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GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 106)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.916
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 22  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1079-5006 - ISSN (Online) 1758-535X
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • DNA Damage in Circulating Hematopoietic Progenitor Stem Cells as Promising
           Biological Sensor of Frailty

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      Pages: 1279 - 1286
      Abstract: AbstractFrailty is an age-related syndrome that exposes individuals to increased vulnerability. Although it is potentially reversible, in most cases it leads to negative outcomes, including mortality. The different methods proposed identify frailty after the onset of clinical manifestations. An early diagnosis might make it possible to manage the frailty progression better. The frailty pathophysiology is still unclear although mechanisms, in particular, those linked to inflammation and immunosenescence, have been investigated. A common feature of several clinical aspects involved in senescent organisms is the increase of oxidative stress, described as one of the major causes of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage accumulation in aged cells including the adult stem cell compartment. Likely, this accumulation is implicated in frailty status. The oxidative status of our frail, pre-frail, and non-frail population was characterized. In addition, the DNA damage in hematopoietic cells was evidenced by analyzing the peripheral blood mononuclear cell and their T lymphocyte, monocyte, circulating hematopoietic progenitor stem cell (cHPSC) subpopulations. The phosphorylation of C-terminal of histone H2AX at amino acid Ser 139 (γ-H2AX), which occurs at the DNA double-strand break focus, was evaluated. In our frail population, increased oxidative stress and a high level of DNA damage in cHPSC were found. This study may have potential implications because the increment of DNA damage in cHPSC could be suggestive of an organism impairment preceding the evident frailty. In addition, it may open the possibility for attenuation of frailty progression throughout specific drugs acting on preventing DNA damage or removing damaged cells
      PubDate: Wed, 09 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac034
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Potential of Stem Cell-Based Therapy to Restore Function in Aging Systems:
           Are We There Yet'

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      Pages: 1292 - 1294
      Abstract: AbstractWhile there is extensive interest in geroscience approaches to health and disease, few basic science discoveries have made their way into clinical trials. Herein, we comment on cell-based therapies, in which supplementing robust stem cell capacity to aged systems theoretically could lead to sustained improvement. This exciting approach has undergone translational development, and we highlight studies targeting a single system and others aimed at treating overall aging frailty by restoring the aged stem cell niches that underly diminished endogenous regenerative capacity.
      PubDate: Tue, 04 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac003
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Comparing Effects of Polypharmacy on Inflammatory Profiles in Older Adults
           and Mice: Implications for Translational Aging Research

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      Pages: 1295 - 1303
      Abstract: AbstractAging and multimorbidity are associated with inflammation. Polypharmacy is common in older people with multimorbidity. Given the potential for interactions between polypharmacy and inflammation, the relationship between inflammation and polypharmacy were studied in older adults with multimorbidity and in healthy aging mice. A cross-sectional analysis of data from the 5-year wave of the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project, a population-based study of community-dwelling men aged ≥70 years. Serum concentrations of 27 cytokines were measured using a multiplex immunoassay. Associations between polypharmacy (≥5 medications) and cytokines were evaluated using multivariable linear regression adjusting for age, frailty, comorbidities, and individual drug classes. Interaction between polypharmacy and Drug Burden Index (DBI―drugs with anticholinergic and sedative effects) was analyzed. Effects of polypharmacy and DBI on serum levels of 23 cytokines were determined in aging male mice treated with chronic polypharmacy or control. Compared to the nonpolypharmacy group (n = 495), CHAMP participants with polypharmacy (n = 409) had significantly higher concentrations of IL-8, IL-6, CCL3, Eotaxin, IL-1ra, IL-1β, IP-10, and lower concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4. In fully-adjusted multivariable models, polypharmacy was positively associated with concentrations of IL-8 and CCL3. There were no significant differences in inflammatory profiles between control and polypharmacy-treated mice. The relationship was not influenced by DBI in men or in mice. Inflammatory markers associated with polypharmacy in older adults were not seen in healthy aged mice administered polypharmacy, and may be related to underlying diseases. The polypharmacy mouse model provides opportunities for mechanistic investigations in translational research.
      PubDate: Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac061
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Applying the AFRAID and FRIGHT Clocks to Novel Preclinical Mouse Models of
           Polypharmacy

