Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (334 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (19 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
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    - EMERGENCY AND INTENSIVE CRITICAL CARE (121 journals)
    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (177 journals)
    - LABORATORY AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE (90 journals)
    - MEDICAL GENETICS (58 journals)
    - MEDICAL SCIENCES (2241 journals)
    - NURSES AND NURSING (331 journals)
    - OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY (199 journals)
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    - PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY (800 journals)
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    - SPORTS MEDICINE (77 journals)
    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Applied Gerontology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.786
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0733-4648 - ISSN (Online) 1552-4523
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1174 journals]
  • Depression within the First Year of Relocation to Residential
           Care/Assisted Living: Where You Come From Matters

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Evan Plys, Cari Levy
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Depression is common within the first year of relocation to residential care/assisted living (RC/AL). Yet, few studies investigate the relationship between depression and relocation factors that might help identify at-risk residents, such as previous location. This study analyzed cross-sectional resident data (n = 2651) from the National Survey of Residential Care Facilities to test: (1) group differences between residents relocating from acute/post-acute facilities (e.g., hospital, rehabilitation facility) and community-based residences, and (2) the relationship between previous location and depression within the first year of relocation. The 921 (35%) residents relocating directly from acute/post-acute facilities were more likely to have depression (p < .001) and poorer outcomes on select health and psychosocial variables. After controlling for covariates, relocating directly from an acute/post-acute facility significantly related to depression (OR = 1.22). Findings highlight opportunities to improve routine screening and transitional care for this subpopulation of RC/AL residents at heightened risk for depression.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T08:38:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221117524
       
  • Exploring the Criterion Validity of Pragmatic Person-Centered Care/Culture
           Change Measures

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      Authors: Miranda C. Kunkel, Caroline Madrigal, Reese Moore, John R. Bowblis, Jane Straker, Matt Nelson, Kimberly Van Haitsma, Katherine M. Abbott
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundNursing homes (NHs) are required to provide person-centered care, efforts often folded into broader culture change initiatives. Despite the known benefits of culture change, it is difficult to measure. This study aims to assess the criterion validity of the Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory (PELI) Implementation Indicator with other culture change measures.MethodsUsing data from Ohio-based NHs (n = 771), logistic regression techniques demonstrated the relationship between the PELI Implementation Indicator and two validated culture change measures, the Resident Preferences for Care (RPC) and Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) Empowerment scales.ResultsThere was a significant relationship between the two scales and complete PELI implementation holding all other variables constant. The RPC and CNA Empowerment scales were significantly associated with complete PELI implementation.DiscussionFindings suggest that the PELI Implementation Indicator can be used as a pragmatic indicator of a community’s adoption of person-centered care and culture change.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T08:37:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221117528
       
  • An Examination of Conditions Exposing Older Adults to Economic Abuse:
           Logistic Regression Analysis

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      Authors: Derya Ünlü, Emel Yurtsever, Taner Artan, Hatice Selin Irmak
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to determine factors affecting the economic abuse status of older adults. The study was conducted with 385 individuals aged 65 years and above, living in the Bahçelievler district of Istanbul. Data were collected using a Sociodemographic Form, and a Determination of Economic Abuse of Older Adults Form. Logistic regression analysis was applied to determine the factors affecting the economic abuse status of the older adults. The study participants comprised 51.4% males and 48.6% females with a mean age of 70.44 ± 6.73 years. It was determined that 9.4% of the older adults were exposed to economic abuse. As a result of the logistic regression analysis, the factors found to affect the situations of exposure to economic abuse of the older adults were age, income status, number of children, exposure to emotional abuse, and exposure to physical abuse.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T06:35:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221116159
       
  • Predictors of Quality-of-Care Provided by Migrant Live-In Caregivers of
           Frail older Persons: A Cross-Sectional Study

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      Authors: Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, Hava Golander
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      We examined the association between employment-related characteristics and the quality-of-care migrant live-in caregivers provide to older care-recipients. Structured interviews were conducted with 115 migrant live-in caregivers, 72 older care-recipients, and 117 relatives of care-recipients. We conducted correlations among dependent (quality-of-care), independent (quality of relationship between caregiver and informant, caregiver perception of work, and problematic employment conditions), and demographic variables, and performed a path analysis by conducting a series of multiple regressions. Quality-of-care was most highly correlated with quality of relationship between informant and caregiver. Quality of relationship was predicted by caregiver perceptions of work, which was negatively predicted by problematic employment conditions. In the relatives-based model, quality of relationship was significantly better when the care-receiver was female and the care-recipient needed more assistance with activities of daily living. The study clarifies the role of caregiver work characteristics for quality-of-care and highlights the crucial role of the relationship with the care-recipient.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T04:28:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221107616
       
  • Sleep Quality Predicts Functional Disability in Older Adults with Low Back
           Pain: A Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Sabrina Dias Oliveira, Rafael Z. Pinto, Cynthia Gobbi, Guilherme L. Fernandes, Vinícius Dokkedal-Silva, Ítalo Ribeiro Lemes, Monica L. Andersen, Sergio Tufik, Roselene Modolo Regueiro Lorenconi, Priscila K. Morelhão
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Low back pain (LBP) and sleep quality are two very prevalent complaints in the older population. However, little is known about the prognostic relationship between sleep quality and disability in older adults with LBP. The aim of this study was to examine the association between sleep quality and disability in older adults with LBP. This was a longitudinal study over a 6-month period. Older adults with LBP in the last 12 weeks and who had preserved cognitive functions were recruited. The questionnaires used were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire. At baseline, we collected information on demographic/anthropometric variables, cognitive status, depression, daytime sleepiness, and comorbidities. Linear regression adjusted for potential covariates were performed. Poor sleep at baseline predicted higher disability after 6 months [β = 0.30 (CI95%:0.07 to 0.55)]. Our results support the existence of an important relationship between sleep and disability in older adults with LBP.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T12:35:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221113500
       
  • Financial Contributions and Experiences of Non-Spousal, Employed Family
           Caregivers

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      Authors: Maningbè B. Keita Fakeye, Laura J. Samuel, Jennifer L. Wolff
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The economic impacts of caring for an older adult may be amplified for employed family and unpaid caregivers. We examine out-of-pocket spending among employed, retired, and unemployed caregivers. Among employed caregivers, we identify correlates of spending and assess whether spending and work productivity loss contribute to financial burden. Analyses use the 2015 National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and National Study of Caregiving. We find that employed caregivers incur more out-of-pocket spending on caregiving than retired and unemployed counterparts. Employed caregivers spending more than $500 out-of-pocket provide more hours of care and assist older adults with greater impairment. Among employed family caregivers, caregiver and care recipient Medicaid enrollment, spending, and work productivity loss are associated with financial burden. Findings suggest that caregiving exacerbates economic well-being among employed caregivers, particularly for those with socioeconomic vulnerability.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T02:45:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221115261
       
  • Assessing Public Opinions of Sexual Advance Directives Among Older Adults
           With Dementia

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      Authors: Shelby M. Astle, Paige McAllister, M. Hunter Stanfield, Erin Yelland, Caroline Gimarc
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study used a mixed-method research design to examine public attitudes toward sexual advance directives (SADs), a theoretical legal document intended to protect the sexual rights of individuals across the lifespan. Respondents (N = 537) largely indicated that SADs should exist (65.4%) to preserve autonomy and protect resident rights, but they would not sign one right now (60.4%) because they were too young. Linear regression analyses revealed statistical associations between education level, relationship length, and sexual instrumentality for the existence of SADs, while gender, age, perceived importance of sexuality, and sexual self-disclosure were associated with whether a respondent would sign the document now. Overall analyses indicate that valuing sexual expression as a right, autonomy, sexuality in older age, and sexual communication led to a greater amount of general support for SADs. Respondents were sensitive to the concerns of SADs in the context of fluid consent between partners and their safety.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-12T05:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221114632
       
  • The Impact of Multiple Long-Term Care Services Use on Dementia and
           Nondementia Caregivers’ Health Care Utilization and Costs

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      Authors: Su-Yuan Chan, Hsiao-Wei Yu, Ming-Ching Yang, Yue-Chune Lee, Ya-Mei Chen
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe study examined the effects of multiple long-term care (LTC) services (i.e., using both social and professional care services) on caregivers of service recipients with and without dementia.MethodsWe retrieved data for 10,771 caregivers of older adults in the Ten-Year Long-Term Care Project (TLTCP) in Taiwan. We examined the effects of care recipients’ initial prescription of single or multiple LTC services on their caregivers’ healthcare services use, including outpatient, emergency department (ED), and inpatient services.ResultsFor care recipients prescribed a single LTC service, dementia caregivers had 0.82 more ED visits and 10.4% higher total fees than nondementia caregivers (p < .05). However, for care recipients prescribed multiple LTC services, dementia caregivers and nondementia caregivers used healthcare services at similar levels, and dementia caregivers had 3.5% lower per-visit outpatient fees (p < .05).DiscussionProviding multiple LTC services for people with dementia results in great benefit to their caregivers.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-09T02:38:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221114110
       
  • Better Preparation and Training Determine Home Care Workers’
           Self-Efficacy in Contributing to Heart Failure Self-Care

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      Authors: Michael A. Stawnychy, Joanna B. Ringel, Barbara Riegel, Madeline R. Sterling
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveIdentify determinants of home care workers’ (HCW) self-efficacy in contributing to heart failure (HF) self-care.MethodsSecondary analysis of a survey (n = 328) examining characteristics of HCWs caring for adults with HF in New York. Self-efficacy assessed using Caregiver Self-Efficacy in Contributing to Self-Care Scale. Standardized scores range 0–100; ≥ 70 points indicate adequate self-efficacy. Characteristics determined by self-efficacy (low vs. adequate). Prevalence ratios with 95% confidence intervals (PR [95% CI]) were estimated using multivariable Poisson regression with robust standard errors.ResultsHome care workers with adequate self-efficacy had at least some prior HF training (55% vs. 17%, p < .001) and greater job satisfaction (90% vs. 77%, p = .003). Significant determinants for adequate self-efficacy were employment length (1.02 [1.00–1.03], p = .027), preparation for caregiving (3.10 [2.42–3.96], p < .001), and HF training (1.48 [1.20–1.84], p < .001).ConclusionHome care agencies and policy-makers can target caregiving preparation and HF training to improve HCWs’ confidence in caring for adult HF patients.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T09:33:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221113322
       
  • Built Environment and Loneliness Among Older Adults in South East
           Queensland, Australia

