Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Drug Issues
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.534
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0022-0426 - ISSN (Online) 1945-1369
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Risk Factors Associated with Simultaneous Use of Alcohol and Prescription
           Opioids Among Young Adults in Michigan

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      Authors: Guijin Lee, Emily Pasman, Jennifer D. Ellis, Marvin A. Solberg, Danielle Hicks, Elizabeth Agius, Stella M. Resko
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose: Alcohol can have serious side effects alone and can enhance the side effects of prescription opioids in unpredictable and dangerous ways. This study aims to identify risk factors for simultaneous use of alcohol and prescription opioids among young adults. Methods: Demographic characteristics, substance use, mental well-being, other substance-related factors, and simultaneous use of alcohol and prescription opioids were utilized to run multiple logistic regression analysis (N = 1751; aged 18–25). Results: Mental well-being (OR = 0.971, p = .003) and education level (OR = 0.383, p < .001) were associated with a lower likelihood of simultaneous use. Knowing someone who had a fatal overdose (OR = 2.443, p < .001), binge drinking (OR = 1.065, p = .012), and older age (OR = 1.250, p < .001) were associated with a greater likelihood of simultaneous use. Conclusion: The risk and protective factors identified in the current study point to specific areas for intervention to reduce simultaneous use. Further efforts are needed to minimize the increasing polysubstance-involved overdose mortality among young adults.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-22T06:35:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231165264
       
  • Marijuana Policies in Drug Treatment Courts

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      Authors: Ruibin Lu
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Drug treatment courts are challenged by the ongoing trend of marijuana legalization. In states where it is legal for adult citizens to consume marijuana for medical and recreational purposes, treatment courts need to determine whether participants should be allowed to consume or possess marijuana. By analyzing the written policies of treatment courts in states that have legalized recreational and medical marijuana, this study explores how treatment courts address such challenges. The review shows a large percentage of drug treatment courts have yet to clearly communicate their marijuana policies with the participants in writing. However, among the drug treatment courts that have established marijuana-specific policies, the vast majority of courts continue to ban the use of marijuana while a few courts allow medical marijuana use on an individual basis.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T07:08:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231163796
       
  • “Boys are Allowed to be Drunk”: Exploring Gender Norms in Adolescents'
           Alcohol References Across Different Social Media Platforms and Message
           Types

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      Authors: Sofie Vranken, Sarah Murru, Kathleen Beullens
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      With alcohol experiences increasingly shared on social media, this study investigated the construction and understanding of gender norms in alcohol posts: (a) whether stereotypical gender norms prevail across different platforms and message types (b) among adolescents. Focus group interviews with 47 adolescents (Mage = 16.21; SD = 1.22) indicated that social media are important outlets for reproducing stereotypical norms. While sharing alcohol depictions was deemed to be stereotypically female, there were gender differences in the acceptability of sharing certain types of alcohol depictions. As opposed to girls, it was more appropriate for males to depict extreme, negative alcohol behaviors. While girls acknowledged that ephemeral environments enabled them to feel comfortable sharing extreme alcohol behaviors, they carefully negotiated these references by limiting the number of these posts, highlighting female traits in them, and restricting this content to close friends only. Thus, alcohol-related social media posts are more stereotypical than actual drinking experiences, even in more deliberating message types including ephemeral ones.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-20T04:42:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231163791
       
  • Exploring the Intersection of Drug Addiction and Mental Ill-Health in
           Scottish Prisons: A Qualitative Study of Incarcerated Men

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      Authors: Ross Deuchar, James Densley
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This article presents insights from small-scale qualitative research exploring the intertwining nature of drug addiction and mental ill-health among men in Scottish prisons. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 men in two Scottish prisons. The men’s narratives suggested that increased tension in prison halls had stimulated a huge surge in the use of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS), in turn increasing and deepening existing mental ill-health and violence. They believed health care in the prisons to be of low quality, and that methadone was prescribed as a mechanism for social control. Implications for future policy, practice and research are outlined.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T07:14:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231161282
       
  • Are the “Big 5” Personality Traits Associated With Substance
           Use Self-Stigma'

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      Authors: Seth A. Brown
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Self-stigma among individuals with substance use problems is notably high, but not all individuals with substance use problems experience elevated self-stigma. Unfortunately, there is limited research to account for such variation. A few studies have examined the association between personality traits from the five-factor model (FFM; “Big 5”) and self-stigma among those with mental illness, but no research exists among individuals with substance use disorders. Based on data from 125 individuals residing in a substance use treatment unit, the FFM personality traits collectively account for 33% to 56% of the variance across four components of self-stigma. More specifically, individuals with high neuroticism, low conscientiousness, and/or low extraversion experience greater self-stigma. The identification of at-risk individuals, via personality traits, could allow for development of targeted interventions to address self-stigma, and ultimately improve treatment retention and outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-11T03:54:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231163801
       
  • Assessing Stage of Change and Harm Reduction Strategies for Synthetic
           Cannabinoid Use Among Individuals Experiencing Homelessness in Houston,
           Texas

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      Authors: Alane Celeste-Villalvir, Cathy Crouch, Laura Witte, Angela M. Heads, Michael Weaver, Joy M. Schmitz, Frances Isbell, Vanessa Schick
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Synthetic cannabinoids (SCs) are low-cost substances that have been associated with adverse health outcomes and an increase in emergency department visits over recent years, particularly among people experiencing homelessness. This mixed methods study explored the connection between homelessness, SC use, and readiness to quit in order to inform the development of harm reduction strategies. Individuals (18+) residing in homeless encampments in Houston, TX with experiences of SC use were eligible to participate. Participants (N = 65) completed an interviewer-administered survey about their SC use. Most participants were Black/African American (65.7%), male (82.9%), and most (75.4%) reported using SCs to avoid positive drug tests. Many wanted to quit using SCs (69.2%) and already employed harm reduction strategies while using SCs. Organizations supporting individuals experiencing homelessness who use SCs should focus on reducing barriers to stopping SC use and increasing the availability of housing and supportive services.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-04T02:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231161284
       
  • Educational Attainment and Differences in Patterns of Alcohol, Cannabis,
           and Tobacco Use Among Young Adults

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      Authors: Amy L. Stamates, Christina T. Schulz, Emily Junkin, Douglas J. Glenn, Cathy Lau-Barraco
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Multigroup latent profile analysis examined whether patterns of alcohol, cannabis, and tobacco use varied between college student and nonstudent young adults (N = 745), and profiles were characterized by alcohol- and drug-related problems, psychological distress, and perceived stress. Findings supported three profiles (high use across substances, primarily high tobacco use, and low use across substances) among students. Students in the high use group, relative to other groups, experienced the highest number of problems and psychological distress. Among nonstudents, two profiles emerged (high use across substances and primarily high tobacco use), and noncollege participants in the high use group experienced the highest problems, psychological distress, and perceived stress. Students, compared to nonstudents, reported more variability in their substance use profiles, as a low substance use group was not observed among nonstudents. Prevention and intervention efforts should target nonstudents, which could aid in reducing negative health outcomes based on disparities in education.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-03-03T04:34:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231161525
       
