Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8196 journals)
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GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Drugs & Aging
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.072
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1170-229X - ISSN (Online) 1179-1969
Published by Adis Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Temporal Trends Over Two Decades in the Use of Anticholinergic Drugs Among
           Older Community-Dwelling People in Helsinki, Finland

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      Abstract: Background Knowledge of the adverse effects of drugs with anticholinergic properties (DAPs) has increased in recent decades. However, research on the temporal trends of the clinical use of DAPs is still sparse. Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal trends of DAP use over two decades in the older community-dwelling population and to explore the medication classes contributing to the use of DAPs. Methods The study involved random samples of ≥ 75-year-old community-dwelling Helsinki citizens in 1999, 2009, and 2019 from the Helsinki Ageing Study. A postal questionnaire inquired about their health, functioning, and medications. The medications were categorized as DAPs according to Duran’s list. In addition, we grouped DAPs into various medication groups. Results The prevalence and burden of DAPs on Duran's list showed a decreasing trend over the years. In 1999 the prevalence was 20% and the burden 0.35, in 2009 they were 22% and 0.35, respectively, and in 2019 they were 16% and 0.23, respectively. There were no differences in how the 75- and 80-year-olds used DAPs compared with those aged 85 years and older. The proportion of typical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, hypnotics, urinary antispasmodics, and asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease medications decreased, whereas the proportion of atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants, strong opioids, and antihistamines increased. In particular the use of mirtazapine increased—to 3.9% in 2019. In 2019 the three most prevalent groups of DAPs were antidepressants (7.4%), opioids (2.7%), and antihistamines (2.4%). Conclusions The decrease in the use of DAPs on Duran's list is a welcome change. Although the use of old, strong DAPs has decreased, new DAPs have simultaneously emerged. Physicians need continuous education in prescribing DAPs and more recent information on the use and effects of DAPs is needed in order to decrease their exposure among the rapidly growing older population.
      PubDate: 2022-08-01
       
  • Hormonal Agents for the Treatment of Depression Associated with the
           Menopause

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      Abstract: Abstract Perimenopause marks the transition from a woman’s reproductive stage to menopause. Usually occurring between 42 and 52 years of age, it is determined clinically by the onset of irregular menstrual cycles or variable cycle lengths. Women are at an increased risk of depression and anxiety during perimenopause and the menopausal transition. Depressive symptoms experienced in perimenopause are often more severe compared to pre- and post-menopause. During menopausal transition, the impact of fluctuating estrogen in the central nervous system (CNS) can have negative psychological effects for some women. Traditional first-line management of menopausal depression involves antidepressants, with modest outcomes. The positive effects of estrogen treatment in the CNS are becoming increasingly recognised, and hormonal therapy (HT) with estrogen may have a role in the treatment of menopausal depression. In this review we will outline the prevalence, impact and neurochemical basis of menopausal-associated depression, as well as hormone-based approaches that have increasing promise as effective treatments.
      PubDate: 2022-07-30
       
  • Management of Hypertension in the Elderly and Frail Patient

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      Abstract: Abstract Hypertension is a frequent finding in elderly patients. Hypertension in older age can be both associated with frailty and represent a risk factor for frailty. Hypertension is recognized as a main risk factor for cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure, atrial fibrillation, and stroke and the occurrence of these diseases may provoke a decline in health status and/or worsen the degree of frailty. Blood pressure targets in hypertensive older and frail patients are not completely defined. However, specific evaluations of individual patients and their co-morbidities and assessment of domains and components of frailty, together with weighted consideration of drug use, may help in finding the appropriate therapy.
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
       
  • Primary-Care Prescribers’ Perspectives on Deprescribing Opioids and
           Benzodiazepines in Older Adults

