Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Alcohol and Alcoholism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.376
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0735-0414 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3502
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • COP27 Climate Change Conference: Urgent Action Needed for Africa and the
           WorldWealthy nations must step up support for Africa and vulnerable
           countries in addressing past, present and future impacts of climate
           change†

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      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: The 2022 report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) paints a dark picture of the future of life on earth, characterised by ecosystem collapse, species extinction, and climate hazards such as heatwaves and floods (IPCC, 2022). These are all linked to physical and mental health problems, with direct and indirect consequences of increased morbidity and mortality. To avoid these catastrophic health effects across all regions of the globe, there is broad agreement—as 231 health journals argued together in 2021—that the rise in global temperature must be limited to less than 1.5°C compared with pre-industrial levels.
      PubDate: Wed, 19 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac055
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Relationship Between Alcohol Co-Ingestion and Clinical Outcome in
           Pesticide Self-Poisoning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Pages: 4 - 12
      Abstract: AbstractAimAlcohol is a commonly co-ingested compound during self-poisoning with pesticides. Clinical experiences suggest alcohol co-ingestion (or withdrawal) makes patient management more difficult after self-poisoning and may contribute to poor clinical outcomes. We aimed to systematically review the world literature to explore the relationship between alcohol co-ingestion and outcome in pesticide self-poisoning.MethodsWe searched 13 electronic databases and Google scholar, conducted citation searching and a review of reference lists to find studies which investigated the relationship of alcohol with clinical outcome of pesticide self-poisoning in different countries. Thirteen studies, including 11 case series/reports and two cohort studies were considered for inclusion.ResultsMeta-analysis showed that alcohol co-ingestion in pesticide self-poisoning was associated with increased risk of death [odds ratio (OR) 4.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–8.2 P<0.0001] and that alcohol co-ingested group required intubation eight times more often than non-co-ingested group in organophosphorus insecticide self-poisoning (OR 8.0, 95% CI 4.9–13.0 P<0.0001). Cases who co-ingested alcohol were older than non-alcohol group in two studies. One cohort study demonstrated that alcohol co-ingestion was associated with larger pesticide ingestions but did not itself affect the outcome.ConclusionsThis systematic review indicates that alcohol co-ingestion may worsen clinical outcome in pesticide self-poisoning.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac045
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The Effect of Behavior Couples Therapy on Alcohol and Drug Use Disorder: a
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Pages: 13 - 22
      Abstract: AbstractAimsBehavior couples therapy (BCT) is widely considered to be effective in the treatment of substance use disorders. However, the effect size of BCT in different outcome measures, and at different time points requires further study to prove it.MethodsSystematic searches were performed in various databases. Ultimately, we identified 12 studies, involving 19 randomized controlled trials. We used Hedges’ g as the effect size, and all pooled analyses were performed using random-effects models.ResultsAfter treatment, BCT was superior to control conditions (either an active or inactive control group) in frequency of substance use (g = 0.17), substance use consequences (g = −0.28) and relationship satisfaction (g = 0.45). After a 12-month follow-up, BCT remained superior to control conditions in frequency of substance use (g = 0.32), substance use consequences (g = −0.34) and relationship satisfaction (g = 0.31). In addition, BCT was more effective in reducing the frequency of substance use than individual-based treatment (IBT) (g = 0.23). There was no significant relationship between the effect size of BCT and publication year (t = 0.92, P = 0.372), percentage of females (t = −0.02, P = 0.987) or the number of treatment sessions (t = −0.52, P = 0.609).ConclusionsBCT was superior to the control conditions in all three outcome measures after treatment and at follow-up, and showed a relatively large effect size for relationship satisfaction. Moreover, BCT was superior to IBT in reducing the frequency of substance use.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac053
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Race Differences in the Association Between Binge Drinking and Treatment
           Among First-Time Justice-System-Impacted Youth

