors were given access to an anonymised sample of 982 gamblers registered with an online gambling operator. The data collected for these gamblers consisted of their first three months’ gambling activity. The data points included customer service contacts, number of hours spent gambling, number of active days, deposit amounts and frequency, the number of times a responsible gambling tool (such as deposit limit) were removed by the gamblers themselves, number of cancelled withdrawals, number of third-party requests, number of registered credit cards, and frequency of requesting bonuses through customer service (i.e., the number of instances of ‘bonus begging’). Using these metrics, most of the DSM-5 criteria for gambling disorder can be operationalized (at least to some extent) using actual transaction data. These metrics were then applied to a sample of online gamblers, and through cluster analysis four types of online gambler based on these metrics (non-problem gamblers, at-risk gamblers, financially vulnerable gamblers, and emotionally vulnerable gamblers) were identified. The present study is the first to examine the application of the DSM-5 criteria of gambling disorder to actual gambling behaviour using online gambling transaction data and suggests ways that gambling operators could identify problem gamblers online without the need for self-report diagnostic screening instruments.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10080-9
       
  • Satisfaction of Basic Psychological Needs and Adherence to Responsible
           Gambling Practices: The Mediating Role of Flourishing

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      Abstract: Abstract Responsible gambling (RG) is a practical approach to contain potential gambling-associated harms to an acceptable level. However, few studies have proposed a theoretical framework to account for significant individual differences in RG adherence, which hinders an effective RG promotion in public. To address this missing link, the current study aims to identify psychological need factors associated with adherence to RG practices. We applied the self-determination theory (SDT) to explore the association between the satisfaction of basic psychological needs (i.e., relatedness, competency, and autonomy) and RG adherence in a probability Chinese community adult sample (N = 1002; 55.7% women and M age = 44.28 years), acquired from a telephone survey conducted in the 2018 fall with a two-stage cluster random sampling method. We found that the three types of basic needs satisfaction were significantly and positively related to RG adherence via a full mediation of flourishing. The findings provide practical insights to understanding individual differences in RG adherence and designing corresponding SDT-based interventions for gambling communities globally.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10104-4
       
  • Gambling Disorder in an Italian Population: Risk of Suicide Attempts and
           Associated Demographic-Clinical Factors using Electronic Health Records

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      Abstract: Abstract To identify the demographic and clinical characteristics associated with access to Emergency Departments for Suicide Attempt in a cohort of patients with Gambling disorders. We used electronic health records of inpatient and outpatient services to identify individuals who received a diagnosis of gambling disorder (ICD-9 or ICD-10 codes) in the Metropolitan area of Bologna from 2009 to 2019. In this cohort we identified accesses to Emergency Departments for suicide attempt through cross-matching with electronic records. We calculated Crude Suicide Attempt Rates; we also included the demographic-clinical variables in a multivariate Poisson regression. We identified 692 patients with a diagnosis of gambling disorder and a total of 2733 Person Years. The Crude Suicide Attempt Rate per 1000 Person Years was 9.17 (95% CI 6.20–13.58), higher for females and much higher than the general population (incidence rate ratio = 93.72). The multivariate analysis showed a higher risk of suicide attempt in the year following the first contact with a clinical service, in patients younger than 45 years, with alcohol use disorders and personality disorders. This study evidenced a high risk of access to Emergency Departments for suicide attempt in individuals with a diagnosis of gambling disorder and highlighted important demographic and clinical factors that should be considered when evaluating suicide risk in this population.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10088-1
       
  • Proneness to Alcohol use Disorder or Pathological Gambling as
           Differentially Determined by Early Parental and Personality Factors

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      Abstract: Abstract Owing to growing alcoholism and gambling, numerous variables have been the subject of study to better understand the causes of such addictions. This study aims to investigate personality factors, parental styles in upbringing and early exposure to alcoholism integratively to shed light on how such variables generally shape vulnerability for addictive behaviours and alcohol use disorder (AUD) as well as pathological gambling (PG), separately. The sample consisted of 150 for the inpatient groups (78 AUD and 72 PG) and 102 participants for the control group. The inpatient group comprised “pure” AUD (excluding gambling and other significant addictive disorders) and “pure” PG (excluding AUD and other significant addictive disorders). A random forest-trees analysis established a model accurately classifying 79% of participants from the addictive group and found low conscientiousness, an authoritarian father, a less-flexible mother and neuroticism to be predisposed factors for both addictions. Additionally, through structural equation modeling, a satisfying-index model shows higher extroversion and lower openness may be attributed to PG, as well as the father’s authoritarian parenting style. The mother’s authoritarian or permissive styles may be linked to AUD and the father’s alcoholism. The research concludes AUD and PG have similarities in personality as vulnerable factors for addictive behaviours as well as essential differences in personality and early experiences from boundaries set by mothers and fathers and alcoholism in childhood. The results are applicable in preventive programs as well as working with patients and their parents to create more individualized treatment in relation to addiction type.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10095-2
       
  • Stressful Life Events Precede Gambling Problems, and Continued Gambling
           Problems Exacerbate Stressful Life Events; A Life Course Calendar Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Do stressful life events cause gambling problems, or do gambling problems cause stressful life events' This study used a retrospective design to examine the temporal order of these associations. Specifically, the study employed a life course calendar in a self-directed online survey to minimise memory biases common in retrospective designs. A total of 1564 US respondents who had gambled at any point in their life (51.0% female, median age 46) were asked whether, for each year of their adult life, they had experienced each of eight stressful life events, and whether they had engaged in casual or heavy gambling, drinking or drug use, with heavy gambling defined in line with a problem gambling definition. We found that five stressful life events were associated with the onset of heavy gambling: work issues, financial issues, legal issues, relationship issues and the death of a loved one. The same five stressful life events predict the cessation of an episode of heavy gambling, indicating a possible tendency for gambling problems to self-resolve in the presence of stress. Insights are also gained into comorbidities with alcohol and drug use, and the course of stressful life events and gambling and substance use throughout the life course, albeit with a non-representative sample. The methodology allows tentative conclusions in terms of possible causation pathways, indicating that stressful life events may play a role both in the onset and the maintenance (or cessation) of gambling problems.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10899-021-10090-7
       
 
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