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GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

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Journal Cover
Gerontology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.534
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0304-324X - ISSN (Online) 1423-0003
Published by Karger Homepage  [122 journals]
  • Evaluation of Appendicular Muscle Mass in Sarcopenia in Older Adults Using
           Ultrasonography: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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      Abstract: Background: The measurement of appendicular muscle mass is essential for the diagnosis of sarcopenia. Ultrasonography is an accurate and convenient method used to evaluate muscle mass. Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of ultrasonography for appendicular muscle mass in sarcopenia in older adults and find out proper ultrasound parameters. Methods: Medline, Embase, Cochrane, and Web of Science databases were searched for relevant articles. Published studies on the validity and/or reliability of ultrasonography for quantifying muscle mass of the limbs in sarcopenia in the older population were included. A systematic review was conducted based on specific muscles and reference methods. A meta-analysis was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the ultrasonography. Results: Forty articles were included in this review. There were nine, nine, nine, and four studies included in the qualitative synthesis for a diagnostic test, correlation coefficient, intra-class reliability, and inter-class reliability, respectively. The diagnostic value of rectus femoris (RF) or gastrocnemius (GM) thickness on ultrasonography for sarcopenia or low muscle mass was moderate (the area under summary receiver operating characteristic curve [SROC] = 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.72–0.79, SROC = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.76–0.83, respectively). The pooled correlation between muscle mass on dual-energy X-ray (DXA) or bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and muscle thickness (MT) on ultrasound was moderate (r = 0.56, 95% CI: 0.49–0.62). There was a low-to-moderate correlation between muscle mass on DXA or BIA and cross-sectional area (CSA) on ultrasound (r = 0.267–0.584). The correlation was high to very high between muscle mass from DXA and the ultrasound-predicted formula (r = 0.85–0.963). The CSA from ultrasound had a high or very high correlation with that from computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging (r = 0.826, intra (inter)-correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.998–0.999). The respective meta-analyses showed good inter-rater and intra-rater reliabilities (ICC #x3e; 0.9). Conclusion: Ultrasonography is a reliable and valid diagnostic method for the quantitative assessment of appendicular muscle mass in sarcopenia in older people. The thickness and CSA of the RF or GM seem to be proper ultrasound parameters to predict muscle mass in sarcopenia. Multicenter studies with large samples and the application of new ultrasonic techniques will be the future research directions.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Mon, 25 Jul 2022 06:36:09 +020
       
  • Frailty Prevalence, Incidence, and Association with Incident Disability in
           the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging

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      Abstract: Introduction: Data on frailty frequency are heterogeneous and mostly based on cross-sectional studies. Little is known about frailty development and progression over time. Our aim was to conduct a systematic analysis of frailty prevalence and incidence in a large cohort of older adults and to evaluate the association with incident disability, in order to tackle the current paucity and fragmentation of longitudinal data on frailty. Methods: As secondary analysis of the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA) population-based cohort (n = 5,632, 65–84), frailty status was operationalized according to Fried criteria (n = 2,457). Weighted prevalence and incidence rates were calculated at each ILSA wave (T0 1992–1993, T1 1995–1996, T2 2000–2001). The association with incident disability in Activities of Daily Living (ADL) or Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) was investigated through Cox proportional hazard models, controlling for possible confounders. Results: Prevalence of frailty and pre-frailty at baseline (mean age 71.6 years; women 58.9%) were 4.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.4–4.6) and 44.6% (95% CI: 43.1–46.1), respectively. Incidence rates per 1,000 person-years for the T0–T1 interval were 7.3 (95% CI: 5.2–9.3) for frailty and 83.7 (95% CI: 73.6–93.8) for pre-frailty. Prevalence and incidence of frailty, and to a lesser degree of pre-frailty, were overall higher for women and increased with age, yet no increasing trend with advancing age was detected for pre-frailty incidence. Frailty incidence rates were significantly higher among pre-frail than non-frail individuals at follow-up entry. After full adjustment, being frail markedly increased the risk of incident disability in ADL (hazard ratio [HR] 3.58, 95% CI: 1.97–6.52) and IADL (HR 2.56, 95% CI: 1.58–4.16) over a 4-year period. Discussion/Conclusion: According to our findings, frailty is common among older people and is a strong and independent predictor of disability. Further research on factors and characteristics related to frailty progression, and especially remission, over time is crucial to calibrate effective public health preventive measures.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Fri, 22 Jul 2022 10:40:50 +020
       
  • Association among Terminally Differentiated T Cells, Frailty, and
           Dependency in a Group of Cuban Centenarians

