Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)

Showing 1 - 85 of 85 Journals sorted alphabetically
Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Addiction Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Addiction Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Addiction Research & Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Addictive Behaviors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Adicciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Alcohol     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Alcohol and Alcoholism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Weekly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Alcoholism Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal on Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Neuro Psycho Physiology     Open Access  
Bereavement Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Child Abuse Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Clinical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Drug Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Critical Gambling Studies     Open Access  
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Drug and Alcohol Dependence Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Drug and Alcohol Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Drug Intoxication & Detoxification : Novel Approaches     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 144)
Drugs and Alcohol Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 149)
Drugs: education, prevention and policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Addiction Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Expert Opinion on Drug Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Forensic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Global Crime     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 284)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Alcohol and Drug Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Drug Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 251)
International Journal of High Risk Behaviors and Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Prevention and Treatment of Substance Use Disorders     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addiction     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Addiction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictions Nursing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addictive Behaviors, Therapy & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Addictive Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Behavioral Health Services & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Child & Adolescent Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Drug Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Drug Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Dual Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Emotional Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Gambling Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Groups in Addiction & Recovery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Psychoactive Drugs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Work Practice: Psychotherapeutic Approaches in Health, Welfare and the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Substance Use     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Teaching in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Juvenile and Family Court Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Land Use Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Nanotoxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Nicotine & Tobacco Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
OA Alcohol     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Psychology of Addictive Behaviors     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Salud y Drogas     Open Access  
SMAD, Revista Electronica en Salud Mental, Alcohol y Drogas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Substance Abuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Substance Abuse and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Substance Use & Misuse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
SUCHT - Zeitschrift für Wissenschaft und Praxis / Journal of Addiction Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Brown University Digest of Addiction Theory and Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Toxicodependências     Open Access  
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Addictions Nursing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.229
Number of Followers: 8  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1088-4602 - ISSN (Online) 1548-7148
Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [330 journals]
  • Journal of Addictions Nursing, 34(1): Winter/Spring Issue

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      Authors: Mitchell; Ann M.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • 2021-2022 Peer Reviewers

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Pain Management and Substance Use Disorders: A Position Statement

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      Authors: Sowicz; Timothy Joseph; Compton, Peggy; Matteliano, Deborah; Oliver, June; Strobbe, Stephen; St. Marie, Barbara; Turner, Helen N.; Wilson, Marian
      Abstract: The American Society for Pain Management Nursing and the International Nurses Society on Addictions hold the position that persons with co-occurring pain and substance use disorder have the right to be treated with dignity and respect and receive evidence-based, high-quality assessment and management for both conditions using an integrated, holistic, multidimensional approach. Nonopioid and nonpharmacological approaches to pain management are recommended. Opioids should not be withheld from anyone if necessary to treat pain, and a team-based approach, including pain and addiction specialists, should be utilized when possible. Pain management should include interventions aimed at minimizing the risk for relapse or escalation of problematic substance use and actively involve the person and their support persons in the plan of care. Institutions should establish policies and procedures that support this position statement.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Gender Differences Among Out-of-School Korean Adolescents in a
           Counselor-Visiting Smoking Cessation Program

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      Authors: Sohn; Min; Im, Boae; Lee, Hoonjae; Suh, Minhee; Kim, Kyu-Sung
      Abstract: imageThe purpose of this study was to explore the determinants of self-reported smoking cessation among out-of-school Korean adolescents who participated in a counselor-visiting smoking cessation program. This retrospective descriptive study analyzed data from the Korea Health Promotion Institute. Participants were enrolled between June 1, 2015, and December 31, 2017, at a regional smoking cessation center in a counselor-visiting smoking cessation program for out-of-school adolescents. Participants consisted of 807 adolescents (70.3% male) with a mean age of 16.9 ± 1.2 years. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that female gender (OR = 1.54–1.92), cohort year 2016 (OR = 1.69–1.90), smoking more than half a pack a day (OR = 0.44–0.50), strong motivation to quit (OR = 1.44), and number of counseling in person (OR = 1.97–2.10) were statistically significant independent contributors to quitting, based on follow-up assessments at 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 6 months. This study explored smoking cessation outcomes of a government-driven smoking cessation program that targeted out-of-school adolescents and identified several risk factors that affect a successful outcome. More research is necessary to evaluate the efficacy of such smoking cessation programs for marginalized or understudied populations.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Social Motivation as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Problematic
           Internet Use and Alcohol Use Among Adolescents in Mexico

