Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 143)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift f├╝r Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodepend├¬ncias     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders
Number of Followers: 6  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2279-3909
Published by Sri Lanka Journals Online Homepage  [71 journals]
  • Towards evidence-based substance abuse prevention and treatment in
           developing countries

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. No abstract available

      International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):3-4 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Extent and patterns of drug use among persons with disabilities in Kenya

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Background: Although some data existed suggesting that there was high prevalence of drug use among the general population in Kenya with 39-48% of 15-65 year olds having used alcohol and at least one other substance, there was a general absence of comprehensive data on the extent of drug use among Persons With Disability (PWD). The current study therefore sought to fill the gap by establishing the extent and patterns of drug use among PWD.Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study targeting PWD based in learning institutions as well as within the community in three selected regions of Kenya (Nairobi, Coast and Central). A combination of stratified and purposive sampling was used to identify a sample of 486 PWD. Data was collected using a structured questionnaire and quantitatively analysed using descriptive statistics, namely, frequencies and percentages to show the extent and patterns of drug use among PWD.Results: The findings revealed that 35% of the respondents had used some form of drug, with a majority having done so between the ages 15-19 (43.3%). Further, 13.6% had used at least one substance in the past year, 7.4% in the past month and 3.9% had used drugs daily. The type of drug used were alcoholic beverages (28.2%), tobacco products (19.6%), khat (miraa/muguka) (14.8%) and marijuana (9.2%).Conclusion:The findings proved that compared to the general population, the prevalence of drug use among PWD is higher for most of the drugs. The findings point to an urgent need for policies to guide Alcohol and Drug Abuse (ADA) prevention and treatment programmes targeting PWD.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):5-17 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • International standards in prevention: how to influence prevention systems
           by policy interventions'

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. The existence of multiple standards for drug prevention, published by different national and international organisations, might seem redundant and confusing at a glance. This paper aims to explain the rationales of the different standards and that they differentially respond to specific challenges of each of the three main components of a prevention system: interventions, services and people. Effectiveness of standards can improve the effectiveness of programmes and interventions, while process standards can improve the con-text within which effective programmes and interventions are implemented. The variety of the existing standards and their different levels of exigencies can be beneficiary if policy makers apply them in combination - ie. choosing effective interventions and assuring that they are properly implemented and accepted, and in the appropriate cultural and geographic context. Other international organisations involved provide additional support such as certified training and online resources. Taken together, these initiatives might pave the way for setting up accreditation systems, in some countries, and help to assure that prevention providers take up such effective interventions and that prevention professionals are capable of implementing and willing to use it. All this requires, however, the political will to actually implement these standards since it implies revising, challenging and improving custom-ary prevention systems with traditional approaches.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):18-37 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Uptake of HIV, Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C testing among injection drug
           users in Thailand

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Background: Behaviour related to injection drug use such as needle and sy­ringe sharing and unsafe sex contribute to the transmission of blood-borne viral infections such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Therefore, it is recommended that ongoing Injection Drug Users (IDUs) should receive screening for HIV, HBV and HCV at least once every 6 to 12 months. This study aims to esti­mate prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV testing uptake among IDUs living in Songkhla Province, Thailand, and explore its associated factors.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 157 male IDUs liv­ing in Songkhla, in southern Thailand, between July 2013 and January 2014. Participants were recruited through a snowball technique where they were given a unique coded coupon. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire.Results: The most common test reported was HIV (72%), followed by HBV (44.6%) and HCV (39.5%) respectively. Over one quarter (26.1%) reported not having been tested in the past 12 months while 35.7% reported having been tested for all three viruses. IDUs who had visited an NGO-run drop-in centre, knew the risks of injection drug use, had completed secondary or higher education, had used heroin or amphetamine less than weekly, had re­ceived targeted information or education, or were married, and had a greater likelihood to report receiving all three tests.Discussion and conclusions: There is room for improvement in the utili­sation of testing for blood-borne viral infections. More attention must be given to those participants who have never visited a health facility or a drop-in centre, do not know the risks of injection drug use and do not receive targeted information or education. Particularly, IDUs who use drugs more frequently should be the first priority.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):38-54 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Islamic principles in preventing drug use among Muslims: a reflection on
           drug use and treatment in Malaysia