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      Pages: 1304 - 1312
      Abstract: AbstractThe Frailty Inferred Geriatric Health Timeline (FRIGHT) and Analysis of Frailty and Death (AFRAID) clocks were developed to predict biological age and lifespan, respectively, in mice. Their utility within the context of polypharmacy (≥5 medications), which is very common in older adults, is unknown. In male C57BL/6J(B6) mice administered chronic polypharmacy, monotherapy, and undergoing treatment cessation (deprescribing), we aimed to compare these clocks between treatment groups; investigate whether treatment affected correlation of these clocks with mortality; and explore factors that may explain variation in predictive performance. Treatment (control, polypharmacy, or monotherapy) commenced from age 12 months. At age 21 months, each treatment group was subdivided to continue treatment or have it deprescribed. Frailty index was assessed and informed calculation of the clocks. AFRAID, FRIGHT, frailty index, and mortality age did not differ between continued treatment groups and control. Compared to continued treatment, deprescribing some treatments had inconsistent negative impacts on some clocks and mortality. FRIGHT and frailty index, but not AFRAID, were associated with mortality. The bias and precision of AFRAID as a predictor of mortality varied between treatment groups. Effects of deprescribing some drugs on elements of the clocks, particularly on weight loss, contributed to bias. Overall, in this cohort, FRIGHT and AFRAID measures identified no treatment effects and limited deprescribing effects (unsurprising as very few effects on frailty or mortality), with variable prediction of mortality. These clocks have utility, but context is important. Future work should refine them for intervention studies to reduce bias from specific intervention effects.
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac067
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Meta-analysis Integrated With Multi-omics Data Analysis to Elucidate
           Pathogenic Mechanisms of Age-Related Knee Osteoarthritis in Mice

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      Pages: 1321 - 1334
      Abstract: AbstractIncreased mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of knee osteoarthritis (KOA) is needed to develop efficacious disease-modifying treatments. Though age-related pathogenic mechanisms are most relevant to the majority of clinically presenting KOA, the bulk of our mechanistic understanding of KOA has been derived using surgically induced posttraumatic OA (PTOA) models. Here, we took an integrated approach of meta-analysis and multi-omics data analysis to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of age-related KOA in mice. Protein-level data were integrated with transcriptomic profiling to reveal inflammation, autophagy, and cellular senescence as primary hallmarks of age-related KOA. Importantly, the molecular profiles of cartilage aging were unique from those observed following PTOA, with less than 3% overlap between the 2 models. At the nexus of the 3 aging hallmarks, advanced glycation end product (AGE)/receptor for AGE (RAGE) emerged as the most statistically robust pathway associated with age-related KOA. This pathway was further supported by analysis of mass spectrometry data. Notably, the change in AGE–RAGE signaling over time was exclusively observed in male mice, suggesting sexual dimorphism in the pathogenesis of age-induced KOA in murine models. Collectively, these findings implicate dysregulation of AGE–RAGE signaling as a sex-dependent driver of age-related KOA.
      PubDate: Mon, 03 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glab386
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Association Between Homocysteine, Frailty and Biomechanical Response of
           the CNS in NPH-Suspected Patients

