Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.267
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 15  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0893-164X - ISSN (Online) 1939-1501
Published by APA Homepage  [89 journals]
  • Tasks and investigated components in social cognition research among
           adults with alcohol use disorder: A critical scoping review.

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      Abstract: Objective: Social cognition research in alcohol use disorder (AUD) has accumulated over the past decades and has implications for understanding the interpersonal problems reported in this population and for improving clinical outcomes. However, recent criticism of classically used social cognition tasks calls for an evaluation of social cognition assessments in AUD. Moreover, available literature reviews focus on a restricted subset of social cognition components, leaving the outcomes and significance of studies assessing the remaining components unknown. Hence, to qualify and broaden our understanding of the available evidence and identify research perspectives, we systematically charted and critically appraised the tasks used and social cognition components investigated in AUD. Method: We searched databases for studies comparing patients with AUD and healthy controls on behavioral social cognition assessments. We extracted the number of times specific social cognition components were investigated and the tasks assessing them. Results: Of the 74 included records, 58 investigated emotion recognition, 14 investigated theory of mind (ToM), three investigated social perception/knowledge, and two investigated attributional biases. Most emotion recognition tasks required complex categorization, and presented unimodal static and context-free emotional stimuli among verbal labels. ToM was mostly assessed with the reading the mind in the eyes and faux-pas tests. Conclusions: Emotion recognition and ToM have been extensively investigated yet most tasks are multidetermined, lack ecological validity, or fail to assess the targeted ability. Conversely, social perception/knowledge and attributional biases, despite their clear relevance to AUD, are insufficiently studied. We propose concrete ways to address these issues. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 08 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000874
       
  • "Sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol: The role of trait
           impulsivity and sex differences": Clarification.

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      Abstract: Reports a clarification to "Sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol: The role of trait impulsivity and sex differences" by Holley C. Allen, Michael J. Wesley, Jessica Weafer and Mark T. Fillmore (Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Advanced Online Publication, May 05, 2022, np). In the original article, simultaneous linear regression analyses examined the role of sex and trait impulsivity differences in participants’ unintoxicated level of behavioral impulsivity and sensitivity to alcohol-induced increases in disinhibition. High levels of trait impulsivity were associated with higher unintoxicated disinhibition; however, no sex difference in this relationship was obtained. Similarly, high attention impulsivity was associated with elevated unintoxicated disinhibition, but no sex difference in this relationship was obtained. It is likely that the inclusion of participants with ADHD in the original analyses disproportionately accounted for the sex differences initially obtained. This reanalysis suggests that behavioral disinhibition serves as a broad indicator of trait impulsivity in both men and women. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2022-58551-001). Objective: Higher trait impulsivity is associated with more impulsive responding on certain behavioral measures of disinhibition. Additionally, behavioral disinhibition is acutely elevated following alcohol consumption. The present study examined the possibility that trait impulsivity may predict individual differences in sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol. Specifically, the present study tested the hypothesis that those with elevated trait impulsivity also experience heightened sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol, which might further compound their tendency toward impulsive action. Method: To test this hypothesis, data from six studies were aggregated to comprise a sample of 190 young adults. Participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), and behavioral disinhibition was assessed using a cued go/no-go task following consumption of 0.65 g/kg alcohol and a placebo. Results: Alcohol increased disinhibition overall, but higher impulsivity did not predict increased sensitivity to alcohol-induced disinhibition. In men, higher levels of trait impulsivity predicted heightened disinhibition in the unintoxicated state following placebo, but this relationship was not present in women. Conclusions: These findings suggest significant sex differences in the relationship between trait impulsivity and disinhibition. This sex difference may explain inconsistent research findings in studies assessing links between trait and behavioral measures of impulsivity. The data also point to trait impulsivity and sensitivity to alcohol-induced disinhibition as independent constructs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 18 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000872
       
  • Augmented reality for extinction of cue-provoked urges to smoke: Proof of
           concept.