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      Authors: Guzmán-Ramírez; Verónica; Armendáriz-García, Nora Angélica; Roberts Williams, Jessica
      Abstract: imageBackground Prior research shows a link between alcohol use and problematic Internet use among adolescents. This relationship likely indicates a vulnerability to addiction; however, little is known about factors that may increase this vulnerability. One potential factor is social motivation. Adolescents often engage in Internet use and alcohol use as a way of connecting socially. This study examines the moderating effects of social motivation for Internet use on the relationship between problematic Internet use and alcohol use among adolescents.Methods A cross-sectional survey was administered to 582 adolescents selected randomly from one middle school and one high school in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Participants answered questions related to demographics/background (including reasons for Internet use), problematic Internet use, and alcohol use. Hierarchical regression modeling examined the moderating effects of social Internet use on problematic Internet use and alcohol use, controlling for age and gender.Results Social Internet use and problematic Internet use accounted for a significant amount of variance in alcohol use (R2 = .126, F(4, 575) = 20.77, p < .001). When the interaction term was entered, social Internet use was found to moderate the relationship between problematic Internet use and alcohol use (β = .525, t = 3.293, p = .001), and the direct effects of social Internet use (β = −.062, t = −0.663, p = .507) and problematic Internet use (β = −.129, t = −1.053, p = .293) were no longer significant.Conclusion This study highlights the role that social connections may play in contributing to problematic Internet use and alcohol use among adolescents. Interventions aimed at preventing problematic and addictive behaviors among adolescents should address the role of social motivations.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Factors Predicting Dependence on Waterpipe Smoking Among Waterpipe
           Exclusive Smokers

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      Authors: Rayan; Ahmad; Eshah, Nidal F.; Froelicher, Erika S.
      Abstract: imageThe current study targeted a sample of waterpipe (WP) exclusive smokers to identify the levels and predictors of dependence on this smoking pattern and to examine the relationship between WP smoking (WPS) dependence and depressive symptoms. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a community sample of 270 subjects who are currently WP exclusive smokers. Assessment of WPS dependence and depressive symptoms was performed using self-report measures. About 62.6% of the subjects were WPS dependent. The unique significant predictors of WPS dependence were age, depression levels, age of starting WPS, duration of WPS, income, smoking WP daily, the belief of being attracted to WPS, and the desire to stop WPS. These predictors explained 35% of the variance in WPS dependence. WPS dependence was associated with increased depressive symptoms. Although few studies have been conducted, the WPS dependence prevalence appears to be alarmingly high among WP exclusive smokers. Factors associated with WPS dependence provide useful information that can be used to tailor WP prevention interventions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Humanizing Substance Abuse: A Theory-Based Educational Intervention for
           Undergraduate Nursing Students

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      Authors: Roncallo; Hannah R.; Aronson, Barbara
      Abstract: imageBackground Healthcare providers, as well as healthcare students, have been found to harbor negative attitudes toward individuals with substance abuse disorders, impacting the care they give and subsequently creating poor patient outcomes.Purpose This study seeks to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention, grounded in theory, toward changing nursing student attitudes regarding patients with a substance abuse disorder.Methods Nursing students participated in a teaching intervention, developed using the experiential learning theory, that utilizes modalities for each kind of learner aimed at reducing bias toward this population. The Medical Condition Regard Scale was used pre/post intervention to determine regard toward patients with the diagnosis of substance abuse.Results Student nurses maintained the least favorable attitudes toward individuals who abuse substances in comparison with patients with the diagnoses of pneumonia or gastroesophageal reflux disease; there were significant differences in attitudes toward patients who abused substances before and after participation in the educational intervention, with postparticipation attitudes being significantly more positive than attitudes before participation. Students found the educational intervention and debriefing highly satisfactory.Implications This educational intervention can provide a cost-effective, easy-to-replicate, time-efficient learning activity that could be added to undergraduate nursing curriculum.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Experience of Women With Opioid Use Disorder Accessing Methadone
           Treatment

