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GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 108)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Frailty & Aging
Number of Followers: 0  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Online) 2273-4309
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Predictive Abilities of the Frailty Phenotype and the Swiss Frailty
           Network and Repository Frailty Index for Non-Home Discharge and Functional
           Decline in Hospitalized Geriatric Patients

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      Abstract: Background Frailty is increasingly applied as a measure to predict clinical outcomes, but data on the predictive abilities of frailty measures for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients are scarce. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive ability of the frailty phenotype and a frailty index currently validated as part of the ongoing Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study based on clinical admission data for non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized older patients. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting and Participants Data were analyzed from 334 consecutive hospitalized patients of a tertiary acute care geriatric inpatient clinic admitted between August 2020 and March 2021. Measurements We assessed frailty using 1) the frailty phenotype and 2) the Swiss Frailty Network and Repository Study (SFNR) frailty index based on routinely available clinical admission data. Predictive abilities of both frailty measures were analyzed for the clinical outcomes of non-home discharge and functional decline using multivariate logistic regression models and receiver operating characteristic curves (ROC). Results Mean age was 82.8 (SD 7.2) years and 55.4% were women. Overall, 170 (53.1%) were frail based on the frailty phenotype and 220 (65.9%) based on the frailty index. Frail patients based on the frailty phenotype were more likely to be discharged non-home (55 (32.4%) vs. 26 (17.3%); adjusted OR 2.4 (95% CI, 1.4, 5.1)). Similarly, frail patients based on the frailty index were more likely to be discharged non-home compared to non-frail patients (76 (34.6%) vs. 9 (7.9%); adjusted OR, 5.5 (95% CI, 2.6, 11.5)). Both, the frailty phenotype and the frailty index were similarly associated with functional decline (adjusted OR 2.7 (95% CI, 1.5, 4.9); adjusted OR 2.8 (95% CI 1.4, 5.5)). ROC analyses showed best discriminatory accuracy for the frailty index for non-home discharge (area under the curve 0.76). Conclusions Frailty using the SFNR-frailty index and the frailty phenotype is a promising measure for prediction of non-home discharge and functional decline in acutely hospitalized geriatric patients. Further study is needed to define the most valid frailty measure.
      PubDate: 2022-06-20
       
  • Could there Be Frailty in the Discrepancy between Lesions and Symptoms of
           Alzheimer’s Disease'

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      PubDate: 2022-05-31
       
  • Preoperative Rehabilitation Is Feasible in the Weeks Prior to Surgery and
           Significantly Improves Functional Performance

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      Abstract: Background Frailty is a multidimensional state of increased vulnerability. Frail patients are at increased risk for poor surgical outcomes. Prior research demonstrates that rehabilitation strategies deployed after surgery improve outcomes by building strength. Objectives Examine the feasibility and impact of a novel, multi-faceted prehabilitation intervention for frail patients before surgery. Design Single arm clinical trial. Setting Veterans Affairs hospital. Participants Patients preparing for major abdominal, urological, thoracic, or cardiac surgery with frailty identified as a Risk Analysis Index≥30. Intervention Prehabilitation started in a supervised setting to establish safety and then transitioned to home-based exercise with weekly telephone coaching by exercise physiologists. Prehabilitation included (a)strength and coordination training; (b)respiratory muscle training (IMT); (c)aerobic conditioning; and (d)nutritional coaching and supplementation. Prehabilitation length was tailored to the 4–6 week time lag typically preceding each participant’s normally scheduled surgery. Measurements Functional performance and patient surveys were assessed at baseline, every other week during prehabilitation, and then 30 and 90 days after surgery. Within-person changes were estimated using linear mixed models. Results 43 patients completed baseline assessments; 36(84%) completed a median 5(range 3–10) weeks of prehabilitation before surgery; 32(74%) were retained through 90-day follow-up. Baseline function was relatively low. Exercise logs show participants completed 94% of supervised exercise, 78% of prescribed IMT and 74% of home-based exercise. Between baseline and day of surgery, timed-up-and-go decreased 2.3 seconds, gait speed increased 0.1 meters/second, six-minute walk test increased 41.7 meters, and the time to complete 5 chair rises decreased 1.6 seconds(all P≤0.007). Maximum and mean inspiratory and expiratory pressures increased 4.5, 7.3, 14.1 and 13.5 centimeters of water, respectively(all P≤0.041). Conclusions Prehabilitation is feasible before major surgery and achieves clinically meaningful improvements in functional performance that may impact postoperative outcomes and recovery. These data support rationale for a larger trial powered to detect differences in postoperative outcomes.
      PubDate: 2022-05-31
       