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      Abstract: Introduction: Centenarians are considered a model of successful aging. Cuba exhibits one of the oldest populations in Latin America with more than two thousand centenarians. Methods: This study aimed to evaluate the immune phenotype of forty-three Cuban centenarians, their clinical characteristics such as comorbidities, frailty, body mass index, and some hemochemical parameters. Results: Centenarians had normal body mass indexes, relatively good health status, and 21.95% of them had no comorbidities; 53.6% were classified as frail, and 7% were classified as robust. In addition, 17% of centenarians were independent, and 41.46% were moderately dependent. The seroprevalence against cytomegalovirus was 100%. Concerning pro-inflammatory markers, the majority of them had very low cytokine levels and serum C-reactive protein around the normal limit. We also found the predominance of memory subsets over naive compartments in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Terminally differentiated CD8+CD28− T cells were higher in frail centenarians than in pre-frail, while CD8+CD57+ and CD8+EMRA T cells were higher in moderately and severely dependent individuals than in independent individuals. Severely dependent centenarians had a lower CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Conclusion: This study describes for the first time the predominance of memory subsets over naive compartments in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, as well as its relation to frailty and/or dependency in a group of Cuban centenarians. Further studies are needed to continue understanding the natural biological aging mechanism and the relationship between terminally differentiated lymphocytes and inflammaging in the context of extreme longevity.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Tue, 21 Jun 2022 10:20:57 +020
       
  • A Decade Later on How to “Use It” So We Don’t “Lose It”: An
           Update on the Unanswered Questions about the Influence of Activity
           Participation on Cognitive Performance in Older Age

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      Abstract: Activity engagement is a modifiable factor that has been widely-cited as being good for the aging brain and cognition and represents a valuable target for reducing dementia risk. However, specific issues about activity engagement (mental, social, and physical) and cognition in older adulthood remain, and Bielak [Gerontology 2010;56: 507-519] reviewed seven major methodological and theoretical questions about this relationship. We present an updated reflection on these key questions, focusing on research published in the last 10 years. For some questions, a significant amount of work has been done and conclusions have become clearer; for others, there have been few additions to the literature and our knowledge remains much the same as it was a decade ago. We review the issues identified in the 2010 paper including the directionality and temporal nature of the relationship; whether specific activity domains offer different benefits to cognition and what domain(s) of cognition are affected; variation in the relation by age, gender, or education; potential mechanisms involved; and how activity engagement is assessed. For each, we present the most up-to-date research, discuss remaining challenges and possible future directions. This formal unifying of the information in the field is intended as a guide to support continued progress by spurring on studies addressing specific questions while reminding researchers of critical issues. We conclude with recommendations that future studies investigating the link between activity engagement and cognitive performance in adulthood should consider.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Jun 2022 10:08:45 +020
       
  • Changes in Psychological Determinants of Behavior Change after Individual
           versus Group-Based Lifestyle-integrated Fall Prevention: Results from the
           LiFE-is-LiFE Trial

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      Abstract: Objective: The Lifestyle-integrated Functional Exercise (LiFE) intervention has been shown to promote physical activity in fall-prone older adults. However, the underlying mechanisms of how LiFE functions remain unclear. This study compares the effects of the individual and group-based LiFE formats on psychological determinants of behavior change derived from the health action process approach, habit formation theory, and self-determination theory. Methods: Secondary analysis on basis of the randomized, non-inferiority LiFE-is-LiFE trial were performed. Questionnaire data on psychological determinants were obtained from older adults (M = 78.8 years, range 70–95) who took part in either the individual (n = 156) or the group-based (n = 153) LiFE intervention. Measurement points varied from three to six times, and from baseline (T1) up to a 12-month follow-up (T6). A generalized linear mixed model was specified for each determinant. Results: Both LiFE and gLiFE participants reported lower levels of motivational determinants at T6. LiFE participants showed significantly higher values of action planning and coping planning at T6. Participants in both formats showed increased levels of action control at T6, whereas participants’ habit strength decreased post-intervention but then stabilized over time. LiFE participants showed higher levels of autonomy, competence, and relatedness throughout the study, but levels of intrinsic motivation did not differ between formats and from T1 to T6. Conclusion: In both formats, but especially in the individual LiFE, the behavior change techniques used affected volitional rather than motivational or general determinants of behavior change. Habit strength as an important indicator of the sustainability of the LiFE exercises stabilized over time, indicating that participants, at least partly, sustained their formed habits long-term.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Fri, 10 Jun 2022 07:42:37 +020
       