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      Abstract: Purpose Opioids and benzodiazepines (BZDs) are frequently implicated as contributing to falls in older adults. Deprescribing of these medications continues to be challenging. This study evaluated primary-care prescribers’ confidence in and perceptions of deprescribing opioids and BZDs for older adults. Methods For this study, we conducted a quantitative analysis of survey data combined with an analysis of qualitative data from a focus group. A survey evaluating prescriber confidence in deprescribing opioids and BZDs was distributed to providers at 15 primary-care clinics in North Carolina between March-December 2020. Average confidence (scale 0–100) for deprescribing opioids, deprescribing BZDs, and deprescribing under impeding circumstances were reported. A virtual focus group was conducted in March 2020 to identify specific barriers and facilitators to deprescribing opioids and BZDs. Audio recordings and transcripts were analyzed using inductive coding. Results We evaluated 61 survey responses (69.3% response rate). Respondents were predominantly physicians (54.8%), but also included nurse practitioners (24.6%) and physician assistants (19.4%). Average overall confidence in deprescribing was comparable for opioids (64.5) and BZDs (65.9), but was lower for deprescribing under impeding circumstances (53.7). In the focus group, prescribers noted they met more resistance when deprescribing BZDs and that issues such as lack of time, availability of mental health resources, and patients seeing multiple prescribers were barriers to deprescribing. Conclusion Findings from quantitative and qualitative analyses identified that prescribers were moderately confident in their ability to deprescribe both opioids and BZDs in older adults, but less confident under potentially impeding circumstances. Future studies are needed to evaluate policies and interventions to overcome barriers to deprescribing opioids and BZDs in primary care.
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
       
  • A Cohort Study on Influenza Vaccine and All-Cause Mortality in Older
           Adults: Methodological Concerns and Public Health Implications

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      Abstract: Introduction In 2020, the restrictions adopted to control the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic led to an unprecedented reduction in influenza-related burden. As such, the reduced chance to characterize the circulating virus strains might have increased the risk of vaccine mismatch for the forthcoming winter seasons. The role of an effective influenza vaccination campaign might therefore assume even more value, especially for frail and multimorbid older individuals. Methodological concerns on confounding by indication are always debated in vaccine effectiveness studies and it might be instrumental to give a pragmatic message on an individual’s responsibility to receive the influenza vaccine. We therefore investigated the role of specific confounders to explain the association between influenza vaccine and mortality among older adults. Methods Using a primary care database, we formed a cohort of patients aged 65 years or older who were actively registered with their general practitioner (GP) at the beginning of each of nine influenza seasons through to the 2018/2019 season. The study index date was the related seasons’ starting date. Exposure to the influenza vaccine was operationally defined in the 2 months preceding the index date up to 2 weeks before the exit date. Cox regression models were estimated to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) of death between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients in a time-dependent fashion. The potential confounders sequentially entered the model based on their increasing effect size observed in univariate analyses. Results Over the 10 years under study, the influenza vaccine showed a significant protective effect in terms of mortality, reaching 13% reduction (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.80–0.95) in the 2018/2019 influenza season. When we estimated the multivariate model by sequentially adding the potential confounders, there was an inversion of HR (below the unit) that was significantly explained by the covariates coding for a prior history of lower respiratory tract infections and the presence of the pneumococcal vaccine. Conclusion In the current pandemic scenario, we cannot divert attention to proper use of face masks, social distancing, and hand hygiene, which are important measures to prevent influenza and other respiratory viral infections. Nonetheless, their effectiveness might be negligible without acceptable coverage for influenza vaccine, especially in older patients with a history of lower respiratory tract infections, which appears to be the main source of confounding by indication.
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
       
  • Drug Survival, Safety, and Effectiveness of Biologics in Older Patients
           with Psoriasis: A Comparison with Younger Patients—A BioCAPTURE Registry
           Study

