Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.49
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1557-1882 - ISSN (Online) 1557-1874
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Profiles of Risk-Taking Sexual and Substance Use Behaviors in
           French-Canadian Emerging Adults: a Latent Class Analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract In Canada, the highest increases in rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and substance use disorders occur among emerging adults aged 18 to 29 years old. Most research on risk-taking behaviors have focused on adolescents or males only—especially gay and bisexual men. This study aimed to assess patterns of sexual and substance use risk-taking behavior (i.e., early sexual onset, number of sexual partners, inconsistent condom use, unconventional sexual behaviors, binge-drinking, and polysubstance use); investigate whether sociodemographic and individual characteristics predict risk-taking profiles; and examine whether risk-taking profiles are associated with differential health outcomes (i.e., STI testing and diagnosis, substance use problems). Latent class analyses were conducted on a sample of 602 heterosexual French-Canadian emerging adults (84% female; M age = 22.3) who completed an online questionnaire. Four profiles were identified: inactive low-risk (13.5%), active low-risk (34.7%), mid-risk (42.3%), and high-risk (9.5%). The two higher risk-taking profiles were overrepresented by older participants, females, and impulsive sensation seekers. Participants in the mid- and high-risk profiles had higher odds of having been screened for and been diagnosed with STIs, and of reporting more substance use problems.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
       
  • Arrest Histories and Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Use
           Disorders Among Women in the USA

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      Abstract: Abstract Justice-involved women have higher rates of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders (CODs) than those in the general population. Most research on the health consequences of justice involvement has focused on incarceration, neglecting other forms of contact. This study uses the Treatment Episode Data Set Admissions from 2015 to 2019 (N = 7,251,301) to examine the association between recent arrest histories and CODs among women while investigating potential racial differences. The random intercept logistic regression revealed that women with arrest histories had 1.130 times the odds of having CODs as women without arrest histories. Being arrested significantly increased the odds of having CODs among Indigenous and Latina women and decreased the odds of reporting CODs among Black/African American and Asian American women. These findings suggest that culturally-sensitive behavioral health service that considers arrest-related stressors and the needs of women from different racial backgrounds are essential in preventing and treating CODs.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
       
  • Development of an Instrument to Assess Expectations for the Use of Online
           Gaming, Social Networking Sites, and Online Pornography: the Marburg
           Internet Use Expectations (MINUS-X) Questionnaire

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      Abstract: Abstract User’s expectations contribute to the maintenance of problematic use of online gaming (OG), social networking (SN), and online pornography (OP). Since an instrument to assess use expectations across applications is lacking, this study aimed at developing and testing such a questionnaire. It consists of a general module (GM), which includes expectations relevant to all three applications, and three application-specific modules. A pilot and a validation study were conducted with 2880 German adults. We conducted item analyses, exploratory factor analyses (EFA), exploratory structural equation modelling, and correlation analyses. The EFA revealed six factors for the GM and two factors for each specific module. The GM demonstrated measurement invariance between applications. The instrument showed excellent psychometric properties, indicating its suitability for assessing expectations concerning the use of OG, SN, and OG reliably and validly. It could be helpful for treating patients with problematic use of the applications and investigating the role of the relevant expectations.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
       
  • A Validity Reassessment of the Recovery Experience Questionnaire with Two
           Extended Confirmatory Factor Analyses

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      Abstract: Abstract Recovery experience during off-job time is crucial for understanding individuals’ health and well-being. This study aimed to further evaluate the construct validity of the Recovery Experience Questionnaire (REQ) using two extended confirmatory factor analyses (CFA). In study 1, we conducted a systematic literature review of articles using the REQ. Results of the analyses supported a two-factor second-order model whereby psychological detachment and relaxation loaded one factor (buffer-oriented strategies), and mastery and control loaded another (supply-oriented strategies). In study 2, 152 participants completed an online survey on five consecutive working days (N = 725 observations). Multi-level CFA indicated that the four-factor first-order model and the two-factor second-order model fit the data better than alternative models at both the between-person and within-person levels. The factor loadings of all items were significantly lower for the day level in comparison to the between-person level. Theoretical and practical implications and further research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
       
