Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
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GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
European Journal of Ageing
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.55
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1613-9380 - ISSN (Online) 1613-9372
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2469 journals]
  • Functional disability and utilisation of long-term care in the older
           population in England: a dual trajectory analysis

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigates the developmental trajectories of long-term care needs and utilisation in older people aged 65 years and over in England. The data came from the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing (ELSA, waves 6–9, 2012–2018, N = 13,425). We conducted dual trajectory analyses to cluster people’s trajectories of care needs (measured by functional disability) and utilisation into distinct groups. We conducted logistic regression analyses to identify the factors associated with trajectory memberships. We identified three trajectories of long-term needs (low, medium, and high) and three trajectories of care utilisation (low, medium, and high). Both care needs and care hours increased with age, but the speed of increase varied by trajectory. Females, minority ethnic groups, people with low wealth, and those experiencing housing problems were more likely to follow the joint trajectories characterised by higher care needs and higher care intensity. People with low or medium care needs stayed in the same trajectories of care utilisation. In contrast, people in the high-needs trajectory followed divergent trajectories of care utilisation: 63% of them followed the trajectory of high care intensity and the rest (37%) followed the trajectory of medium care intensity. Lack of spouse care was the leading predictor of trajectory divergence (OR = 3.57, p < 0.001). Trajectories of care needs and utilisation are highly heterogeneous in later life, which indicates persistent inequalities over time. Single people with multiple functional limitations face an acute and enduring risk of inadequate care and unmet needs. The amount of support is as important as the availability of support.
      PubDate: 2022-08-02
       
  • Chronic patients as retirement-aged workers: the impact of
           employment-based health insurance and chronic conditions on health-related
           working capacity and late-life career participation

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      Abstract: Abstract Retirement-aged workers with chronic conditions are increasingly engaged in late-life careers in the policy context of delayed retirement initiative. However, it remains uncertain as to how chronic conditions and employment-based social health insurance interact to affect health-related working capacity and late career participation in this group of people. Using data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) and the discrete choice model, this study finds that chronic conditions are negatively associated with health-related working capacity (– 0.400, p < 0.01) and late-life career participation (– 0.170, p < 0.01). Employment-based health insurance is positively associated with health-related working capacity of retirement-aged workers (0.432, p < 0.01), but is negatively associated with their late-life career participation (– 1.027, p < 0.01). Moreover, employment-based health insurance could weaken the negative associations between chronic conditions and health-related working capacity (interaction = 0.285, p < 0.05) and late-life career participation (interaction = 0.251, p < 0.05). More fine-grained policies for delayed retirement are needed to focus on the long-neglected health of retirement-aged workers with chronic conditions.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • Gender differences in access to community-based care: a longitudinal
           analysis of widowhood and living arrangements

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      Abstract: Abstract Persistent inequalities in access to community-based support limit opportunities for independent living for older people with care needs in Europe. Our study focuses on investigating how gender, widowhood and living arrangement associate with the probability of receiving home and community-based care, while accounting for the shorter-term associations of transitions into widowhood (bereavement) and living alone, as well as the longer–term associations of being widowed and living alone. We use comparative, longitudinal data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (collected between 2004 and 2015 in 15 countries) specifying sex-disaggregated random-effects within-between models, which allow us to examine both cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among widowhood, living arrangements and community-based care use. We find widowhood and living alone are independently associated with care use for both older women and men, while bereavement is associated with higher probability of care use only for women. Socio-economic status was associated with care use for older women, but not for men in our sample. The gender-specific associations we identify have important implications for fairness in European long-term care systems. They can inform improved care targeting towards individuals with limited informal care resources (e.g. bereaved older men) and lower socio-economic status, who are particularly vulnerable to experiencing unmet care needs. Gender differences are attenuated in countries that support formal care provision, suggesting gender equity can be promoted by decoupling access to care from household and family circumstances.
      PubDate: 2022-07-27
       
  • Loneliness before and during the COVID-19 pandemic—are unpartnered and
           childless older adults at higher risk'

