Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift f├╝r Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodepend├¬ncias     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Canadian Journal of Addiction
Number of Followers: 7  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2368-4739
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [330 journals]
  • On the Pleasure of Your Company

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nady el-Guebaly
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Withdrawal Management Practices and Services in Canada: A Cross-Sectional
           National Survey on the Management of Opioid Use Disorder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ali; Farihah; Russell, Cayley; Law, Justine; Talbot, Annie; Elton-Marshall, Tara; Bozinoff, Nikki; Imtiaz, Sameer; Rehm, Jürgen; Giang, Valerie; Rush, Brian
      Abstract: Objectives: Canada continues to battle an opioid overdose crisis marked by an increasingly toxic drug supply and a lack of access to substance use services. Withdrawal management (WM) programs serve as a frontline response for the treatment and support of Opioid Use Disorders (OUD). To gain a better understanding of WM programs in Canada and their involvement with individuals with OUD, we conducted a national environmental scan toward improving and standardizing the evidence base for best WM practices in Canada.Methods: Between July 2019 and March 2020, we distributed a cross-sectional self-report online questionnaire to program representatives of WM programs across the country. The questionnaire was comprised of both quantitative and open-ended questions, focusing on operational information of programs, as well as admission, treatment, and discharge activities related to OUD and the impacts of the opioid overdose crisis. Data were analyzed for basic frequency distributions and cross-tabulations.Results: A total of 85 WM programs were included in the final analyses. An estimated 14,171 opioid-related admissions occurred among participating WM programs, and the majority (71/82; 85.7%) of programs reported offering services for clients with problematic opioid use as either a primary or secondary presenting problem. The approaches to opioid-specific withdrawal and opioid agonist therapy (OAT) provision varied considerably. Most 66/78 (84.6%) of respondents indicated that they induct clients on OAT either in-house or refer them to another program within their organization. The respondents also identified significant barriers to facilitating OAT for their clients, such as a lack of capacity and knowledge or ability to prescribe OAT. Many programs discussed the impact of the opioid overdose crisis.Conclusions: Findings indicate a lack of capacity for OAT delivery, as well as significant discrepancies in the operation of WM programs in Canada and how they support clients with OUD. The results underscore a need to standardize clinical guidelines outlining evidence-based service delivery and care for the management for OUD in a variety of treatment settings and jurisdictions in Canada.Objectifs: Le Canada continue de lutter contre une crise de surdose d’opioïdes, marquée par un approvisionnement en drogues de plus en plus toxiques et un manque d’accès aux services liés à la consommation de substances. Les programmes de gestion du sevrage (GS) constituent une réponse de première ligne pour le traitement et le support des troubles liés à la consommation d’opioïdes (TCO). Afin de mieux comprendre les programmes de GS au Canada et leur implication auprès des personnes souffrant de TCO, nous avons mené une analyse environnementale nationale visant à améliorer et à normaliser la base de données probantes des meilleures pratiques de GS au Canada.Méthodes: Entre juillet 2019 et mars 2020, nous avons distribué un questionnaire transversal d’auto-évaluation en ligne aux représentants des programmes de GS à travers le pays. Le questionnaire était composé de questions quantitatives et ouvertes, axées sur les informations opérationnelles des programmes, ainsi que sur les activités d’admission, de traitement et de sortie liées au TCO et aux impacts de la crise des surdoses d’opioïdes. Les données ont été analysées pour des distributions de fréquence de base et des tabulations croisées.Résultats: Un total de 85 programmes de GS a été inclus dans les analyses finales. On estime à 14 171 le nombre d’admissions liées aux opioïdes parmi les programmes de GS participants, et la majorité (71/82 ; 85,7%) des programmes ont déclaré offrir des services aux clients ayant un usage problématique d’opioïdes comme problème principal ou secondaire. Les approches du sevrage spécifique aux opiacés et de l’offre du programme pour les TCO variaient considérablement. La plupart des 66/78 (84,6%) répondants ont indiqué qu’ils initiaient les clients au programme pour les TCO soit à l’interne, soit en les orientant vers un autre programme au sein de leur organisation. Les répondants ont également identifié des obstacles importants à la facilitation d’accès au programme pour les TCO pour leurs clients, tels que le manque de capacité et de connaissances ou la capacité de prescrire le programme pour les TCO. De nombreux programmes ont évoqué l’impact de la crise des surdoses d’opioïdes.Conclusion: Les résultats indiquent un manque de capacité pour la mise en œuvre du programme pour les TCO, ainsi que des écarts importants dans le fonctionnement des programmes de GS au Canada et dans la façon dont ils soutiennent les clients souffrant de TCO. Les résultats soulignent la nécessité d’uniformiser les lignes directrices cliniques décrivant la prestation de services et de soins fondés sur des données probantes pour la prise en charge des TCO dans une variété de milieux de traitement et de juridictions au Canada.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Maintaining Evidence-based Opioid Agonist Treatment During a Methadone to
           Buprenorphine Rotation With Slow-release Oral Morphine

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Costa; Tianna; Hannah, Madelynn; Cuperfain, Ari; Chopra, Nitin