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      Pages: 1335 - 1343
      Abstract: AbstractFrailty is a geriatric syndrome that combines physiological decline, disruptions of homeostatic mechanisms across multiple physiologic systems and thus, strong vulnerability to further pathological stress. Previously, we provided the first evidence that increased risk of poor health outcomes, as quantified by a frailty index (FI), is associated with an alteration of the central nervous system (CNS) biomechanical response to blood pulsatility. In this study, we explored correlation between 14 biological parameters, the CNS elastance coefficient and FI. We included 60 adults (52–92 years) suspected of normal pressure hydrocephalus and presenting with markers of multiple coexisting brain pathologies, including Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and vascular dementia. We showed that the homocysteine (Hcy) level was independently and positively associated with both the FI and the CNS elastance coefficient (adjusted R² of 10% and 6%). We also demonstrated that creatinine clearance and folate level were independently associated with Hcy level. Based on previous literature results describing the involvement of Hcy in endothelial dysfunction, glial activation, and neurodegeneration, we discuss how Hcy could contribute to the altered biomechanical response of the CNS and frailty.
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac074
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Covid-19 and Aging: Challenges and Opportunities

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      Pages: 1349 - 1351
      Abstract: Prior to the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic, I had the sense that the fields of Gerontology and Geriatrics were on the doorstep of a period of rapid advancement. Several important findings emerged in the basic biology of aging, major public and private investments were being made in geroscience and a landmark clinical trial (TAME) of an intervention to slow senescence was about to be launched. At the same time, at the other end of the spectrum, the concepts of successful aging of societies and opportunities to strengthen the social capital of older persons were attracting increased attention as there was increased recognition that advances in healthy life expectancy were stalling as morbidity appeared to no longer be compressing and perhaps even begun to decompress, especially among the most needy (1). As the U.S. National Academy of Medicine launched a Healthy Longevity Commission to study global challenges and opportunities, the World Health Organization initiated the ambitious “Decade of Healthy Ageing” program, a major government report in the United Kingdom called for a much more aggressive strategy to foster successful aging (2), and Singapore was preparing to begin its broadly scaled and pioneering age friendly Health District project. There were increased calls for “Age-Friendliness” of communities and health care systems and more emphasis on a life-course approach to planning for what inevitably seemed to be longer and longer lives including Carstensen’s innovative “New Map of Life” project at Stanford (3).
      PubDate: Tue, 05 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac089
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Corticosteroid Therapy in COVID-19 Associated With In-hospital Mortality
           in Geriatric Patients: A Propensity Matched Cohort Study

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      Pages: 1352 - 1360
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundFew data are available on the prognosis of older patients who received corticosteroids for COVID-19. We aimed to compare the in-hospital mortality of geriatric patients hospitalized for COVID-19 who received corticosteroids or not.MethodsWe conducted a multicentric retrospective cohort study in 15 acute COVID-19 geriatric wards in the Paris area from March to April 2020 and November 2020 to May 2021. We included all consecutive patients aged 70 years and older who were hospitalized with confirmed COVID-19 in these wards. Propensity score and multivariate analyses were used.ResultsOf the 1 579 patients included (535 received corticosteroids), the median age was 86 (interquartile range 81–91) years, 56% of patients were female, the median Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was 2.6 (interquartile range 1–4), and 64% of patients were frail (Clinical Frailty Score 5–9). The propensity score analysis paired 984 patients (492 with and without corticosteroids). The in-hospital mortality was 32.3% in the matched cohort. On multivariate analysis, the probability of in-hospital mortality was increased with corticosteroid use (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.63–4.20]). Other factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age (OR = 1.04 [1.01–1.07], CCI (OR = 1.18 [1.07–1.29], activities of daily living (OR = 0.85 [0.75–0.95], oxygen saturation < 90% on room air (OR = 2.15 [1.45–3.17], C-reactive protein level (OR = 2.06 [1.69–2.51], and lowest lymphocyte count (OR = 0.49 [0.38–0.63]). Among the 535 patients who received corticosteroids, 68.3% had at least one corticosteroid side effect, including delirium (32.9%), secondary infections (32.7%), and decompensated diabetes (14.4%).ConclusionsIn this multicentric matched-cohort study of geriatric patients hospitalized for COVID-19, the use of corticosteroids was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality.
      PubDate: Fri, 08 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac084
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • The Effect of Race and Dementia Prevalence on a COVID-19 Infection Control
           Intervention in Massachusetts Nursing Homes