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Islam in Malaysia is the official religion and is considered a way of life. However, there are many drug abusers and most of them are Muslims. In Malaysia, Muslims have many opportunities to learn and practice Islam eas­ily as there are mosques in every city, town and village. This paper focuses on Islamic views on drug use. Islam prohibits the ingestion of khamr which is any substance that intoxicates, in whatever form or under whatever name it may appear. This also includes alcohol, drugs and inhalants, as these in­toxicating substances can affect their faith on Allah the Al Mighty and the development of their family and the Ummah in general. This article gives Islamic views from the Holy Quran and the Prophet’s Sunnah (teachings) on the likely reasons leading to drug use. The paper also presents a framework on prevention and treatment of drug use.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):55-68 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Efficacy of a peer interactive youth-led drug prevention programme: a
           UYDEL-UNODC project

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. While most substance abuse programmes rely more on non-interactive de­livery interventions to help the youth, youth-led involvement in substance abuse prevention has been found to be more effective. The delivery of the non-interactive programmes contains several weaknesses, such as passivity of youth participants. Teachers sometimes may be unaccountable in passing over information or may assume the youth already know. Youth-led interactive programmes have a high rate of authority and significantly register less drunkenness and lower alcohol use among peer-led groups. In screening and selecting, peers look or those who are helpful, trustworthy, concerned and those who are good listeners. A key conclusion is that these programmes need to be supported, monitored and sometimes supplemented by other intervention models so as not to under-rate or over-emphasise and assume that “one size fits all”.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):69-78 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Alcohol use disorder identification test use in Muslim countries

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Background: Although alcohol consumption rates are low in the Middle East, there are pockets of high risk alcohol consumption especially among the youth. However, the main problem is the absence of trusted statistics related to alcohol use in these countries. This study is aimed at finding the possible bias in using Alcohol Use Identification Test (AUDIT) question­naire among undergraduates in Karbala/Iraq and to determine alcohol consumption rates and the potential predictors.Material and methods: A random sample (n=5446 students) answered a questionnaire based on AUDIT. The study objectives were to determine the effect of socio-cultural contexts on validity of AUDIT in a Muslim country. The analysis used descriptive and chi-squares test and regression analysis to assess significant associations at p< 0.001level.Results: Biased AUDIT findings might be estimated due to the high rates of guilt (54%) or knowing that others care about alcohol consumption (49%). Alcohol consumption lifetime incidence rate was 2% and was higher among male smokers. Risky drinking patterns was high (56%); however this might be biased due to socio-cultural reasons.Conclusion: AUDIT use should consider socio-cultural environments. Alcohol consumption among university students is low as similar to the rates reported in neighbouring countries such as Jordan and Turkey. Risky drinking behaviour was alarmingly high which suggests that socio-cultural environ­ment need should be considered in interpreting AUDIT results.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):79-92 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Family therapeutic alliance and the prevention of relapse in collectivist
           Malay community in Malaysia

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Being a drug addict has a high probability of alienation, even if one belongs to a strong inter-dependent family. Culturally, it is simply that he had deviated from his family’s piously-held values and norms. By capitalising on the idea of therapeutic alliance, the researchers identified a strong but slightly different form of therapeutic alliance which is a core value flourishing nat­urally in the Malay collectivist culture. Working on this collectivist family therapeutic alliance has enhanced effective communication and co-operation between the Recovering Addict (RA) and their family members which resulted in RA’s capability to stay drug free. In this study, four RAs and 35 members of their family were put together to form four research groups. Open orientation group is adopted to suit the unpredictable group member’s attendance during the four months’ period of treatment. For the purpose of collecting data, the researchers used three sets of inventory called Establishing and Maintaining Therapeutic Alliance Inventory or EMTAI.1, EMTAI.2 and EMTAI.3, partly based on a modified version of Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) format. The results from pre and post tests showed that there is strong readiness among the subjects to establish and to maintain a therapeutic alliance. The follow up test, conducted two years after the last research group received treatment, showed that three out of four RAs suc­cessfully ‘kicked the habit’ and are living drug free lives.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):93-105 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Aggression as risk for delinquency and substance abuse in adolescents