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      Pages: 23 - 30
      Abstract: AbstractAimsWe aim to determine whether there are racial/ethnic differences in the association between binge drinking frequency and community-based alcohol treatment among justice-system-impacted adolescents and young adults.MethodsWe examined whether race/ethnicity moderated the relation between binge drinking and youths’ likelihood of receiving alcohol treatment. The sample included 1216 male, first-time-arrested youth from the Crossroads Study (2011–2018). Participants were recruited from CA, PA and LA.ResultsAmong youth who binge drank occasionally, Black youth were less likely to receive alcohol treatment than White (b = −0.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] [−0.13, −0.04]) and Hispanic/Latino (b = −0.06, 95% CI [−0.09, −0.02]) youth. There were no differences between the White and Hispanic/Latino youth. Black youth who were frequent binge drinkers were as likely to receive alcohol treatment as White youth who binge drank significantly less often. There were no racial/ethnic differences in alcohol treatment at the highest level of binge drinking.ConclusionBlack youth who binge drink occasionally are less likely than White youth to receive alcohol treatment. The present findings highlight a need for efforts to mitigate racial disparities in access to or motivations to seek community-based treatment.
      PubDate: Fri, 23 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac046
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Mind The Gap: Differences in Alcohol Use Screening And Discussions Among
           Adults Comparing Asian American And Other Racial And Ethnic Subgroups in
           the United States, 2015–2019

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      Pages: 31 - 39
      Abstract: AbstractAimsAsian Americans are the fastest growing racial and ethnic subgroup in the USA but are underrepresented in the alcohol literature, partially due to misconceptions and racial stereotypes. We estimated any alcohol screening/discussions with providers among Asian Americans and other racial and ethnic subgroups and tested associations with alcohol treatment.MethodsWeighted prevalences of any alcohol screening or discussions with providers included US adults reporting past-year alcohol use and > =1 healthcare visit in the 2015–2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (n = 123,002). Multinomial logistic regressions estimated adjusted associations between alcohol use screening/discussions (ref: no screening/discussion) comparing Asian Americans to other racial and ethnic adult subgroups. Among adults with alcohol use disorder (AUD), we estimated adjusted odds of alcohol treatment and perceived treatment need by screening/discussions and racial and ethnic subgroup.ResultsAmong Asian American adults who reported past-year alcohol use and a healthcare visit, 24.7% reported any screening only and 51.4% discussed alcohol with providers. All racial and ethnic subgroups were more likely than Asian Americans to report alcohol screening/discussions (e.g. white adults, screening adjusted relative risk ratio [aRRR] = 1.48, 95% CI: 1.28–1.72; discussions aRRR = 1.92, 95% CI: 1.74–2.10). AUD treatment use and perceived need were about two times higher among people reporting alcohol discussions.ConclusionsAsian Americans were less likely to report discussing alcohol with providers than all other racial and ethnic subgroups. Alcohol discussions were associated with treatment use and perceived need. Efforts to increase equitable alcohol screening and discussions with clinicians are needed.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac050
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • A Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trial of Vigabatrin in the Management of
           Acute Alcohol Withdrawal

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      Pages: 40 - 45
      Abstract: AbstractObjective To undertake a double blinded randomised placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of vigabatrin, a GABA-transaminase inhibitor, as a benzodiazepine sparing agent in the management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome in a residential setting.Methods We enrolled 120 patients with alcohol use disorder who were randomly assigned to either treatment with vigabatrin (2g/day for 4 days) or placebo. The primary outcome was defined as the number of participants in each treatment arm needing diazepam for withdrawal management. A secondary outcome prespecified was the total dose of diazepam received by participants in each treatment arm. Participants were recruited on admission to a residential withdrawal unit at St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne from December 2014 to April 2019.Results No significant difference was observed in the number of participants requiring benzodiazepines during their residential withdrawal stay with 44 participants (78.6%) in placebo arm requiring at least one dose of diazepam compared to 38 (66.7%) in vigabatrin arm (p = .156). An 18.1% difference was observed between the proportion of participants who received a total dose of >100mg of diazepam during their residential withdrawal stay in placebo arm (32.1%), compared to vigabatrin arm (14.0%, p = .022). There were higher rates of reported adverse events in placebo arm with nine (15.0%) participants reporting adverse events compared with two (3.3%) participants in vigabatrin arm (p = .027).Conclusion Vigabatrin significantly reduced the number of participants requiring >100mg diazepam over the course of their alcohol withdrawal and was associated with a reduction in adverse effects when compared to placebo.
      PubDate: Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac044
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Early Improvement of Neuropsychological Impairments During Detoxification
           in Patients with Alcohol Use Disorder