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      Authors: Keenan; Lizette C.; Ojeda, Maria M.; Valdez, Anna
      Abstract: imageThe number of women experiencing opioid use disorder (OUD) in Canada has increased exponentially. In Canada, healthcare is socialized and free for all citizens and, often, medications like methadone are free as well, yet few individuals with OUD access treatment services. The purpose of this study was to describe the lived experiences of Canadian women with OUD who were receiving methadone treatment. Interpretive phenomenology was used to investigate the treatment experiences of seven women with OUD. The conceptual framework of self-care of chronic illness was used to examine this phenomenon. Data were analyzed using a seven-step process of interpretive phenomenological analysis. Four major themes emerged: learning how to be you again, reaching out for help, finding your way to methadone, and going down the path of methadone. Women's experiences were influenced by family, friends, and healthcare providers. Accessibility and self-determination were important factors in entering and sustaining treatment. This study contributes to the discipline of nursing by providing accurate information regarding women's experiences with OUD and uncovering practice changes that can attract and retain women in treatment.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Hospital Experiences of Dignity in People Who Inject Drugs

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      Authors: Dion; Kimberly; Griggs, Stephanie; Murray, Jordan; Friedman, Sarah
      Abstract: imageBackground Dignity is a complex concept necessary for the adequate treatment of patients in the healthcare setting. Autonomy, self-sufficiency, respect, and equality are concepts used to define dignity. Dignity has not been studied in people who inject drugs (PWID).Objective This study aimed to determine how PWID maintain or have their dignity threatened during hospitalization in an acute care unit.Design The qualitative descriptive study was a deductive thematic analysis of secondary data on PWID experiences with received nursing care. In-depth, semistructured interviews were conducted and transcribed verbatim with a constant comparison method for thematic analysis using NVivo. A priori codes of dignity concepts from the literature and dignity scales were used as a guide to examine the nine qualitative transcripts.Findings The three most common threats to dignity during hospitalization were lack of equality compared with other patients, not feeling valued as an individual, and not feeling respected by the healthcare workers providing care. The three most common protectors of dignity were feeling respected by healthcare workers, having autonomy in treatment choices, and feeling valued as an individual.Conclusions Protecting dignity significantly affects whether PWID are willing to seek healthcare in the hospital setting. Preserving dignity in PWID during their hospitalizations can encourage this population to seek care earlier. Nurses must be experienced in caring for PWID and provide nonjudgmental care for this population.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Predisposing, Reinforcing, and Enabling Factors of Nicotine Dependence
           Among Young Adults in a Rural Community

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      Authors: Garcia; Norayda P.; Gamboa, Aldrin Joseph Gio G. II; Ganzalino, Clynt Marc C.; Garcia, Denzel C.; Garcia, Gemcee Evan C.; Torres, Gian Carlo S.
      Abstract: imageObjectives The aim of this study was to determine the influence of predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling factors of nicotine dependence among young adults in a rural community.Study Design A quantitative, predictive–correlational cross-sectional study was done among 190 young adults in a rural community utilizing compact segmental sampling.Methods Data were collected from August to October 2018 utilizing a validated robotfoto, adapted determinants of smoking questionnaire, and Fagerström test to assess nicotine dependence. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used in predicting the relationship between the predictors and nicotine dependence.Results Reinforcing and enabling factors influenced nicotine dependency. The influence of other relatives (β = .179, p = .023) and radio advertisements (β = −.224, p = .008) as well as availability (access) to cigarettes (β = .228, p = .003) were significant predictors of nicotine dependency in the rural community.Conclusion Identified predictors can help form policies that can help address the availability of cigarettes and advertisements (radio) that can influence nicotine dependence among young adults in a rural community. Furthermore, the influence of other relatives (extended family) can be a factor that can increase the development of nicotine dependence.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • COVID-19 Impact on Teaching Substance Use Disorders: A Nursing Curricular
           Thread