  • Service Providers’ Perceptions of Substitute Addictions in the
           Western Cape, South Africa

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      Authors: Deborah Louise Sinclair, Steve Sussman, Lize Vantomme, Maria Florence, Shazly Savahl, Wouter Vanderplasschen
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Globally little is known regarding substance use service providers’ perceptions of substitute behaviours and this significant gap could hinder service provision and recovery outcomes. Semi-structured focus group discussions (including 22 service providers across five sites) were conducted in residential treatment facilities in the Western Cape, South Africa. Service providers recognised substances (e.g. cigarettes and caffeine) and behaviours (e.g. gambling, eating, love, sex, shopping, exercise, and gaming) as potential substitutes. Identified substitute motives included managing cravings; self-medication; filling the experiential void of the primary substance, and time-spending. Concurrent behaviours and addictions were believed to be a key mechanism underlying substitution however, service providers did not uniformly screen for co-occurring behavioural addictions. Substitute behaviours were primarily considered a pathway to relapse and service providers emphasised prevention, detection and family education. To suitably intervene, screening for co-occurring behaviours should be an integral part of the assessment of those presenting for substance use treatment.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-27T04:51:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159550
       
  • Social Media Marketing Practices of Illinois Recreational Cannabis
           Dispensaries in the First Year of Legal Sales: Product Promotions,
           Branding, and Price Promotions

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      Authors: Samantha Marinello
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research from tobacco suggests that the recreational cannabis industry will use aggressive tactics, including product innovation and mass-marketing and advertising, to increase demand for their products. The purpose of this study is to examine product promotions, branding, and promotional pricing on recreational dispensary social media pages in the state of Illinois in the first year of legal sales. Data were collected from all recreational cannabis dispensary Facebook and Twitter accounts and a quantitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. Differences in marketing practices were assessed by neighborhood race/ethnicity and income and dispensary type. Results of the study revealed that flower and edibles were the two most heavily promoted products; promotions for vaporizers and concentrates were also promoted frequently. Posts with branded promotions and price promotions increased substantially over the year. Research suggests that this trend in marketing practices will lead to greater initiation and intensity of cannabis use.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-25T04:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159542
       
  • “I Like the Vibes It Gives”: Adolescent Perspectives on Cannabis
           Billboards and Print Advertising in Nevada

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      Authors: Cara S. Drake, Kim Sloan, Meghan Anderson, Kristen D. Clements-Nolle, Jennifer L. Pearson
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      An influx of laws permitting recreational cannabis sales in the US has allowed for increased advertising. The purpose of this study was to describe how adolescents perceive outdoor and print cannabis advertising and to identify aspects of advertising that are appealing or eye-catching, focusing on five themes: price promotion, sex appeal, wellness, party, and text-only. We recruited adolescents ages 11–17 to participate in seven focus groups (44 participants) from 2019 to 2020. Participants viewed cannabis advertisements and responses were summarized using deductive thematic analysis. The party-themed advertisements were the most salient to participants, who desired to emulate the behaviors shown. Participants favored ads featuring young people and containing multiple colors. Participants disliked advertisements perceived to portray misleading or contradictory messages, such as the promotion of physical activity or use of sex appeal, and ads perceived to lack authenticity. Identification of youth appealing features can help inform cannabis advertising regulations.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T08:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159017
       
  • Mental Health and Recovery Needs Among Women Substance Use Disorder
           Treatment Clients With Stalking Victimization Experiences

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      Authors: TK Logan, Jennifer Cole
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined mental health and recovery needs at substance use disorder (SUD) program entry and at follow-up (n = 2064) among: (1) women with no stalking victimization; (2) women with lifetime stalking victimization experiences; and (3) women with recent stalking victimization experiences (within 12 months of program entry). Stalking can be defined as a repeated pattern of behavior that creates fear or concern for safety or extreme emotional distress in the target. Women who experienced any stalking victimization, and particularly recent stalking victimization at program entry, had more recovery needs and increased mental health symptoms. At follow-up, women with any stalking victimization experiences continued to have more recovery needs with few differences between the lifetime and recent stalking victimization groups. Stalking victimization experiences were significantly associated with depression and anxiety symptoms in the multivariate analysis. Addressing stalking victimization during SUD treatment may be important to facilitate recovery.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-23T07:56:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159307
       
  • Adolescent Substance Use Outcomes in Response to Social Consequences of
           Use: The Role of Empathy

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      Authors: Drew E. Winters, Suena Massey, Joseph T. Sakai
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence suggests empathy deficits have a temporal relationship with substance use severity by late adolescence theorized to decrease use via recognition of social consequences. However, this has yet to be tested empirically along with differences in cognitive and affective empathy. Adolescents admitted to substance use treatment (n = 3382) were followed through treatment and 12 months after treatment. Variable trajectories were fit using growth curve models; and cross-lagged effects of cognitive and affective empathy (interpersonal reactivity index) on response to social consequences of use were tested along with how response to social consequences affected the mean trajectory of substance use. Results indicate higher cognitive empathy predicted greater response to social consequences of use and response to these consequences at the end of treatment predicted a steeper decrease in substance use. This evidence highlights the importance of cognitive empathy for responding to social consequences of use for motivating less adolescent substance use.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-21T01:34:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159303
       
  • Neighborhood Ecological Models of Alcohol Outlet Density and
           Male–on–Female Domestic Violence: Accounting for Adjacent Place and
           Neighborhood Characteristics

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      Authors: Thomas H. Johnson, Aleksandra J. Snowden
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Alcohol availability is a consistent predictor of domestic violence, including intimate partner violence. Less is known about the effects of alcohol availability in neighboring units of analysis on domestic violence. This study examined whether alcohol outlet density in Milwaukee, Wisconsin is associated with Male-on-Female domestic violence (MFDV). Using block groups as the unit of analysis (N = 571), spatial regression models were estimated to model the relationship between the density of total, on-premise, and off-premise alcohol outlets on MFDV, while accounting for the spatial spillover effect (i.e., alcohol availability and neighborhood characteristics in focal and surrounding block groups). At the focal level, off-premise alcohol outlets are associated with MFDV, net of concentrated disadvantage, lack of health insurance, MFDV lag and total population. Additionally, off-premise alcohol outlet density in surrounding units of analysis is a significant predictor of MFDV. However, total and on-premise densities did not demonstrate a relationship with MFDV.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-17T08:41:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231159016
       