  • Evaluating Quality-of-Life, Length of Stay and Cost-Effectiveness of a
           Front-Door Geriatrics Program: An Exploratory Proof-of-Concept Study

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      Abstract: Background The Emergency Department Interventions for Frailty (EDIFY) program was developed to deliver early geriatric specialist interventions at the Emergency Department (ED). EDIFY has been successful in reducing acute admissions among older adults. Objectives We aimed to examine the effectiveness of EDIFY in improving health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) and length of stay (LOS), and evaluate EDIFY’s cost-effectiveness. Design A quasi-experiment study. Setting The ED of a 1700-bed tertiary hospital. Participants Patients (≥85 years) pending acute hospital admission and screened by the EDIFY team to be potentially suitable for discharge or transfer to low-acuity care areas. Intervention EDIFY versus standard-care. Measurements Data on demographics, comorbidities, premorbid function, and frailty status were gathered. HRQOL was measured using EQ-5D-5L over 6 months. We used a crosswalk methodology to compute Singapore-specific index scores from EQ-5D-5L responses and calculated quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. LOS and bills in Singapore-dollars (SGD) before subsidy from ED attendances (including admissions, if applicable) were obtained. We estimated average programmatic EDIFY cost and performed multiple imputation (MI) for missing data. QALYs gained, LOS and cost were compared. Potential uncertainties were also examined. Results Among 100 participants (EDIFY=43; standard-care=57), 61 provided complete data. For complete cases, there were significant QALYs gained at 3-month (coefficient=0.032, p=0.004) and overall (coefficient=0.096, p=0.002) for EDIFY, whilst treatment cost was similar between-groups. For MI, we observed only overall QALYs gained for EDIFY (coefficient=0.102, p=0.001). EDIFY reduced LOS by 17% (Incident risk ratio=0.83, p=0.015). In a deterministic sensitivity analysis, EDIFY’s cost-threshold was SGD$2,500, and main conclusions were consistent in other uncertainty scenarios. Mean bills were: EDIFY=SGD$4562.70; standard-care=SGD$5530.90. EDIFY’s average programmatic cost approximated SGD$469.30. Conclusions This exploratory proof-of-concept study found that EDIFY benefits QALYs and LOS, with equivalent cost, and is potentially cost-effective. The program has now been established as standard-care for older adults attending the ED at our center.
      PubDate: 2022-05-26
       
  • COVID-19 and the Impact on Caregivers

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      PubDate: 2022-05-26
       
  • Clinical Characteristics and Mortality of Old and Very Old Patients
           Hospitalized for Hip Fracture or Acute Medical Conditions

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      Abstract: Background There is increasing interest in healthcare quality and economic implications for hip fracture patients of very old age. However, results are limited by access to comparable control groups. Objectives We examined healthcare quality measures including mortality and length of stay (LOS) in hospital of adults aged 60–107 years undergoing hip operations, compared to an age-matched group admitted for acute general medical conditions. Design Monocentric cross-sectional study. Setting Ashford and St Peter’s Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Surrey, United Kingdom. Participants A total of 3972 consecutive admissions for hip operation from 1st April 2009 to 30th June 2019 (dataset-1) and 6979 for acute general medical conditions from 1st April 2019 to 29th February 2020 (dataset-2). Respective ages, mean (±standard deviation), were 83.5 years (±9.1) and 79.8 years (±9.8). Measurements Mortality and LOS were assessed with each group divided into five- year age bands and those ≥95 years. Results There were proportionally more (P <0.001) females admitted for hip operations (72.8%) than for acute general medical conditions (53.8%). Amongst patients admitted with general medical conditions, the frequency of the most serious recorded conditions - including congestive heart failure, stroke, and pneumonia - increased with age. Amongst patients undergoing hip operations, 5.7% died in hospital and 29.3% had a LOS ≥3 weeks. Corresponding values for acute general medical conditions were 10.4% and 11.8%. For those undergoing hip operations in all age categories, the risk of death was lower than for acute general medical group: sex-adjusted odds ratios ranged between 0.27 and 0.67, but the risk of LOS ≥3 weeks was greater: odds ratios ranged between 2.46 and 2.95. Conclusions Compared to those admitted with acute general medical conditions, patients admitted for hip operations had a lower risk of death, but a longer hospital LOS.
      PubDate: 2022-05-16
       
  • Sex Differences in Frailty Incidence in Greek Community-Dwelling Older
           People: The HELIAD Study