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      Authors: Jack Lam, Siqin Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: To examine characteristics of the built environment and investigate associations with loneliness among older adults. Methods: Drawing on geocoded data from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey and measures of neighborhood features retrieved from multiple publicly available sources, we conducted principal component and regression analyses to examine the associations between characteristics of the built environment and loneliness among older adults in South East Queensland, Australia. Results: Older adults living in compact neighborhoods with higher population and housing density, smaller land parcels, and more access to green space reported lower levels of loneliness. Compact and mixed land-use neighborhoods may increase people’s exposure to and social interactions with surrounding people and the environment. Conclusion: The built environment provides the context for social interactions. Our study and findings inform research and suggest the development of interventions surrounding the built environment that could potentially help tackle loneliness in older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T07:58:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221114345
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kendall Barrett, Emily S. Ihara
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T08:59:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221113628
       
  • Social Citizenship Through Out-of-Home Participation Among Older Adults
           With and Without Dementia

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      Authors: Sophie N. Gaber, Liv Thalén, Camilla W. Malinowsky, Isabel Margot-Cattin, Kishore Seetharaman, Habib Chaudhury, Malcolm Cutchin, Sarah Wallcook, Anders Kottorp, Anna Brorsson, Samantha Biglieri, Louise Nygård
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      There is limited empirical knowledge about how older adults living with dementia enact their social citizenship through out-of-home participation. This study aimed: (a) to investigate out-of-home participation among older adults with and without dementia in four countries and (b) to compare aspects of stability or change in out-of-home participation. Using a cross-sectional design, older adults with mild-to-moderate dementia and without dementia, aged 55 years and over, were interviewed using the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside the Home questionnaire in Canada (n = 58), Sweden (n = 69), Switzerland (n = 70), and the United Kingdom (n = 128). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and a two-way analysis of variance. After adjustment for age, diagnosis of dementia and country of residence had significant effects on total out-of-home participation (p < .01). The results contribute to policies and development of programs to facilitate social citizenship by targeting specific activities and places.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-07-01T01:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221112425
       
  • Characterizing Elder Abuse in the UK: A Description of Cases Reported to a
           National Helpline

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      Authors: Silvia Fraga Dominguez, Jennifer E. Storey, Emily Glorney
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The abuse of older adults by someone in a position of trust—also known as elder abuse (EA)—has a severe impact on victims and society. However, knowledge about EA in the UK is limited in comparison to other types of interpersonal violence and international knowledge. The present study utilized secondary data from a UK national EA helpline to investigate the characteristics of reported cases. Over a one-year period between 2017 and 2018, 1,623 records met inclusion criteria. Descriptive statistics are provided to describe this sample. Most cases reported to the helpline pertained to female victims, suffering from financial or psychological abuse. Co-occurrence of different abuse types was common. Findings provide updated knowledge about the phenomenology of EA cases in the UK. Recommendations are provided for advancing research in this area, including the need for examining cases across longer periods of time with a view to informing practice and policy.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T05:20:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221109513
       
  • Reflections on Mentorship From Scientists and Mentors in an Alzheimer’s
           Disease Focused Research Training Program

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      Authors: Christiana L. Johnson, Daniela B. Friedman, Lucy A. Ingram, Marvella E. Ford, Audrey McCrary-Quarles, Cheryl J. Dye, Margaret C. Miller, Oluwole Ariyo, Omar Bagasra, Hongtu Chen, Quentin McCollum, Sue E. Levkoff
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper presents reflections on mentorship from scientists and mentors of the National Institute on Aging (NIA)-funded Carolina Center on Alzheimer’s Disease and Minority Research (CCADMR). Using a network approach to mentoring, this program aims to increase the pipeline of underrepresented minority (URM) scientists studying Alzheimer’s disease (AD) disparities. Six mentors and five scientists participated in interviews. Thematic analysis identified recurring themes; transcripts of mentors and scientists were compared. Most common thematic categories identified by mentors included experience interacting with scientists, goals as a mentor, recruitment of underrepresented minorities, scientists’ challenges, and programmatic qualities. The most mentioned categories by scientists were challenges, seminars, working with mentors, career development, and project experience. The CCADMR will use findings to enhance the experience and training methods for future grant years. Results can benefit other training programs focused on aging and AD.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T01:23:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221109514
       
  • Nurse Practitioners Navigating the Consequences of Directives, Policies,
           and Recommendations Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic in Long-Term Care
           Homes

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      Authors: Katherine S. McGilton, Alexandra Krassikova, Aria Wills, Vanessa Durante, Lydia Yeung, Shirin Vellani, Souraya Sidani, Astrid Escrig-Pinol
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesNew models for the workforce are required in long-term care (LTC) homes, as was made evident during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Nurse Practitioner (NP)-led models of care represent an effective solution. This study explored NPs’ roles in supporting LTC homes as changes in directives, policies, and recommendations related to COVID-19 were introduced.DesignQualitative exploratory study.ContextThirteen NPs working in LTC homes in Ontario, Canada.MethodsSemi-structured interviews were conducted in March/April 2021. A five-step inductive thematic analysis was applied.FindingsAnalysis generated four themes: leading the COVID-19 vaccine rollout; promoting staff wellbeing related to COVID-19 fatigue; addressing complexities of new admissions; and negotiating evolving collaborative relationships.ConclusionsNurse practitioners were instrumental in supporting LTC homes through COVID-19 regulatory changes producing unintended consequences. The NPs’ leadership in transforming care is equally essential in LTC homes as in other established healthcare settings, such as primary and acute care.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T08:41:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221110210
       
  • The Impact of Spirituality and Religious Practice on Senior Living Leader
           Career Resilience

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      Authors: Dennis R. Myers, Robin K. Rogers, Brianna V. Garrison, Jon E. Singletary, Haley Groce
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Experienced senior living leaders (SLLs) report the impact of spirituality and religious practice on SLL role adaptation and continuation. The sample included 18 SLLs in 18 skilled care settings representing public, non-profit, and for-profit types of incorporation, with oversampling of for-profit facilities. The average years of SLL experience was 24 years. In-depth interviews were examined through a thematic analysis approach using Excel software. Seventy-eight percent described how a higher power, religious beliefs, and faith practices were associated with their role. Their narratives revealed three major themes: Frame (calling and pre-dispositional spiritual beliefs and religious practices), Role Performance (how spirituality informed SLL administrative practice), and Benefits (perceived rewards of adherence to spiritual beliefs and practices). Further analysis of the three themes produced codes that added greater specification for each theme. Implications provided for normalizing the spirituality and work-life intersect and infusing ethical integration of spirituality and work-life in SLL educational programs.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T04:38:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221110868
       
  • Feasibility and Acceptability of a Remotely Delivered Weighted Blanket
           Intervention for People Living With Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

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      Authors: Melissa L. Harris, Marita G. Titler
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic amplified the need for interventions to support community-dwelling families living with dementia. This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of a remotely delivered weighted blanket intervention for people living with dementia, and the feasibility of collecting outcome measures specific to people with dementia and caregivers. A prospective, within subjects, pre-post design was used; 21 people with dementia and their caregivers participated. Measures of feasibility (days blanket was used for the recommended duration, injuries/adverse events, enrollment, and withdrawal rate, time to recruit sample) and acceptability (tolerability, satisfaction, and benefit perceived by participants with dementia and caregivers) were examined. Feasibility of collecting measures was examined through missing data. Results indicated high feasibility and acceptability. Collecting caregiver completed outcome measures was feasible, but measures completed by self-report by people with dementia was not. Weighted blankets are a promising tool for this population that warrant further examination to determine efficacy.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T01:58:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221111123
       
  • Associations between Homelessness and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related
           Dementia: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Ganesh M. Babulal, Rohan Rani, Paris Adkins-Jackson, Adam C. Pearson, Monique M. Williams
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The homeless population in the United States is rapidly aging, with a parallel increase in Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia (ADRD). During an evolving pandemic that jeopardizes employment and housing, assessing the relationship between ADRD and homelessness is critical since the latter is potentially intervenable. The objective of this study is to review the literature and determine whether there is an association between homelessness and dementia risk. A systematic review of existing studies was conducted through PubMED, SCOPUS, and EMBASE among others. Of the 228 results found, nine met inclusion criteria. Homeless studies mainly centered on veteran populations (n = 6/9). There is a complex relationship suggesting homelessness as a risk for and consequence of ADRD but also co-occurrence with psychiatric disorders, substance abuse, and traumatic injuries. Future studies should employ enumeration surveys with modular longitudinal tracking and measure social determinants of health, discrimination, chronic stress, and mood disorders.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-25T01:06:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221109747
       
  • Comparison of Perceptions of Activities of Daily Living of Adult Children
           with Autism Among Three Groups of Aging Caregivers

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      Authors: Christina N. Marsack-Topolewski
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Many aging parents care for adult children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and an additional loved one. This exploratory study compared differences among compound 1 (caring for an additional family member), compound 2 (caring for a typically developing minor child), and noncompound (solely caring for an adult child with ASD) caregivers on perceptions of the degree of support that care recipients need to perform specific types activities of daily living (ADL) that care recipients need assistance to complete. Each caregiver cared for at least one adult child with ASD. Results from a web-based survey completed by 320 aging caregivers were examined using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA tests for independent samples. Compound 1 and noncompound caregivers were more likely to be involved in assisting their adult children with some ADLs when compared with compound 2 caregivers. Findings provide insight into the realities of caregivers with regard to ADL needs of their adult children.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T10:52:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221111392
       
  • Strategies to Ensure Continuity of Care Using Telemedicine with Older
           Adults during COVID-19: A Qualitative Study of Physicians in Primary Care
           and Geriatrics

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      Authors: Kevin Chen, Natalie M. Davoodi, Daniel H. Strauss, Melinda Li, Frances N. Jiménez, Kate M. Guthrie, Elizabeth M. Goldberg
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Our objective was to interview primary care physicians (PCPs) and geriatricians on their experiences using telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic to examine strategies used to maintain continuity of care with their patients, ages 65 and older. Methods: Using purposive sampling, we selected physicians based on community size (metro/suburban/rural) and practice setting (academic/community) and conducted semi-structured interviews via Zoom (mean: 30 minutes). Interviews were recorded, transcribed, coded, and analyzed using framework analysis. Results: We enrolled 33 physicians (15 PCPs and 18 geriatricians) from July to November 2020. Findings indicate that many physicians successfully bridged the digital divide by: assessing patients’ technological readiness in advance, being flexible with telehealth modes, using available home or facility-based staff, educating patients on telehealth privacy and usefulness, making accommodations for disabilities, and involving caregivers. Discussion: These findings can inform future policy and practice and assist physicians in resolving addressable barriers to telehealth use among older patients.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-17T04:40:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221109728
       
  • A Proactive Behavioral Activities Program (EWA) and the Influence of
           COVID-19 among Seniors in Congregate Living Communities