  • Exploring Problematic Substance use Trajectory in Hong Kong: A Life Course
           Perspective

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      Authors: Angus Yuk Fung Chan, Hau-lin Tam
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to take a life course perspective to explore how experiences at different life course stages of substance users and contextual factors influence their drug use behaviors. Using the life history narrative approach to interview 31 persons who were taking part in rehabilitation treatment in Hong Kong, this study maps out substance use trajectory into four stages (onset, persistence, escalation, and desistance) addressing three interrelated themes: (1) substance use behavior characteristics, (2) critical life events, (3) and social and structural factors. The results showed an interaction between substance use behaviors and their experience in different life stages. Because substance use has become more hidden in the stage of persistence and escalation, particularly in dense cities like Hong Kong, early social support is advocated to be provided in prevention and rehabilitation, such as offering better vocational training support and follow-up service to rebuild relationships with families.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-15T10:32:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231157256
       
  • Who Persists and Who Desists' A Prospective Study of Prescription
           Stimulant Misuse in College Graduates

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      Authors: Laura J. Holt, Susan W. Langdon, Richard S. Feinn
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Prescription stimulant misuse (PSM) has been studied extensively in college populations, but few studies have examined how PSM changes after graduation. We used a longitudinal design to follow individuals at risk for PSM 2 years after college graduation to document PSM prevalence, motives, and predictors of PSM persistence. Participants from two small, private colleges completed online surveys focused on intrapersonal, interpersonal, and sociocultural predictors of PSM. Overall, PSM declined over time. Lack of premeditation, perceived peer norms, positive expectancies, media exposure, and other substance use were associated with continued PSM; however, only lack of premeditation, descriptive norms, and other substance use predicted PSM in a multivariate model. This preliminary study suggests dispositional and behavioral risk factors may help to explain why PSM persists after college. Interventions that enhance decision-making skills, correct misperceptions about peers’ PSM, and reduce polysubstance use may be effective in curbing PSM in college graduates.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-02-14T03:36:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231155664
       
  • Challenges and Prescriptions for Homeless Drug Users’ Social
           

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      Authors: Amir Moghanibashi-Mansourieh, Daryush Puyan, Ramin Radfar, Mohammad Jafarian, Thomas Legl, Regina Mattsson, Esbjorn Hornberg, Faezeh Atefi, Iris Neuretter, Cressida de Witte, Rabert Farnam, Mohammad Binazade, Abbas Deilamizade
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The research addressed challenges and prescriptions for reintegration of homeless people who use drugs. Data were collected through conducting semi-structured interviews. Twenty-nine participants were recruited. The primary codes were extracted and divided into two main categories of challenges and prescriptions; the former included becoming homeless after a long term recovery, workplace stigma, service users’ different cultural backgrounds, dismissing the 12-Step Program, message fatigue, negative effect of relapse on groups and cyberspace overuse; and the latter included connection by hook or by crook, abstinence-harm reduction orientation, organizational service collection, pushing boundaries of interventions, and expanding services umbrella.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T11:13:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231151372
       
  • The Relationship Between Social Support and Relapse Tendency Among Those
           Who Struggle With Drug Addiction: Multiple Mediators of Exercise
           Self-Efficacy and Health-Related Quality of Life

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      Authors: Dongming Jia, Kai Zhang, Yuming Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Based on social support theory and exercise promotion health theory, we verified the mediating role of exercise self-efficacy and health-related quality of life in the relationship between social support and the relapse tendency of Chinese people who struggle with drug addiction. Samples who had received traditional Chinese health-promoting exercise interventions over 3 months were recruited from two drug rehabilitation centres in Zhejiang Province (n = 415). The participants completed the Social Support Rating Scale, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Health Survey Short Form Questionnaire Chinese version, and Relapse Tendency Scale. Correlation analysis showed significant positive correlations between social support, exercise self-efficacy, and quality of life. In contrast, social support, exercise self-efficacy, and quality of life were negatively correlated with relapse tendency. In addition, intermediary effect analysis showed that social support has a direct negative predictive effect on relapse tendency in two ways: as an independent intermediary of exercise self-efficacy and as a chain intermediary of exercise self-efficacy and quality of life. Good exercise habits and adherence, as well as early establishment of social support, are beneficial not only for reducing craving and relapse behaviour but also for enhancing the quality of life of people who struggle with drug addiction, thereby facilitating the recovery efficacy for maintenance.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T10:47:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231152912
       
  • Retail Drug Trade, Effects on Neighbourhoods, and Sellers’ Navigational
           Strategies: Accounts of Nigerian Dealers

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      Authors: Ediomo-Ubong E. Nelson, Olayinka M. Onayemi
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Studies have examined the negative effects of drug markets on neighbourhoods. But few explore the views of drug sellers. Drawing on 31 in-depth interviews with Nigerian retail drug sellers, we explore why they sell drugs, the effects of drug markets on neighbourhoods, and how they navigate social and legal problems. The participants sold drugs as a means of livelihood in the context of poverty and economic decline. Drug market activities were seen as nuisance, and as fostering crime and violence in neighbourhoods. These views stirred opposition from residents and led to police raids on drug scenes. Drug sellers navigated policing and opposition by concealing drug trade, selling covertly and reducing nuisance among other strategies. We argue that retail drug trade is shaped by the imperatives of survival in the context of poverty. Providing alternative means of livelihood for drug sellers offers potential to curb drug selling and related problems.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T05:04:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231152803
       
  • Workplace Context to Prevent Substance Misuse in the United States:
           Associations Between workplace Policies and Employee Substance Use
           Disorders

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      Authors: Daejun Park, Dane Minnick
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace policies are important because employee rates of alcohol and drug misuse can be associated with work-related risk factors in the United States. To explore the associations, this study analyzed the 2010–2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health datasets. The overall sample size was 130,726, and the SUD outcome variables included alcohol, marijuana, pain reliever, and illicit drug use disorders. 20% of participants reported no substance use policies in their workplace. Significant associations were identified between all four measured SUD outcome variables, the presence of specific substance use workplace policies, and individual employment sectors. Specifically, comprehensive policies out of six policies were significantly associated with decreased SUDs in nearly every employment sector. The results of this study suggest that workplace substance use policies are important to prevent the development of employee SUDs and comprehensive policies in place can be most effective.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-14T02:44:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231152913
       
  • The Importance of Perceived Safety, Stigma and Pleasure for Solitary
           Injecting