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      Pages: 46 - 53
      Abstract: AbstractAimsTo assess recovery of alcohol-related neuropsychological deficits in a group of patients with pure severe alcohol use disorder (AUD) during a detoxification program using the Brief Evaluation of Alcohol-Related Neuropsychological Impairment (BEARNI) test.MethodsThirty-two patients with severe AUD using DSM-IV criteria (24 men, mean age = 45.5 ± 6.8 years old) were assessed using the BEARNI 8 ± 2 days after alcohol cessation (T1) and then were reassessed within 18 ± 2 days after alcohol cessation (T2). The primary study endpoint was the number of patients initially impaired at T1 who recovered cognitive functions at T2 assessment.ResultsAt T1, 59% (n = 19) patients with pure severe AUD had at least one impaired cognitive function assessed by the BEARNI. At T2, 63% of the patients with AUD with deficits at T1 had normal BEARNI cognitive scores (χ2 = 7.7, P = 0.005); specifically, the percentages of participants with normal subtest scores were 63% on memory (χ2 = 12.4, P = 0.0004), 100% on verbal fluency (χ2 = 16; P = <0.0001), 60% on alphabetical span (χ2 = 12.8; P = 0.0003) and 67% on visuospatial (χ2 = 15, P = 0.0001).ConclusionsThe cognitive impairments of two-thirds of patients with pure AUD included in the present study recovered within 18 days of abstinence, earlier than reported in previous studies.
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac048
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Relationship Between Primary Care Providers’ Perceptions of Alcohol Use
           Disorder And Pharmacotherapy Prescribing Rates

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      Pages: 54 - 59
      Abstract: AbstractAimsAcamprosate, naltrexone and disulfiram are underprescribed for alcohol use disorder (AUD) with marked variability among primary care providers (PCPs). We aimed to identify differences between high and low prescribers of medications for AUD (MAUD) with regard to knowledge, experiences, prioritization and attitudes.MethodsWe surveyed PCPs from a large healthcare system with at least 20 patients with AUD. Prescribing rates were obtained from the electronic health record (EHR). Survey responses were scored from strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (5). Multiple imputation was used to generate attitude scores for 7 missing subjects. PCPs were divided into groups by the median prescribing rate and attitude. Comparisons were made using Wilcoxon rank-sum and regression.ResultsOf the 182 eligible PCPs, 68 (37.4%) completed the survey. Most indicated willingness to attend an educational course (57.4%). Compared with low prescribers, high prescribers viewed the effectiveness of medications more favorably (short term 4.0 vs 3.7, P = 0.02; long term 3.5 vs 3.2, P = 0.04) and were more likely to view prescribing as part of their job (3.9 vs 3.4, P = 0.04). PCPs with positive attitudes (72.4%, CI 60.9–83.8%) had a prescribing rate of 5.0% (CI 3.5–6.5%) compared to 1.9% (CI 0.5–3.4%) among those with negative attitudes (P = 0.028). When stratified by attitude, belief in effectiveness was associated with higher prescribing among PCPs with positive attitudes but not those with negative attitudes.ConclusionsPCPs indicated an interest in learning to prescribe MAUD. However, education alone may not be effective unless physicians have positive attitudes towards patients with AUD.
      PubDate: Fri, 11 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac057
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Social Support as a Protective Factor for Alcohol Use Disorders: Results
           from a Nationally Representative Family History Study