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      Authors: Julian Montoro-Rodriguez, Bert Hayslip, Jennifer Ramsey
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Older adults in affordable housing are at risk for mental health problems, physical vulnerability, and isolation. We examine the role of an activities program in buffering the influence of life stressors on the mental health of seniors in congregate housing, using a non-experimental pretest–posttest study design. Results based upon repeated measures analyses (N = 29), found statistically significant (p < .05) program by time effects for depression, coping strategies, positive affect, isolation, and resident satisfaction. Analyses based upon independent samples of pretest and posttest measures (N = 60) were considerably less strong, but consistent in yielding similar patterns to those of the longitudinally gathered data. Our longitudinal findings substantiate the positive impact of the Engage with Age program in supporting older adults living in congregate housing. Researchers need to develop strategies to assess and support the mental health of older persons in low-income urban congregate living in the larger context of COVID-19.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-13T08:04:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221108279
       
  • ‘Make the Most of the Situation’. Older Adults’ Experiences during
           COVID-19: A Longitudinal, Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Emily Brooks, Somayyeh Mohammadi, W. Ben Mortenson, Catherine L. Backman, Chihori Tsukura, Isabelle Rash, Janice Chan, William C. Miller
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic restrictions have been associated with increased social isolation and reduced participation in older adults. This longitudinal qualitative study drew on life course theory to analyse data from a series of four sequential semi-structured interviews conducted between May 2020–February 2021 with adults aged 65+ (n = 12) to explore older adults’ experiences adjusting to the COVID-19 pandemic. We identified three themes: (1) Struggling ‘You realize how much you lost’ describes how older adults lost freedoms, social connections and activities; (2) Adapting ‘whatever happens, happens, I’ll do my best’, revealing how older adults tried to maintain well-being, participation and connection; and (3) Appreciating ‘enjoy what you have’, exploring how older adults found pleasure and contentment. Engagement in meaningful activities and high-quality social interactions supported well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic for older adults. This finding highlights the need for policies and services to promote engagement during longstanding global crises.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-06T12:52:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221105062
       
  • A Comparative Analysis of State Implementation of the Community First
           Choice Program

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      Authors: Lisa Kalimon Beauregard, Edward Alan Miller
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act included Community First Choice (CFC), a new optional Medicaid home and community-based services (HCBS) state plan benefit which states could adopt. Through the CFC program, states can provide expanded home and community-based attendant services and supports to older adults and persons with disabilities. A benefit of CFC is that states receive a higher federal match rate than other HCBS programs. Thus far, eights states have adopted CFC. This comparative case study analysis examines state-level implementation of CFC to identify what facilitated implementation and what created challenges. The results suggest that consulting with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services facilitated implementation while existing programs, insufficient engagement with stakeholders, aggressive timelines, and limited staff resources presented challenges. Based on these findings, states may want to consider how they approach implementing expansions or enhancements to HCBS benefits under the American Rescue Plan Act.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-04T07:44:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221107073
       
  • Factors Associated With Driving Status Among Brazilian Older Adults

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      Authors: Eduardo Hauser, Adriano F. Borgatto, Vandrize Meneghini, Aline R. Barbosa
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study analyzed the factors associated with driving status among older adults in Brazil. The sample consisted of 15,221 older adults (≥65 years) residing in Brazilian capitals in 2018. The following question established the participants’ driving status: “Do you drive a car, motorcycle, and/or another vehicle'” Sociodemographic, health conditions, and health-related behaviors were derived through standard procedures. Poisson regression analysis was performed to estimate prevalence ratios and 95% confidence interval. The prevalence of drivers was 28.83%. We found that being physically active during leisure time and higher daily recreational screen time (>3 h/day) were associated with driving status. Self-perceived negative health and being physically active by commuting showed an inverse association with driving status. The high prevalence of older drivers and the characteristics associated with driving reinforces the importance of public policy strategies for these individuals.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T12:50:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221106764
       
  • The National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care and Hospital Readmission
           Among Skilled Nursing Facility Residents

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      Authors: Sijiu Wang, Helena Temkin-Greener, Yeates Conwell, Shubing Cai
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The National Partnership to Improve Dementia Care in Nursing Homes (i.e., the National Partnership) was launched in March 2012. Using national Medicare, Minimum Data Set, and Nursing Home Compare data in CY 2010–2014, we examined changes in hospital readmissions for older post-acute skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents with Alzheimer’s disease or related dementias (ADRD) following the National Partnership. Using residents without ADRD as reference group to control for concurrent policy and SNF quality changes, we estimated linear probability models to examine the relationship between readmissions and the National Partnership for residents with ADRD, and also stratified the analysis by quality of SNFs. We found a decreasing trend in hospital readmissions over time. The risk of readmissions in residents with ADRD decreased additional 0.3 percentage-points (p < .01) after the launch of the National Partnership. This relationship varied across SNFs with different quality, as it was stronger in high-quality compared to low-quality SNFs.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T05:02:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221102402
       
  • Adult Day Service Use Among Minority Older Adults: Facilitators, Barriers,
           and Outcomes From an Updated Integrative Literature Review Between 2010 to
           2021

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      Authors: Yawen Li, Jinyu Liu, Fei Sun, Ling Xu
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Adult day services (ADS) are one of the more popular long-term care options for racial and ethnic minority older Americans. Focusing on minority older adults, this study aims to (a) identify both the individual and structural/organizational levels factors associated with ADS use and to (b) examine ADS’ effect on health and well-being. Using the integrative review approach of Whittemore and Knafl, we found 14 studies published between 2010 to 2021. Findings concluded that individual-level needs and enabling factors were associated with ADS use and outcomes among minority older adults centered mostly on quality of life. Organizational/structural characteristics of ADS were never empirically examined in relation to service use or health outcomes. Future research should move beyond the individual level to identify and address the impact of the institutional structure, culture and practice on access, quality, and use.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-06-02T01:24:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221106772
       
  • Working With Older Adults in Integrated Health Care: Social Workers’
           Perspective

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      Authors: Suzie S. Weng, Jessica Valenzuela
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Older adults are a rapidly growing segment of the global population; a paucity of research exists on social workers supporting this vulnerable group in integrated health care that focuses on both physical and behavioral health. To fill the gap, this study explored social workers’ perspectives of working with older adults in integrated healthcare settings. Methods: Using qualitative methods, a constant comparison data analysis approach was conducted to identify themes. Results: Themes included: (1) working with and highlighting the unique needs of older adults in integrated health, (2) identifying skills needed for working as a social worker within integrated healthcare settings, (3) supporting patient families, and (4) needing to make decisions on behalf of patients. Discussion: Study findings demonstrate social workers as key members of interdisciplinary team as well as highlight the unique needs, skills, and challenges for working with older adults in integrated healthcare settings.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-31T08:35:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221105266
       
  • Cognitive Stimulation in Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease

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      Authors: Jesús Gonzalez-Moreno, Encarnacion Satorres, Gema Soria-Urios, Juan C. Meléndez
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Cognitive stimulation is one of the non-pharmacological therapies recommended for dementia intervention. The present study evaluated the efficacy of an intervention based on cognitive stimulation in people with moderate Alzheimer’s disease. Fifty-nine subjects with moderate dementia were randomly assigned to the stimulation group (N = 36) and the control group (N = 35). The treatment group received 16 intervention sessions cognitive tasks. All participants were evaluated with a battery of neuropsychological tests at three time points (pre, post, and follow-up). The treatment group showed significant increases in the three domains studied (memory, attention, and executive functions), although some of these effects were not maintained at follow-up. The control group progressively worsened. Cognitive stimulation was found to be an effective intervention for people with moderate Alzheimer’s disease because it helped to maintain memory function, executive functions, and attention. However, the effects were minimized at the 3-month follow-up.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T12:39:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221089283
       
  • Optimizing Post-Acute Care Patient Safety: A Scoping Review of
           Multifactorial Fall Prevention Interventions for Older Adults

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      Authors: Natalie E. Leland, Cara Lekovitch, Jenny Martínez, Stephanie Rouch, Patrick Harding, Carin Wong
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Accidental falls are preventable adverse events for older post-acute care (PAC) patients. Yet, due to the functional and medical care needs of this population, there is little guidance to inform multidisciplinary prevention efforts. This scoping review aims to characterize the evidence for multifactorial PAC fall prevention interventions. Of the 33 included studies, common PAC intervention domains included implementing facility-based strategies (e.g., staff education), evaluating patient-specific fall risk factors (e.g., function), and developing an individualized risk profile and treatment plan that targets the patient’s constellation of fall risk factors. However, there was variability across studies in how and to what extent the domains were addressed. While further research is warranted, health system efforts to prevent accidental falls in PAC should consider a patient-centered multifactorial approach that fosters a culture of safety, addresses individuals’ fall risk, and champions a multidisciplinary team.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T12:35:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104375
       
  • Using the Intersectionality-Based Policy Analysis Framework to Evaluate a
           Policy Supporting Sexual Health and Intimacy in Long-Term Care, Assisted
           Living, Group Homes & Supported Housing

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      Authors: Kate McBride, Marie Carlson, Bethan Everett
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Sexuality is an integral part of being human throughout life. This does not change when moving into long-term care (LTC). However, the sexual health of persons living in LTC is often overlooked. This paper presents an analysis of the recently released health organizational policy: Supporting Sexual Health and Intimacy in Long-Term Care, Assisted Living, Group Homes & Supported Housing. The Intersectionality-Based Policy Analysis Framework is used to outline the policy problem, examine how this policy was developed, and evaluate its potential to address the problem. Key findings are that both the development process and the policy constructs align with principles of intersectionality, such as equity, reflexivity, and diverse knowledges. In conclusion, this analysis suggests this policy is feasible, equitable and could effectively address sexual health for persons living in LTC, while leading to an improved workplace for staff. We recommend that this policy be more widely adopted across Canada.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T10:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221099728
       
  • Book Review: Ageism Unmasked: Exploring Age Bias and How to End It

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      Authors: Mary Ann Erickson
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-26T12:23:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221094921
       
  • With a Little Help From My Friends and Family: Transportation and
           Caregiving Hours

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      Authors: Athena Koumoutzis, Jonathon M. Vivoda, Jiawei Cao
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To better understand the associations between the driving status of the care recipient and caregiver with provided caregiving hours, more research on the relationships between contextual caregiving factors and driving-related behaviors is needed.Method:Using data from Round 7 of the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and the linked National Survey of Caregiving (NSOC; n = 1054 dyads), this study explored how caregiver transportation assistance and care recipient driving frequency are associated with caregiving hours.Results:Caregiving hours were highest among caregivers who provided transportation every day and among care recipients who had not driven in the last month. After controlling for covariates, negative binomial regression results indicated that greater caregiver transportation assistance was related to more caregiving hours, while greater care recipient driving frequency was related to less caregiving hours.Conclusion:Integrated supports and greater accessibility to transportation services may decrease time spent caregiving.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T12:57:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221089624
       