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      Abstract: Objective: Cue-exposure therapy (CET) aims to extinguish conditioned cue reactivity (CR) to aid in smoking cessation. A key disadvantage of extant CET is its limited ability to generalize extinction to the real world. Our team developed a set of augmented reality smoking-related and neutral cues that can appear in real-time in smokers’ natural environments as viewed through a smartphone screen. Prior to deployment as a clinical tool, the present study tested the ability of AR smoking cues to extinguish CR in a controlled laboratory study with an AR smartphone application developed for this project. We hypothesized that daily smokers who completed a single session of cue exposure with AR smoking cues (extinction condition) would demonstrate lower cue-provoked urge to smoke at posttest compared to those who viewed AR neutral cues (control condition). Method: Daily smokers (N = 129, 46.5% female, Mage = 47.6, Mcigarettes/day = 19.1) in acute abstinence were randomized to either the extinction or control condition comprising 28 AR trials. Results: As hypothesized, we found a Time × Condition interaction indicating that posttest urge ratings were lower in the extinction condition than in the control condition (p = .034). A secondary hypothesis that participants in the extinction condition would show a longer latency to smoke when provided a cigarette was not supported. Conclusions: These laboratory findings provide evidence supporting the potential clinical efficacy of AR cues for cue-exposure trials, setting the stage for testing in smokers’ naturalistic environments. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000868
       
  • Understanding what changes adults in a smoking cessation study believe
           they need to make to quit smoking: A qualitative analysis of pre- and
           post-quit perceptions.

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      Abstract: Objective: Most individuals who try to quit smoking will not succeed even if they use evidence-based treatment. Qualitative methods can help identify cessation treatments’ limitations and suggest adaptations to increase treatment success. Method: Rapid qualitative analysis was conducted on data from 125 adults who smoked daily (48% female; 44% White) and participated in a smoking cessation trial and completed qualitative interviews 2 weeks prequit, reporting on changes they needed to make to quit, and 100 adults (50% female; 49% White) who completed a second interview 2 weeks postquit, reporting changes they had made. Results: The anticipated changes reported prequit (in order of frequency) were as follows: identify smoking triggers (without a coping plan), focus on benefits of quitting, reduce exposure to others smoking, make other health changes, reduce exposure to nonsocial smoking cues, and reduce alcohol consumption. Many participants were unable to identify specific changes that would aid their cessation success. Changes reported postquit included the following: use the 4 D strategies (delay, drink water, deep breathing, distract), reduce exposure to nonsocial smoking cues, focus on benefits of quitting, change daily routine, make other health changes, reduce exposure to others smoking, and get support from loved ones. Most changes reported postquit were consistent with clinical practice guidelines; however, use of cessation medication was the least reported theme. Conclusion: Prior to quitting, over a third of participants were unable to identify changes to increase cessation success. Those who could focus on triggers and cues for smoking. Postquit, participants reported using cessation strategies encouraged during study cessation counseling. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000856
       
  • Impact of acute stress on neural indices of positive and negative
           reinforcement processing in cannabis users.

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      Abstract: Objective: Chronic cannabis use is maintained in part through dysregulated stress and reward response systems. Specifically, stress-related negative affect is thought to act as a salient motivator for chronic substance use. Models of addiction posit that the transition from positive to negative reinforcement motives for substance use is a key mechanism of disordered use. However, research in substance-using samples has not assessed stress-related neural processing of both positive and negative reinforcement. Method: Therefore, the present study utilized laboratory stress induction to examine how stress affects the reward positivity, an event-related potential sensitive to both positive (RewP) and negative (relief-RewP) reinforcement, in 87 cannabis users (58.10% female, Mage = 19.40) varying in cannabis use disorder (CUD) severity and, as part of larger study aims, history of traumatic brain injury (TBI). We predicted greater CUD severity would be associated with a blunted RewP and enhanced relief-RewP, particularly after stress induction, independent of TBI status. Results: Findings indicated that CUD severity was not associated with RewP/relief-RewP amplitude regardless of acute stress. Exploratory analyses revealed, however, that among those with history of TBI +, CUD severity was associated with greater stress-elicited blunting of the RewP and enhancement of the relief-RewP. Conclusion: Although initial findings contradict current allostatic models of addiction, exploratory findings suggest that history of TBI, and potentially other confounding variables related to increased risk of TBI experience, may influence the extent to which stressful experiences modulate the neurophysiology of both positive and negative reinforcement reward processing in CUD. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 13 Jun 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000846
       
  • Sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol: The role of trait
           impulsivity and sex differences.