  • Changesin Cognitive and Functional Status and in Quality of Life of Older
           Outpatients during the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Background: Older adults denoted one of the populations that mostly suffered from the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. The cost of confinement was paid in terms of social isolation, distance from relatives and friends, lack of social support, and limited access to the healthcare system, which had a negative impact on health of older adults with comorbidities and frailty. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to report the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on cognitive performances, functional status, and health-related quality of life among frail outpatients, compared to pre-pandemic status. Method: The current sample was part of a larger sample of frail and pre-frail outpatients, who were first evaluated at the clinic between April and May 2019 and who underwent a first follow-up evaluation between April and May 2020. Those outpatients who have undergone the first follow-up evaluation were contacted between April and May 2021 and were asked to voluntarily participate in a second telephone-based evaluation. Cognitive performances (through Mini Mental State Examination – MMSE), functional independency in basic and instrumental daily activities, physical and mental components of health-related quality of life (SF-12 PCS and SF-12 MCS, respectively) were evaluated and compared to previous evaluations. Results: Seventy one outpatients (mean age of 80.69 years) completed the present follow-up evaluation. Patients reported significantly lower cognitive performances (mean MMSE 19.37; p #x3c; 0.001), lower physical quality of life (mean score 31.69; p #x3c; 0.001), and lower mental quality of life (mean score 38.79; p #x3c; 0.001) compared to both pre-pandemic baseline and the first follow-up. Moreover, patients showed a significantly reduced independency in basic daily activities (mean score 3.8; p = 0.004), and a significantly reduced independency in managing telephone (p = 0.012) and medications (p = 0.035), compared to baseline. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has been a prolonged stressor over time, which has markedly affected health-related quality of life of outpatients, and it can be considered a stressor that might have contributed to the patients’ greater cognitive and functional vulnerability.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Tue, 07 Jun 2022 08:06:22 +020
       
  • Comparison of Postoperative Neurocognitive Function in Older Adult
           Patients with and without Diabetes Mellitus

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      Abstract: Introduction: Delayed neurocognitive recovery (DNR; neurocognitive disorder up to 30 days postoperative) and postoperative neurocognitive disorders (POCD; neurocognitive disorder 1–12 months postoperative) occur frequently after surgery, with diabetes mellitus (DM) suggested to contribute to this. This was a single-center prospective cohort study. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of DM and preoperative hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the development of POCDs after noncardiac surgery. Methods: Older adult patients ≥65 years of age scheduled for elective surgery were recruited. The Modified Telephone Interview for Cognitive Status questionnaire (TICS-M), a test of global cognitive functioning, was administered to determine cognition. Preoperative, 30-day postoperative, and 6-month postoperative cognition were compared for patients with and without DM. Cognitive decline was subdivided into mild (1 to 2 standard deviations below controls) and major (≥2 standard deviations below controls) DNR or POCD. Preoperative HbA1c levels were correlated with TICS-M scores. Results: We analyzed 102 patients [median (IQR [range]) age 72.0 (5 [68–74])]), who were divided into patients with DM (80 patients [78%]) and patients without DM (22 patients [22%]). Baseline cognitive function was similar for both groups. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that mean DM patient TICS-M scores decreased 30 days postoperative (F(2, 200) = 4.0, p = 0.02), with subsequent recovery 6-month postoperative, compared to stable TICS-M scores in non-DM patients. There were significantly more DM patients with DNR than non-DM patients (n = 11 [50%] vs. n = 14 [17.5%]; p = 0.031). There were no between-group differences in mild or major POCD. Higher preoperative HbA1c levels were significantly correlated with decreased 30-day Δcognition scores (F(1, 54) = 9.4, p = 0.003) with an R2 of 0.149 (β −0.45, 95% confidence interval: −0.735 to −0.154). Conclusions: Older adult patients with DM undergoing surgery have an increased risk of DNR compared to older adult non-DM patients, but no increased risk of POCD. In DM patients, higher preoperative HbA1c levels were associated with an increased risk of DNR.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Fri, 03 Jun 2022 12:45:59 +020
       
  • Cross-Sectional Analysis of Risk Factors for Outbreak of COVID-19 in
           Nursing Homes for Older Adults in the Community of Madrid