  • The Impact of Supervisor Support on the Job Satisfaction of Immigrant and
           Minority Long-Term Care Workers

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      Authors: Frances M. Hawes, Shuangshuang Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research has demonstrated the effect of supervisor support on the job satisfaction of long-term care workers (LTCW); however, much less is known about how this effect differs among race/ethnicity or immigration groups. We examined how supervisor support mediates the associations between race/ethnicity, immigration status, and job satisfaction among nursing assistants (NAs). Data of 2749 NAs were extracted from the National Nursing Assistant Survey (2004). Findings indicated that NAs of non-Hispanic Black and other races and immigrant workers were more likely to be satisfied with their jobs compared to White and non-immigrant workers, and the associations were mediated by NAs’ perceived supervisor support. Minority or immigrant LTCW may be more sensitive to supervisory support and more grateful if they received support from supervisors. Managers should be aware of these racial differences and by being supportive they may improve NAs job satisfaction and reduce turnover rates.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T08:02:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104088
       
  • Factors of Functional Disability in the Social Participation of Older
           Adults Living Alone With Fall Experience

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      Authors: SuJung Jung, Sunghee H. Tak
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The fall experiences of older adults living alone lead to restrictions in their social participation. This study aimed to examine the factors that influence functional disability in social participation (FSP) among older adults who live alone and have experienced falls. This study used secondary data of 493 older adults living alone who experienced a fall, which were collected from the 2017 National Survey of Older Koreans. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed. Factors, such as old age, sex, economic status, frequency of drinking, and number of acquaintances, significantly related to functional disability in terms of social participation. In addition, poor muscle strength, depression, and cognitive decline comprised predictors of FSP. The findings of this study revealed that it is important to comprehensively evaluate the social participation of older adults who live alone and have experienced falls.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T03:22:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104791
       
  • Collecting Information on Caregivers’ Financial Well-Being: A Document
           Review of Federal Surveys in Canada

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      Authors: Husayn Marani, Sara Allin
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Population-based surveys conducted by governments inform strategies concerning emergent areas of policy interest. One such area is unpaid caregiving in the context of an aging population. In the Canadian and global contexts, research suggests a need for public financial support to mitigate financial risks of caregiving. In this document analysis, we reviewed 17 federal surveys since 2005 to understand how caregiving-related information is captured. We found that caregiving-related questions were largely derived from two surveys, the General Social Survey and the Canadian Community Health Survey. However, gaps exist concerning questions related to estimates of private care expenditure, and the impacts of older adult caregiving across domains of financial risk (income, productivity, and healthcare utilization). Addressing these gaps, either through revising existing surveys or a new national survey on unpaid caregiving, may improve meaningful assessments about risks and impacts of caregiving, which may better inform public strategies that offset these risks.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T11:17:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221099279
       
  • Critical Questions for Aging Societies

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      Authors: Pam Wiener
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-21T10:47:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221091973
       
  • Patterns of Home and Community Based Service Use by Beneficiaries Enrolled
           in the Pennsylvania Medicaid Aging Waiver

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      Authors: Raymond Van Cleve, Howard B Degenholtz
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This study examines multiple services are used across a population and the association between type and amount of services use with level of disability and living arrangement.Methods:This is a descriptive cross-sectional analysis examining HCBS use among older Pennsylvanians from 2014 to 2016 enrolled in Pennsylvania’s 1915(c) waiver program. Data were derived from Medicaid claims. Logistic regression and OLS regression were used to examine the association between service use and level of disability, controlling for age, gender, race, and other covariates.Results:People with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia were more likely to use adult day care. People with higher ADL and IADL limitations were more likely to use higher amounts of PAS and less likely to have delivered meals.Conclusions:These findings demonstrate HCBS is a complex package of services that are allocated regarding the level of need and resources available to individual program participants.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T12:16:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221094578
       
  • Unmet Caregiving Needs Among Sepsis Survivors Receiving Home Health Care:
           The Need for Caregiver Training

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      Authors: Julia G. Burgdorf, Jo-Ana D. Chase, Christina Whitehouse, Kathryn H. Bowles
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Unmet needs for family caregiver assistance threaten patient outcomes during Medicare home health care (HHC). Sepsis survivors represent a growing proportion of the HHC patient population, but little is known regarding their risk for unmet caregiving needs. We describe prevalence and underlying cause of unmet caregiving needs for sepsis survivors receiving HHC, using HHC patient assessment data for 85,851 older sepsis survivors receiving post-acute HHC in 2013–2014. Unmet caregiving needs were most common for assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) (28%) and medication administration (27%). Caregivers’ need for training accounted for more than three-fourths of all unmet caregiving needs. Those who experienced decline/no improvement in cognitive function were more likely to experience unmet caregiving needs. Findings highlight the potential value of expanding family caregiver training to improve HHC outcomes for sepsis survivors and indicate that caregivers of sepsis survivors with poor cognitive function may benefit most.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T09:44:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104084
       
  • Evaluation of Telephone-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation Services Delivered to
           Adults 65 and Older During the Early Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Nicholas Ownbey, Jeff Soukup, Elizabeth Fugate-Whitlock, Tina M. K. Newsham
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of a hybrid, telephone-based cardiac rehabilitation (TBCR) program implemented early in the COVID-19 pandemic compared with in-person, center-based programming offered prior to the pandemic. The focus was on older adults’ engagement and outcomes. Matched groups of hybrid and in-person cardiac rehabilitation (CR) participants were created from existing data and compared using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. Qualitative interviews were conducted with participating CR staff then transcribed, coded, and analyzed for key themes. There were significant differences in body mass index and weight from pre-to post-CR within both hybrid and in-person groups. Despite this, CR staff believed exercise adherence was reduced in the hybrid group when compared to those in the in-person program. In the future, TBCR should be considered as an adjunct to in-person CR. Reluctance to prescribe exercise needs to be addressed through CR staff training.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T07:25:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104380
       
  • Approaches to Serving Rural Older Adults in State Plans on Aging: A Policy
           Content Evaluation

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      Authors: Carrie Henning-Smith, Mary Anne Powell, Megan Lahr
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Every state is required to submit a State Plan on Aging describing how it will use resources from the Older Americans Act (OAA), including a section specific to serving rural older adults. This paper describes a policy content evaluation of all 50 State Plans on Aging, focusing on Section 307(a)(10), which describes how states will serve rural older adults. We identified the most common and innovative approaches to using OAA funds to serve rural older adults across states. The most common information included about using OAA funds to serve rural older adults was describing the funding formula used to allocate resources. However, states varied in their definition of rural and in the details of their funding formulas. A minority of states also described additional approaches to serving rural older adults, including prioritizing Black, Indigenous, or rural residents of color; outreach; and targeted service delivery.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T04:29:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221104085
       
  • “Can Everyday Assistive Technologies Provide Meaningful Support to
           Persons With Dementia and Their Informal Caregivers' Evaluation of
           Collaborative Community Program”

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      Authors: Lora Warner, LaReina Tipping
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      One of the most challenging caregiving roles today is providing informal care to an individual with dementia. A new program, “AT-Home with Dementia,” was created by three collaborative social service agencies to offer simple assistive technologies to persons with dementia and their informal caregivers. Staff, equipped with a traveling kit of everyday devices, offered items during home visits to enhance memory, functional activities, safety, and comfort of persons with dementia. A limited formative program review led to improvements in the new program’s reach, service delivery, and data. The results showed that the program enhanced the home environment of the caregiving dyad and led to greater independence of persons with dementia (PWD) and self-assurance among caregivers. Existing community agencies may refer to this program to serve individuals with early-stage dementia. Finally, community agencies and funders may consider adapting this program to provide support to the informal care providers and PWD.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T06:35:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221101041
       
  • Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Older Adult Driving in the United
           States

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      Authors: Marian E. Betz, Nicole R. Fowler, S. Duke Han, Linda L. Hill, Rachel L. Johnson, Lauren Meador, Faris Omeragic, Ryan A. Peterson, Carolyn DiGuiseppi
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:To examine how the COVID-19 pandemic affected driving and health outcomes in older adults.Methods:We compared Advancing Understanding of Transportation Options (AUTO) study participants enrolled before (December 2019 to March 2020) versus during the pandemic (May 2020 to June 2021). Participants were English-speaking, licensed drivers (≥70 years) who drove weekly and had a primary care provider at a study site and ≥1 medical condition potentially associated with driving cessation. We used baseline self-reported measures on mobility and health.Results:Compared to those enrolled pre-COVID-19 (n = 61), more participants enrolled during COVID-19 (n = 240) reported driving reductions (26% vs. 70%, p < .001) and more often for personal preference (vs. medical/emotional reasons). While mean social isolation was higher during than pre-COVID-19, self-reported depression, stress, and overall health PROMIS scores did not differ significantly.Discussion:Our findings highlight the resiliency of some older adults and have implications for mitigating the negative effects of driving cessation.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T11:14:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221091556
       
  • Finding the Balance: Embracing the Two-Eyed Seeing Approach to Understand
           what Cultural Safety in Care Means to Older Adults Living with HIV

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      Authors: Anna Vorobyova, Antonio Marante, Claudette Cardinal, Patience Magagula, Sharyle Lyndon, McKenzie Braley, Kathleen Inglis, Surita Parashar
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Older adults living with HIV (OALHIV) are a fast-growing demographic who rely on home and community care (HCC) services. Cultural safety (an environment free of racism that fosters feelings of safety and respect) is integral to HCC services. We conducted 27 semi-structured interviews with OALHIV in Vancouver, British Columbia about their HCC experiences. Excerpts about cultural safety were qualitatively analyzed using Two-Eyed Seeing. Our themes—Voices from across Turtle Island, Voices from the African continent, Western Perspectives, and Universal Principles—indicate that cultural safety is important yet lacking. While specific aspects of culturally safe HCC services varied between and within cultural groups, some aspects were shared by participants across groups (e.g., respect, compassion, and non-judgment).
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-18T06:25:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221100803
       
  • A Legal Mapping Analysis and Model Bylaw of Massachusetts Municipal
           Accessory Dwelling Units

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      Authors: Travis M. Gagen
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Adapting the built-environment to include an accessory-dwelling unit (ADU) is one alternative housing solution for community-dwelling older adults (CDOA) to age-in-place and avoid institutionalization. ADUs are one form of the built-environment in which the field of public health law can intervene to accommodate population aging. Under Massachusetts law MGL c. 40A, the state gives authority to municipalities to adopt zoning bylaws to regulate the use of land, buildings, and structures. A legal mapping content analysis was employed to quantify Massachusetts municipalities’ (N=351) ADU zoning ordinances using the ADU Friendliness Score instrument and to describe the characteristics of ADU availability across the state. Results are organized into four ordinal categories of POOR (score 0–24; 24%), FAIR (score 25–49; 8.5%), GOOD (score 50–74; 53%), and EXCELLENT (score 75–100%; 13.5%). An age-and-disability specific model ADU bylaw is reported as an outcome of this research.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-17T02:57:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221102140
       