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. The objective of this study is to explore the role of aggression (i.e. physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger and hostility) in the development of delinquency and drug abuse in adolescents. Hypotheses were formulated where delinquent adolescents would score high on the variables of physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger and hostility. Adolescents who abuse drugs would score high on the variable of aggression as compared to non-users. Total sample of study comprised of 200 adolescents out of which 101 were juvenile delinquents and 105 were non-delinquents of 12 to 18 year olds (mean age=15years) belonging to a low socio-economic status. The sample (delinquents) of the study was selected from central jail of Karachi and non-delinquents were selected from various public sector schools in Karachi by using random sampling techniques. Descriptive statistics were used to get a precise and better view of the characteristics of sample of the data. Independent sample t-test was used to determine the differences of aggression (physical aggression, verbal aggression, anger and hostility) between juvenile delinquents and non-delinquent (control) groups and between drug-users and non-users. The results show significant differences on variables of aggression between delinquent and non-delinquent adolescents. Delinquents are found to exhibit a high level of aggression as depicted by their mean scores on the aggression questionnaire. When subtypes of aggression are analysed delinquents are found to score high on physical aggression, verbal aggression and hostility. However, no significant difference is found between delinquents and non-delinquents on anger subtype. Similarly, t-test analysis and mean difference suggest that those who use drugs have a high level of aggression than those who do not use drugs. Prospects for future research have also been recommended on the basis of limitations drawn from the study. The role of aggression is well established in this study and a disorganised environment is significant in inculcating aggression among adolescents. Parents of high-risk children must be guided on their role in discouraging anti-social and deviant behaviour among their children. Also, results are useful for teachers who can identify a positive role they can play in teaching, coping skills to high risk children. Moreover, education is found to be a protective factor and thus the government must take initiatives to design and implement large scale life skills training programmes to overcome the problems that adolescents face.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):106-118 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
  • Patterns of binge drinking among adults in urban and rural areas of Pha-An
           township, Myanmar

    • Abstract: Correction: Due to an error in the online publication of this journal, the publication date of this issue was recorded as 2014. The publication date was corrected to 2015 on 3rd September 2015. The date on the cover is correct. Binge alcohol drinking is a dangerous pattern of alcohol consumption that may result in intoxication and death. In Myanmar, no prior study for binge drinking has been conducted. This study aims to assess the alcohol con­sumption among adults in urban and rural areas of Pha-An Township, the capital city of the Karen state in South East Myanmar.Method: This study was conducted via face-to-face interviews among urban (264) and rural (114) participants. The participants who consume alcohol were assessed for their alcohol drinking patterns by using the Time Line Follow Back (TLFB) method. The collected data was analysed using the Chi-square test.Results: The result indicated that about 60% had previously consumed alcohol, and half of them reported practicing binge drinking. The largest age group of binge drinkers was 25-44. The majority of the participants (over 70%) started alcohol consumption as teens, especially at the age between 15-20 years, and the most common type of alcohol for their first time use was toddy (54.4%). The onset of alcohol consumption, occupations and other substances like smoking and betel chewing, are associated with binge drinking.Conclusion: It is concluded that 17.7% of the total study population have practiced binge drinking and it peaks in the age group of 25-44 years.Recommendation: It is strongly recommended that a more in-depth research is carried out regarding binge drinking.International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders 2015;1(3-4):119-130 Published on 2015-07-28 00:00:00
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.205.66.93
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-