  • Nearly Five Times Higher than We Think: How Much People Underestimate the
           Amount of Alcohol in Popular Movies and What Predicts Underestimation'
           

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      Abstract: Abstract Reducing alcohol use is challenging due to the volume of alcohol shown in media and the relationship between exposure and use. It is unclear to what degree people are aware of and able to estimate alcohol exposure in the media, such as in movies. In this study, 609 Australian adults estimated the amount of alcohol exposure in up to 10 of 102 popular movies they remembered best. They reported when they last saw each movie, their alcohol use, age, and gender. Participants underestimated the amount of alcohol in movies by an average of 35.39 times. Movies classified as featuring adult content (PG-13 or R) and movies with the greatest amount of alcohol were particularly underestimated. Individual’s age, gender, alcohol use, or when the movie was last viewed had no effect on underestimation. In conclusion, due to the severe underestimation, alcohol exposure should be more seriously reviewed by governmental and medial organizations.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
       
  • Sexual Victimization and Mental Health Among LGBQ + College Students:
           Examining Social Support and Trauma-Related Drinking as Mediators

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      Abstract: Abstract Sexual victimization is associated with worse mental health outcomes among LGBQ + adolescents and adults; however, limited work has focused on these relations among emerging adults in college and has not tested mechanisms that might explain these associations. Thus, the current study tested the associations between sexual victimization and mental health outcomes (i.e., anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms) and examined social support and trauma-related drinking as mediators of these associations among diverse LGBQ + college student emerging adults. Additionally, we tested whether findings varied among Students of Color and White Students. Participants included 179 LGBQ + college students (M = 19.48, SD = 0.74) who completed measures of sexual victimization, social support, trauma-related drinking, and mental health. Trauma-related drinking was a significant mediator, such that sexual victimization was associated with greater trauma-related drinking and, in turn, greater anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Although social support was not a significant mediator, social support was associated with less anxiety symptoms and less depressive symptoms. Findings did not vary by ethnicity/race. Findings have research and intervention implications by highlighting the ways in which sexual victimization, social support, and trauma-related drinking affect LGBQ + college students’ mental health.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • The Practice and Feasibility of Screening, Treatment, and Referral for
           Gaming Problems in Gambling, Alcohol and Other Drugs, and Youth Services

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      Abstract: Abstract Screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) is a comprehensive approach to identifying people at risk of addiction, but its feasibility for gaming disorder is unknown. This study surveyed 88 clinicians from gambling, alcohol and other drugs, and youth services in New Zealand. Results indicated that the most frequent GD screening method was an unstructured interview (61%), but 74% stated they would use a standardized tool if available. Responsivity to the detection of GD was an immediate intervention (84%), and rates of referral were low (28%). Around 50% of clinicians indicated high confidence in administering motivational approaches and relapse prevention. There was strong support for screening training (85%), treatment guidelines (88%), self-help materials (92%), and access to internet-delivered CBT that could be used in conjunction with other treatment (84%). Clinicians appear motivated and willing to implement SBIRT for GD but report lacking necessary training and resources, including access to screening tools and treatment guidelines.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • Validation of the Arabic Version of the Community Assessment of Psychic
           Experiences (CAPE-42) in a Large Sample of Young Adults from the General
           Population

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      Abstract: Abstract No self-report measures of psychotic experiences have been validated in the Arabic language. We aimed to examine the psychometric properties (i.e., factor structure, internal consistency, gender invariance, and discriminant validity as evidenced by correlations with psychopathology) of an Arabic translation of the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE-42) in a nonclinical population. A sample of 2024 Arabic-speaking young adults (aged 25.42 ± 8.44 years, 57.9% females) from the general population in Lebanon completed an online questionnaire. The forward and backward translation method was applied. In terms of factorial structure, findings showed that the eight-factor model had the best model fit indices in comparison with the three-factor model, supporting that a four-factor solution for the positive symptoms dimension (bizarre experiences, persecutory ideas, perceptual abnormalities, and magical thinking) and a three-factor solution for the negative symptoms dimension (social withdrawal, affective flattening, and avolition) are appropriate in our sample. Besides, configural, metric, and scalar invariance was supported across gender. All factors yielded an acceptable level of reliability. Finally, all CAPE-42 scores moderately correlated with higher scores of depression, anxiety, stress, suicidal ideation, and smartphone addiction, which provides supporting evidence of the convergent validity of the Arabic CAPE items. The Arabic CAPE-42 proved to have adequate psychometric qualities, indicating its applicability to the general population as a brief screening tool for subthreshold self-reported psychotic symptoms. Making the Arabic version of the scale available might open the doors for future focus on the early intervention field in the Arab world.
      PubDate: 2023-01-23
       