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      Authors: Kristin Hanoa, Ola Røed Bilgrei, Kristin Buvik
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Many people who inject drugs (PWID) inject when they are alone which increases the risk for drug-related mortality, and the majority of overdose-related deaths occur among solitary users in residential environments. Drawing on qualitative data from interviews with 80 PWID in Norway, this study explores the complex practices of solitary injecting. The analysis illustrates that the risk environments in which they participated involved high levels of distress, fear and stigma that made them prefer solitary injecting. This involved a perceived notion of safety from an unpredictable social environment. Stigma was described as causing additional harms and they therefore wanted to hide their drug-using practices. Finally, injecting drug use involved contextual pleasures that were maximised by injecting alone. The study illustrates how the risk environment the PWID inhabited caused additional harms, by which solitary injections was rationalized, despite its increased mortality risks. Future harm-reduction initiatives should reflect this important aspect.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T08:14:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231151377
       
  • Screening Incarcerated Women for Opioid Use Disorder

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      Authors: Michele Staton, Martha Tillson, Mary M. Levi, Matthew Webster, Carrie Oser, Carl Leukefeld
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The overall aim of the present study is to examine the utility of the DSM OUD Checklist and the NM-ASSIST screening tools to identify symptoms consistent with OUD among incarcerated women in county jails. This study contributes to the existing literature because research on screening and assessment approaches for incarcerated women has been limited. The focus of the current study is to describe the screening procedures and study recruitment for a larger parent study focused on increasing treatment linkages. Study findings indicate a positive correlation between indicators of OUD using the two screening tools, as well as a high degree of correlation between street opioid misuse and other high-risk drug indicators (overdose and injection practices). These findings underscore the importance of outreach, screening, and intervention in real-world settings, including jails, in order to increase access to OUD treatment among this vulnerable sample of women.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2023-01-09T02:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426231151595
       
  • CBD Oil as a Miracle Drug: A Thematic Analysis of Caregivers’ Attitudes
           and Practices Towards Cannabidiol in Dementia Treatment

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      Authors: Urszula Kłosińska, Magdalena Leszko
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to understand caregivers of individuals with dementia attitudes toward CBD oil. Thematic analysis was conducted with 67 posts (570 comments) about CBD oil selected from a Polish online support forum for caregivers. We identified caregivers’ expectations, motivations, and practices of using CBD oil. Caregivers expected CBD to improve the behavior, cognition, communication, and daily activities of their loved ones. They motivated each other by sharing experiences about the positive effects of CBD oil and claimed to be administering CBD oil without medical advice, which led to dangerous practices such as an overnight withdrawal of all drugs or experimenting with CBD oil dosage. Caregivers perceive CBD oil as a safer and more effective treatment for those with dementia than the conventional methods. We recommend healthcare professionals inquire about possible CBD oil usage during follow-up visits and thoroughly explain what to expect from prescribed medications.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-12-12T08:59:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221145019
       
  • Motives Linking Subclinical Psychopathy and Benign Masochism to
           Recreational Drug use

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      Authors: Christina Sagioglou, Tobias Greitemeyer
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      As the use of some psychoactive substances continues to be a global health risk, it is important to understand why people use them. We compared the predictive power of psychopathy and masochism with regard to lifetime recreational drug use and tested the underlying motives in a sample of 415 US-based adults. Psychopathy predicted use of illicit drugs, cannabis, and nicotine, while masochism predicted cannabis, alcohol, and caffeine use. Both traits were related to most motives, but the motives differentially predicted substance use. Expansion motivation was the sole motive for illicit drug use, whereas cannabis was predicted mainly by expansion and enhancement. Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine were used to escape daily worries, and alcohol was further used for social reasons. Benign masochism is a newly identified predictor of popular drug use. Future research could investigate masochism and expansion motivation as predictors of potentially harmful substance use.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T06:04:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221145024
       
  • The Seduction of a Drug Mule: Drug Trafficking Among Female Offenders

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      Authors: Melvina T. Sumter, Frank Wood, Ingrid Whitaker
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This research examined how women are recruited into drug trafficking. Previous findings indicate that women are recruited into drug trafficking due to economic hardship. Data for this research study is taken from in-depth interviews with 13 female offenders incarcerated at the Trinidad and Tobago Prison Service. The findings in this study suggest women become involved in drug smuggling for reasons that are far more complex than simple financial need. Specifically, the majority of women fell prey, under the guise of friendship, to an unscrupulous individual, interested in furthering his or her cause. Under systems of patriarchy and capitalism, the findings from this study suggests that women became involved in drug trafficking because of how they are socialized.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T01:08:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221145020
       
  • Motivations for Change in Drug Addiction Recovery: Turning Points as the
           Antidotes to the Pains of Recovery

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      Authors: David Patton, David Best
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Painful life events have been highlighted as being instrumental in promoting change during drug addiction recovery. This paper attempts to integrate the ‘pains of desistance’ approach into a recovery capital framework. It explores the life courses of 30 people in drug addiction recovery who had previously had a problem with an illicit substance to explore the role of the pains of recovery (potential push factors) alongside different forms of recovery capital (pull factors) at key turning points of change during recovery. Findings demonstrate that pull factors linked to CHIME were significant in promoting positive changes. Turning points acted as antidotes to pains experienced in early recovery. Three antidotes appeared to be gender specific. Implications highlight the need for greater access to community capital pathways. It advocates the need to dispel the myth for a rock bottom moment and for a more macro conceptualisation of drug addiction recovery.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T04:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221140887
       
  • Qualitative Research on Cannabis Use Among Youth: A Methodological Review

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      Authors: Robert Colonna, Melissa Knott, Sean Kim, Reem Bagajati
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recreational cannabis legalization has encouraged research regarding cannabis use among youth, especially the use of qualitative approaches. In fact, alcohol and drug use journals have recently encouraged qualitative submissions and provided criteria to ensure “high-quality” research. This study provides an objective account of the qualitative approaches used by researchers in this field and discusses implications for future research. A methodological review was conducted for studies published between January 2010 and November 2019. Targeted keyword searches in four research databases returned 1956 unique records. Pairs of reviewers independently screened records against eligibility criteria and charted data for study philosophical positioning, methodology, study aims, sampling, sample, data collection, and data analysis. 23 studies met the inclusion criteria. Several gaps in study quality criteria are observed: less than half of the studies specified the overarching methodology and just two stated philosophical positioning, with some methods unjustified. Implications for future research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T05:44:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221139420
       
  • Association Rules on Attributes of Illicit Drugs, Suspect’s Demographics
           and Offence Categories

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      Authors: Donald Douglas Atsa’am, Terlumun Gbaden, Ruth Wario
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Association rules mining technique was employed to extract 6 rules that show the co-occurrences of the attributes on illicit drug types, suspects’ demographics, and categories of drug offences. A dataset on 262 arrestees of various drug offences was utilized for rules extraction using the apriori algorithm. The rules reveal the different levels of involvement with various illicit drugs by suspects of varying ages. The established rules provide a form of drug suspects segmentation which could guide how drug control and intervention programs are designed and deployed. Further, the rules could serve as a reference tool for security agents when dealing with drug suspects and offenders.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T09:43:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221140010
       