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      Authors: Fay-Hillier; Theresa; Regan, Roseann V.; Murphy-Parker, Dana
      Abstract: imageVulnerable populations such as those with substance use disorders (SUDs) are at a higher risk for early morbidities and mortalities yet are less likely to receive primary care and other necessary psychosocial services essential for comprehensive care of these clients. This need has been magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic. Evidence supports an increase in alcohol sales in 2020, and overdoses from illicit drugs have been reported to have more than doubled by May 2020 from the 2018 and 2019 baseline rates, and one reason for these increases is because of COVID-19. The healthcare system is overwhelmed with the cost of treating and addressing the impact of SUDs. Individuals with SUDs often meet providers who are not sufficiently prepared to address their complex issues that include co-occurring mental and physical health disorders. In addition to changes in practice, nursing education must change their curricular approach to meet the challenges in health services across the life span, and nursing education should include lessons being learned during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nurses must be prepared to recognize and screen individuals for SUDs at the undergraduate level as well as assess and treat individuals with SUDs at the advanced practice level in all areas of healthcare services. SUDs should not continue to be siloed and separated into the psychiatric–mental health nursing course within the nursing curriculum but should be addressed in multiple specialties across the curricula and include health responses in regard to the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic is having on SUDs.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Relationship Between Trauma and Substance Use Among Healthcare
           Workers: A Cross-Sectional Analysis

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      Authors: Okoli; Chizimuzo T. C.; Seng, Sarret
      Abstract: imageTrauma exposure is prevalent in the general population, but healthcare workers may be at greater risks for additional work-related trauma. Trauma is a known risk factor for substance use, particularly tobacco and risky alcohol use. Few studies have examined the relationship between trauma and substance use in healthcare workers. Among healthcare workers, the aims of our study were to examine (a) frequency of current tobacco use and risky alcohol use, (b) frequency and types of traumatic experiences, and (c) the associations between trauma experiences and current tobacco and risky alcohol use controlling for demographic factors. This study is a secondary analysis of cross-sectional survey data from healthcare workers (N = 850) in an academic medical center. Demographic and work-related variables, trauma experience, and substance use were examined. Multivariate logistic regression analysis examined associations between trauma exposure and tobacco and risky alcohol use controlling for demographic and work-related variables. Nearly 75% of respondents reported at least one lifetime traumatic experience, and one in 10 reported tobacco and risky alcohol use. When controlling for demographic and work-related variables, a dose-response relationship was observed such that the higher the number of traumatic experiences, there was a greater likelihood of reporting tobacco or risky alcohol use. Because healthcare providers have additional work-related trauma risk above the public, and greater trauma is associated with increased risk for substance use, it is important to screen for trauma and provide appropriate treatment resources to healthcare providers. Future research is needed to better delineate the relationship between specific traumas and risky substance use among healthcare providers.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Buprenorphine Program Evaluation in a Private Psychiatric Office-Based
           Practice

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      Authors: Palmer; Joshua; Mitchell, Ann M.; Schlenk, Elizabeth A.; Mullick, Prabir; Lee, Heeyoung
      Abstract: imagePurpose The opioid crisis has contributed to the mortality, morbidity, and rising healthcare costs in the United States. Buprenorphine (BUP) is an effective medication for opioid use disorder. The aims of this quality assurance evaluation of a BUP program were to (a) evaluate the clinic's performance in illicit opioid abstinence and (b) identify patient risk and resilience characteristics to improve patient success in recovery with BUP.Methods A retrospective chart review of open (n = 35) and closed (n = 21) cases and a cross-sectional survey in open cases were completed. Adults (aged ≥18 years) who completed 6 months of BUP treatment at a psychiatric clinic were included. Clinical performance was measured with percentages of opioid-negative urine and completed monthly urine drug tests (UDTs) for the first 6 months. Open cases were surveyed regarding risk and resilience characteristics (frequency of opioid cravings and triggers, therapy participation, and coping skills). Descriptive statistics, t test, and chi-square test were used to analyze data.Results Average opioid-negative urine was significantly higher in open cases than closed cases (88.57% vs. 74.82%; t = 2.885, p = .004). There was no significant association between open cases (61.4%) and closed cases (73.8%) in completed monthly UDT. Opening and closing of cases stabilized with mandatory monthly UDT. Most individuals reported therapy participation, minimal opioid cravings, and use of distraction to cope with chronic-pain-induced cravings.Conclusions/Implications This clinic met benchmarks leading to improved substance recovery. Recommendations include regular evaluations of UDT, cravings, and chronic pain; therapy participation; and continuous quality assurance activities.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Substance Use Disorder Treatment Through Telemedicine in the Age of
           CoVID-19