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      Abstract: Abstract COVID-19 mitigation efforts had the potential to exacerbate loneliness among older adults, particularly for the unpartnered or childless, yet specific studies on loneliness among these groups during the COVID-19 pandemic are lacking. Using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) collected before (October 2019–March 2020) and during the pandemic (June–August 2020), we examine two loneliness outcomes: (1) “have you felt lonely recently'” (both datasets) and (2) “have you felt lonelier than before the pandemic'” (2020), and examine differences by partnership and parenthood status. Before COVID-19, those who lacked one tie but had the other (unpartnered parents or partnered childless) were at highest loneliness risk. During COVID-19, unpartnered and childless—especially unpartnered—remain at higher risk for loneliness, entering loneliness, and not “exiting” loneliness. We discuss these findings in light of family norms and needs in pandemic and non-pandemic times and provide recommendations for future research.
      PubDate: 2022-07-19
       
  • Evaluation of a multi-component training programme for employees aged 50+

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      Abstract: Abstract Lifelong learning offers an opportunity for mature employees to stay adept in the light of changing demands, to promote health and counteract physical and cognitive decline. This intervention study evaluates the effects of a multi-component training programme for employees aged 50+ , focussing on competence expectations, stress management, cognitive, metacognitive and psychomotoric training. Effects were evaluated in a longitudinal control group design with follow-up after six months (24 training groups, n = 247, participants per group: M = 13.04, SD = 2.44; control group, n = 199). To control for experimenter effects the same programme was administered to 6 additional groups by trained instructors (n = 54, participants per group: M = 11.83, SD = 3.37). To validate effects of the multi-component training 12 supplementary groups were included, with 4 groups each focusing on either the competence (n = 49, participants per group: M = 15.00, SD = 0.00) or cognitive (n = 43, participants per group: M = 14.25, SD = 1.50) or stress management components (n = 41, participants per group: M = 14.50, SD = 0.58). Data of 633 adults (mean age: M = 55.03, SD = 3.71 years) were analysed. Participants reported high acceptance of the programme. The multi-component training programme was effective regarding improvements in subjective health, self-concept of professional competence, self-efficacy, coping with stress and cognitive abilities with long-term effects for the latter four. Trainings administered by trained instructors had similar effects to those administered by the programme’s designers. The single-component trainings led to specific effects in the focused areas, overall comparable to those of the multi-component training. Unexpectedly, cognitive effects were obtained by all single-component trainings. Subjective health and self-efficacy were only promoted by the multi-component training, indicating broader effects. The results are discussed with respect to strengths and limitations of the study, possible mechanisms underlying the effects, suggestions for further research as well as for the training’s implementation in business practice.
      PubDate: 2022-07-11
       
  • A link between age, affect, and predictions'

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      Abstract: Abstract The prevalence of depressive symptoms decreases from late adolescence to middle age adulthood. Furthermore, despite significant losses in motor and cognitive functioning, overall emotional well-being tends to increase with age, and a bias to positive information has been observed multiple times. Several causes have been discussed for this age-related development, such as improvement in emotion regulation, less regret, and higher socioeconomic status. Here, we explore a further explanation. Our minds host mental models that generate predictions about forthcoming events to successfully interact with our physical and social environment. To keep these models faithful, the difference between the predicted and the actual event, that is, the prediction error, is computed. We argue that prediction errors are attenuated in the middle age and older mind, which, in turn, may translate to less negative affect, lower susceptibility to affective disorders, and possibly, to a bias to positive information. Our proposal is primarily linked to perceptual inferences, but may hold as well for higher-level, cognitive, and emotional forms of error processing.
      PubDate: 2022-07-05
       
  • Correction to: Changes in socioeconomic differentials in old age life
           expectancy in four Nordic countries: the impact of educational expansion
           and education-specific mortality

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      PubDate: 2022-06-28
       
  • Testing the informal care model: intrapersonal change in care provision
           intensity during the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract Informal care, meaning taking health-related care of people in their own social network, is a topic that gets more and more attention in social science research because the pressure on people to provide informal care is rising due to ageing societies and policy changes. The Informal Care Model developed by Broese van Groenou and de Boer (Eur J Ageing 13(3):271–279, 2016) provides a theoretical foundation to understand under what conditions a person provides informal care. We test this theoretical model by applying it to intrapersonal changes in informal care provision during the first COVID-19 lockdown in the Netherlands in Spring 2020. Data from the LISS panel from two time points, March 2020 and data from July over the period of April/May 2020, were analysed with multinominal multilevel regression analysis (N = 1270 care situations of 1014 caregivers). Our results showed that the individual determinants (Do I have to', Do I want to', and especially Can I') discussed in the Informal Care Model (apart from a series of control variables) are contributing substantially to the understanding of intrapersonal changes in care provision during the first lockdown and by that, we found empirical support for the theoretical model. We conclude that on top of its original purpose to explain between-individual differences in informal caregiving using static indicators, the Informal Care Model is also useful to explain intrapersonal changes in informal caregiving using dynamic indicators.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
       