  • Examining Gender Differences in the Relationship Between School Bonding
           and Opioid Misuse Among Justice-Involved Adolescents

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      Authors: Enya B. Vroom, Micah E. Johnson, Zahra Akbari, Zachary Frederick, Skye C. Bristol
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Justice-involved adolescents (JIAs) have an increased risk for opioid use disorder and overdose related to opioid misuse (OM). Consequences of untreated OM include recidivism and poor educational outcomes, which can be harsher for female JIA. Therefore, identifying relevant factors and settings that reduce the risk for OM is critical. Schools are a central institution in adolescent development. Drawing on social control theory, JIA with higher levels of school bonding was hypothesized to attenuate risk for OM. Cross-sectional data on 79,960 JIA from the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice were examined. Multivariate and stratified logistic regression analyses were employed. On average, for every one-unit increase in school bonding, JIA had 22%, female JIA had 23%, and male JIA had 22% lower odds of OM. Results suggest school bonding and the school context should be considered in treatment and how this setting may impact OM intervention outcomes among JIA.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-12T11:09:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221139423
       
  • Local Prohibitions on Marijuana Businesses With On-Site Consumption:
           Evidence from New York State

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      Authors: David M. Yaskewich
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      As several US states have legalized recreational marijuana over the past decade, local approval of commercial marijuana activities has faced opposition in a non-negligible share of communities. A common provision in state laws often grants local governments the authority to prohibit marijuana businesses from locating within their jurisdictions. This paper analyzed determinants of local government policies in New York State following the legalization of recreational marijuana in 2021. A key feature of New York’s law authorized municipal governments to pass an “opt-out” ordinance prohibiting marijuana retail stores, on-site consumption establishments, or both. Based on results from multilevel logistic regression models, the likelihood of allowing commercial marijuana activities was higher for local governments representing communities with larger Black populations, fewer evangelical Protestants, and lower levels of household income. While slightly more municipalities prohibited on-site consumption, determinants of opt-out decisions were similar for both retail and consumption businesses.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-09T01:14:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221138229
       
  • Prevalence and Predictors of Substance Use Support Programming Among U.S.
           Religious Congregations

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      Authors: Vanessa N. Torres, Brad R. Fulton, Eunice C. Wong, Kathryn P. Derose
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of data from the 2012 National Congregation Study, a nationally representative survey of religious congregations in the United States (N = 1,331). Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify congregational characteristics associated with providing substance use support programing. Nearly one-third (38%) of U.S. congregations indicated that they provided substance use support programming; approximately half (52%) of all congregational attendees were in a congregation that provided some type of substance use support. The internal factors associated with a congregation providing substance use programming include having members who are unemployed and younger, being conservative Protestant, engaging in the practice of speaking in tongues, and having the resources to support social services. The analysis also identifies external factors (i.e., assessing community needs and hosting social service speakers) as being associated with a congregation’s likelihood of providing substance use programming. Findings identify factors associated with congregations providing substance use support.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T08:51:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221138479
       
  • Crime in a Time of Cannabis: Estimating the Effect of Legalizing Marijuana
           on Crime Rates in Colorado and Washington Using the Synthetic Control
           Method

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      Authors: Alexis J. Harper, Cody Jorgensen
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The legalization of marijuana for recreational use continues to expand across America. Colorado and Washington were the first states to legalize marijuana in 2012. A primary concern regarding legalization is how these policy changes affect crime rates. Researchers have begun to estimate the effect marijuana legalization has had on crime rates. We extend this literature by using a different analytical approach. State level data covering years 2000–2019 were analyzed using the synthetic control method to find that legalizing marijuana for recreational use in Colorado and Washington was generally not associated with variations in index crime rates. These findings substantiate prior research. Increased crime rates should not be a primary concern as more states move to adopt recreational marijuana use legislation. Instead, the benefits to states via harm reduction, increased tax revenue, and a more efficient allocation of policing resources ought to be more of a consideration for states when passing recreational marijuana legislation.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T02:41:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221134107
       
  • Navigating Alcogenic Brand Environment: Exploring How Young Nigerians
           Negotiate and Make Sense of Alcohol Brand Preferences

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      Authors: Emeka W. Dumbili, Kelechi Uwa-Robinson
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      No previous research has examined how and why Nigerians choose their alcohol brands. Using qualitative data, this study explored brand preference and the reasons for brand choice among 18 to 24 year-old Nigerians who use alcohol. Participants were divided into three categories based on their beer, spirit, and wine preferences. While most men preferred beer and spirits, many women chose traditional and recently developed flavoured beers and spirit-based drinks, which the alcohol industry promotes as women-friendly alcoholic drinks. Some participants chose low-strength brands to avoid heavy drinking and intoxication, while others preferred high-strength brands for immediate bodily thrills/intoxication. Some participants preferred expensive brands to cheaper beverages to construct social identity and portray an affluent lifestyle, while others used the consumption of ‘foreign’ or uncommon brands to enact distinction. Alcohol advertising and peer influence significantly impacted brand awareness and preferences. Interventions should focus on reducing alcohol/brand availability and accessibility in Nigeria.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T09:10:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221135765
       
  • How High-Frequency Users Embraced Cannabis Regulation in Uruguay

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      Authors: Rosario Queirolo, Eliana Álvarez, Belén Sotto, José Miguel Cruz
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      How cannabis legalization affects users’ behaviors' In this paper, we describe changes in the way users access cannabis in Uruguay before and after the implementation of cannabis regulation. We explore the differences between users that access through the legal, black, and gray markets. To do so, we rely on two face-to-face surveys of high-frequency users using the Respondent Driven Sample technique. The first survey was conducted at the beginning of the regulation implementation in 2014, and the second one in 2017. Results indicate that cannabis users gradually moved to the legal market, and most switched to the gray market. Furthermore, users kept acquiring cannabis from the black market even when using legal mechanisms. Considering these results, we argue that the strict regulations imposed in Uruguay may have operated as barriers for consumers to abandon the black market completely. These findings show that the specifics of each legalization policy matter.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-22T09:20:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221134902
       
  • “I Had No Problems and Just Felt So Fabulous”: The “Storylines” of
           Methamphetamine Initiation in Aotearoa/New Zealand