      Abstract: imagePatients may transition from methadone to buprenorphine-naloxone for various reasons. Alternative methods to ease this transition have been reported in the literature including low-dose buprenorphine (microdosing) and using slow-release oral morphine (SROM). We present the case of a 34-year-old male presenting to the hospital with stimulant-induced psychosis, wishing to transition from methadone to buprenorphine. Given the long and variable half-life of methadone, a wash-out period of at least 5 days is recommended to avoid precipitated withdrawal, before starting buprenorphine-naloxone. This can be a high-risk period if a patient decided to leave against medical advice during the transition. To reduce withdrawal symptoms during this period and to maintain the patient on opioid agonist treatment, SROM was started the day after methadone was discontinued. SROM and immediate-release morphine PRN were increased every 1–2 days (maximum dose of 570 mg daily) and on day 6, a rapid induction of buprenorphine-naloxone was initiated. In 3 days, he stabilized on 32 mg and continued on this dose for the remainder of his hospitalization. He later transitioned to buprenorphine extended-release injection. This case highlights an approach to facilitate transitioning from methadone to buprenorphine-naloxone and subsequently buprenorphine extended-release injection that prioritizes patient comfort and treatment retention, maintaining the use of evidence-based opioid agonist therapy throughout treatment.Les patients peuvent passer de la méthadone à la buprénorphine-naloxone pour diverses raisons. Des méthodes alternatives pour faciliter cette transition ont été rapportées dans la littérature, notamment la buprénorphine à faible dose (“microdosage”) et l’utilisation de la morphine orale à libération prolongée (LP). Nous présentons le cas d’un homme de 34 ans se présentant à l’hôpital avec une psychose induite par des stimulants, souhaitant passer de la méthadone à la buprénorphine. Étant donné la demi-vie longue et variable de la méthadone, une période d'élimination d’au moins 5 jours est recommandée pour éviter un sevrage précipité, avant de commencer la buprénorphine-naloxone. Cette période peut être à haut risque dans le cas où un patient déciderait de partir contre avis médical pendant la transition. Afin de réduire les symptômes de sevrage pendant cette période et de maintenir le patient sous traitement par agoniste opioïde (TAO), le LP a été commencé le jour suivant l’arrêt de la méthadone. Le LP et la morphine à libération immédiate (LI) ont été augmentées tous les 1 à 2 jours (dose maximale de 570 mg par jour) et le 6e jour, une induction rapide de buprénorphine-naloxone a été initiée. En trois jours, il s’est stabilisé à 32 mg, et a continué à prendre cette dose pendant le reste de son hospitalisation. Il est ensuite passé à la buprénorphine injectable à libération prolongée. Ce cas met en évidence une approche visant à faciliter la transition de la méthadone à la buprénorphine-naloxone, puis à la buprénorphine à libération prolongée par injection, qui donne la priorité au confort du patient et à la rétention du traitement, tout en maintenant l’utilisation d’un traitement par agoniste opioïde fondé sur des preuves tout au long du traitement.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Suggestions for Canada’s Opioid Use Disorder Management Guidelines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kleinman; Robert A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Involuntary Hospital Admission in the Treatment of People With Severe
           Substance Use Disorder

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Di Paola; Francesca; Franchuk, Susan; Katz, Robyn; Kendell, Emily; Ling, Sara
      Abstract: Objectives: In Canada, substance-related harms and mortality are a significant public health concern. Recently there have been discussions about the utility of involuntary hospital admissions for patients who have severe substance use disorders (SUDs) and may otherwise not receive or remain in treatment. This case report describes 3 patient cases where involuntary hospital admissions were used and resulted in good outcomes.Methods: Patients provided written informed consent to have their deidentified cases shared in this case report, and to review their electronic medical records for this purpose.Results: Patients ranged in age from early 20s to mid-50s. Each patient had a severe SUD and required inpatient hospitalization to stabilize. In each case, patients were admitted involuntarily to hospital for a brief period of time for safety and stabilization, permitting withdrawal management and initiation of medications to treat their SUDs. Although the patients were admitted involuntarily, they remained capable of consenting to treatment.Conclusions: When utilized for the least amount of time under specific circumstances, involuntary hospital admissions for people with severe SUDs may be productive and result in good outcomes for patients. Care should be taken to debrief involuntary admissions with patients to preserve therapeutic rapport. Future research should explore patient perspectives on involuntary hospitalization in the treatment of SUDs.Objectifs: Au Canada, les méfaits et la mortalité liés à l’utilisation de substance constituent un problème de santé publique important. Récemment, des discussions ont eu lieu sur l’utilité du placement d’office dans un centre hospitalier pour les patients souffrant de troubles graves de consommation de substances qui, autrement, pourraient ne pas recevoir ou terminer leur traitement. Ce rapport décrit trois cas de patients où le placement d’office à l’hôpital a donné de bons résultats.Méthodes: Les patients ont donné leur consentement écrit pour que leurs cas dépersonnalisés soient partagés dans ce rapport de cas, et pour que leurs dossiers médicaux électroniques soient examinés à cette fin.Résultats: Les patients étaient âgés de 20 à 50 ans. Chaque patient souffrait d’un grave trouble lié à la consommation de substances et a dû être hospitalisé pour se stabiliser. Dans chaque cas, les patients ont été admis d’office à l’hôpital pour une brève période pour des raisons de sécurité et de stabilisation, permettant la gestion du sevrage et l’initiation de médicaments pour traiter leurs troubles liés à la consommation de substances. Bien que les patients aient été admis contre leur gré, ils étaient capables de consentir au traitement.Conclusions: Lorsqu’elles sont utilisées pour une durée minimale dans des circonstances spécifiques, le placement d’office en hôpital pour les personnes souffrant de graves troubles liés à la consommation de substances peuvent être productives et donner de bons résultats pour les patients. Il faut prendre soin de débriefer les placements d’office avec les patients pour préserver le rapport thérapeutique. Les recherches futures devraient explorer les perspectives des patients sur le placement d’officedans le traitement des troubles liés à la consommation de substances.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Differences Between Gamblers and Substance Users Who Seek Treatment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gooding; Nolan B.; Williams, Jennifer N.; Williams, Robert J.