  • Individual and program Characteristics May Drive Variability in Outcomes
           After Caregivers Participate in a Tailored Support Intervention

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      Authors: Megan Shepherd-Banigan, Kelley A. Jones, Caitlin Sullivan, Ke Wang, Amy G. Clark, Courtney Van Houtven, Jennifer M. Olsen
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Critically needed programs designed to support family caregivers have shown inconsistent reductions in stress and burden. To explore drivers of improvement in caregiver outcomes after participation in a support intervention we analyzed data from a one-on-one, tailored problem-solving intervention targeting caregiver wellbeing (2015–2019, n = 503). We explored data patterns across 21 individual, household, and program-level variables using elastic net regression to identify drivers of improvements, and their relative importance. Baseline subjective burden, baseline depressive symptom scores, baseline caregiver problem solving, African American race, and site and coach fixed effects were the most consistent drivers of changes across the explored caregiver outcomes. Caregiver and program characteristics may be promising avenues to target to decrease distress and burden during intervention design. Interventions focusing on highly distressed caregivers may lead to greater improvements. More research is needed to identify how site or interventionists characteristics drive positive intervention effects.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221091564
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccinations and Anxiety in Middle-Aged and Older Jews and Arabs
           in Israel: The Moderating Roles of Ethnicity and Subjective Age

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      Authors: Yoav S. Bergman, Yuval Palgi, Boaz Ben-David, Ehud Bodner
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Subjective age (i.e., feeling younger/older than one’s chronological age) plays a significant role in older minority group members’ psychological well-being. In light of the importance of vaccinations for fighting COVID-19, it is unclear whether ethnicity and subjective age moderate the connection between receiving COVID-19 vaccinations and anxiety in Israel. Jewish (n = 198) and Arab older adults (n = 84) provided information regarding COVID-19 vaccinations, subjective age, and anxiety symptoms, as well as additional socio-demographic and COVID-19-related health factors (age range= 40–100, M = 62.5, SD = 12.34). Results demonstrated that feeling older was associated with increased anxiety (p < .001) and that vaccinations were linked to increased anxiety among Jews (p < .05). Moreover, the association between COVID-19 vaccinations and anxiety was significant only among Jewish participants with an older subjective age (p < .05). We stress the importance of examining cultural diversities regarding the contribution of subjective age in the context of COVID-19 and psychological well-being.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T10:29:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221092029
       
  • “What Matters Most' Intersectional Correlates of Caregiver
           Burdens”

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      Authors: Nytasia M. Hicks, Sherrill L. Sellers, Jinghua Zhang, Na Sun, Karleah Harris
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Increasing numbers of older adults require caregiver support from unpaid caregivers. Yet, there is limited research on caregiver burden type and interactions across race, gender, and other sociodemographic characteristics. This quantitative study uses an intersectional framework to examine associations between caregiving burden and sociodemographic factors. Using survey data from the National Survey of Caregiving the sample included unpaid caregivers (N = 1304) of older adult (65+) Medicare beneficiaries. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed that over 40% of the respondents reported emotional difficulties. Correlates to emotional difficulties included race, gender, age, and income with an age by income interaction. For physical difficulties, gender, age, work, and education mattered most, with an age by education interaction. Age and income predicted financial difficulties without interactions. Findings suggest that policymakers target emotional and physical difficulties, attend to age and socioeconomic status, and address the unique challenges faced in midlife by caregivers.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T04:52:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221100227
       
  • Addressing the Experiences of Family Caregivers of Older Adults During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic in Finland

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      Authors: Roosa-Maria Savela, Tarja Välimäki, Irma Nykänen, Sohvi Koponen, Anna Liisa Suominen, Ursula Schwab
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This cross-sectional study assessed the experiences of family caregivers of older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants were recruited (n = 101) between April and December 2019. We applied a mixed-method approach. Quantitative data were analyzed using an independent samples t-test and logistic regression analysis, and qualitative experiences with modified thematic content analysis. The mean age of the family caregivers was 76 years (SD = 7), and 72% were females. Experiences of loneliness and worry during the pandemic were evaluated by self-assessment. Approximately one-third of the participants reported loneliness and worry. These experiences were further associated with female sex, increased psychological distress and depressive symptoms, and decreased physical condition and social relationships. Family caregivers were also worried about the pandemic’s impact on health and well-being. Thus, the COVID-19 pandemic has added an extra psychosocial load to family caregivers. The post-pandemic era requires increased attention to re-evaluating policies and services.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:22:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221095510
       
  • Driving, Social Distancing, Protective, and Coping Behaviors of Older
           Adults Before and During COVID-19

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      Authors: Catherine M. Roe, Sayeh Bayet, Jamie Hicks, Ann M Johnson, Samantha Murphy, Jason M. Doherty, Ganesh M. Babulal
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      A thorough understanding of individual characteristics of older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic is critical for managing the ongoing pandemic course and planning for the future pandemics. Here, we explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on driving, social distancing, protective, and coping behaviors of older adults. This study reports data on participants aged above 65 whose driving behaviors are being monitored using Global Positioning System (GPS) devices. Participants completed a COVID-19 survey in May 2020. We found that older adults decreased their number of days driving, number of trips per day, as well as average driving speed, and had fewer speeding incidents following COVID-19 onset. We also show that female and African American older adults engaged in more positive coping and cleaning behaviors, and had greater decreases in the number of days driving during the pandemic. The findings highlight the importance of considering older adults’ individual characteristics for an equitable response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221093851
       
  • Is it a Macho Thing' Older Adults’ Perceptions of Gender Differences
           inFall Prevention Class Participation

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      Authors: Catherine Arnold, Joel Lanovaz, Danelle Banman
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Perceptions that women are in greater need of fall prevention might impact their participation in programs. This study aimed to understand gender differences in motivating factors and experiences in a fall prevention program. Thirty-four adults (18 men and 16 women) aged 60 years or older participated in focus groups after 12 weeks of fall prevention exercises and education. Six main themes emerged. It might be a macho thing represented an overarching theme of why men might not participate in fall prevention as readily as women. Personal experience as a motivator, Get my balance back, and Challenges/Successes were common themes for men and women. Both genders realized the benefits of the program; however, men emphasized the importance of personal outcomes (Being part of something bigger), whereas women highlighted group outcomes (Socialization). These findings can guide the future messaging and marketing of fall prevention programs for older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:22:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221095623
       
  • Low-Threshold Testing for SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) in Long-Term Care
           Facilities Early in the First Pandemic Wave, the Twente Region, the
           Netherlands: A Possible Factor in Reducing Morbidity and Mortality

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      Authors: Felix Geeraedts, Mariska Luttje, Jan Visschedijk, Monique van Hattem, Henk-Jan Hasper, Roy Kohnen, Rene Loman, Rudi de Goede, Desiré Jansen, Dorine Hess, Nashwan al Naiemi
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a shortage of SARS-CoV-2 diagnostic tests, and testing patients with mild symptoms (low-threshold testing) was not recommended in the Netherlands. Despite these guidelines, to protect those who were most at risk, low-threshold testing was advocated and offered to the majority of long-term care institutions in the Twente region. In this manner, 144 healthcare workers and 96 residents tested SARS-CoV-2-positive and were isolated before the same service was provided nationwide by public health services. Strikingly, excess mortality rate in the Twente region 1 month after the introduction of this strategy was found to be 62%–89% lower than that in neighboring regions, which may be explained by this divergent testing strategy. In an emerging pandemic, early implementation of a liberal testing policy may be more effective than restricted testing in settings with a high death rate.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:21:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221093050
       
  • Exploring Coping Strategies and Barriers in Dementia Care: A Mixed-Methods
           Study of African American Family Caregivers in Kentucky

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      Authors: Sunshine M. Rote, Heehyul E. Moon, Allison M. Kacmar, Sharon Moore
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores coping strategies and barriers to dementia care experienced by African American dementia caregivers in Kentucky. Utilizing a convergent mixed-method design integrating focus group and survey data on African American dementia caregivers recruited through churches in Kentucky (N = 28), we elucidate three coping strategies: love-based coping, religion-based coping, and family support. Results from survey data supported these themes, with over 90% of participants reporting that they provide care to give back to family members and for religious reasons. However, over half of the caregivers’ reported strain due to three barriers identified by focus group data: time constraints, low support, and the high cost of formal care. This exploratory study highlights the importance of intervention tactics for African American dementia caregivers that focus not only on individual and family support but also community-based outreach and support.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:20:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221093618
       
  • Resilience and Mental Health Among Regularly and Intermittently Active
           Older Adults: Results From a Four-Year Longitudinal Study

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      Authors: Maria Priscila Wermelinger Ávila, Jimilly Caputo Corrêa, Maria Clara de Castro Furtado Zaidem, Matheus Venancio Passos, Ana Paula Sena Lomba Vasconcelos, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, Giancarlo Lucchetti
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Background:This study aims to investigate whether regularly active individuals have different levels of mental health and resilience compared to intermittently active individuals.Methods:In this 4-year longitudinal study, 180 older people were included. General linear models were used to assess the level of physical activity, psychological resilience, and mental health among regularly and intermittently active older adults.Results:Those who maintained regular physical activity were more resilient than those who did not. However, no differences were observed for mental health outcomes. Although those with higher levels of resilience had fewer mental health problems, there were no significant differences between the groups based on their level of physical activity.Conclusion:Differences in resilience levels favoring regularly active individuals were found. In both groups, resilience was inversely associated with mental health problems. These findings may help elucidate the underlying mechanisms in the relationship between physical activity and health outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:20:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221095075
       
  • Purpose in Life and Cognition Interact to Impact Healthcare and Financial
           Decision Making in Old Age

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      Authors: Christopher C. Stewart, Lei Yu, Crystal M. Glover, David A. Bennett, Robert S. Wilson, Patricia A. Boyle
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Little is known about the contribution of positive psychological factors, such as purpose in life, to healthcare and financial decision making in aging. Here, we examined the relationship between purpose and decision making and tested the hypothesis that purpose benefits decision making, particularly when cognition is limited. Methods: Participants were 1081 community-based older adults without dementia. Healthcare and financial decision making was measured via a 12-item performance-based instrument. Purpose was measured via a 10-item scale. Results: In a linear regression model adjusted for age, sex, and education, higher global cognition was associated with better performance on the decision making measure, as expected. Purpose was not directly related to decision making. However, the interaction of purpose with cognition was significant, such that greater purpose was associated with better decision making among persons with lower cognition. Discussion: Purpose in life may promote better decision making among older adults with lower cognition.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:20:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221095514
       