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      Authors: Trent Bax
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This qualitative life course-based study analyses the key circumstances preceding methamphetamine initiation. This paper utilizes Agnew’s “storylines” concept to analyse the background and situational factors that led 42 Aotearoa/New Zealanders to initiate methamphetamine. Multiple exposure to adversity across multiple life domains placed participants at heightened risk of early-onset drug use. Preceding methamphetamine initiation, the impact of social bonds and social roles were identified within the domains of family, romantic relationships, friendship and work. Whilst drug use onset broadly follows the stage theory sequence of drug use, participants did not initiate methamphetamine until age 27 on average. Initial use typically took place in a private setting among friends, family and co-workers. The initial effect was typically very positive, which greatly contributed to escalating use. Analysis revealed four main storylines, which highlight the importance of psychological state, social bonds, romantic attachments and social functioning in methamphetamine initiation.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-15T03:17:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221134903
       
  • Experiences Administering Naloxone Among People in Different Social Roles:
           People Who Use Opioids and Family Members and Friends

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      Authors: Adelya A. Urmanche, Alex Harocopos
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Unintentional drug overdose deaths continue to be a critical public health issue. Naloxone, a nonscheduled, safe, and effective drug that reverses opioid-involved overdoses is available to non-medically trained individuals (“lay people”), but there is scant information about how people in different social roles experience naloxone administration. We conducted 24 in-depth interviews with people who use opioids (PWUO; n = 15) and family members and friends of people who use opioids (FF; n = 9) who had administered naloxone in response to an opioid overdose. Compared with PWUO, members of the FF group were less reticent to administer naloxone in response to an overdose. PWUO and FF had different perspectives of law enforcement and demonstrated varied knowledge of the Good Samaritan Law. While PWUO found that having and administering naloxone was empowering, FF took a more pragmatic approach, reporting the need for naloxone as an unfortunate reality of their loved one’s drug use.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T08:16:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221133024
       
  • Pandemic Procedures: Adapting Problem-Solving Court (PSC) Operations and
           Treatment Protocols During COVID-19

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      Authors: Lindsay R. Smith, Fanni Faragó, James C. Witte, Thomas Blue, Michael S. Gordon, Faye S. Taxman
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      With an ongoing pandemic claiming hundreds of lives a day, it is unclear how COVID-19 has affected court operations, particularly problem-solving courts (PSCs) which have goals rooted in rehabilitation for participants in their programs. Even with practical recommendations from national organizations directing courts on how to manage COVID-19, whether and how PSCs met the needs of PSC participants during this time is underexplored. This study, drawn from a larger national study using a survey of PSC coordinators, examines the COVID-19 responses of PSCs to remain safely operational for participants. A sub-sample of survey respondents (n = 82 PSC coordinators) detailed how the COVID-19 pandemic led to changes to their court and treatment operations amidst the constraints of the pandemic. The courts’ shifts in policy and practice have important impacts for court participants’ treatment retention and success in the PSC program, and these shifts need more in-depth research in the future.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T07:27:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221133037
       
  • Are Illicit Drugs a Driving Force for Cryptomarket Leadership'

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      Authors: Naoki Hiramoto, Yoichi Tsuchiya
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Cryptomarkets, i.e., illicit online marketplaces, have gained considerable attention from the media, law enforcement agencies, and researchers. An increasing number of studies have revealed various aspects of these cryptomarkets; however, whether drugs play a major role for competing cryptomarkets to be the market leader, has not been addressed. Weekly sales and the number of listings for the major products on three leading cryptomarkets (Silk Road 2, Agora, and Evolution) were examined using Granger causality tests and interrupted time series analysis. Not only drugs trading on cryptomarkets played a pivotal role in the growth of each cryptomarket, but also a higher increase in drug supply than in competing marketplaces is crucial to become market leaders. The relative supply of drugs plays a larger role when leading marketplaces disappear. Law enforcement agencies should focus on monitoring marketplaces with a larger increase in drug supplies than on competing marketplaces.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T02:12:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221133030
       
  • Recovery Identity and Psychosocial-Spiritual Health: A Survey of
           Individuals in Remission From Substance Use Disorders

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      Authors: Tricia Witte, Matthew Amick, Jesse Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Recovery identity – the degree to which someone identifies as “in recovery” from a substance use disorder – has been shown to be associated with a host of positive health outcomes. The purpose of the present study was to test the association between recovery identity, quality of life, spiritual well-being, and relational health in a sample of individuals in remission from moderate or severe SUDs recruited from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk crowdsourcing platform (n = 494). Results indicated that the presence of a recovery identity was significantly associated with greater spiritual health, but not significantly associated with psychological, social, or environmental quality of life, nor with family functioning. Results have important implications for understanding paths to recovery and important correlates of health outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-08T01:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221133039
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Uptake and Attitudes Within Two Cohorts of Younger Adult
           Cannabis Users

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      Authors: Ekaterina V. Fedorova, Carolyn F. Wong, Bridgid M. Conn, Janna Ataiants, Stephen E. Lankenau
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      It is crucial to understand COVID-19 vaccine uptake and attitudes among young adult cannabis users given the lowest vaccination rates among young adults and negative association between cannabis use and willingness to get vaccinated. 18–21-year-old and 26–33-year-old cohorts of cannabis users, recruited in California, were surveyed about the COVID-19 vaccine uptake/attitudes between March-August 2021. Cannabis use/demographic differences were investigated by vaccination status. Vaccine attitudes data were categorized and presented descriptively. 44.4% of the older and 71.8% of the younger cohorts were vaccinated. Non-Hispanic Black/African American race/ethnicity, lack of health insurance, and medicinal orientation towards cannabis use were negatively associated with vaccine receipt within the older cohort. For both cohorts, top reasons for vaccine hesitancy and rejection were concerns about speed of development, potential side effects, natural immunity, and lack of trust of vaccines. Our results highlight greater vaccine hesitance/rejection and need for targeted interventions among mid-20’s-early-30’s cannabis users.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-10-02T01:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221131488
       
  • Benefits of Continuing Linkages to Recovery Homes Following Departure

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      Authors: Leonard A. Jason, Nicole Menis
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      There is a need to better understand social mechanisms that increase or decrease successful departures from recovery homes. A prior study found that involuntary departure as well as one’s personal social capital were important to sustaining recovery following the departure from recovery homes. Little is known about what house contextual or interpersonal factors explain who successfully exits these recovery settings. In the present study, we examined continued linkages to Oxford House recovery homes following departure, using questions concerning 1. Continuing to visit their previous recovery home, 2. Maintaining contact with the Oxford House Organization, 3. Continuing to see people they saw as residents following departure, and 4. Continuing to attend the same AA/NA meetings that had been attended as an Oxford House resident. Residents with continued linkages to the recovery home were found to evidence significant increases in self-efficacy as well as abstinence following departure. For those that remained most linked by answering all four questions positively, 95% remained abstinent following leaving the recovery homes. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of possible changes in constructing a new social identity.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-09-30T10:47:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221130937
       
  • Heads, Seekers, Psychonauts, and One-Timers: Patterns in Stories of
           Psychedelic Consumption