      Abstract: imageBackground and Objectives: Gambling disorder (GD) and substance use disorder (SUD) are diagnostically similar and share many etiological, clinical, and psychosocial factors. However, even among individuals who gamble, treatment-seeking (TS) rates appear much higher for SUD than GD.Methods: An analysis was conducted on data from an online survey of 10,199 Canadian adults (18+) over-selected for gambling participation to explore the basis of these differences.Results: Fewer respondents sought treatment for GD (6.8%; 91/1346) relative to SUD (30.3%; 236/778). Respondents seeking treatment for substance use (TS-SUD) had significantly higher levels of childhood abuse, generalized anxiety, and withdrawal/cravings, whereas respondents seeking gambling treatment (TS-GD) had higher overall addiction severity. A final analysis identified 8 variables as predictive of TS, with 5 of these occurring at higher rates in respondents with SUD: younger age, more past year negative life events, childhood abuse, post-traumatic stress, and not engaging in their addiction longer or with heavier use than intended. By comparison, greater addiction severity was the only predictor of TS that was more prevalent in respondents with GD.Conclusion: The present results indicate that (a) fewer respondents sought gambling treatment relative to substance use treatment; (b) TS-SUD is associated with a more prominent comorbidity profile; and (c) the higher rate of TS for SUD compared with GD is due, in part, to people with SUD having more general factors that are predictive of TS (eg, comorbidities). Scientific significance: these findings provide insight regarding different rates of TS for gambling and substance use.Objectifs: Le trouble du jeu (TJ) et le trouble lié à l’utilisation de substances (TUS) sont diagnostiqués de façon similaire et partagent de nombreux facteurs étiologiques, cliniques et psychosociaux. Cependant, même parmi les personnes qui jouent, les taux de recherche de traitement (RT) semblent beaucoup plus élevés pour le TUS que pour le TJ.Méthodes: Une analyse a été menée sur les données d’une enquête en ligne auprès de 10 199 adultes canadiens (18+) sélectionnés pour leur participation aux jeux de hasard et d’argent, afin d’explorer le fondement de ces différences.Résultats: Les répondants ont été moins nombreux à chercher un traitement pour le TJ (6,8% ; 91/1346) que pour le TUS (30,3% ; 236/778). Les répondants cherchant un traitement pour la consommation de substances (RT-TUS) avaient des niveaux significativement plus élevés d’abus durant l’enfance, d’anxiété généralisée et de symptômes de sevrage, alors que les répondants cherchant un traitement pour le jeu (RT-TJ) avaient une gravité globale de la dépendance plus élevée. Une analyse finale a permis d’identifier huit variables prédictives de RT, cinq d’entre elles étant plus fréquentes chez les répondants souffrant de TUS : un âge plus jeune, un plus grand nombre d'événements négatifs au cours de l’année écoulée, des abus durant l’enfance, un stress post-traumatique et le fait de ne pas s’engager dans leur dépendance plus longtemps ou avec une consommation plus importante que prévu. En comparaison, une plus grande sévérité de la dépendance est le seul élément précurseur de RT qui est plus prévalent chez les répondants atteints de TJ.Conclusion: Les présents résultats indiquent que a) moins de répondants ont cherché un traitement pour le jeu que pour l’utilisation de substances ; b) le RT-TUS est associé à un profil de comorbidité plus important; etc) le taux plus élevé de RT pour le TUS par rapport au TJ est dû, en partie, au fait que les personnes atteintes de TUS ont des facteurs plus généraux qui sont prédictifs de RT (p. ex., comorbidités). Importance scientifique : Ces résultats donnent un aperçu des différents taux de recherche de traitement pour le jeu et la consommation de substances.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 3.236.209.138
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-