  • The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test and Mortality 20 Years
           later

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      Abstract: Abstract The objective was to test whether Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) results may predict mortality after 20 years. An observational study was conducted. It included an interview of a general population sample aged 18 to 64 in northern Germany in the years 1996 − 1997 (baseline) and a mortality-follow-up in the years 2017 − 2018. Study participants were 3581 persons who had consumed alcohol during the last 12 months prior to the baseline assessment. It included the AUDIT which was filled in by study participants. At follow-up, death cases were ascertained including the date of death. Official records and death certificates from local health authorities were used. Cox proportional hazards regression revealed that the AUDIT predicted time to death. The hazard ratio was 1.70 (95% confidence interval: 1.43 − 2.02) with the lowest AUDIT zone of values as the reference group. Competing risks regression analysis for diagnosis-specific mortality data revealed that the AUDIT predicted cardiovascular mortality (subhazard ratio, 1.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.49 − 2.27). It is concluded that the alcohol screening predicted total and cardiovascular mortality in this adult general population sample.
      PubDate: 2023-01-19
       
  • Patterns and Predictors of Heroin Use, Remission, and Psychiatric Health
           Among People with Heroin Dependence: Key Findings from the 18–20-Year
           Follow-Up of the Australian Treatment Outcome Study (ATOS)

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      Abstract: Abstract This study aimed to investigate the long-term patterns and predictors of heroin use, dependence, and psychiatric health over 18–20 years among a cohort of Australians with heroin dependence, using a prospective longitudinal cohort study conducted in Sydney, Australia. The original cohort consisted of 615 participants, who were followed up at 3 months and 1, 2, 3, 11, and 18–20 years post-baseline; 401 (65.2%) were re-interviewed at 18–20 years. The Australian Treatment Outcome Study structured interview with established psychometric properties was administered to participants at each follow-up, addressing demographics, treatment and drug use history, overdose, crime, and physical and mental health. Overall, 96.7% completed at least one follow-up interview. At 18–20 years, 109 participants (17.7%) were deceased. Past-month heroin use decreased significantly over the study period (from 98.7 to 24.4%), with one in four using heroin at 18–20 years. Just under half were receiving treatment. Reductions in heroin use were accompanied by reductions in heroin dependence, other substance use, needle sharing, injection-related health, overdose, crime, and improvements in general physical and mental health. Major depression and borderline personality disorder (BPD) were consistently associated with poorer outcome. At 18–20 years, there is strong evidence that clinically significant levels of improvement can be maintained over the long term. The mortality rate over 18–20 years was devastating, with over one in six participants deceased. More sustained and targeted efforts are needed in relation to major depression and BPD to ensure evidence-based treatments are delivered to people with heroin dependence.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Co-occurrence of Common Biological and Behavioral Addictions: Using
           Network Analysis to Identify Central Addictions and Their Associations
           with Each Other