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      Pages: 60 - 67
      Abstract: AbstractAimsThe current study examined the buffering effect of social support on the relationship between family history and alcohol use disorder symptoms (AUDsx).MethodsThe current study analyzes data from Waves 1 and 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (N = 34,653). Count of AUDsx were measured using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version, the independent variable was a weighted density measure of family history of AUDsx and the moderating variable was social support measured using the 12-item Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-12). Negative binomial regression models were used to estimate the association between (1) family history and AUDsx and (2) social support and AUDsx. Average marginal effects were estimated to explore the buffering effect of social support on the association between family history and AUDsx.ResultsFamily history was positively associated with AUDsx (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.39–1.54) and social support was negatively associated with AUDsx (IRR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.74–0.86). The marginal effects of family history decreased at higher levels of social support, indicating a buffering influence of social support on the association between family history and AUDsx.ConclusionsResults reveal a buffering effect of social support, where greater levels of social support reduce the association between family history and AUDsx. These results indicate that the social context, and social support specifically, may be important for diminishing the risk of AUDsx.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac059
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • A Latent Class Analysis of Perceived Barriers to Help-seeking Among People
           with Alcohol Use Problems Presenting for Telephone-delivered Treatment

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      Pages: 68 - 75
      Abstract: AbstractAimsDespite the magnitude of alcohol use problems globally, treatment uptake remains low. This study sought to determine the proportion of people presenting to telephone-delivered alcohol treatment who are first-time help-seekers, and explored perceived barriers to help-seeking to understand the barriers this format of treatment may help to address.MethodsSecondary analysis of baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of a telephone-delivered intervention for alcohol use problems. Latent class analysis (LCA) identified participant profiles according to self-reported barriers to alcohol treatment.ResultsParticipants’ (344) mean age was 39.86 years (SD = 11.36, 18–73 years); 51.45% were male. Despite high alcohol problem severity (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test: mean = 21.54, SD = 6.30; 63.37% probable dependence), multiple barriers to accessing treatment were endorsed (mean = 5.64, SD = 2.41), and fewer than one-third (29.36%) had previously accessed treatment. LCA revealed a two-class model: a ‘low problem recognition’ class (43.32%) endorsed readiness-for-change and attitudinal barriers; a ‘complex barriers’ class (56.68%) endorsed stigma, structural, attitudinal and readiness-to-change barriers, with complex barrier class membership predicted by female sex (adjusted OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.28, 0.72) and higher psychological distress (adjusted OR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.08, 1.18).ConclusionThe majority of people accessing this telephone-delivered intervention were new to treatment, yet had high alcohol problem severity. Two distinct profiles emerged, for which telephone interventions may overcome barriers to care and tailored approaches should be explored (e.g. increasing problem awareness, reducing psychological distress). Public health strategies to address stigma, and raise awareness about the low levels of drinking that constitute problem alcohol use, are needed to increase help-seeking.
      PubDate: Wed, 30 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac063
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction, Burnout and Alcohol Use Among
           Dental Hygienists

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      Pages: 76 - 83
      Abstract: AbstractAimsThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between demographics, compassion fatigue (CF), compassion satisfaction (CS), burnout (BO) and alcohol use among dental hygienists (DHs).MethodsThe web-based survey consisting of two validated instruments [Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and Professional Quality of Life] to measure alcohol use, CF, CS and BO was conducted with a convenience sample of DHs (n = 963).ResultsThe completion rate was 81.6% (n = 786). Nearly one in five DHs (19.1%) reported having their alcohol consumption influenced by the Coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic at least moderately. The number of hours worked per week (x) and AUDIT scores (y) were fully mediated by BO (m) (P < 0.001); the average number of hours worked per week (x) and AUDIT scores (y) were fully mediated by CF (m) (P < 0.001); the average number of patients seen per day (x) was a predictor of AUDIT scores (y) when partially mediated by BO (m) (P < 0.001); and age (x) was a predictor of AUDIT scores (y), mediated by CS (m). Results showed that one in four DHs could qualify for binge drinking (25.6%, n = 177) and 15.1% experienced blackout drinking episodes within the past year (n = 118).ConclusionMediating relationships exist between demographics, CF, CS, BO and alcohol use among DHs. More research needs to be conducted on alcohol use and CF among DHs and protective factors that may reduce the risk of BO, CF or alcohol use.
      PubDate: Fri, 16 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac036
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Chemosensory Alterations and Impact on Quality of Life in Persistent
           Alcohol Drinkers