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: [Clarification Notice: A clarification for this article was reported online in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors on Aug 18 2022 (see record 2022-92429-001). In the original article, simultaneous linear regression analyses examined the role of sex and trait impulsivity differences in participants’ unintoxicated level of behavioral impulsivity and sensitivity to alcohol-induced increases in disinhibition. High levels of trait impulsivity were associated with higher unintoxicated disinhibition; however, no sex difference in this relationship was obtained. Similarly, high attention impulsivity was associated with elevated unintoxicated disinhibition, but no sex difference in this relationship was obtained. It is likely that the inclusion of participants with ADHD in the original analyses disproportionately accounted for the sex differences initially obtained. This reanalysis suggests that behavioral disinhibition serves as a broad indicator of trait impulsivity in both men and women.] Objective: Higher trait impulsivity is associated with more impulsive responding on certain behavioral measures of disinhibition. Additionally, behavioral disinhibition is acutely elevated following alcohol consumption. The present study examined the possibility that trait impulsivity may predict individual differences in sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol. Specifically, the present study tested the hypothesis that those with elevated trait impulsivity also experience heightened sensitivity to the disinhibiting effect of alcohol, which might further compound their tendency toward impulsive action. Method: To test this hypothesis, data from six studies were aggregated to comprise a sample of 190 young adults. Participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11), and behavioral disinhibition was assessed using a cued go/no-go task following consumption of 0.65 g/kg alcohol and a placebo. Results: Alcohol increased disinhibition overall, but higher impulsivity did not predict increased sensitivity to alcohol-induced disinhibition. In men, higher levels of trait impulsivity predicted heightened disinhibition in the unintoxicated state following placebo, but this relationship was not present in women. Conclusions: These findings suggest significant sex differences in the relationship between trait impulsivity and disinhibition. This sex difference may explain inconsistent research findings in studies assessing links between trait and behavioral measures of impulsivity. The data also point to trait impulsivity and sensitivity to alcohol-induced disinhibition as independent constructs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000839
       
  • Central stress response among deprived and continuing marijuana users and
           nonusers.

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      Abstract: Objective: We examined central nervous system [CNS] stress responses among deprived and continuing heavy marijuana users and nonusers. Method: Participants (N = 210; 46.7% female; Mage = 21.99; 91.4% White, 94.3% Non-Hispanic) were heavy marijuana users (N = 134) and nonusers (N = 76). Heavy users were randomly assigned to a 3-day marijuana deprivation condition (N = 68) or to continue using regularly (N = 66). Participants completed two threat-of-shock stressor tasks that manipulated stressor predictability by varying shock probability or timing. We measured central stress responses via startle potentiation (stressor conditions minus matched no-stressor condition). We examined two group contrasts (heavy use: all heavy users vs. nonusers; deprivation: deprived vs. continuing heavy users) on startle potentiation overall and moderated by stressor predictability (unpredictable vs. predictable). Results: Deprivation did not affect startle potentiation overall (timing task: p = .184; probability task: p = .328) or differently by stressor predictability (timing task: p = .147; probability task: p = .678). Heavy use did not affect startle potentiation overall (timing task: p = .213; probability task: p = .843) or differently by stressor predictability (timing task: p = .655; probability task: p = .273). Posthoc analyses showed mixed evidence of general startle reactivity × deprivation interaction on startle potentiation overall (timing task: p = .019; probability task: p = .056) and differently by stressor predictability (probability task: p = .024; timing task: p = .364). Conclusions: A history of marijuana use or acute deprivation did not alter central stress responses despite prominent theoretical expectations. This study adds to growing research on central stress responses in individuals with a history of drug use and begins to parse moderating roles of individual differences and stressor characteristics. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000821
       
  • Neurofunctional alterations of cognitive down-regulation of craving in
           quitting motivated smokers.