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      Authors: Cindy Brooks Dollar
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Psychedelics are psychoactive substances that alter ordinary states of consciousness. The U.S. criminalized ingestion of these drugs approximately 60 years ago and use remains punishable by law. Prior to this time, the substances were differentially declared spiritual sacraments, medicines, and/or party drugs. (Auto)Ethnographies and other research often indicate psychedelic-induced experiences as remarkably personal, necessitating subjective interpretation. Empirical studies exploring patterns across psychedelic encounters are rare, but among the few that exist, users tend to be identified as either pursuing psycho-spiritual enlightenment or self-indulgent amusement. The present paper utilizes narratives collected through 37 in-depth interviews with adults from diverse social backgrounds who report a history of psychedelic consumption in non-clinical settings. The data suggest a potential 4-part categorization based on five factors: named forms of psychedelic substances used, reported frequency of psychedelic ingestions, stated reasons for consumption and desistance, self-imposed rules surrounding use, and descriptions of drug effects and experiences.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T06:08:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221128191
       
  • Improving Harm Reduction Services: A Qualitative Study on the Perspectives
           of Highly Marginalized Persons Who Inject Drugs in Montreal

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      Authors: Hélène Poliquin, Michel Perreault, Ana C. Villela Guilhon, Karine Bertrand
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Harm reduction (HR) is an alternative to the moralization of drug use and a pragmatic public health approach aimed at minimizing harms associated with use. This study sought to gain the perspectives of persons who inject drugs (PWID) on the adequacy of services provided by HR organizations in Montreal. Twenty-two semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted with 30 participants. Some of the key advantages of HR perceived by participants include access to injection equipment, psychosocial support, and reduced social isolation. However, many wanted more opportunities for social insertion and greater value to be placed on their knowledge and life experiences (e.g., experiential knowledge of the street scene, drug use, sex work, or homelessness). This study suggests that PWID who access HR services in Montreal are interested in paid work opportunities in environments that promote power sharing, and activities that are conducted and managed by and for them.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T12:00:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221123269
       
  • Religiosity and Substance Use Among Youth in Southeast Europe: The
           Importance of God as the Strongest Protective Religious Dimension

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      Authors: Miran Lavrič, Vanesa Korže, Rudi Klanjšek
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Using a large sample of youth (N = 10,398) from 10 countries of Southeast Europe, the present study analyzed the effects of different dimensions of religiosity on various types of substance use across three different religions. The results, based on risk ratios and binary logistic regression, indicated that belief in the importance of God is generally a much stronger protective factor against substance use than church attendance or personal prayer. At the level of the entire sample, risk ratios revealed that finding God to be highly important reduced the likelihood of using hard drugs by as much as 69% and the likelihood of using soft drugs by 74%. In the case of alcohol use, the effect was weaker and less robust. Overall, the results of this study results point to the high relative importance of belief in God as a factor strengthening an individual’s ability to refrain from substance use.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-08-28T05:10:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221121123
       
  • Corrigendum to Longitudinal Study on Deterrent Effect of Drug-Induced
           Homicide Law on Opioid-Related Mortality Across 92 Counties and the
           District of Columbia in the U.S.

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      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-08-18T10:36:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221121697
       
  • Substance Use Disorder, Bail Reform, and Failure to Appear in Court:
           Results From a Naturalistic Study

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      Authors: Albert M. Kopak, Alexa J. Singer
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Most adults processed through local correctional facilities report symptoms consistent with substance use disorder and there is growing interest in bail reform to reduce or eliminate financial conditions as a requirement for release from detention in local jails. These practices are endorsed for their ability to reduce jail populations and enhance judicial efficiency, but failure to appear in court has become a major area of concern under these new procedures. The current study examined the associations between substance use disorder, financial release conditions, and failure to appear in court in the context of a naturalistic study of bail reform in one judicial district. Multivariate logistic regression results demonstrate significantly higher odds of failure to appear in court among adults with substance use disorder who received a nonfinancial release from jail. Findings suggest bail reform initiatives must address substance use disorder and provide person-centered services during the pretrial release period to become effective.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-09T06:26:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221107561
       
  • Mechanisms for Expanding Harm Reduction for Opioid Use in Suburban and
           Rural U.S. Settings

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      Authors: Helena D. G. Montaque, Erika Christenson, Antoinette Spector, Jenifer Wogen, Madelyn McDonald, Margaret R. Weeks, Jianghong Li, Julia Dickson-Gomez
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      The availability and adoption of Syringe Services Programs (SSPs) depends heavily on the towns and counties charged with implementing and sustaining these programs. Suburban and rural areas especially lack the community and political support for SSPs. We examined key informant in-depth interview data among professionals providing harm reduction services as well as some health department directors, doctors, and law enforcement officers from a three-state (Connecticut, Kentucky, and Wisconsin) study. Results revealed the challenges and emerging solutions for expanding harm reduction services in suburban and rural areas. Additional comparisons of experiences of those working in urban areas were highlighted. Overall, there were widespread similarities in challenges across the three states for providing harm reduction services in rural and suburban settings. Findings revealed potential directions to address the identified barriers and community-supported ideas to improve harm reduction efforts.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T09:42:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221108694
       
  • How Adverse Childhood Experiences and Gender Shape Perceptions of
           Synthetic Drug Use and Desistance in Yunnan, China

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      Authors: Elizabeth Monk-Turner, Hongyun Fu, Jianghong Li, Xiushi Yang
      First page: 213
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Past research on illicit drug use and desistance has primarily been conducted in western countries, relied on quantitative data, and given little attention to potential gender differentiation. Utilizing qualitative data, we explore gender differences in how illicit drug users perceive the onset of use, whether or not they connect this to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), and why they quit. The work is based on a sample of 24 informants from Yunnan. Women link onset of use to adverse childhood experiences (ACE) and report quitting primarily for their children. Men found support from their families helpful in ending illicit drug use. This adds qualitative support to theoretical work done by Wu and colleagues, Zhang, and Zhang and Demant who argue that familial attachment is critical in desistance. Utilizing a gendered lens, we gain and nuanced understanding of illicit drug use and links to ACEs which may better inform intervention programs.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-15T11:04:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221108689
       
  • Tobacco Dependence Among French University Students: A Cluster Analytic
           Approach to Identifying Distinct Psychological Profiles of Smokers