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study used network analysis to examine the network properties (network graph, centrality, and edge weights) comprising ten different types of common addictions (alcohol, cigarette smoking, drug, sex, social media, shopping, exercise, gambling, internet gaming, and internet use) controlling for age and gender effects. Participants (N = 968; males = 64.3%) were adults from the general community, with ages ranging from 18 to 64 years (mean = 29.54 years; SD = 9.36 years). All the participants completed well-standardized questionnaires that together covered the ten addictions. The network findings showed different clusters for substance use and behavioral addictions and exercise. In relation to centrality, the highest value was for internet usage, followed by gaming and then gambling addiction. Concerning edge weights, there was a large effect size association between internet gaming and internet usage; a medium effect size association between internet usage and social media and alcohol and drugs; and several small and negligible effect size associations. Also, only 48.88% of potential edges or associations between addictions were significant. Taken together, these findings must be prioritized in theoretical models of addictions and when planning treatment of co-occurring addictions. Relatedly, as this study is the first to use network analysis to explore the properties of co-occurring addictions, the findings can be considered as providing new contributions to our understanding of the co-occurrence of common addictions.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Cooling Off and the Effects of Mandatory Breaks in Online Gambling: A
           Large-Scale Real-World Study

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      Abstract: Abstract The prevention of problematic online gambling behavior is a topic of major interest for regulators, the gambling industry, and researchers. Many gambling operators approach this issue by using responsible gambling tools. Among such tools, mandatory play breaks are used to interrupt long online gambling sessions, providing “cooling off” periods for players to take a reflective “time out”. The present study investigated the effects of mandatory play breaks in a large-scale experiment with 23,234 online gamblers engaging in more than 870,000,000 gambling transactions on Norsk Tipping’s gambling platform over a 1-month period. The gamblers were randomly assigned to several intervention groups with varying duration of mandatory play breaks and one control group with Norsk Tipping’s standard play break duration. More specifically, the study analyzed the relationship between the mandatory break received and the gambler’s acceptance of this tool, the interaction patterns with the tool, and how quickly they started to gamble again, as well as post-intervention effects on gambling behavior. Results showed that gamblers who were treated with longer mandatory breaks (i) tended to take longer voluntary breaks, and (ii) interacted more frequently with the tool (for instance, by clicking the “logout” button). Furthermore, gamblers appeared to accept longer mandatory play breaks. However, only a fraction of post-intervention effects remained, and mainly only for gamblers who received a substantial number of long mandatory play breaks. Overall, the present study provides actionable insights for both researchers and the gambling industry to improve the effectiveness of mandatory play breaks as a responsible gambling tool.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • What Client Demographic, Substance Use, Mental Health, Treatment, and
           Psychological Variables Predict Residential Treatment Completion for
           Substance Use Disorders'

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      Abstract: Abstract Residential treatment is a common option for individuals with moderate to severe substance use disorders. In a cohort of individuals who accessed residential treatment, we investigated client demographic, substance use, mental health, treatment, and psychological predictors of treatment completion. Participants were a retrospective cohort of 1056 (15–69 years) individuals admitted to residential treatment facilities across Queensland, Australia, from January 2014 to December 2016. Participant characteristic information was obtained at admission, including the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale 21 (DASS-21). A multiple logistic regression model was conducted with treatment completion as the outcome. The overall rate of treatment completion was 14.3%. Mild to moderate (aOR = 0.48 [0.28–0.84], p = .010) and severe to extremely severe (aOR = 0.35 [0.17–0.74], p = .006) stress on the DASS-21 at service entry was significantly associated with a lower likelihood of treatment completion. Participants with higher levels of stress at service entry were less likely to complete treatment, representing a missed opportunity to provide targeted support during high-risk periods for individuals with substance use disorders. Further research investigating the nature and causes of stress in-between, during, and following presentations to residential treatment is needed.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Latent Profile Analyses of Addiction and Mental Health Problems in Two
           Large Samples