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      Abstract: Background Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disease in any age group, but also in older patients (≥ 65 years of age). Since older patients are often excluded from clinical trials, limited data specifically on this growing population are available, e.g. regarding the safety and performance of biological treatment. Aims We aimed to give insight into this specific population by comparing the drug survival and safety of biologics in older patients with that in younger patients. Methods In this real-world observational study, data from 3 academic and 15 non-academic centers in The Netherlands were extracted from the prospective BioCAPTURE registry. Biologics included in this study were tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-17, IL-12/23, and IL-23 inhibitors. Patients were divided into two age groups: ≥ 65 years and < 65 years. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used to measure comorbid disease status, and all adverse events (AEs) that led to treatment discontinuation were classified according to the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) classification. All AEs that led to treatment discontinuation were studied to check whether they could be classified as serious AEs (SAEs). Kaplan–Meier survival curves for overall 5-year drug survival and split according to reasons of discontinuation (ineffectiveness or AEs) were constructed. Cox regression models were used to correct for possible confounders and to investigate associations with drug survival in both age groups separately. Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores during the first 2 years of treatment and at the time of treatment discontinuation were assessed and compared between age groups. Results A total of 890 patients were included, of whom 102 (11.4%) were aged ≥ 65 years. Body mass index, sex, and distribution of biologic classes (e.g. TNFα, IL12/23) were not significantly different between the two age groups. A significantly higher CCI score was found in older patients, indicative of more comorbidity (p < 0.001). The 5-year ineffectiveness-related drug survival was lower for older patients (44.5% vs. 60.5%; p = 0.006), and the 5-year overall (≥ 65 years: 32.4% vs. < 65 years: 42.1%; p = 0.144) and AE-related (≥ 65 years: 82.1% vs. < 65 years: 79.5%; p = 0.913) drug survival was comparable between age groups. Of all AEs (n = 155) that led to discontinuation, 16 (10.3%) were reported as SAEs but these only occurred in younger patients. After correcting for confounders, the same trends were observed in the drug survival outcomes. Linear regression analyses on PASI scores showed no statistical differences at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months of treatment between age groups. Conclusions This study in a substantial, well-defined, prospective cohort provides further support that the use of biologics in older patients seems well-tolerated and effective. Biologic discontinuation due to AEs did not occur more frequently in older patients. Older patients discontinued biologic treatment more often due to ineffectiveness, although no clear difference in PASI scores was observed. More real-world studies on physician- and patient-related factors in older patients are warranted.
      PubDate: 2022-07-21
       
  • An Updated Analysis of Psychotropic Medicine Utilisation in Older People
           in New Zealand from 2005 to 2019

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      Abstract: Background Psychotropic medicine utilisation in older adults continues to be of interest because of overuse and concerns surrounding its safety and efficacy. Objective This study aimed to characterise the utilisation of psychotropic medicines in older people in New Zealand. Methods We conducted a repeated cross-sectional analysis of national dispensing data from 1 January, 2005 to 31 December, 2019. We defined utilisation using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification defined daily dose system. Utilisation was measured in terms of the defined daily dose (DDD) per 1000 older people per day (TOPD). Results Overall, the utilisation of psychotropic medicines increased marginally by 0.42% between 2005 and 2019. The utilisation increased for antidepressants (72.42 to 75.21 DDD/TOPD) and antipsychotics (6.06–19.04 DDD/TOPD). In contrast, the utilisation of hypnotics and sedatives (53.74–38.90 DDD/TOPD) and anxiolytics decreased (10.20–9.87 DDD/TOPD). The utilisation of atypical antipsychotics increased (4.06–18.72 DDD/TOPD), with the highest percentage change in DDD/TOPD contributed by olanzapine (520.6 %). In comparison, utilisation of typical antipsychotics was relatively stable (2.00–2.06 DDD/TOPD). The utilisation of venlafaxine increased remarkably by 5.7 times between 2005 and 2019. The utilisation of zopiclone was far greater than that of other hypnotics in 2019. Conclusions There was only a marginal increase in psychotropic medicines utilisation from 2005 to 2019 in older adults in New Zealand. There was a five-fold increase in the utilisation of antipsychotic medicines. Continued monitoring of psychotropic medicine utilisation will be of interest to understand the utilisation of antidepressants and antipsychotic medicines during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic year.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Pain Management in Older Adults with Chronic Wounds

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      Abstract: Abstract Older people often suffer from different types of ulcers, with the most prevalent being chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) and diabetic foot ulcers. There are major issues in the current medical approach because these ulcers are hard to heal, and, in the case of CLUs, very painful and with a high frequency of relapse. Older people complain of pain more frequently than young people, frequently due to a combination of painful chronic wounds with other comorbidities (e.g. arthritis, peripheral arterial disease, vertebrogenic pain syndrome). However, chronic pain appears to be managed better by older people because the pain sensitivity is downregulated and the pain threshold is higher in older people. Pain management of chronic wounds is often insufficient, especially in older individuals. It is highly important to use non-traumatic wound dressings and pay attention to patients’ feelings and fears because pain in chronic ulcers can impair wound healing. Key factors include good preparation for dressing change and adequate analgesia, ideally a combination of topical and oral agents.
      PubDate: 2022-07-13
       