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      Authors: Onderdonk; Mary; Goldstein, Nancy
      Abstract: Telemedicine has been effective at bridging the gap between patients, providers, and health systems. As part of a large, academic medical center in Baltimore, MD, it has been found that using digital tools, particularly when access to care is otherwise limited, is beneficial to supporting recovery. However, there are barriers to telemedicine surrounding patient privacy and increased tendency of patients to avoid treatment. Maintaining personalized, evidence-based clinical care while limiting the spread of CoVID-19 has required swift adaptation from healthcare providers. The intent of this article is to discuss provider perspectives of benefits and barriers to telemedicine for substance use disorder treatment during the CoVID-19 pandemic.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Relationship Between Trauma and Substance Use among Healthcare
           Workers: A cross-sectional analysis

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      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Attitudes Scale on Alcohol, Alcoholism, and Persons With Alcohol Use
           Disorders

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      Authors: de Vargas; Divane; Naegle, Madeline A.
      Abstract: imageBackground The Attitudes Scale on Alcohol, Alcoholism, and Persons with alcohol use disorders (“Escala de Atitudes Frente ao Álcool, ao Alcoolismo e ao Persons with alcohol use disorders” [EAFAA]) is an instrument designed to measure attitudes toward alcohol, alcoholism, and persons with alcohol use disorders. It has been validated in Portuguese and Spanish.Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the psychometric properties and factor structure of the American English version of the EAFAA (EAFAA-AEV).Methods One hundred eighty-seven participants (nurses = 101 and nursing students = 86) completed the EAFAA-AEV.Results Confirmatory factor analysis resulted in a four-factor solution, supporting the original factor structure of the EAFAA. The scale has shown good internal consistency and reliability for the four factors. The total scale had a Cronbach's alpha of .85 and a McDonald's omega of .87.Conclusion The EAFAA-AEV has similarly strong psychometric properties as the original version, suggesting that it is a reliable tool to identify attitudes toward alcohol and related issues among American-English-speaking nurses and nursing students.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Predictors of Burden and Resilience in Family Caregivers of Individuals
           With Opioid Use Disorder

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      Authors: Tyo; Mirinda Brown; McCurry, Mary K.; Horowitz, June Andrews; Elliott, Kathleen
      Abstract: imageBackground Family caregivers are an essential resource for individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD). Overburdened caregivers often experience detrimental effects to their emotional and physical well-being.Method A cross-sectional, nonexperimental, correlational study was used to identify correlates and predictors of burden and resilience in caregivers of care recipients with OUD. Pearson product–moment correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to explore the relationships between caregiver characteristics, care recipient characteristics, the caregiver–care-recipient dyad characteristics, and burden and resilience among caregivers of individuals with OUD and to determine the best predictive model. Participants (N = 152) completed the study using an online electronic survey.Results The standardized regression coefficients indicated that supervision of care recipient behavioral problems (β = .29), dyadic interaction (β = .29), caregiver stress (β = .28), and care recipient opioid use (β = .12) were the strongest predictors of caregiver burden, whereas caregiver mental health (β = −.31) and physical health (β = .30) were the strongest predictors of caregiver resilience.Conclusions Caregiver and care recipient characteristics, and their dyadic interaction, directly influence the degree of burden and resilience reported by family caregivers. Caregivers experiencing increased stress who are tasked with supervising problematic care recipient behaviors are more likely to experience higher levels of burden. In contrast, caregivers with good physical and mental health and adequate resources showed higher levels of resilience.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Adolescent, Parent, and Provider Perspectives of a Social-Media–Based
           Support Tool for Parents of Teens in Treatment for Substance Use