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      Abstract: Objective: Cognitive down-regulation of craving involves a neural network within the prefrontal cortex. Tobacco use disorder (TUD) and trait impulsivity have been associated with prefrontal cortex impairments and down-regulation deficits. However, general deficits in down-regulation of craving (regarding non-drug-related cues) compared to never-smokers (NS), differential alterations between drug-related and non-drug-related cues, as well as its links to subject characteristics (smoking severity, trait impulsivity) have so far sparsely been investigated in TUD. Method: In this study, 78 subjects (37 TUD & 42 NS) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a down-regulation of craving task. Two reward cue-types were presented (drug cues and alternative rewards). Subjects applied down-regulation of craving during a LATER condition and up-regulated their craving during a NOW condition. Subjective craving ratings were assessed after each trial. To evaluate down-regulation of craving, we investigated the LATER versus NOW condition. Results: TUD subjects showed no differences in down-regulation on a behavioral level, neither compared to NS nor between the two reward cue-types. On a neurofunctional level, we found a stronger BOLD response in the middle temporal gyrus in TUD subjects compared to NS in the alternative reward condition. No differences between the two reward cue-types were found within TUD subjects. During down-regulation across both reward cue-types, we identified significant negative associations between activation of control areas and smoking severity. Conclusions: Results neither indicate evidence for the expected general alterations in down-regulation of craving in TUD, compared to NS, nor specific alterations between drug-related and alternative reward cues on a neurofunctional level. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000820
       
  • Do smokers’ harm perceptions of cigarillos differ by modified use of the
           tobacco product' Findings from waves 3 and 4 of the PATH study.

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      Abstract: Objective: The harm perceptions of individuals who smoke either blunts or the Black & Mild (B&M) brand, which is often “freaked,” have seldom been investigated. Since these practices could affect users’ perceived health risks of the cigarillo, this study was intended to compare such risks among cigarillo users by modified use of the tobacco product. Method: Adult cigarillo and blunt smokers were selected from the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study for cross-sectional (Wave 4; n = 3,331) and longitudinal (Waves 3–4; n = 1,898) analyses of predictors of general and relative harm perceptions of cigarillos. Ordinal and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for testing whether adjusted odds of perceiving cigarillo harms were greater in blunt versus cigarillo smokers. In a separate model (n = 1,258), preference for B&M cigarillos was examined as a correlate of harm perception due to the perceived health benefits of removing the inner tobacco liner. Results: Cross-sectional estimates indicated that blunt smokers, mixed cigarillo/blunt smokers, and those who preferred B&M brand perceived significantly more risk than conventional cigarillo smokers. Longitudinal estimates indicated that among those who underwent a transition in use, former blunt and former cigarillo smokers had significantly greater odds of reporting an increase in perceived harm compared to new users. Conclusions: The change in blunt smokers’ harm perceptions upon transitioning in blunt use suggests acknowledgment of the harm of using cigarillos in some form. Given their high perceived risk of cigarillos, blunt smokers might be receptive to replacing the tobacco product with a nontobacco wrap. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 27 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000819
       
  • Daily variation in the patterns and characteristics of adolescent ENDS
           use.

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      Abstract: Objective: Adolescents are more likely than young adults to use electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), yet most of what is known is concluded from young adult ENDS use as young adults are easier to survey. Additionally, while evidence about the prevalence and trends of adolescent ENDS use comes from cross-sectional studies, ecological momentary assessment (EMA) studies provide greater detail about the ways in which adolescents vape and the environments that are favorable to adolescent vaping, providing important guidance for policy, prevention, and intervention. Method: We conducted a 2-week EMA study with 50 adolescents to assess behaviors, contexts, and characteristics of ENDS use. Given longitudinal research showing strong associations between ENDS use and use of other substances, we also examined tobacco cigarettes use, and daily concurrent use with tobacco cigarettes and marijuana. Results: There was little daily variability in motivations, willingness, and intentions, or in product characteristics. ENDS use varied by day and was more frequent on weekends, whereas cigarette use was less likely on weekends. We found daily variability in contexts and the characteristics of situations where adolescents used, which were largely social-normative, including whose device was used, which flavors were used, and where and with whom adolescents used ENDS. Unexpectedly, marijuana accompanied more than a quarter of ENDS use occasions. Conclusions: Socio-ecological context is important for explaining adolescent ENDS use and it is critical to developing adolescent ENDS prevention, intervention, and treatment resources. Prevention messaging may be most relevant and effective on weekends when youth exposure to advertising and peer influences are greatest. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 13 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000810
       
  • Application of the acquired preparedness model for alcohol and cigarette
           use among reserve-dwelling first nation adolescents.