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      Pages: 84 - 92
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundHeavy alcohol consumption-associated chemosensory dysfunction is understudied, and early detection can help predict disease-associated comorbidities, especially those related to four quality of life (QOL) domains (physical, psychological, social and environment). We examined self-reports of chemosensory ability of individuals with different alcohol drinking behaviors and their association with changes in QOL domains.MethodsParticipants (n = 466) were recruited between June 2020 and September 2021 into the NIAAA COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on Alcohol study. Group-based trajectory modeling was used to categorize participants without any known COVID-19 infection into three groups (non-drinkers, moderate drinkers and heavy drinkers) based on their Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test consumption scores at four different time points (at enrollment, week 4, week 8 and week 12). Linear mixed models were used to examine chemosensory differences between these groups. The associations between chemosensory abilities and QOL were determined in each group.ResultsWe observed significant impairment in self-reported smell ability of heavy drinking individuals compared to non-drinkers. In contrast, taste ability showed marginal impairment between these groups. There were no significant differences in smell and taste abilities between the moderate and non-drinking groups. Heavy drinkers’ impairment in smell and taste abilities was significantly associated with deterioration in their physical, psychological, social and environmental QOL.ConclusionPersistent heavy drinking was associated with lower chemosensory ability. Heavy drinkers’ reduced smell and taste function and association with poorer QOL indicate that early assessment of chemosensory changes may be crucial in identifying poorer well-being outcomes in heavy drinkers at risk for alcohol use disorder.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac047
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • The health halo effect of ‘low sugar’ and related claims on alcoholic
           drinks: an online experiment with young women

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      Pages: 93 - 99
      Abstract: AbstractAimsTo investigate whether ‘low sugar’ and related claims influence consumers’ perceptions of the healthiness or other attributes of alcoholic drinks, promote greater consumption or impact diet and activity behaviour intentions.MethodN = 501 Australian women aged 18–35 viewed and rated six images of alcoholic drinks in a randomized online experiment with a 2 (claim: low sugar claim, no claim control) × 2 (drink type: cider, ready-to-drink spirits) between-subjects design.ResultsParticipants who viewed drinks with low sugar claims rated them as healthier, less harmful to health, lower in sugar and kilojoules, and more suitable for weight management and a healthy diet than participants who viewed identical drinks with no claim (P < 0.001-P = 0.002). Drinks with low sugar claims were also perceived as being lower in alcohol (P < 0.001) despite being of equivalent alcohol content. There were no significant differences in anticipated social approval associated with consumption or in hypothetical intended consumption of the drinks, but participants who viewed drinks with low sugar claims were less likely to indicate they would compensate for consumption of the drink by modifying food intake or physical activity (P = 0.01).ConclusionsLow sugar and related claims on alcoholic drinks can generate a health halo: consumers generalise from a specific favourable attribute (low sugar) to misperceive other favourable health- and nutrition-related attributes, including lower alcohol content. Findings support calls to reconsider the permissibility of low sugar claims on alcoholic drinks as they may mislead consumers.
      PubDate: Sun, 23 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac054
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Ghrelin Predicts Stimulant and Sedative Effects of Alcohol in Heavy
           Drinkers