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      Authors: Schulte; Marya T.; Kelleghan, Annemarie R.
      Abstract: imageAdolescent substance use disorder contributes to negative psychosocial and physical health outcomes. Parents best support their child's treatment and recovery when they are equipped with knowledge and skills; however, barriers hinder parental engagement. Social-media-based groups present an opportunity for parents who may not otherwise seek support. Qualitative data were collected via focus groups to examine the opinions of adolescents, parents, and treatment providers on the potential utility and possible concerns of a Facebook-based parent support group; input constituted the development phase for an online group (PURPOSE). Fifty-eight participants, recruited through adolescent treatment programs, took part in six focus groups: two parent (n = 18), two adolescent (n = 21), and two provider (n = 19) groups. Groups were audio recorded and transcribed, and themes were extracted. Three main themes emerged: (a) traditional support groups and treatment services, (b) PURPOSE intervention content and delivery, and (c) issues related to PURPOSE implementation. Traditional treatment/support groups can be helpful, but participation in them is limited. Emotional support offered by peers is valuable, but parents also need and seek out psychoeducation, parenting skills, and self-care support. PURPOSE could offer easy access to skills and real-time peer support.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Identification of the Obstetric Factors Increasing Tendency to Smoking
           Cessation During Pregnancy

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      Authors: Avcibay Vurgec; Burcu
      Abstract: imageIntroduction Cigarette, one of the various forms of tobacco, is the most commonly used tobacco product in Turkey and in the world. Cigarette has several negative effects on general health and is a major problem in the pregnancy period. This study aims to identify pregnancy-related factors that affect the tendency to smoking cessation and their effect levels in pregnant women who continue to smoke during pregnancy.Method The sample of this descriptive and cross-sectional study was 430 pregnant women who smoked. Data were collected through an original interview form and face-to-face interviews. Data analysis was performed using chi-square, independent t test, and multiple logistic regression model in terms of demographic, obstetric, maternal, and fetal features.Results The average number of cigarettes smoked before pregnancy was 13.28 ± 8.62, whereas the average number of cigarettes smoked during pregnancy was 6.60 ± 7.64. The tendency to decrease smoking increases 2.8 times (OR = 2.825, 95% CI [1.631, 4.895]) with the number of pregnancies and approximately 2 times in case of a planned pregnancy (OR = 1.946, 95% CI [1.076, 3.520]). The frequency of having prenatal visits showed a weak but significant relationship with the number of abortuses and the number of living children.Conclusions Developing a risk map in line with the findings of the study and considering the obstetric features of smoking women could enable to hypothesize about the types of behaviors in smoking in the following processes of pregnancy. With the precautions to be taken, the negative effects of smoking on maternal and fetal health could be prevented or minimized.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Nurse-Sensitive Indicators in the Care of Individuals With Opioid Use
           Disorder

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      Authors: Bernhardt; Jean M.
      Abstract: imagePatients with opioid use disorder (OUD) seek care in primary care settings where nurses support the provision of medication-assisted treatment. Office-based opioid treatment (OBOT) that includes buprenorphine hydrochloride administration under the supervision of a nurse for stabilization and maintenance therapy has the potential to improve outcomes for patients with OUD in primary care settings. However, the first step is to determine if OBOT nurses provide nurse-sensitive care, which consists of activities that have been shown to make a difference in patient outcomes. Content analysis of 368 nursing notes from 100 patients enrolled in an OBOT program in an urban hospital-based primary care clinic was conducted. Data were analyzed descriptively according to quantity and qualitatively according to the content. Entries indicative of care coordination and transition management were extracted. Seven content categories within care coordination were identified, including harm reduction, medication management, symptom management, communication between providers, promoting adherence, self-management goal setting, and patient education. Four areas within transition management were identified including supporting connections to resources, referrals for care, medication reconciliation, and communication with other facilities. Care coordination was documented more frequently than transition management. The presence of nurse-sensitive indicators provides evidence for and distinguishes the role of the nurse in OUD care.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
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