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      Abstract: Abstract This study explored patterns of addictive behaviours and mental health symptoms among two distinct, non-treatment-seeking samples. A total of 1612 undergraduate students and 607 community-based adults reported on substance use (alcohol, cannabis, vaping), behavioural addictions (gambling, gaming, shopping, eating, sex), mental health symptoms (depression, anxiety, ADHD), and psychosocial variables (impulsivity, emotion dysregulation, childhood adversity, social support). Latent profile analysis was used to classify participants into statistically distinct and homogenous subgroups based on addiction and mental health indicator variables. A three-step procedure was performed to predict latent profile membership based on psychosocial variables. In each sample, parallel three-profile solutions emerged. Profile 1 (the “normative” profile) was the largest and characterized by low problematic substance use, behavioural addictions, and mental distress. Profile 2 (the “behavioural and mental health” profile) was characterized by low problematic substance use, and elevated behavioural addictions and mental distress. Profile 3 (the “substance, behavioural, and mental health” profile) was characterized by elevated problematic substance use, behavioural addictions, and mental distress. Non-normative profiles differed from the normative profile on several psychosocial variables. Results highlight the tendency for problems with addiction and mental health to co-occur, underscoring the need for greater emphasis on assessing and treating concurrent disorders.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • Machine Learning Models to Predict Readmission Risk of Patients with
           Schizophrenia in a Spanish Region

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      Abstract: Abstract  Currently, high hospital readmission rates have become a problem for mental health services, because it is directly associated with the quality of patient care. The development of predictive models with machine learning algorithms allows the assessment of readmission risk in hospitals. The main objective of this paper is to predict the readmission risk of patients with schizophrenia in a region of Spain, using machine learning algorithms. In this study, we used a dataset with 6089 electronic admission records corresponding to 3065 patients with schizophrenia disorders. Data were collected in the period 2005–2015 from acute units of 11 public hospitals in a Spain region. The Random Forest classifier obtained the best results in predicting the readmission risk, in the metrics accuracy = 0.817, recall = 0.887, F1-score = 0.877, and AUC = 0.879. This paper shows the algorithm with highest accuracy value and determines the factors associated with readmission risk of patients with schizophrenia in this population. It also shows that the development of predictive models with a machine learning approach can help improve patient care quality and develop preventive treatments.
      PubDate: 2023-01-17
       
  • A Vicious Cycle: The Reciprocal Longitudinal Relationship Between Social
           Rejection, Social Avoidance, and Smartphone Addiction Among Adolescents

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      Abstract: Abstract To address the gap regarding the lack of longitudinal studies on smartphone addiction and social rejection, the present study examined the reciprocal relationship between them, and whether social avoidance could play a mediating role. The sample consisted of 1368 Chinese high school students (60.01% boys; Mage = 15.05, SD = 0.85) who participated in three measurements and completed questionnaires assessing social rejection, social avoidance, and smartphone addiction. Using cross-lagged panel models, the current study found that there was a reciprocal relationship between social rejection and smartphone addiction, with social avoidance playing a mediating role. Additionally, these relationships differed by gender. These findings highlighted the mediating role of social avoidance, implying that interventions aimed at reducing social avoidance may help adolescents break the vicious cycle of social rejection and smartphone addiction.
      PubDate: 2023-01-11
       
  • Online Gaming Addiction and Basic Psychological Needs Among Adolescents:
           The Mediating Roles of Meaning in Life and Responsibility

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      Abstract: Abstract Individuals whose basic needs are naturally satisfied are much less dependent on their environment and more autonomous. Basic psychological needs (i.e., the general motivators of human actions) are significant predictors of online gaming addiction. Moreover, it has been posited that meaning and responsibility in life are at the center of life from an existential point of view. Therefore, a hypothetical model was tested to examine the relationships between basic psychological needs (autonomy, competence, relatedness), online gaming addiction, responsibility, and meaning in life. Data were collected from a sample of 546 participants. Mediation analysis was conducted, and the results indicated that basic psychological needs, online gaming addiction, responsibility, and meaning in life had significant negative and positive relationships. The findings indicated that responsibility and meaning in life had a serial mediating effect in the relationship between basic psychological needs and online gaming addiction. The findings also showed that the inverse relationship between online gaming addiction and basic psychological needs was at least partially explained by meaning in life and responsibility. The results of the present study are of great importance and suggest that interventions to satisfy the basic psychological needs of adolescents may help prevent online gaming addiction.
      PubDate: 2023-01-10
       
  • Exploring the Impact of Emotional and Cognitive Factors on Anxiety
           Symptoms of Chinese Adolescents: a Serial Mediation Study