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      Abstract: Background Previous frailty studies found higher prevalence of frailty in female than in male participants. This was mainly attributed to the fact that compared to men, women show increased longevity. Recent studies have reported that the observed difference between sexes applies irrespectively of the age of older people. Objectives To provide data on sex differences in incident frailty by applying both phenotypic and multi-domain frailty measures in the same population of Greek community-dwelling older people. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Data were drawn from the Hellenic longitudinal Investigation of Aging and Diet (HELIAD), a population-based, multidisciplinary study designed to estimate the prevalence and incidence of dementia in the Greek population. Participants 1104 participants aged 65 year and above were included in this longitudinal study. This incidence cohort was reevaluated after a mean follow-up period of 3.04±0.90 years. Measurements Frailty was operationalized using 5 different definitions in the same population the Fried Frailty Phenotype (FFP) definition, the FRAIL Scale, the Frailty Index (FI), the Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) and the Groningen Frailty Index (GFI). Frailty incidence was calculated a) for the whole sample, b) separately for men and women and c) after both age and sex stratification. Results Age and sex stratification revealed that irrespective of age and frailty measurement, women showed higher incidence rates of frailty than men. Specifically, frailty seems to be a condition concerning women >65 years old, but when it comes to men, it is more frequent in those aged more than 75 years old. Finally, in relation to overall frailty incidence and comparing our results to previous studies, we detected a lower frailty incidence in the Greek population. Conclusions Differences between the two sexes indicate that when exploring the factors that are related to frailty, studies should provide data disaggregated for men and women.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
       
  • A Simplified Approach for Classifying Physical Resilience among
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults: The Health, Aging, and Body Composition
           Study

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      Abstract: Background Physical resilience is an emerging concept within the context of aging and geriatric medicine, and we previously developed and validated one such indicator based on the mismatch between persons’ frailty level and multimorbidity burden. We sought to develop a simplified version for classifying physical resilience. We also examined the agreement between the simplified version and the original approach and evaluated its predictive validity. Methods Participants were 2,457 older adults from the Health, Aging, and Body Composition Study. We constructed a simplified version for quantifying physical resilience based on the multimorbidity burden and level of frailty (score: 0–10). Participants were grouped by the number of diseases and classified into three groups—adapters, expected agers, and premature frailers—based on the mean and SD of frailty score (less than, within, or above one standard deviation of the mean). Results The Cohen’s kappa between the novel resilience classification and the original approach was 0.70, and the percentage of absolute agreement was 85.4%. We observed a steep increase in years of healthy and able life from premature frailers to adapters in the simplified resilience classifications. Conclusions We developed a simplified version for quantifying physical resilience in a cohort of initially well-functioning older Black and White adults. The agreement between the simplified version and the original approach is high. Adapters had a longer healthy lifespan than expected agers and premature frailers. This user-friendly indicator could help assess patients’ physical resilience in clinical settings.
      PubDate: 2022-05-05
       
  • Socioeconomic Disadvantage is Associated with Probable Sarcopenia in
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Findings from the English Longitudinal
           Study of Ageing

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      Abstract: Background Sarcopenia is characterized by the accelerated loss of muscle strength, mass, and function in aging. The disease is a major public health issue with emerging evidence of a disproportionate burden in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of probable sarcopenia overall, and according to Socioeconomic Position (SEP). To explore the association between markers of SEP and probable sarcopenia. Design Cross-sectional analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing data. Setting England, United Kingdom (UK). Participants This study comprised 6,052 older adult participants from Wave 6 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) aged 60 years and older. Measurements Probable sarcopenia was identified by the EWGSOP2 guidelines as low hand grip strength (females <16kg and males <27kg) or poor chair rise test performance (completion of 5 chair rises >15 seconds). Socioeconomic position was defined by educational attainment and subjective social status (SSS). Weighted multivariable regression analysis was employed to identify determinants of probable sarcopenia. Results Over one-third of older adults met the criteria for probable sarcopenia (33.7%; weighted, 36.1%) in the study population of mean age 70.7 (SD 7.7) years. When examined by SEP, the prevalence of probable sarcopenia was over 2-fold higher in adults in the most vs the least disadvantaged SEP groups (47.0% vs 20.6%, respectively, p<0.001). Multivariable regression analysis identified disadvantaged SEP, as measured by educational attainment and SSS, as independent predictors of probable sarcopenia, along with older age, physical inactivity, underweight BMI, chronic conditions, osteoarthritis, and minority group ethnicity. Conclusions Disadvantaged SEP was associated with an increased likelihood of probable sarcopenia when controlled for other known risk factors. The findings suggest a need and opportunity for sarcopenia prevention and treatment strategies to address socioeconomic disadvantage in policies and practice.
      PubDate: 2022-05-02
       