  • Work ability and physical fitness among aging workers: the Finnish
           Retirement and Aging Study

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      Abstract: Background With advancing age, physical capacity gradually decreases which may lead to decreased work ability, if the physical work requirements remain the same. Examination of the importance of physical fitness for work ability among aging workers will help to find potential strategies to promote work ability in old age. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between physical fitness and work ability among aging workers. Methods Aging workers (n = 288, mean age 62.5, 83% women) from the Finnish Retirement and Aging study underwent cardiorespiratory, muscular fitness and functional testing. Work ability was inquired on a scale 0–10 from poor to excellent. Association between physical fitness indicators and work ability was examined using ordinary least squares regression, taking into account age, gender, occupational status, heavy physical work, body mass index and accelerometer-measured daily total physical activity. Results VO2peak, modified push-up test and maximal walking speed were positively associated with work ability (β = 0.51, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29–0.74, β = 0.46, 95% CI 0.26–0.66 and β = 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.39, respectively), while chair rise test time was inversely associated with work ability (β = −0.23, 95% CI −0.39–−0.06). No associations were found between hand grip strength or sit-up test and work ability. Conclusions Cardiorespiratory fitness, upper body strength, and lower extremity function were positively associated with work ability. Good physical fitness may help to maintain work ability among aging workers.
      PubDate: 2022-06-22
       
  • Correction to: Revisiting the Nordic long-term care model for older
           people—still equal'

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      PubDate: 2022-06-16
       
  • Frailty at Risk Scale (FARS): development and application

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      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this cross-sectional study was to develop a Frailty at Risk Scale (FARS) incorporating ten well-known determinants of frailty: age, sex, marital status, ethnicity, education, income, lifestyle, multimorbidity, life events, and home living environment. In addition, a second aim was to develop an online calculator that can easily support healthcare professionals in determining the risk of frailty among community-dwelling older people. The FARS was developed using data of 373 people aged ≥ 75 years. The Tilburg Frailty Indicator (TFI) was used for assessing frailty. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the determinants multimorbidity, unhealthy lifestyle, and ethnicity (ethnic minority) were the most important predictors. The area under the curve (AUC) of the model was 0.811 (optimism 0.019, 95% bootstrap CI = −0.029; 0.064). The FARS is offered on a Web site, so that it can be easily used by healthcare professionals, allowing quick intervention in promoting quality of life among community-dwelling older people.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Fear of falling and all-cause mortality among young-old community-dwelling
           adults: a 6-year prospective study

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      Abstract: Abstract This study investigated whether fear of falling (FOF) measured by two different instruments, the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) and the single question on FOF and activity restriction (SQ-FAR), is associated with mortality at 6-year follow-up. Participants (n = 1359, 58.6% women) were community-dwelling persons enrolled in the Lausanne cohort 65 + , aged 66 to 71 years at baseline. Covariables assessed at baseline included demographic, cognitive, affective, functional and health status, while date of death was obtained from the office in charge for population registration. Unadjusted Kaplan Meyer curves were performed to show the survival probability for all-cause mortality according to the degree of FOF reported with FES-I and SQ-FAR, respectively. Bivariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed to assess hazard ratios, using time-in-study as the time scale variable and adjusting for variables significantly associated in bivariable analyses. During the 6-year follow-up, 102 (7.5%) participants died. Reporting the highest level of fear at FES-I (crude HR 3.86, 95% CI 2.37–6.29, P < .001) or “FOF with activity restriction” with SQ-FAR (crude HR 2.42, 95% CI 1.44-4.09, P = .001) were both associated with increased hazard of death but these associations did not remain significant once adjusting for gender, cognitive, affective and functional status. As a conclusion, although high FOF and related activity restriction, assessed with FES-I and SQ-FAR, identifies young-old community-dwelling people at increased risk of 6-year mortality, this association disappears when adjusting for potential confounders. As a marker of negative health outcomes, FOF should be screened for in order to provide personalized care and reduce subsequent risks.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • The association between supportive social ties and autonomic nervous
           system function—differences between family ties and friendship ties in a
           cohort of older adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Supportive family and friendship ties can serve different functions and thus might show different associations with an individual’s health. Particularly, older adults might show varying health benefits of different types of supportive ties depending on their marital and retirement status. Our aim is to analyze relationships between different types of supportive social ties and autonomic nervous system (ANS) function, a physiological indicator of health that can help to establish the biological plausibility of the association—measured by heart rate variability (HRV). We present cross-sectional linear regression analyses of a German cohort of community-dwelling older adults (2008–2010; n = 1,548; mean age = 68.7 years). Our findings indicate that supportive friendship ties show significant positive associations (i.e., higher HRV) in individuals that are either not married or above retirement age. Supportive family ties show significant positive associations in individuals below retirement age. Significant results vanish or are reduced after accounting for behavioral/physical and psychological/cognitive indicators. We conclude that programs supporting the development or maintenance of friendship ties might be especially beneficial in unmarried older adults and adults above retirement age.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Using the intergenerational solidarity framework to understand the
           grandparent–grandchild relationship: a scoping review