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      Pages: 1361 - 1365
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundNursing home (NH) residents, especially those who were Black or with dementia, had the highest infection rates during the COVID-19 pandemic. A 9-week COVID-19 infection control intervention in 360 Massachusetts NHs showed adherence to an infection control checklist with proper personal protective equipment (PPE) use and cohorting was associated with declines in weekly infection rates. NHs were offered weekly webinars, answers to infection control questions, resources to acquire PPE, backup staff, and SARS-CoV-2 testing. We asked whether the effect of this intervention differed by racial and dementia composition of the NHs.MethodsData were obtained from 4 state audits using infection control checklists, weekly infection rates, and Minimum Data Set variables on race and dementia to determine whether adherence to checklist competencies was associated with decline in average weekly rates of new COVID-19 infections.ResultsUsing a mixed-effects hurdle model, adjusted for county COVID-19 prevalence, we found the overall effect of the intervention did not differ by racial composition, but proper cohorting of residents was associated with a greater reduction in infection rates among facilities with ≥20% non-Whites (n = 83). Facilities in the middle (>50%–62%; n = 121) and upper (>62%; n = 115) tertiles of dementia prevalence had the largest reduction in infection rates as checklist scores improved. Cohorting was associated with greater reductions in infection rates among facilities in the middle and upper tertiles of dementia prevalence.ConclusionsAdherence to proper infection control procedures, particularly cohorting of residents, can reduce COVID-19 infections, even in facilities with high percentages of high-risk residents (non-White and dementia).
      PubDate: Tue, 11 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glab355
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Frailty and COVID-19 mRNA Vaccine Antibody Response in the COVID-19
           Community Research Partnership

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      Pages: 1366 - 1370
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundCOVID-19 has disproportionately affected older adults. Frailty has been associated with impaired vaccine response in other vaccine types, but the impact of frailty on mRNA vaccine response is undefined.MethodsObservational study of adults aged 55 and older from 1 U.S. health care system between January 22, 2021 and September 16, 2021 with self-reported Moderna or Pfizer COVID-19 mRNA vaccine and an electronic frailty index (eFI) score from their medical record (n = 1 677). Participants’ frailty status was compared with positive antibody detection (seroconversion) following full vaccination and subsequent loss of positive antibody detection (seroreversion) using logistic regression models.ResultsOf 1 677 older adults with median (interquartile range) age, 67 (62 and 72) years, and frailty status (nonfrail: 879 [52%], prefrail: 678 [40%], and frail: 120 [7.2%]), seroconversion was not detected in 23 (1.4%) over 60 days following full vaccination. Frail individuals were less likely to seroconvert than nonfrail individuals, adjusted odds ratio (OR) 3.75, 95% confidence interval (CI; 1.04, 13.5). Seroreversion was detected in 50/1 631 individuals (3.1%) over 6 months of median follow-up antibody testing. Frail individuals were more likely to serorevert than nonfrail individuals, adjusted OR 3.02, 95% CI (1.17, 7.33).ConclusionOverall antibody response to COVID-19 mRNA vaccination was high across age and frailty categories. While antibody detection is an incomplete descriptor of vaccine response, the high sensitivity of this antibody combined with health-system data reinforce our conclusions that frailty is an independent predictor of impaired antibody response to the COVID-19 mRNA vaccines. Frailty should be considered in vaccine studies and prevention strategies.
      PubDate: Thu, 21 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac095
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • COVID-19 Pandemic Impact on Trajectories in Cardiometabolic Health,
           Physical Activity, and Functioning Among Adults from the 2006–2020
           Health and Retirement Study