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      Abstract: Objective: North American Indigenous youth experience disproportionate harm associated with alcohol and cigarette use compared to other racial/ethnic groups. The Acquired Preparedness Model (APM), developed and tested in primarily White samples, hypothesizes that urgency contributes to risk for substance use by influencing the degree to which adolescents attend to positive aspects of substance use, leading to the development of more positive expectations about the consequences of substance use, and increasing subsequent substance use. The purpose of the present study was to provide an initial test of whether the APM generalizes to understanding alcohol and cigarette use among high-risk First Nation adolescents. Method: First Nation adolescents (n = 106, Mage = 14.6, 50.0% female) recruited from reserve communities in Eastern Canada completed self-report measures as part of a larger community-based participatory research project. Procedures were approved by tribal chief, council, and university IRB. Results: The hypothesized model demonstrated excellent fit for alcohol use, χ²(1) = 1.07, p = .30, CFI = 0.99, RMSEA = .03, SRMR = .02, and adequate fit for cigarette use, χ²(1) = 2.58, p = .11, CFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.12, SRMR = 0.03. The indirect effects of urgency on alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking through alcohol and cigarette expectancies were each significant. Conclusions: Findings of the present study provide initial support for the generalizability of the APM in understanding risk for alcohol and cigarette use among reserve-dwelling First Nation youth. The next important step is to replicate this finding in a prospective sample. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 20 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000798
       
  • Counterproductive effects of overfamiliar antitobacco messages on smoking
           cessation intentions via message fatigue and resistance to persuasion.

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      Abstract: Objective: While smoking may result in various harmful effects, such as mental health issues caused by addiction, antitobacco messages have typically focused on the physical health consequences of smoking for decades. Prolonged exposures to these conventional messages may have not only increased awareness about the harmful health effects of smoking but may have also caused message fatigue and resultant resistance to persuasion. The latter effects, however, remain largely unexamined. Addressing this gap, this study examined the effects of overfamiliar antitobacco messages focusing on the health consequences of smoking on message fatigue and resistance to persuasion. Method: In an online experiment, current smokers (N = 296) in the U.S. were randomly assigned to one of the four message conditions that manipulated a degree of familiarity in a 2 (thematic frame: physical vs. mental health) × 2 (valence frame: loss vs. gain) factorial design. Results: The results show that a message portraying physical health consequences of smoking in a loss frame (i.e., overfamiliar frame) induced greater message fatigue than that in a gain frame. Message fatigue, in turn, was associated with higher levels of active (i.e., reactance) and passive resistance (i.e., disengagement) toward antitobacco messages. Reactance induced by message fatigue predicted less favorable attitude and lower intentions to quit smoking. Overall, message fatigue showed both direct and indirect effects on intentions, with the latter being mediated by reactance. Conclusions: Overfamiliar antitobacco message frames may activate greater message fatigue and resistance to persuasion, which may dampen campaign effects. The findings caution against the habitual use of conventional antitobacco messages. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000776
       
  • Simultaneous use of alcohol and cigarettes in a mixed psychiatric sample:
           Daily-life associations with smoking motives, craving, stimulation,
           sedation, and affect.

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      Abstract: Co-use of alcohol and cigarettes is common and associated with greater negative consequences compared to use of either substance alone. Furthermore, alcohol and cigarettes are often used at the same time, and these “simultaneous” use events are associated with greater consumption of each substance. Given the prevalence and negative consequences associated with this pattern, we sought to identify proximal predictors and reinforcers of simultaneous use in individuals with a range of emotional and behavioral dysregulation who may be at greater risk of experiencing substance-related problems. Specifically, 41 adults who drank alcohol and smoked cigarettes (28 with borderline personality disorder and 13 community individuals) completed 21 days of ecological momentary assessment (EMA). First, we used multilevel models on cigarette-use moments to examine whether momentary cigarette motive endorsement differed based on whether participants were also drinking alcohol in that moment. Second, we used multilevel models on all EMA moments to examine whether simultaneous use was associated with greater craving and reinforcing effects compared to use of either substance alone. Participants reported greater enhancement and social motives for smoking cigarettes when also drinking alcohol compared to when they were only smoking. Participants also reported greater alcohol craving, greater sedation, attenuated positive affect, and greater fear following simultaneous use compared to use of either substance alone. Our results add to a growing body of research characterizing proximal influences on simultaneous substance use. Findings highlight potential treatment targets for individuals seeking to better understand or cut down on their use of alcohol, cigarettes, or both. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 28 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1037/adb0000790
       
 
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