  • Many Paths to Recovery: Comparing Basic Function and Participation in
           High-Functioning Older Adults After Acute Hospitalization

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      Authors: Maya Arieli, Rachel Kizony, Efrat Gil, Maayan Agmon
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Function after acute hospitalization is mostly operationalized by Basic Activities of Daily Living (BADL), a limited concept that overshadows a wide range of instrumental, social, and recreational activities, otherwise referred to as participation. Participation is important for patients’ health and quality of life after hospitalization. This study focuses on high-functioning older adults, examining functional recovery after hospitalization by comparing BADL assessment with assessment of participation at one and three months following discharge relative to pre-hospitalization. Quantitative data were collected from 72 participants divided into two age groups of hospitalized older adults (age 65–74, n = 38; age ≥75, n = 34), followed by home visits after 1 month and telephone interviews 3 months after discharge. Both groups experienced a significantly greater decline in participation, compared with BADL, which were mostly preserved. A comprehensive assessment of participation better captures functional changes in high-functioning older adults. Early identification of participation withdrawal is crucial for preventing disability.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:19:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221089481
       
  • What Role Does Geragogy Play in the Delivery of Digital Skills Programs
           for Middle and Older Age Adults' A Systematic Narrative Review

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      Authors: Jessica R. Gates, Gemma Wilson-Menzfeld
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This systematic narrative review aimed to explore the implementation and delivery of digital skills programs for middle and older age adults; and understand the presence of adult learning theory (namely, geragogy/critical geragogy) in their delivery. A database search was undertaken to examine international literature, published between 2010 and 2020. From 1,713 papers identified during the database searches, 17 papers were included. Thematic synthesis was used to analyze the papers in this review. Themes were generated relating to the implementation and delivery of digital skills programs: negative perceptions of aging; the learning environment; and value of technology. The role of geragogy/critical geragogy is not explicit in the delivery of digital skills programs in this review but has an underlying thread of empowerment and embodies the ethos of these learning theories to some extent. The findings of this review have been used to develop recommendations for delivering digital skills to older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T09:19:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221091236
       
  • Functional Limitations and Access to Long-Term Services and Supports Among
           Sexual Minority Older Adults

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      Authors: Jasmine L. Travers, Tetyana P. Shippee, Jason D. Flatt, Billy A. Caceres
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objective: Little is known about sexual minority (SM) older adults’ activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) limitations and their subsequent access to long-term services and supports (LTSS). Methods: We analyzed cross-sectional data from the 2016 Health and Retirement Study limited to individuals ≥50 years old. Bivariate analyses were performed to examine 1) sexual identity differences in the prevalence of ADL/IADL limitations and 2) associations of sexual identity with having ADL/IADL limitations and having access to help with ADL/IADL limitations. Results: Our sample consisted of 3833 older adults, 6% (n = 213) were SM. Compared to heterosexual participants, bisexual older adults had greater reports of ADL/IADL limitations (20.9% vs. 35.9%, p = 0.013). Among those who reported having ADL/IADL limitations (n = 803), there were no sexual identity differences in accessing help for ADL/IADL limitations (p = .901). Discussion: Our findings contribute to the limited research on LTSS access among SM older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T09:04:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221099006
       
  • Competing Risk Analysis of Time to Communal Residence for Elder Orphans

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      Authors: Regina Roofeh, Sean A. P. Clouston, Dylan M. Smith
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Elder Orphans, socially/physically isolated older adults without caregiving support, are of interest in an aging population. Lack of caregivers for Elder Orphans may influence relocation to residential care facilities, including skilled nursing or assisted living facilities, compared to aging in place. Using the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), Competing Risk Survival Analyses were performed to determine if Elder Orphans or those At Risk for becoming elder orphans had increased risk for residential care relocation over nine NHATS waves (2011–2019). Elder Orphans had significantly higher risk for moving to residential care facilities in unadjusted (SHR = 1.780; p = 0.001) and adjusted (SHR = 1.571; p = 0.043) models. Those At Risk for becoming an elder orphan had significantly decreased risk for residential care residence in unadjusted (SHR = 0.517; p < 0.001) and adjusted (SHR = 0.726; p = 0.037) models. As aging in place becomes prioritized in the US healthcare system, understanding caregiving needs of older adults is vital to their health outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-10T01:26:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221098994
       
  • Will Downward Intergenerational Housing Support Increase Parents’
           Expectations for Old-Age Care from Adult Children' Evidence from China
           

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      Authors: Zequn Tang, Ning Wang
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Toward a background of young people’s decreasing housing affordability and parents’ increasing involvement in intergenerational housing support, this study investigates how such support influences parents’ expectation of future care from adult children. Using data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, we found that, in general, middle-aged/older adults who provided adult children financial housing support were more likely to expect old-age care from them. The help-receiving child was more likely to be an expected caregiver than the other children in multi-children families. Moreover, the reciprocal relationship was most prominent among the 1950s cohort, compared with the pre-1950s and the post-1950s cohorts. Our study broadly contributes to understanding how modernization reshapes intergenerational relationships and family members’ expectations of commitments toward each other. It also informs the design of a comprehensive multi-level care system for older adults in China.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T07:14:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221099001
       
  • Social Exclusion Among Older Rural Residents in China: Does Either
           Non-Agricultural Work or Living Away from Their Hometowns over the Courses
           of Their Lives Make any Difference'

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      Authors: Maodi Xu, Zhixin Feng
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This paper analyses the prevalence of social exclusion experienced by older rural residents in China and investigates the impact of work and residence history on rural residents’ social exclusion in later life. Data are from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). Logistic regression models are used. Results show that rural males with non-agricultural work experience are less likely to experience exclusion from social participation, financial products and common consumer goods and report perceived exclusion than those who have only engaged in agricultural work over their life course. However, no significant associations between work history and the five domains of social exclusion were found among rural females. The change in place of residence itself leads to higher levels of perceived exclusion for both males and females. Policymakers should focus on promoting social participation and the psychological health for return migrants, particular for rural females.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-06T01:32:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221097690
       
  • The Need for Stability in Paid Dementia Care: Family Caregiver
           Perspectives

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      Authors: Jennifer M. Reckrey, Sasha Perez, Deborah Watman, Katherine A. Ornstein, David Russell, Emily Franzosa
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Paid caregivers (e.g., home health aides, home care workers) provide essential care to people with dementia living at home; this study explored family caregiver perspectives on the role and impact of paid caregivers in home-based dementia care. We conducted semi-structured interviews with family caregivers (n = 15) of people with advanced dementia who received long-term paid care at home in New York between October 2020 and December 2020. We found that given the vulnerability resulting from advanced dementia, family caregivers prioritized finding the “right” paid caregivers and valued continuity in the individual providing care. The stable paid care that resulted improved outcomes for both the person with advanced dementia (e.g., eating better) and their family (e.g., ability to work). Those advocating for high quality, person-centered dementia care should partner with policymakers and home care agencies to promote the stability of well-matched paid caregivers for people with advanced dementia living at home.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T06:34:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221097692
       
  • A Matched Cohort Analysis for Examining the Association Between Slow Gait
           Speed and Shortened Longevity in Older Americans

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      Authors: Brenda M. McGrath, Pamela Jo Johnson, Ryan McGrath, Peggy M. Cawthon, Lukus Klawitter, Bong-Jin Choi
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This investigation examined the association between slow gait speed, as defined with newly established cut-points, and all-cause mortality in older Americans with a matched cohort analysis. The analytic sample included 10,259 Americans aged ≥65 years from the 2006–2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. Walking speed was measured in participant residences. Slow gait speed cut-points of
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T12:49:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221092399
       
  • The Stability of Nursing Home Residents’ Ratings of Importance of
           Recreation Preferences Over One Year

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      Authors: Allison R. Heid, Katherine M. Abbott, Michael J. Rovine, Karen Eshraghi, Caroline Madrigal, Victoria Crumbie, Kimberly Van Haitsma
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Long-term stability of nursing home (NH) residents’ everyday preference remains unknown. We examined 1-year stability in reports of importance of 34-recreational activity preferences (8-MDS 3.0 Section F items; 26-Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory-NH items) by NH residents (N = 161). We examined mean differences on demographic and clinical characteristics of residents for preferences showing change. Importance ratings of preferences were highly stable over 1-year, with 91% of items retaining the same valence of importance for the majority of the sample (
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T12:49:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221089239
       
  • If You Ask Them, They Will Support: A National Study of Local Initiatives
           Developed to Provide Social Care to Older Adults in the Community

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      Authors: Athena Koumoutzis, Jennifer Heston-Mullins, Pamela S. Mayberry, Robert Applebaum
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives:Some communities across the nation are utilizing alternative funding sources to better support home and community-based services for older adults.Methods:A variety of methods identified local initiatives across the United States. An online survey was distributed to a total of 377 communities in 15 states identified as using locally raised funds to provide aging services, yielding a 55% response rate.Results:Total funding from programs generated almost 400 million dollars annually with funding ranging from $8000-$47 million. Commonly provided services with local funds include home-delivered and congregate meals, transportation, and homemaker services with provision varying by the size of the levy initiative. Additionally, six in 10 initiatives reported local funds being used to provide at least one family or friend caregiver service.Conclusion:Locally-funded initiatives fill a gap in long-term services needs for older adults, yet policy concerns regarding potential inequities across states and communities warrant attention.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T12:48:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221090945
       
  • Factors Associated With Contracting Between Area Agencies on Aging and
           Health Care Entities

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      Authors: Amanda L. Brewster, Traci L. Wilson, Suzanne R. Kunkel, Leslie A. Curry, Chris Rubeo
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Contracting with health care entities offers an avenue for Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) to be reimbursed for providing services that improve health and avoid the need for expensive health care among older adults. However, we have little systematic evidence about the organizational characteristics and policy environments that facilitate these contractual relationships. Using survey data on AAAs from 2017–18, we found that contracting with health insurers was significantly more likely if AAAs had strong business capabilities and access to a state CBO contracting network. AAA contracting with health care delivery organizations trended with different factors, becoming more likely if states had implemented more integrated health care delivery programs, and becoming less likely if states had managed long-term services and supports. Contracting could be facilitated by supports for AAA business capabilities, as well as state policies that increase demand for their services among health insurers and health care delivery organizations.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T05:22:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221096137
       
  • Exploration of Demographic Differences in Past and Anticipated Future Care
           Experiences of Older Sexual Minority Adults