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      Abstract: Abstract Intergenerational interactions and exchange are major components of grandparenting, and the present study sought to examine how the intergenerational solidarity framework has been used to investigate grandparenting practices across the lifespan and in different cultures. This framework is widely used across cultures and provides a basis to discuss the future of grandparenting research, considering cultural intermingling and changes in society. Following PRISMA-ScR guidelines, we searched three databases (PsycInfo, PubMed, and Web of Science). Finally, 42 empirical studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this scoping review. They were published between 1991 and 2020 and assessed intergenerational solidarity between grandparents and their grandchildren. Our findings show that research on grandparenting based on the intergenerational solidarity framework has increased in the last 30 years, and that this model provides a comprehensive approach to studying grandparenting across the lifespan in different cultures. The present study identified cross-cultural differences in the prevalence of the types of intergenerational solidarity. Affectual solidarity was shown to be the most studied dimension of intergenerational solidarity in North America, Europe and Israel, while normative solidarity was the most represented in Asian studies. The only Australian study investigated affectual and functional solidarity. This model is thus suitable for studying grandparenting, but further studies are needed to investigate changes in intergenerational solidarity between grandparents and their grandchildren at different stages of development and account for cultural specificities.
      PubDate: 2022-06-01
       
  • Social inequalities in ageing in the Nordic countries

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      PubDate: 2022-05-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00702-5
       
  • Choice models in nordic long-term care: care managers' experiences of
           privilege and disadvantage among older adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Consumer choice models have been introduced in eldercare services in several Western welfare societies. Choice models in eldercare emphasise the importance of individuals’ abilities to make informed choices and therefore entail a risk for increased inequalities among older adults with care needs. In the Nordic countries, such inequality risks are in stark contrast to universal policy ambitions of equal access to care services. Care managers, who are responsible for needs assessment for eldercare services, have a central role in implementing policies and, thus, have first-hand experience of their impact on older adults’ access to care. The aim of this study was to explore care managers’ experiences of how user choice affects older adults’ access to care services in three Nordic cities: Copenhagen, Tampere, and Stockholm. These cities were purposely selected as forerunners in marketisation, with different ways of implementing choice models. Semi-structured interviews with care managers were conducted in Copenhagen, Tampere, and Stockholm and analysed thematically. The findings indicate there are difficulties related to older adults’ ability to access information needed to make informed choices, as well as limitations in choice related to available services and personal finances. Further, care managers find that older adults’ abilities to overcome these difficulties are shaped by their health, education, language skills, and assistance from relatives. In order to reduce the risk of choice models increasing the gap between older adults with different resources and capabilities, there is a need to develop accessible information, as well as models for professional guidance.
      PubDate: 2022-05-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00697-z
       
  • Revisiting the Nordic long-term care model for older people—still
           equal' Special issue EJA, edited by Fritzell, Jylhä and Rostgaard