  • Safety, Effectiveness, and Immunogenicity 6 Months After BNT162B2 mRNA
           Vaccine in Frail Nursing Home Residents

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      Abstract: Background Elderly people who reside in long-term care facilities form a frail and vulnerable population, with multiple pathologies and high percentages of cognitive and functional disability. Objectives The aims of this study were to assess the safety of vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in frail nursing home residents and to evaluate its effectiveness 6 months after full vaccination. Design This was an ambispective observational study. Setting Residents of a long-term care facility in Madrid, Spain. Participants One hundred and thirty-seven nursing home residents (81.8% female, mean age 87.77 ± 8.31 years) with high comorbidity (61.3% Charlson Index ≥ 3) and frailty (75% Clinical Frail Scale ≥ 7) who received the BNT162B2 mRNA vaccine. Measurements Safety data were collected to evaluate the type of adverse drug reactions and their duration, severity, and causality. Immunogenicity was tested 6 months after the primary vaccination and effectiveness was evaluated by the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the number of hospital admissions, and mortality due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Results Safety: Of the residents, 21.9% had some adverse reaction and 5.8% had a severe or more serious adverse reaction. The most frequent adverse reactions were fatigue (13.1%), pyrexia (12.4%), and headache (7.3%). No association was observed between frailty (including a need for palliative care) and clinical, functional or cognitive status of the participants and the occurrence of adverse events. Immunogenicity and Effectiveness: After 6 months of vaccination, only one case of SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed in the vaccinated residents. Most of the nursing home residents presented positive serology (95.2%). Loss of immunogenicity was associated with older age (95.12 ± 3.97 vs. 87.24 ± 8.25 years; p = 0.03) and no previous COVID-19 infection (16.6% vs. 70%; p < 0.001). Binary logistic regression models did not reveal this association. Conclusion The BNT162B2 vaccine is well tolerated and effective in nursing home residents, independently of their clinical, functional, cognitive, or frailty characteristics. For the most part, immunogenicity has been maintained over time, regardless of comorbidity, functional status or frailty.
      PubDate: 2022-07-07
       
  • New Horizons in the Treatment of Age-Associated Obesity, Sarcopenia and
           Osteoporosis

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      Abstract: Abstract The rapid increase in both the lifespan and proportion of older adults in developed countries is accompanied by the dramatic growth of age-associated chronic diseases, including obesity, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis. Hence, prevention and treatment of age-associated chronic diseases has become increasingly urgent. The key to achieving this goal is a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying their pathophysiology, some aspects of which, despite extensive investigation, are still not fully understood. Aging, obesity, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis are characterized by the creation of a systemic, chronic, low-grade inflammation (SCLGI). The common mechanisms that govern the development of these chronic conditions include a failed resolution of inflammation. Physiologically, the process of inflammation resolution is provided mainly by specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs) acting via cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Noteworthy, SPM levels and the expression of their receptors are significantly reduced in aging and the associated chronic disorders. In preclinical studies, supplementation of SPMs or their stable, small-molecule SPM mimetics and receptor agonists reveals clear beneficial effects in inflammation-related obesity and sarcopenic and osteoporotic conditions, suggesting a translational potential. Age-associated chronic disorders are also characterized by gut dysbiosis and the accumulation of senescent cells in the adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and bones. Based on these findings, we propose SCLGI resolution as a novel strategy for the prevention/treatment of age-associated obesity, sarcopenia, and osteoporosis. Our approach entails the enhancement of inflammation resolution by SPM mimetics and receptor agonists in concert with probiotics/prebiotics and compounds that eliminate senescent cells and their pro-inflammatory activity.
      PubDate: 2022-07-04
       
  • Frailty and Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing in Older People with
           Polypharmacy: A Bi-Directional Relationship'