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      Authors: Mekiayla C. Singleton, Susan M. Enguidanos
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Care experiences of sexual minority (SM) adults are largely characterized by the need for receiving care and providing care to their chosen family. This is due, in part, to the lack of family and social support and higher rates of health disparities. Using data from the “Maintaining Dignity: Understanding and Responding to the Challenges Facing Older LGBT Americans” AARP survey (N = 1694), we examined factors associated with past and anticipated future care experiences among older SMs. Older SM individuals reported high rates of providing care (70%), anticipating future provision of care (71%), and needing care from a loved one (73%). Being older, identifying as female, and having a disability were highly associated with past care experiences. Being female, being in a relationship, and having better self-rated health were highly associated with future anticipated care experiences. These outcomes indicate the importance of having services that are inclusive in serving the SM community.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T04:29:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221098996
       
  • Impact on the Nutritional and Functional Status of Older Mexican Adults in
           the Absence of Recreational Activities due to COVID-19: A Longitudinal
           Study From 2018 to 2021

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      Authors: Jaime Alberto Bricio-Barrios, Mónica Ríos-Silva, Miguel Huerta, Rosa Yolitzy Cárdenas-María, Alondra Elizabeth García-Ibáñez, María Guadalupe Díaz-Mendoza, Héctor Mariano Jiménez-Leal, Liz Argelia Chávez-Torres, Liliana Islas-Piza, Shelem García-García, Mario del Toro-Equihua, Ricardo García-Rodríguez, Karla Berenice Carrazco-Peña, Fátima López-Alcaraz, Xóchitl Trujillo
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      A longitudinal study, from 2018 to 2021, identified impacts on the nutritional and functional status of older adults when face-to-face activities at a social assistance center in Mexico were suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 71 older adults were evaluated at three different periods: 18 months prior, three months before the pandemic, and 12 months after the onset of the pandemic. Seventy-one older adults completed follow up. Anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, physical tests, and health screening for malnutrition, dependence, and physical frailty, were evaluated. There was a significant decrease in lean body mass and body water in the older adults assessed, in addition to a significant reduction in the frailty scale and gait speed. Finally, a significant reduction in ingested energy and several nutrients such as protein, and carbohydrates, was found, yet an increase in sugar and cholesterol intake was noted.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T04:09:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221099278
       
  • Characteristics and Quality of Diagnostic and Risk Prediction Models for
           Frailty in Older Adults: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Yinyan Gao, Yancong Chen, Mingyue Hu, Ting Gan, Xuemei Sun, Zixuan Zhang, Wenbo He, Irene X. Y. Wu
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Several prediction models for frailty in older adults have been published, but their characteristics and methodological quality are unclear. This review aims to summarize and critically appraise the prediction models. Studies describing multivariable prediction models for frailty among older adults were included. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and PsycINFO were searched from outset to Feb 21, 2021. Methodological and reporting quality of included models were evaluated by PROBAST and TRIPOD, respectively. All results were descriptively summarized. Twenty articles including 39 models were identified. The included models showed good predictive discrimination with C indices ranging from 0.70 to 0.98. However, all studies except one were assessed as high risk of bias mainly due to inappropriate analysis; meanwhile, poor reporting quality was also frequently observed. Few mature prediction models can be used in practice. Researchers should pay more attention to external validation and improving the quality both in methodology and reporting.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-02T07:27:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221097084
       
  • The Resilience Divide Among Older Adults Under Uncertainty: A Positive
           Sociological Study of Life Satisfaction During the COVID-19 Crisis

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      Authors: Satoshi Araki
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      While recent research has detected older adults’ resilience during the global pandemic, its unequal distribution is inadequately examined. Using the panel survey data in Japan (N = 3,725), this positive sociological study investigated who were more/less resilient under COVID-19, with attention to the heterogeneity in life satisfaction (LS). It was first confirmed that older adults’ LS had substantially improved during the pandemic, indicating their resilience on average. However, the multinomial logistic regression and the fixed effects model revealed that the shift in LS was associated with age, gender, income, family/social relationships, and heath in a nuanced way. This suggests, while older adults who have access to economic, social, and health-related resources can maintain/enhance their LS under the global crisis, those without such assets face the risk of being penalized. In these uncertain times, it is therefore imperative to shed light on the resilience divide among older adults alongside their average strength.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-26T07:01:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221089284
       
  • Vaccine and Psychological Booster: Factors Associated With Older Adults’
           Compliance to the Booster COVID-19 Vaccine in Israel

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      Authors: Boaz M. Ben-David, Shoshi Keisari, Yuval Palgi
      First page: 1636
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Israel became the first country to offer the booster COVID-19 vaccination. The study tested for the first time the role of sense of control (SOC) due to vaccinations, trust and vaccination hesitancy (VH), and their association with compliance to the booster COVID-19 vaccine among older adults, during the first 2 weeks of the campaign. 400 Israeli citizens (≥ 6 years old), eligible for the booster vaccine, responded online. They completed demographics, self-reports, and booster vaccination status (already vaccinated, booked-a-slot, vaccination intent, and vaccination opposers). Multinomial logistic regression was conducted with pseudo R2 = .498. Higher SOC and lower VH were related to the difference between early and delayed vaccination (booked-a-slot, OR = 0.7 [0.49‐0.99]; 2.2 [1.32‐3.62], intent OR = 0.6 [0.42‐0.98]; 2.7 [1.52‐4.86]), as well as to rejection (OR = 0.3 [0.11‐0.89]; 8.5 [3.39‐21.16]). Increased trust was only related to the difference between early vaccinations and vaccine rejection (OR = 0.3 [0.11‐0.89]). We suggest that SOC, as well as low VH, can be used as positive motivators, encouraging earlier vaccinations in older age.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-05T07:20:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221081982
       
  • Southeastern United States Predictors of COVID-19 in Nursing Homes

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      Authors: Sandi J. Lane, Maggie Sugg, Trent J. Spaulding, Adam Hege, Lakshmi Iyer
      First page: 1641
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study’s aim was to determine nursing home (NH) and county-level predictors of COVID-19 outbreaks in nursing homes (NHs) in the southeastern region of the United States across three time periods. NH-level data compiled from census data and from NH compare and NH COVID-19 infection datasets provided by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services cover 2951 NHs located in 836 counties in nine states. A generalized linear mixed-effect model with a random effect was applied to significant factors identified in the final stepwise regression. County-level COVID-19 estimates and NHs with more certified beds were predictors of COVID-19 outbreaks in NHs across all time periods. Predictors of NH cases varied across the time periods with fewer community and NH variables predicting COVID-19 in NH during the late period. Future research should investigate predictors of COVID-19 in NH in other regions of the US from the early periods through March 2021.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T12:50:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221082022
       
  • Technology Learning and the Adoption of Telehealth Among
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults During the COVID-19 Outbreak

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      Authors: Weidi Qin
      First page: 1651
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The present study aims to examine changes in the prevalence of telehealth utilization in older adults before and during the COVID-19 outbreak, and to investigate the relationship between learning a new technology and the adoption of telehealth during the outbreak. The study sample came from the National Health and Aging Trend Study COVID-19 Supplement (N=1769). The adoption of telehealth was assessed for utilization of emails and video calls to communicate with healthcare providers. Logistic regressions were performed to test the study aims. The findings showed that older adults substantially increased the utilization of telehealth during the outbreak. Additionally, learning a new technology is related to the adoption of both emails and video calls to access telehealth. The findings suggest that older adults may be motivated and able to quickly learn a new technology that is required to access telehealth during the COVID-19 outbreak.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-03-08T09:25:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221085473
       
  • Leveraging Public–Private Partnerships During COVID-19: Providing
           Virtual Field Opportunities for Student Learners and Addressing Social
           Isolation in Older Adults

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      Authors: Omolola E. Adepoju, Sheara Jennings, Patti Schrader, Kathleen Reeve, Tracy McManaman-Bridges, Lauren Gilbert, Ben King, Jessica Dobbins, Andy Rollins, Tray Cockerell, LeChauncy Woodard, Luis Torres-Hostos
      First page: 1657
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      While preventive and management measures are important to mitigate the spread of COVID-19, strategies like social distancing can have devastating effects on older adults who are already at risk for social isolation and loneliness. In response, two Colleges of Health Professions (Social Work and Nursing) at a large public University leveraged a partnership with a national health and wellbeing company to address social isolation and loneliness in Houston area older adults during the COVID-19 pandemic. This intergenerational linkage initiative involved 707 older adults and 177 graduate social work and nursing students. This study describes the process of developing a virtual educational opportunity for students while also meeting the needs of vulnerable older adults in Houston, the third largest, and one of the most diverse cities in the U.S. Findings include student/learner outcomes, as well as self-reported improvements in loneliness scores, and unhealthy physical and mental health days among enrolled older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-18T12:14:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221087120
       
  • Health Promotion Practice Among Older Persons: A Nordic Multi-Professional
           Focus Group Study Exploring what It Is and How It Could be Achieved

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      Authors: Emilia W.E. Viklund, Johanna Nordmyr, Greta Häggblom-Kronlöf, Anna K. Forsman
      First page: 1665
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The growing ageing population in the Nordic region calls for increased focus on health promotion work. To enhance multi-professional understanding and further develop strategies for promoting healthy ageing, it is vital to consider the perspectives of those working with health promotion. The aim of this study was to explore a wide spectrum of practitioners’ experiences of community-level health promotion targeting older adults in Finland and Sweden. Nine focus group interviews (34 informants) were conducted in 2019–2020. “Seeing the person” emerged as the ideal for health promotion targeting older adults, but this ideal was not always realized in current practice. Barriers related to organizational structures and the practitioner role were identified. However, work methods connected to user involvement and technology-based tools were considered key facilitators, enabling tailored health promotion initiatives.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-03-28T01:22:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221082021
       
  • Assessing the Effects of eHealth Tutorials on Older Adults’ eHealth
           Literacy

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      Authors: Atami S. De Main, Bo Xie, Kristina Shiroma, Tom Yeh, Nathan Davis, Xu Han
      First page: 1675
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      eHealth literacy is the ability to access, assess, and use digital health information. This study compared the effects of a multimedia tutorial versus a paper-based control in improving older adults’ eHealth literacy from pre- to posttest. A total of 99 community-dwelling older adults (63–90 years old; mean = 73.09) participated from July 2019 to February 2020. Overall, knowledge about computer/Internet terms, eHealth literacy efficacy, knowledge about the quality of health information websites, and procedural skills in computer/Internet use improved significantly from pre- to posttest. No interaction effect was found between time and group. Participants in both groups had an overwhelmingly positive attitude toward training. Their attitudes toward training approached a statistically significant difference between the two conditions: F (1, 89) = 3.75, p = .056, partial η2 = .040, with the multimedia condition showing more positive attitudes. These findings have implications for designing effective eHealth literacy interventions for older adults.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T01:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221088281
       