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      Abstract: Abstract With the extensive long-term care services for older people, the Nordic countries have been labelled ‘caring states’ as reported (Leira, Welfare state and working mothers: the Scandinavian experience, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 1992). The emphasis on services and not cash benefits ensures the Nordics a central place in the public service model (Anttonen and Sipilä, J Eur Soc Policy 6:87–100, 1996). The main feature of this ideal model is public social care services, such as home care and residential care services, which can cover the need for personal and medical care, as well as assistance with household chores. These services are provided within a formally and professionally based long-term care system, where the main responsibility for the organization, provision and financing of care traditionally lays with the public sector. According to the principle of universalism (in: Antonnen et al. (eds), Welfare state, universalism and diversity, Elgar, Cheltenham, 2013), access to benefits such as home care and residential care is based on citizenship and need, not contributions nor merit. Also, care services should be made available for all and generally be used by all, with no stigma associated. Vabø and Szebehely (in: Anttonen (ed), Welfare State, universalism and diversity, Edward Elgar Publishing, London, 2012)) further argue that the Nordic service universalism is more than merely issues of eligibility and accessibility, in that it also encompasses whether services are attractive, affordable and flexible in order to meet a diversity of needs and preferences. However, recent decades have seen a continuous tendency towards prioritization of care for the most frail, contributing to unmet need, informalization of care and privatization in the use of topping up with market-based services. These changes have raised questions about increasing inequalities within Nordic long-term care systems. We investigate in the article what effect changes have for equality across social class and gender, for users and informal carers. The article is based on analysis of comparable national and international statistics and a review of national research literature and policy documents.
      PubDate: 2022-05-03
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00703-4
       
  • Changes in socioeconomic differentials in old age life expectancy in four
           Nordic countries: the impact of educational expansion and
           education-specific mortality

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      Abstract: Abstract which poses a risk for the future increase of inequalities in LE.
      PubDate: 2022-04-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00698-y
       
  • The influence of sociodemographic factors and close relatives at hospital
           discharge and post hospital care of older people with complex care needs:
           nurses’ perceptions on health inequity in three Nordic cities

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      Abstract: Abstract Hospital discharge of older people in need of both medical and social care following their hospital stay requires extensive coordination. This study aims to examine and compare the views of nurses in three Nordic cities on the influence of sociodemographic factors and having close relatives, for the hospital discharge and post hospital care of older people with complex health and social care needs. Thirty-five semi-structured interviews (Copenhagen n = 11, Tampere n = 8, Stockholm n = 16) with nurses were conducted. The nurses were identified through the researchers’ networks, invitation and snowball sampling, and recruited from hospitals, primary care practices, home care units, home nursing units, and geriatric departments. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Interpretations were discussed and agreed within the team. Four main themes and 13 sub-themes were identified. Across the cities, informants reported that the patient’s health status, rather than their gender or ethnicity, steered the discharge date and further care. Care costs, commonly reported in Tampere but also in Copenhagen and Stockholm including costs for medications and home help, were considered barriers for disadvantaged older people. Home situation, local arrangements and differences in collaboration between healthcare professionals at different sites also influenced the hospital discharge. Generally, the patient’s health status steered the hospital discharge and post-hospital care. Close relatives were regarded important and a potential advantage. Some informants tried to compensate for the absence of close relatives, highlighting the importance of care systems that can compensate for this to minimise avoidable inequity.
      PubDate: 2022-04-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00701-6
       
  • A social exclusion perspective on loneliness in older adults in the Nordic
           countries

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      Abstract: Abstract Several factors associated with loneliness are also considered indicators of social exclusion. While loneliness has been proposed as an outcome of social exclusion, there is limited empirical evidence of a link. This study examines the associations between social exclusion indicators and loneliness in older adults (60+ years) in four Nordic countries. Data from four waves of the European Social Survey were pooled, providing a total of 7755 respondents (Denmark n = 1647; Finland n = 2501, Norway n = 1540; Sweden n = 2067). Measures of loneliness, demographic characteristics, health, and eight indicators of social exclusion were selected from the survey for analysis. Country-specific and total sample hierarchical logistic regression models of loneliness were developed. Significant model improvement occurred for all models after social exclusion indicators were added to models containing only demographic and health variables. Country models explained between 15.1 (Finland) and 21.5% (Sweden) of the variance in loneliness. Lower frequency of social contacts and living alone compared to in a two-person household was associated with a higher probability of loneliness in all countries, while other indicators were associated with loneliness in specific countries: lower neighbourhood safety (Sweden and Denmark); income concern (Sweden and Finland); and no emotional support (Denmark, Finland, and Sweden). A robust relationship was apparent between indicators of social exclusion and loneliness with the direction of associations being highly consistent across countries, even if their strength and statistical significance varied. Social exclusion has considerable potential for understanding and addressing risk factors for loneliness.
      PubDate: 2022-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10433-022-00692-4
       
 
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