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      Abstract: Abstract Frail older adults commonly experience multiple co-morbid illnesses and other risk factors for potentially inappropriate prescribing. However, determination of frailty varies depending on the frailty instrument used. Older people’s degree of frailty often influences their care and treatment priorities. Research investigating the association between frailty and potentially inappropriate prescribing is hindered by a wide variety of frailty definitions and measurement tools. We undertook a narrative review of selected articles of PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Articles were selected on the basis of relevance to the core themes of frailty and potentially inappropriate prescribing. We identified observational studies that clearly link potentially inappropriate prescribing, potential prescribing omissions, and adverse drug reactions with frailty in older adults. Equally, the literature illustrates that measured frailty in older adults predisposes to inappropriate polypharmacy and associated adverse drug reactions and events. In essence, there is a bi-directional relationship between frailty and potentially inappropriate prescribing, the underlying substrates being multimorbidity and inappropriate polypharmacy. We conclude that there is a need for consensus on rapid and accurate identification of frailty in older people using appropriate and user-friendly methods for routine clinical practice as a means of identifying older multimorbid patients at risk of potentially inappropriate prescribing. Detection of frailty should, we contend, lead to structured screening for inappropriate prescribing in this high-risk population. Of equal importance, detection of potentially inappropriate prescribing in older people should trigger screening for frailty. All clinicians undertaking a medication review of multimorbid patients with associated polypharmacy should take account of the important interaction between frailty and potentially inappropriate prescribing in the interest of minimizing patient harm.
      PubDate: 2022-06-29
       
  • The Prevalence of Adverse Drug Reactions and Adverse Drug Events from
           Heart Failure Medications in Frail Older Adults: A Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Introduction Frailty is highly prevalent in heart failure populations and a major risk factor for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and adverse drug events (ADEs). This review aimed to describe the prevalence, causality and severity of ADRs or ADEs from heart failure medications among frail compared with non-frail older adults. Methods A systematic search of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, Ageline, CINAHL, International Pharmaceutical s, PsychInfo, Scopus, registries and citations prior to 18 May 2021 was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) 2020 checklist. Risk of bias and quality of evidence were assessed. Eligible studies included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies of people diagnosed with heart failure, aged ≥ 65 years, with frailty defined by an objective measurement, and reported ADRs/ADEs from/with heart failure medications. Results Two reviewers screened 2419 articles; interrater reliability kappa = 0.88. Three observational studies (n = 2596), a secondary analysis of two RCTs (n = 2098) and two cohort studies (n = 498) were included in a narrative synthesis. Frail patients in randomised trials of sacubitril/valsartan, aliskiren, or enalapril had twice the risk of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.09, 1.62–2.71) and hospitalisations (HR 1.82, 1.37–2.41) compared with robust patients, which may reflect responsiveness to medications and/or factors unrelated to medication use. Hospitalisations from falls, tiredness and nausea were probably attributable to digoxin and possibly preventable according to the Naranjo and Hallas scales, respectively. Conclusion The potential harms from heart failure medications in frail older people are poorly studied and understood. Clinical trials and pharmacovigilance studies should include frailty as a covariate to inform medication optimisation for this vulnerable and growing population. Registration Prospero registration number: CRD 42021253762. Graphical
      PubDate: 2022-06-28
       
  • Antihypertensive Drugs and Risk of Bone Fractures

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      Abstract: Abstract Antihypertensive drugs are among the most documented regimens worldwide with an overall survival and cardioprotective benefit. However, there is evidence that they cause symptoms of orthostatic hypotension (i.e., dizziness and syncope) placing patients at risk for falls and fall-related injuries such as bone fractures. Moreover, it seems that they might impact bone metabolism and architecture impairing bone health. The aim of this review was to summarize the accumulative literature exploring any potential association between several antihypertensive medications including diuretics, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors, beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers and the risk of fractures.
      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • Pharmacotherapy for Spine-Related Pain in Older Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract As the population ages, spine-related pain is increasingly common in older adults. While medications play an important role in pain management, their use has limitations in geriatric patients due to reduced liver and renal function, comorbid medical problems, and polypharmacy. This review will assess the evidence basis for medications used for spine-related pain in older adults, with a focus on drug metabolism and adverse drug reactions. A PubMed/OVID search crossing common spine, neck, and back pain terms with key words for older adults and geriatrics was combined with common drug classes and common drug names and limited to clinical trials and age over 65 years. The results were then reviewed with identification of commonly used drugs and drug categories: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs), acetaminophen, corticosteroids, gabapentin and pregabalin, antispastic and antispasmodic muscle relaxants, tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), tramadol, and opioids. Collectively, 138 double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were the focus of the review. The review found a variable contribution of high-quality studies examining the efficacy of medications for spine pain primarily in the geriatric population. There was strong evidence for NSAID use with adjustments for gastrointestinal and renal risk factors. Gabapentin and pregabalin had mixed evidence for neuropathic pain. SNRIs had good evidence for neuropathic pain and a more favorable safety profile than TCAs. Tramadol had some evidence in older patients, but more so in persons aged < 65 years. Rational therapeutic choices based on geriatric spine pain diagnosis are helpful, such as NSAIDs and acetaminophen for arthritic and myofascial-based pain, gabapentinoids or duloxetine for neuropathic and radicular pain, antispastic agents for myofascial-based pain, and combination therapy for mixed etiologies. Tramadol can be well tolerated in older patients, but has risks of cognitive and classic opioid side effects. Otherwise, opioids are typically avoided in the treatment of spine-related pain in older adults due to their morbidity and mortality risk and are reserved for refractory severe pain. Whenever possible, beneficial geriatric spine pain pharmacotherapy should employ the lowest therapeutic doses with consideration of polypharmacy, potentially decreased renal and hepatic metabolism, and co-morbid medical disorders.
      PubDate: 2022-06-27
       