  • Adverse Drug Reactions Due to Opioid Use in Oldest-Old Patients Visiting
           the Emergency Unit of the Geneva Geriatric Hospital

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      Abstract: Abstract Opioid use has much increased in several countries during the last two decades, accompanied by a rise in associated morbidity and mortality, especially in the United States. Data on a possible opioid crisis are scarcer in Europe. We performed a study aiming to assess the frequency of adverse drug reactions (ADR) related to opioids in patients presenting to the emergency unit (EU) of a geriatric tertiary Swiss University Hospital. This particular setting is intended for patients aged 75 and older. Our retrospective, monocentric survey of opioid use and related ADR was conducted over two months in 2018. The main and secondary outcomes were the frequency of EU visits considered due to an opioid ADR and insufficient pain relief, respectively. Current opioid use was identified in 20.3% (n=99) of the 487 included EU visits (mean age 86). An ADR was the suspected cause of the EU visit in 22 opioid users, mainly fall-related injury and gastrointestinal disorders. All these patients had at least one comorbid condition. In 19/22 cases (86%) of ADR, a drug-drug interaction might have been involved. In 12 opioid users (12%), insufficient pain relief was suspected as the cause of the EU visit. In conclusion, one-third of opioid users visiting a geriatric EU consulted for a problem related to its use mainly adverse drug-related reaction (22%) followed by insufficient pain relief (12%).
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Sleep Quality and Duration as Determinants of Healthy Aging Trajectories:
           The HELIAD Study

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      Abstract: Background The aging of global population has increased the scientific interest in the concept of healthy aging and its determinants. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of sleep characteristics with trajectories of healthy aging. Design and Setting Prospective observational study conducted in two cities, Maroussi and Larissa. Participants A total of 1226 older adults (≥65 years, 704 women) were selected through random sampling. Measurements Sleep quality was assessed with the Sleep Index II, and sleep duration was self-reported. A healthy aging metric was introduced using an Item Response Theory approach based on validated questionnaires that assessed functionality. Four healthy aging trajectories were developed based on whether the healthy aging status of the participants was above (High) or below (Low) the median at baseline and follow-up, i.e., High-High, High-Low, Low-High, and Low-Low. The association of sleep characteristics with the trajectories was investigated using a multinomial logistic regression with the Low-Low group as reference, adjusting for potential confounders. Results 34.3% participants classified to the High-High group, 15.7% to the High-Low, 18.6% to the Low-High, and 31.4% to the Low-Low group. Better sleep quality was associated with the probability of belonging to the High-High group (p-value<0.001); while, long sleep duration was inversely associated with likelihood of being classified in the High-High group (p-value < 0.05). Conclusion Poor sleep quality and long sleep duration seem to have a significant negative association with healthy aging. Public health policies are needed to raise awareness about the importance of sleep characteristics on human health.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Predicting the Readmission and Mortality in Older Patients Hospitalized
           with Pneumonia with Preadmission Frailty

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      Abstract: Background In older people, frailty has been recognized as an important prognostic factor. However, only a few studies have focused on multidimensional frailty as a predictor of mortality and readmission among inpatients with pneumonia. Objective The present study aimed to assess the association between preadmission frailty and clinical outcomes after the hospitalization of older patients with pneumonia. Design Single-center, retrospective case-control study. Setting Acute phase hospital at Kobe, Japan. Participants The present study included 654 consecutive older inpatients with pneumonia. Measurements Frailty status before admission was assessed using total Kihon Checklist (KCL) score, which has been used as a self-administered questionnaire to assess comprehensive frailty, including physical, social, and cognitive status. The primary outcome was a composited 6-month mortality and readmission after discharge. Results In total, 330 patients were analyzed (median age; 79 years, male; 70.4%, median total KCL score; 10 points), of which 68 were readmitted and 10 died within 6 months. After multivariate analysis, total KCL score was associated with a composited 6-month mortality and readmission (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.12; p = 0.006). The cutoff value for total KCL score determined by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was 15 points (area under the curve = 0.610). The group with a total KCL score ≥ 15 points had significantly higher readmission or mortality rates than the groups with a total KCL score < 15 points (p < 0.001). Conclusions Preadmission frailty status in older patients with pneumonia was an independent risk factor for readmission and survival after hospitalization.
      PubDate: 2022-04-28
       
  • Longitudinal Associations between Concurrent Changes in Phenotypic Frailty
           and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms among Older Men