  • The Relationship Between Light Exposure before Bedtime and Daytime
           Sleepiness Among People Living With Cognitive Impairment

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      Authors: Yeji Hwang, Miranda V. McPhillips, Sonia Talwar, G. Adriana Perez, Nancy A. Hodgson
      First page: 1686
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      While sleep disturbances are common in people living with cognitive impairment, little is known about the influence of evening light exposure on their sleep. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between evening light exposure in natural living environment and daytime sleepiness in community residing people living with cognitive impairment. A secondary data analysis was conducted using the baseline data of the Healthy Patterns Clinical Trial. Actiwatch Spectrum Plus was used to collect information on the average white light intensity of 4 hours before sleep for three consecutive days. Multivariate regression analyses were used. Among 173 participants, the average light intensity during evening was 80.25 ± 123.04 lux. After controlling for covariates, greater intensity of light exposure during evening was related to excessive daytime sleepiness (β = 0.211, p = .004). The results of our study suggest exposure to light during evening may disturb sleep and subsequently influence daytime sleepiness the following day.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T03:18:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221083658
       
  • The Association Between Nursing Home Information Technology Maturity and
           Urinary Tract Infection Among Long-Term Residents

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      Authors: Catherine C. Cohen, Kimberly Powell, Andrew W. Dick, Patricia W. Stone, Gregory L. Alexander
      First page: 1695
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common infections among nursing home (NH) residents. Antibiotics are often misused when a UTI is suspected. Using sophisticated information technology (IT) could help in appropriate UTI prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. This repeated cross-sectional study explored relationships between IT maturity and UTI prevalence among long-stay NH residents. Data were from (1) four annual surveys 2013–2017 measuring IT maturity in a random sample of Medicare-certified NHs, (2) Minimum Data Set assessments for resident characteristics, and (3) Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting data for facility characteristics. In multivariate regressions using NH fixed effects, controlling for resident and NH characteristics, Administrative IT maturity in NHs was associated with decreased odds of UTI (AOR: 0.906, 95% CI: 0.843, 0.973). These results were robust in all sensitivity analyses. Using IT to relieve administrative burden may decrease UTIs.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T04:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221082024
       
  • ‘Good Treatment’ in Residential Care Settings in Quebec: Meanings,
           Practices and Conditions

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      Authors: Sophie Éthier, Sandra Smele, Anna Andrianova, Anne Myrand, Mélanie Couture, Éric Gagnon, François Aubry
      First page: 1702
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of ‘bientraitance’(good treatment) of older adults was introduced in Quebec policy a few years prior to the pandemic, and its significance from the perspectives of those directly involved in care remains underexplored. Centring these perspectives, this article presents findings from a study of the meanings, practices and conditions of good treatment. Data was collected at three different residential care settings through world cafés with residents, staff, management, volunteers and family members (n = 61) and through interviews with care aides (n = 13). The study results indicate that those directly involved in care identify good treatment as fundamentally oriented towards developing and maintaining good relationships with residents; as contingent upon interpersonal, material, and organizational factors; and as requiring (more) time. Given the need for radical reform within Quebec’s residential care settings revealed by the pandemic, it is imperative that these perspectives inform the changes introduced.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T05:44:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221087217
       
  • Formative Evaluation of a Workforce Investment Organization to Provide
           Scaled Training for Home Health Aides Serving Managed Long-Term Care Plan
           Clients in New York State

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      Authors: David Russell, Mei-Chia Fong, Oude Gao, Dan Lowenstein, Marian Haas, Faith Wiggins, Carlin Brickner, Emily Franzosa
      First page: 1710
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      As part of its Medicaid program restructuring, New York State funded 11 Workforce Investment Organizations (WIO) to support training initiatives for the long-term care workforce. Focusing on one WIO, this formative evaluation examined quality improvement training programs delivered to 11,163 Home Health Aides employed by home care agencies serving clients of Managed Long-Term Care plans. Results are presented from a thematic analysis of qualitative interviews with organizational and program stakeholders examining contextual factors influencing program objectives, implementation, barriers and facilitators, and perceived outcomes. Findings suggested that WIO training programs were implemented during a period of shifting organizational strategies alongside value-based payment reforms and challenges to aide recruitment and retention. Stakeholders appraised WIO training programs positively and valued program flexibility and facilitation of communication and collaboration between agencies and plans. However, delivery and implementation challenges existed, and industry-wide structural fragmentation led stakeholders to question the WIO’s larger impact.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-14T08:07:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084182
       
  • The Age-Friendly Community Policy Movement and the Residential Location of
           U.S. Older Adults: The Case of Hamilton County, Ohio

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      Authors: Jongwoong Kim
      First page: 1722
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study maps and discusses the status of the age-friendly community movement in a United States (U.S.) residential-geographic context using the AARP Livability Index and Hamilton County, Ohio, as a case study. The framework for the construction of this index shares multiple commonalities with the World Health Organization’s widely adopted Age-Friendly Cities and Communities framework. Via visual inspection of maps and spatial analytics, this study compares geographic locations and spatial patterns of census tracts in terms of their residence desirability for older adults based on the Livability Index and actual residence locations of adults aged 65+ in Hamilton County. The comparison reveals that the actual residence locations of older adults differ from those that are most desirable. Given this difference between actual location choices and ideal or age-friendly residential environments, the age-friendly movement needs to discuss the gap between its framework, exemplified here by the AARP Livability Index, and reality to promote and implement its policies more effectively, especially in the U.S.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T02:00:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221085462
       
  • Intergenerational Socioeconomic Mobility and Cognitive Impairment Among
           Chinese Older Adults: Gender Differences

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      Authors: Rong Fu, Yujun Liu
      First page: 1733
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the impact of intergenerational socioeconomic mobility on the risk of cognitive impairment in a cohort of Chinese older adults aged 60 years and older. Data were derived from the 2014 wave of the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey. Logistic regression models were performed to assess the impact of three dimensions of socioeconomic mobility (occupational mobility, educational mobility, and residential mobility) on the risk of cognitive impairment. We found that men who were stable with non-professional jobs across generations had a higher risk of cognitive impairment than their counterparts who experienced upward occupational mobility compared to their father. This pattern was not observed in women. There was little evidence that educational mobility or residential mobility affected cognitive impairment in later life. The findings have implications for advancing supportive policies and practices related to maximizing the benefits of education and career advancements for cognition in later life.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-13T07:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084996
       
  • Care v. Caring: Obligation, Duty, and Love Among Latino Alzheimer’s
           Family Caregivers

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      Authors: Iveris L. Martinez, Elaine Acosta Gonzalez
      First page: 1744
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s disease is projected to grow. Latinos currently make one-fifth of U.S. family caregivers. In this paper, we explore the cultural scripts and gendered practice of care in Latino families in relation to the underutilization of services to persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. We conducted interviews with 24 Latino caregivers in Miami-Dade, Florida representing six Latin American countries of origin. Interviews were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. We critically examined the concept of familism in order to better understand in-depth experiences of diverse Latino caregivers and concluded that an ethics of care model better elucidates the complexities of the care experience. Our analysis illustrates the ambivalence, contradictions, and changes in the beliefs and practice of care. These findings can help advance understanding among researchers and providers to develop a formal support system that is responsive to Latino caregiver needs.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-29T06:20:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084998
       
  • Examining Patterns of Driving Avoidance Behaviors Among Older People Using
           Latent Class Analysis

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      Authors: Laurie F. Beck, Feijun Luo, Bethany A. West
      First page: 1752
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Objectives: Some older drivers choose to avoid certain situations where they do not feel confident driving. Little is known about the process by which older drivers may use avoidance in transitioning to non-driving. Methods: We analyzed 2015 ConsumerStyles data for 1198 drivers aged 60+. Driving patterns were examined by sociodemographic and driving characteristics. Avoidance classes were characterized by latent class analysis. Results: Among drivers 60+, 79% reported driving 3+ days/week and 84% reported good to excellent health. We identified four driving avoidance classes (low, mild, moderate, and high). High- (versus low-) avoidance drivers were more likely female, 75+, not White/non-Hispanic, and to have income
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-20T09:16:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221086953
       
  • Willingness to Discuss End-of-Life Care Wishes Among Rural Black/African
           American Residents of the Alabama Black Belt

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      Authors: Hyunjin Noh, Hee Y. Lee, Yan Luo, Lewis H. Lee
      First page: 1763
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      Willingness for end-of-life discussion and related factors among rural Blacks/African Americans of the Alabama Black Belt have not been well-studied. This study aims to assess their willingness for the discussion and examine its relationship with social determinants of health (SDH) and demographic factors. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with a convenience sampling of 182 participants. Most participants were willing to discuss end-of-life wishes with family (77.1%) or doctors (72.1%). Controlling for demographics, results from binary logistic regressions showed those with hospice awareness were more likely to have willingness for discussion with family (OR = 10.07, p < .01) and doctors (OR = 7.23, p < .05). Those who were older (50+) were less likely to have willingness for discussion with doctors (OR = 0.19, p < .05), whereas those who were more socially isolated were less likely to have willingness for discussion with family (OR = 0.53, p < .05). Therefore, end-of-life discussion efforts should focus on older, socially isolated individuals and consider hospice awareness.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T01:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084174
       
  • Women Gerontologists’ Personal Experiences with Aging: Results From the
           Women in Gerontology Legacy Project

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      Authors: Adrienne L. Cohen, Akiv Dawson, Rebecca Ryan
      First page: 1773
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.
      The Women in Gerontology Legacy (WIGL) Project involved interviewing 46 older women gerontologists between 2014 and 2015. The current study focuses on the WIGL interview questions regarding the interactions between participants’ experiences as gerontologists and their own aging. Emergent themes focus on the direction of influence: professional lives influencing personal lives, personal lives informing professional lives and mutuality between personal and professional lives. Thematic findings expand our current understanding of how professional knowledge and experiences contribute to personal aging experiences and the role personal aging experiences can have on the professional lives of women gerontologists. There is a potential for disconnect to occur between our personal experiences and the experiences of others. The current study contributes to our understanding of when and how this occurs, so we can then ensure our messages fall on receptive ears by overcoming the natural tendency to distort or ignore messages that may create anxiety.
      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T12:26:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221082653
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R Megan, LMSW Westmore, A Keith
      First page: 1780
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-04-04T04:57:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221083077
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amy M. Schuster
      First page: 1782
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-03-25T01:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084753
       
  • Book Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mariya Kovaleva
      First page: 1784
      Abstract: Journal of Applied Gerontology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Applied Gerontology
      PubDate: 2022-03-22T11:41:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/07334648221084757
       
 
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