  • Incident Functional Limitations Among Community-Dwelling Adults Using
           Opioids: A Retrospective Cohort Study Using a Propensity Analysis with the
           Health and Retirement Study

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      Abstract: Background Opioid analgesics are commonly used to manage pain; however, it is unclear how they affect patient function. This study examines the association between opioid analgesics and incident limitations in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), and cognitive functioning among community-dwelling older adults. Methods Data included 10,003 participants of the 2016 and 2018 waves of the Health and Retirement Study, which sampled US adults aged 51–98 years. The primary exposure was self-reported opioid pain medication use in 2016. Outcomes included incident limitations in ADL, IADL, and cognitive functioning in 2018. Statistical methods adjusted for confounding using multivariable logistic regressions, inverse probability of treatment weighting, and propensity scores. Results Opioid use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.07–1.68) was associated with a statistically significant higher odds of incident ADL limitation in multivariable regression and in propensity score adjustment (aOR: 1.41, 95% CI 1.13–1.76). The association between opioid use and ADL and IADL limitations was modified by age. Adults aged < 65 years had a higher odds of incident ADL (aOR: 1.83, 95% CI 1.38–2.42) and IADL (aOR: 1.42, 95% CI 1.06–1.90) limitations compared with those aged ≥ 65 years. Conclusions Community-dwelling adults using opioid analgesics to manage pain may be at risk for incident ADL limitations. Middle-aged adults, compared with those older than 65 years of age, experienced the greatest odds for incident ADL and IADL limitations following opioid use. According to sensitivity analyses, our findings were robust to unmeasured confounding.
      PubDate: 2022-06-17
       
  • Correction to: Scoping Review of Studies Evaluating Frailty and Its
           Association with Medication Harm

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      PubDate: 2022-06-16
       
  • Correction to: The FORTA (Fit fOR The Aged) List 2021: Fourth Version of a
           Validated Clinical Aid for Improved Pharmacotherapy in Older Adults

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      PubDate: 2022-06-06
       
  • Potentially Inappropriate Medications Pre- and Post-Diagnosis of Major
           Neurocognitive Disorders Among Older People in Sweden: A Register-Based,
           6-Year Longitudinal Study