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      Abstract: Abstract  The onset age of anxiety is decreasing worldwide, yet the majority of the study conducted on anxiety were focused on adult populations. This study aimed to investigate the mediating effect of psychological capital and coping style tendency on the relationship between emotional intelligence and anxiety in Chinese adolescents and provide empirical evidence for research and prevention. A cross-sectional study recruited 5747 participants from 5 randomly selected middle schools in the northeast China. Study results showed that high emotional intelligence (P < 0.05), high level of psychological capital (P < 0.05), and positive coping style tendency (P < 0.05) were correlated to lower level of anxiety symptoms in adolescents. Psychological capital and coping style tendency performed partial and serial mediating effect on the relationship between emotional intelligence and anxiety. Teaching adolescents how to regulate emotions can strengthens their positive mentalities, promotes the use of positive coping strategies, and then attenuates the severity of anxiety symptoms in a nonadditive manner.
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • Can Psychopathology Predict Adolescent Drug Use or Moderate the Effect of
           a Schoool-Based Drug Use Prevention Program'

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      Abstract: Abstract  Although psychiatric symptoms and drug use are commonly associated with adolescence, the causal relationship has not been fully established. In this study, we sought to identify baseline predictors of adolescent drug use focused on psychopathology and participation in the school-based prevention program #Tamojunto 2.0. We also aimed to assess the moderating effect of mental health in reducing adolescent drug use, which is the primary outcome of the #Tamojunto 2.0 program. A cluster randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms was conducted in 73 Brazilian public schools (37 in the intervention group and 36 in the control group). Baseline and 9-month follow-up measures of 5208 students in the 8th grade—mean age of 13.2 years (SD = 0.8) and equal gender ratio—were assessed. The main outcome variable of the study was adolescents’ past-month drug use at 9-month follow-up. The explanatory variables were past-month drug use, the RCT group, psychopathology, and sociodemographic items (gender, age, and socioeconomic status) at baseline. Findings indicated that besides females, older age, an abnormal score of mental health symptoms, and previous drug use were the most significant predictors of adolescent drug consumption. We found no evidence of a moderating effect of mental health symptoms in reducing drug use because of intervention. These results suggest that strategies for drug use prevention among adolescents should consider abnormal mental health as a predictor of drug use, but not in the case of #Tamojunto 2.0, as a moderator of the intervention effect. Brazilian Register of Clinical Trials: RBR-8cnkwq (http://www.ensaiosclinicos.gov.br/rg/RBR-8cnkwq/).
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • Prospective Polysubstance use Profiles Among Adolescents with Early-onset
           Cannabis Use, and their Association with Cannabis Outcomes in Emerging
           Adulthood

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      Abstract: Abstract Background: Research is yet to elucidate adolescent polysubstance use profiles among youth with early-onset cannabis use (CU; ≤15 years). The present study aimed to fill this gap in the literature and determine whether CU outcomes in early adulthood are best explained by early-onset CU per se, or by its resulting polysubstance use profiles. Methods: Participants were N = 794 youth (56% females) from the Québec Longitudinal Study of Child Development, who reported lifetime CU by age 21. Participants were stratified into early-onset (n = 349), later adolescent-onset (16–18 years; n = 359), and adult-onset (≥19 years; n = 86) CU groups. Self-reported substance use was collected from the early-onset CU group at age 15 and 17, while CU frequency and problem CU were assessed for all participants at age 21. Results: Repeated measures latent profile analyses revealed four polysubstance use profiles among youth in the early-onset CU group: (1) light (54%); (2) escalating (13%); (3) frequent (without cigarettes; 14%); (4) frequent (with cigarettes; 19%). Only youth in the early-onset CU group who followed an escalating or frequent (with cigarettes) adolescent polysubstance use profile had consistently greater CU frequency and problem CU at 21 years, compared to youth in the later adolescent-onset (16–18 years), or adult-onset (≥19 years) CU groups (β range = 0.13 to.40; Cohen’s f2 range = 0.02 to 0.12). Conclusions: Youth with early-onset CU are not a single homogenous group, but rather follow unique polysubstance use profiles that are differentially associated with risk for future problem CU.
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
       
 
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