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      Abstract: Background Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) are associated with prevalent frailty and functional impairment, but longitudinal associations remain unexplored. Objectives To assess the association of change in phenotypic frailty with concurrent worsening LUTS severity among older men without clinically significant LUTS at baseline. Design Multicenter, prospective cohort study. Setting Population-based. Participants Participants included community-dwelling men age ≥65 years at enrollment in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men study. Measurements Data were collected at 4 visits over 7 years. Phenotypic frailty score (range: 0–5) was defined at each visit using adapted Fried criterion and men were categorized at baseline as robust (0), pre-frail (1–2), or frail (3–5). Within-person change in frailty was calculated at each visit as the absolute difference in number of criteria met compared to baseline. LUTS severity was defined using the American Urologic Association Symptom Index (AUASI; range: 0–35) and men with AUASI ≥8 at baseline were excluded. Linear mixed effects models were adjusted for demographics, health-behaviors, and comorbidities to quantify the association between within-person change in frailty and AUASI. Results Among 3235 men included in analysis, 48% were robust, 45% were pre-frail, and 7% were frail. Whereas baseline frailty status was not associated with change in LUTS severity, within-person increases in frailty were associated with greater LUTS severity (quadratic P<0.001). Among robust men at baseline, mean predicted AUASI during follow-up was 4.2 (95% CI 3.9, 4.5) among those meeting 0 frailty criteria, 4.6 (95% CI 4.3, 4.9) among those meeting 1 criterion increasing nonlinearly to 11.2 (95% CI 9.8, 12.6) among those meeting 5 criteria. Conclusions Greater phenotypic frailty was associated with nonlinear increases in LUTS severity in older men over time, independent of age and comorbidities. Results suggest LUTS and frailty share an underlying mechanism that is not targeted by existing LUTS interventions.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
       
  • Resilience in a Greek Sample of Informal Dementia Caregivers: Familism as
           a Culture-Specific Factor

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and the factors associated with resilience among a sample of 118 Greek informal caregivers (78.8% females, mean age=58.9, SD=11.6) of people with dementia. Face-to-face interviews assessed caregivers’ sociodemographics, resilience, quality of life, burden, familism, and perception of services and their proxy assessments of the cognitive functioning, functional activity, and behavioral problems of people with dementia. Moderate levels of resilience were reported by 58.6% of the caregivers. Dementia-related knowledge and higher levels of familism were associated with higher levels of resilience, whereas higher frequency of dealing with behavioral problems was associated with lower resilience. Effective interventions to strengthen Greek dementia caregivers’ resilience should be culture-specific, targeting both behavioral problems and caregivers’ intrapersonal facilitators (i.e, dementia-related knowledge) and interpersonal interactions (i.e., familism). Healthcare professionals may have a key role in building caregivers’ resilience and contribute to implications for policy and practice.
      PubDate: 2022-04-22
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2022.31
       
  • Erratum to: The Association Between Frailty and All-Cause Mortality in
           Community-Dwelling Older Individuals: An Umbrella Review

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      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2021.24
       
  • Frailty Status and Outcomes of COVID-19 Patients Admitted to an Intensive
           Care Unit

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      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2022.5
       
  • Number of Chair Stands Should Not Be Considered a Muscle Function Measure,
           But a Physical Performance Measure. What Can We Do Then'

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      PubDate: 2022-04-01
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2021.50
       
  • The Management of Frailty: Barking Up the Wrong Tree

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      PubDate: 2022-03-31
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2022.29
       
  • Changes in Body Composition in Older Adults after a Technology-Based
           Weight Loss Intervention

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      Abstract: Abstract We conducted a post-hoc analysis of a pre/post, single-arm, nonrandomized, multicomponent weight loss intervention in older adults. Fifty-three older adults aged ≥65 with a body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m2 were recruited to participate in a six-month, remote monitoring and video-conferencing delivered, prescriptive intervention consisting of individual and group-led registered dietitian nutrition and physical therapy sessions. We assessed weight, height, and body composition using a SECA 514 bioelectrical impedance analyzer. Mean age was 72.9±3.9 years (70% female) and all had ≥2 chronic conditions. Of those with complete data (n=30), we observed a 4.6±3.5kg loss in weight, 6.1±14.3kg (1.9%) loss in fat mass, and 0.78±1.69L loss in visceral fat (all p<0.05). Fat-free mass (−3.4kg±6.8, p=0.19), appendicular lean mass (−0.25±1.83, p=0.22), and grip strength (+3.46±7.89, p=0.56) did not significantly change. These variables were preserved after stratifying by 5% weight loss. Our intervention led to significant body and visceral fat loss while maintaining fat-free and appendicular lean muscle mass.
      PubDate: 2022-02-24
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2022.15
       
  • Osteosarcopenia to Raise Awareness on the Complexity of the Older Person

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      PubDate: 2022-02-17
      DOI: 10.14283/jfa.2022.10
       
 
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