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      Abstract: Objective The aim of the present study was to investigate how potentially inappropriate medication usage and anti-dementia drug use change from 3 years prior to, up until 3 years post-diagnosis of major neurocognitive disorders among older people living in Sweden. Methods People registered in the Swedish registry for cognitive/dementia disorders from 1 July, 2008 to 31 December, 2017, and aged 68 years or older at diagnosis, were included (n = 67,226). Data were combined with the Swedish Prescribed Drug Registry to obtain information about drugs collected in 6-month periods at Swedish pharmacies from 3 years pre-diagnosis until 3 years post-diagnosis. Potentially inappropriate medications were identified according to Swedish national guidelines. A generalised estimating equation regression model and estimated marginal means were used. Results Of the 67,226 people included in the study population, 59.2% were women and the mean age ± standard deviation was 81.5 ± 6.4 years, 47.0% lived together with a spouse or partner, and 88.9% were living at home at the time of diagnosis. The proportions of people using potentially inappropriate medications continuously decreased pre- and post-diagnosis, except for antipsychotic drug use, which continuously increased both pre- and post-diagnosis. Moreover, anticholinergic drug use increased pre-diagnosis and declined post-diagnosis. When comparing the periods pre- and post-diagnosis date, the adjusted proportion of people using potentially inappropriate medications was significantly lower post-diagnosis compared with pre-diagnosis, except for the adjusted proportion using antipsychotics, which was significantly higher post-diagnosis, 10.6%, compared with the period before, 3.1% (adjusted odds ratio 3.71; 95% confidence interval 3.59–3.83). The adjusted proportion of people using anticholinergic drugs was significantly lower post-diagnosis, 7.2%, compared with the pre-diagnosis period, 8.9% (adjusted odds ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.78–0.82). Anti-dementia drug use was significantly higher post-diagnosis, 52.6%, when compared with the pre-diagnosis period, 3.5% (adjusted odds ratio 30.13; 95% confidence interval 29.19–31.10). Conclusions Overall, the prevalence of people using potentially inappropriate medications decreased and was significantly lower post-diagnosis of major neurocognitive disorders, except for antipsychotics. This indicates that potentially inappropriate medication use should be noticed and reviewed among all older people. The small decrease in the prevalence of anticholinergic drug users and the increasing proportions of people using antipsychotic drugs post-diagnosis are of special concern because of the adverse drug reactions associated with these types of potentially inappropriate medications. Consequently, it is important to identify and regularly question anticholinergic and antipsychotic drug treatment to prevent unnecessary and serious adverse drug reactions among a vulnerable group of people.
      PubDate: 2022-06-03
       
  • Relationship Amongst Vitamin K Status, Vitamin K Antagonist Use and
           Osteoarthritis: A Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Vitamin K is essential for the carboxylation of the vitamin K-dependent proteins that are responsible for the suppression of matrix calcification. The use of vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) in patients with cardiovascular diseases could affect protein carboxylation and lead to the development of osteoarthritis (OA). This review aims to summarise the current evidence for the relationship between VKAs and OA. The literature search revealed that in observation studies, good vitamin K status, as reflected by the circulating level or protein carboxylation status of vitamin K, is associated positively with improved joint structural and functional indices and negatively associated with OA incidence. By contrast, in limited retrospective and prospective studies, the use of VKAs is associated positively with OA occurrence and knee/hip replacement. Pharmacological interactions between VKAs and various OA therapeutic agents exist and require careful monitoring and dosing. In conclusion, further epidemiological studies are warranted to verify the relationship between VKA use and OA to strengthen the evidence. Given that VKA use exerts potentially negative effects on joint health, intervention is required to protect the quality of life and mobility of patients.
      PubDate: 2022-05-30
       
  • Current Therapies and Drug Development Pipeline in Lewy Body Dementia: An
           Update

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      Abstract: Abstract The term Lewy body dementia refers to either of two related diagnoses: dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Clinical management of Lewy body dementia is challenging. The current treatment options focus on relieving symptoms; no disease-modifying therapies are available. There are currently no US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs for the treatment of DLB, and there are only a few for PDD. Cholinesterase inhibitors are shown to be beneficial in improving cognitive symptoms in Lewy body dementia. Rivastigmine was approved by the FDA to treat PDD. Donepezil was approved in Japan as a treatment for DLB. Levodopa may provide modest benefit in treating motor symptoms and zonisamide in adjunct to low-dose levodopa helps with parkinsonism. Treatment of autonomic symptoms are based on symptomatic treatment with off-label agents. Our main objective in this article is to present an overview of the current pharmacological options available to treat the clinical features of DLB and PDD. When evaluating the existing management options for Lewy body dementia, it is difficult to fully separate PDD from DLB. However, we have attempted to identify whether the cited studies include patients with PDD and/or DLB. Moreover, we have provided an overview of the current drug pipeline in Lewy body dementia. All currently active trials are in phase I or II and most are focused on disease modification rather than symptomatic treatment. Phase II trial results for neflamapimod show promising results. Due to heterogeneity of symptoms and underlying pathophysiology, there is a need for new biomarker strategies and improved definitions of outcome measures for Lewy body dementia drug trials.
      PubDate: 2022-05-27
       
 
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