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      Pages: 100 - 106
      Abstract: AbstractAimThe aim of this study was to examine the relationship between ghrelin levels and the subjective effects of alcohol in heavy drinkers, and to compare them to healthy controls.MethodsGhrelin levels were collected as part of two laboratory studies. Both groups received either IV infusion of saline or high dose of alcohol (100 mg%). In the study of heavy drinkers, ghrelin was gathered on all subjects, but data was analyzed only for participants who received placebo (N=12). Healthy controls (N=20) came from another study that collected data on family history. Ghrelin levels and measures of alcohol effects (BAES, VAS, NDS, YCS [see manuscript for details]) were collected at 4 timepoints: baseline, before infusion, during infusion and after infusion.ResultsIV alcohol significantly reduced ghrelin levels and higher fasting ghrelin levels were associated with more intense subjective alcohol effects. There were no differences in fasting ghrelin levels or subjective effects between heavy drinkers and controls. However, while both groups showed similar decline in ghrelin levels following alcohol infusion, on the placebo day, ghrelin levels in the healthy subjects increased significantly and exponentially over time while for the heavy drinkers ghrelin levels remained flat.ConclusionsOur findings support the role of ghrelin in reward mechanisms for alcohol. Contrary to others, we found no differences in fasting ghrelin levels or subjective experiences of alcohol between heavy drinkers and healthy controls. However, the group differences on the IV placebo day may be a possible indication of ghrelin abnormalities in heavy drinkers.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac058
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Pituitary Volumes Are Reduced in Patients With Alcohol Use Disorder

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      Pages: 107 - 112
      Abstract: AbstractAimsTo determine whether there is a difference in pituitary gland volumes in patients with alcohol use disorder compared to healthy people.MethodsThe subjects included in the study consisted of 15 individuals who met the criteria for alcohol use disorder according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM 5) diagnostic criteria based on the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM 5 and were admitted to Firat University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, or were hospitalized, and 17 healthy controls. The volumes of pituitary were measured in subjects.ResultsAbsolute pituitary gland volumes of patients with alcohol use disorder and healthy controls were compared in the analysis performed using the independent samples t-test. The mean volume of the patient group was significantly smaller than the healthy controls (58.02 ± 7.24 mm3 in patients with alcohol use disorder vs. 83.08 ± 12.11 mm3, P < 0.01), a difference which persisted after controlling for age, gender and total brain size.ConclusionsPatients with alcohol use disorder in this study had smaller pituitary gland volumes compared to those of healthy control subjects. However, this study has limitations including small sample size and not adjusting for previous or current medication use or current anxiety and depression.
      PubDate: Thu, 01 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac062
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Alcohol Use in Patients with Opioid Use Disorder Linked to and Undergoing
           Buprenorphine Treatment via a Peer-Navigator Program Based in an Urban
           Emergency Department

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 113 - 114
      Abstract: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration10.13039/1000000581H79TI081510-01
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac061
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Love Your Sober Year: A Seasonal Guide to Alcohol-Free Living By Kate
           Baily and Mandy Manners. Welbeck Balance 1st September 2022 £14.99
           Paperback.

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      Pages: 115 - 115
      Abstract: I should say at the outset that I enjoyed this book. I am a woman early on in my recovery and this book is very much written for people like me.
      PubDate: Sat, 15 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac049
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
  • Vitamin C: A 500-Year Scientific Biography from Scurvy to Pseudoscience by
           Stephen M. Sagar M.D., Prometheus Books, 2022 ISBN 978–1–63,388-826-5
           US$24.95. Pp 226 Incl. Index and Bibliography

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      Pages: 116 - 116
      Abstract: Competing explanations for the multi-system disease of scurvy – bad air, damp clothing, lack of exercise, salted meat, and many others – were only disentangled when careful experiments were conducted. But even then, as Sagar illustrates in fascinating detail, implementing the results was a sometimes a political decision. Although this book is about mainly about Vitamin C, Sagar recalls how the Japanese Navy got rid of beri-beri in its sailors while the Japanese Army continued to believe that polished rice was superior to unpolished rice based on the Army’s observation that officers eating polished rice did not get beri-beri. The Army had not appreciated that officers’ wider diet than just rice provided other sources of what later would be known as ‘vitamins’.
      PubDate: Sat, 29 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/alcalc/agac052
      Issue No: Vol. 58, No. 1 (2022)
       
 
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