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      Authors: Maxime Mauduy, Nicolas Mauny, Jessica Mange
      First page: 226
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates the combination of several psychological factors related to tobacco smoking to identify smokers’ psychological profiles among French university students. A cluster analysis was performed on smoking motives, psychosocial variables, and the smoker identity (N = 909). Five profiles were identified and then compared regarding tobacco dependence and motivations to quit. “Normative” and “sociohedonist smokers” are characterized by two distinct social factors (normative influences and social motives) and moderate dependence. “Dependent identified smokers” have higher levels of dependence motives, smoker identity and tobacco dependence associated with low motivations to quit. “Inconsistent smokers” have weak smoker identity and weak smoking motives, a strong perceived control over resisting smoking, low dependence and motivations to quit. “Coping smokers” have strong sedative and addictive motives and exhibit moderate dependence and motivations to quit. This research encourages prevention programs to consider the diversity of student smokers with strategies adapted to their psychological profiles.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T12:26:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221107560
       
  • Understanding the Impact of Deviant Peer Association on Risk for
           Stimulant/Amphetamine Use: The Moderating Role of Exposure to Violence

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      Authors: Thomas Wojciechowski
      First page: 247
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research has indicated that deviant peer association is associated with increased risk for stimulant/amphetamine use. However, there remain gaps in our understanding of the context under which this relationship occurs. This study examined two forms of exposure to violence (direct victimization, witnessed violence) as moderators of the relationship between deviant peer association and stimulant/amphetamine use risk. All 11 waves of the Pathways to Desistance longitudinal data were used in analyses. Mixed effects logistic regression models were used to estimate relationships of interest while accounting for repeated measures nested within individual participants across time. Findings indicated that greater deviant peer association was associated with greater odds of stimulant/amphetamine use. Experiencing direct victimization significantly moderated this relationship, but in the opposite of the hypothesized direction, with individuals reporting direct victimization also reporting less reactivity to deviant peer association as it pertained to stimulant/amphetamine use. Witnessed violence did not moderate this relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T02:10:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221111728
       
  • Stakeholders’ Problematisation of Drug Consumption Rooms: A Case Study
           of the Policy Initiative in Helsinki

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      Authors: Ali Unlu, Tuukka Tammi, Pekka Hakkarainen
      First page: 262
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Drug consumption rooms are one of the harm reduction interventions to handle complex social problems. The Helsinki city initiative puts drug consumption room (DCR) on a government agenda in Finland, which has also triggered a broader discussion. This study presents how stakeholders problematise and what solutions they propose for DCRs. The research is based on in-depth interviews of 23 stakeholders and the theoretical perspective of Bacchi’s approach – ‘What’s the problem represented to be'’ (WPR).The results show that while stakeholders’ solutions resemble each other on the core DCR functions, the variations are found mainly in the introduction of extended services, policy development strategy, types of drug allowance in DCRs, and drug testing options. Stigmatisation of PWUDs still leads the harm reduction services to be considered from a moral framework. Stakeholders tend to take their positions according to strategic considerations related to electoral politics, expedience and the symbolic role of policies.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T01:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221093609
       
  • Program, Policy and Social Support Characteristics Associated With Rural
           vs. Urban Recovery Housing, 2018–2020

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      Authors: Angela Lynn Kirby, Amber Lynn Kizewski, Robin Anne Thompson, Madison Ashworth, Terry Lee Bunn
      First page: 280
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Study objectives were to survey rural and urban recovery house owners/operators on their existing National Alliance for Recovery Residences-like (NARR-like) house programs/policies, and delineate rural–urban differences to raise awareness of NARR standards that align with current recovery house policies/programs and to inform new/enhance existing NARR standards. An electronic survey was developed and disseminated to 112 identified recovery houses in Kentucky. There was a 77% survey response rate. Rural recovery houses were more likely to have provisions in place for persons with disabilities, require clinical services participation, and have a stricter return-to-use policy. Work and/or school requirements in recovery houses were associated with resident stability and house expectations for community integration. Understanding differences in existing NARR-like rural versus urban recovery house policies and programs is necessary to raise state-led NARR affiliate awareness of differential recovery house training and support service needs that can best ready recovery houses for NARR certification.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-07-14T12:19:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221114018
       
  • Medication-Assisted Treatment in Problem-solving Courts: A National Survey
           of State and Local Court Coordinators

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      Authors: Fanni Farago, Thomas R. Blue, Lindsay Renee Smith, James C. Witte, Michael Gordon, Faye S. Taxman
      First page: 296
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Problem-solving courts (PSCs) are a critical part of a societal effort to mitigate the opioid epidemic's devastating consequences. This paper reports on a national survey of PSCs (N = 42 state-wide court coordinators; N = 849 local court coordinators) and examines the structural factors that could explain the likelihood of a local PSC authorizing medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and MAT utilization. Results of the analyses indicate that MAT availability at the county level was a significant predictor of the likelihood of local courts authorizing MAT. The court's location in a Medicaid expansion state was also a significant predictor of local courts allowing buprenorphine and methadone, but not naltrexone. Problem-solving courts are in the early stages of supporting the use of medications, even when funding is available through Medicaid expansion policies. Adoption and use of treatment innovations like MAT are affected by coordinators' perceptions of MAT as well as structural factors such as the availability of the medications in the community and funding resources. The study has important implications for researchers, policymakers, and practitioners.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-08-02T01:09:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221109948
       
  • Social Status and Opioid Drugged Driving

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      Authors: Bryan D Rookey
      First page: 321
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the effects of social status on opioid drugged driving fatalities in the context of the ongoing opioid mortality crisis. Broad criminological insights are leveraged to understand how position in the age, race, and sex status hierarchies impacts opioid use by drivers. Analysis of data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System shows that fatally injured drivers who used opioids prior to the crash were more often male, White, non-Hispanic, and older compared to other statuses. Moreover, the social statuses of opioid drugged drivers are dissimilar to those who used opioids in drug overdose deaths. Results suggest that social status-informed and driver-focused initiatives may be particularly effective in reducing opioid use by drivers.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T03:37:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221121121
       
  • Parent-child Relations, Religiousness, and Adolescent Substance Use
           Disorders

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      Authors: John P. Hoffmann
      First page: 335
      Abstract: Journal of Drug Issues, Ahead of Print.
      Research has shown that parent-child relationships and religiousness are negatively associated with substance use among adolescents, but few studies have addressed their relationship with substance use disorders (SUDs). This study explored whether high quality parent-child relations are negatively associated with the risk of an SUD among adolescents, especially when religiousness is high. The data used to assess this inquiry were from 4 years (2016–2019) of the U.S. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH). SUDs in the past year were based on a set of questions consistent with criteria enumerated in the DSM-IV. Latent measures of parent-child relations and religiousness were also constructed. The results of an augmented inverse probability weighting (AIPW) model furnished empirical evidence in support of the notion that the lowest risk of an SUD occurred among those reporting high quality parent-child relations and high religiousness, even after adjusting for a substantial number of selection factors.
      Citation: Journal of Drug Issues
      PubDate: 2022-08-15T09:12:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00220426221121608
       
 
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