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      Abstract: Introduction: Nursing homes for older adults have been hot spots for SARS-CoV-2 infections and mortality. Factors that facilitate COVID-19 outbreaks in these settings need to be assessed. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study of a cohort of residents and workers in nursing homes taking occasion of a point seroprevalence survey was done in the Community of Madrid. Factors related to outbreaks in these facilities were analyzed. Results: A total of 369 nursing homes for older adults, making a population of 23,756 residents and 20,795 staff members, were followed from July to December 2020. There were 54.2% SARS-CoV-2 IgG+ results in residents and in 32.2% of workers. Sixty-two nursing homes (16.8%) had an outbreak during the follow-up. Nursing homes with outbreaks had more residents than those without (median number of 81 [IQR, 74] vs. 50 [IQR, 56], p #x3c; 0.001). Seropositivity for SARS-CoV-2 was lower in facilities with versus without outbreaks, for residents (42.2% [IQR, 55.7] vs. 58.7% [IQR, 43.4], p = 0.002) and for workers (23.9% [IQR, 26.4] vs. 32.8% [IQR, 26.3], p = 0.01). For both residents and staff, the number of infections in outbreaks was larger in centers with lower, as compared with intermediate or high seroprevalence. The size of the facility did not correlate with the number of cases in the outbreak. Taking the incidence of cases in the community as a time-dependent variable (p = 0.03), a Cox analysis (HR [95% CI], p) showed that intermediate or high seroprevalence among residents in the facility was related to a reduction of 55% (0.45 [0.25–0.80], p = 0.007) and 78% (0.22 [0.10–0.48], p #x3c; 0.001) in the risk of outbreaks, respectively, as compared with low sero­prevalence. Also, as compared with smaller, medium (1.91 [1.00–3.65], p = 0.05) or large centers (4.57 [2.38–8.75], p #x3c; 0.001) had more respective risk of outbreaks. Conclusions: The size of the facility and the seroprevalence among residents in nursing homes, and the incidence of infections in the community, are associated with the risk of outbreaks of COVID-19. Facilities with greater proportion of seropositives had smaller number of cases. Monitoring of immunity in nursing homes may help detect those at a greater risk of future cases.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Thu, 02 Jun 2022 13:29:52 +020
       
  • Feeling Younger, Rehabilitating Better: Reciprocal and Mediating Effects
           between Subjective Age and Functional Independence in Osteoporotic
           Fracture and Stroke Patients

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      Abstract: Introduction: The current study aimed to find reciprocal effects between subjective age and functional independence during rehabilitation from osteoporotic fractures and stroke and whether these effects can be mediated by indicators of well-being. Methods: Participants were 194 older adults (mean age = 78.32 years, SD = 7.37; 64.8% women) who were hospitalized following an osteoporotic fracture or stroke. Participants completed measures of subjective age and well-being (i.e., optimism, self-esteem, and life satisfaction) several times during rehabilitation. Functional Independence Measure (FIM) was completed by nursing personnel at admission and at discharge. Results: Younger subjective age at admission predicted higher FIM scores at discharge. The reverse effect, that is, of FIM scores at admission on subjective age at discharge, was nonsignificant. Optimism during hospitalization mediated the effect of subjective age on subsequent FIM scores while self-esteem and life satisfaction did not. Sensitivity analyses further showed that the effect of subjective age on FIM was significant for both fracture and stroke patients. Discussion: The findings highlight the effect of subjective age on rehabilitation outcomes among osteoporotic fractures and stroke patients and suggest several potential mechanisms behind this effect. Rehabilitation outcomes following osteoporotic fractures or strokes could improve if subjective age and an optimistic outlook are taken into consideration.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Wed, 25 May 2022 10:16:48 +020
       
  • Neuromuscular Aging: A Case for the Neuroprotective Effects of Dancing

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      Abstract: Aim: We planned a cross-sectional investigation (study 1) and a longitudinal training intervention (study 2) to investigate whether recreational dancing affords greater neuroprotective effects against age-related neuromuscular junction (NMJ) degeneration compared to general fitness exercise training. Methods: In study 1, we recruited 19 older volunteers regularly practising dancing (older dancers [OD]) and 15 recreationally physically active older individuals (OA) and physical performance, muscle morphology, muscle function, and NMJ stability (from serum C-terminal agrin fragment [CAF] concentration) were assessed. In study 2, employing a longitudinal study design in a different cohort (composed of 37 older adults), we aimed to study whether a 6-month dancing intervention decreased CAF concentration compared to general fitness exercise training in older adults. Results: Our findings show that OD had a lower CAF concentration (suggesting an increased NMJ stability) compared to OA. This result was accompanied by superior functional performance despite no differences in muscle size. In study 2, we observed a reduction in CAF concentration only in the dancing group. Conclusion: Overall, these findings suggest that dancing is an effective training modality to promote neuroprotection and increase muscle function in healthy older individuals.
      Gerontology
      PubDate: Mon, 23 May 2022 13:26:19 +020
       
 
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