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      Pages: 1371 - 1379
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundThe aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on trajectories in cardiometabolic health, physical activity, and functioning among U.S. older adults, overall and according to selected baseline sociodemographic characteristics.MethodsWe performed secondary analyses using longitudinal data on 1,372 participants from the 2006–2020 Health and Retirement Study. Pre-post COVID-19 pandemic onset was examined in relation to body mass index (BMI), number of cardiometabolic risk factors and/or chronic conditions, physical activity, Activities of Daily Living (ADL), and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) using mixed-effects regression models and group-based trajectory models.ResultsThe COVID-19 pandemic was associated with significantly increased BMI (β = 1.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.74, 2.03). Furthermore, the odds of having at least one cardiometabolic risk factor and/or chronic disease increased pre-post COVID-19 onset (odds ratio 1.16, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.36), whereas physical functioning worsened pre-post COVID-19 onset (ADL: β = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.94, 1.28; IADL: β = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.73). The pre-post COVID-19 period (2018–2020) showed a stable group of trajectories, with low, medium and high levels of the selected health indicators. Health disparities according to sex, race/ethnicity, educational level, work status, and total wealth are highlighted.ConclusionsThe COVID-19 pandemic onset appears to worsen cardiometabolic health and physical functioning among U.S. older adults, with clusters of individuals defined by selected sociodemographic characteristics experiencing distinct trajectories pre-post COVID-19 pandemic onset.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac028
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Is Now the Time for the Fourth BNT162b2 Dose for Residents of Long-term
           Care Facilities'

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      Pages: 1380 - 1381
      Abstract: On December 31, 2021, Israel was the first country to decide on a fourth dose of the BNT162b2 vaccine for people aged >65 years living in long-term care facilities (LTCFs), which account for 30%–40% of all coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) deaths (1). This decision extends the proactive vaccination policy of the Israel Ministry of Health (MOH), which started in 2020 with a nationwide vaccination campaign. Within 4 months 90% of people aged ≥65 years had been vaccinated, with an effectiveness of 94.8% (2). However, emergence of the B.1.617.2 (delta) variant and the waning immunity afforded by BNT162b2 over time led to a resurgence of COVID-19. In August 2021, following MOH approval (July 30, 2021) of a third BNT162b2 dose, a renewed vaccination campaign led to the vaccination, within 100 days, of 77%–82.8% of people aged ≥65 years, and an attendant decrease in the incidence of severe COVID-19 by a factor of 19.5 (3). Following identification of the B.1.1.529 (omicron) variant on November 24, 2021, data from United Kingdom have shown that emergency care and hospitalization due to omicron infection are 31%–45% and 50%–70%, respectively, less than infection with the delta variant. However, the question now arises whether it is necessary to administer a fourth dose to LTCF residents who received the third (booster) dose 6 months ago. Emerging outbreaks in third-dose-vaccinated LTCF residents have been reported in Israel, for example, of 115 residents and staff in a single LTCF, 27 residents and 12 employees were infected with omicron, with 4 residents being hospitalized with severe disease.
      PubDate: Tue, 22 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac044
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
  • Development of the ADFICE_IT Models for Predicting Falls and Recurrent
           Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Pooled Analyses of European
           Cohorts With Special Attention to Medication

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      Pages: 1446 - 1454
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundUse of fall prevention strategies requires detection of high-risk patients. Our goal was to develop prediction models for falls and recurrent falls in community-dwelling older adults and to improve upon previous models by using a large, pooled sample and by considering a wide range of candidate predictors, including medications.MethodsHarmonized data from 2 Dutch (LASA, B-PROOF) and 1 German cohort (ActiFE Ulm) of adults aged ≥65 years were used to fit 2 logistic regression models: one for predicting any fall and another for predicting recurrent falls over 1 year. Model generalizability was assessed using internal–external cross-validation.ResultsData of 5 722 participants were included in the analyses, of whom 1 868 (34.7%) endured at least 1 fall and 702 (13.8%) endured a recurrent fall. Positive predictors for any fall were: educational status, depression, verbal fluency, functional limitations, falls history, and use of antiepileptics and drugs for urinary frequency and incontinence; negative predictors were: body mass index (BMI), grip strength, systolic blood pressure, and smoking. Positive predictors for recurrent falls were: educational status, visual impairment, functional limitations, urinary incontinence, falls history, and use of anti-Parkinson drugs, antihistamines, and drugs for urinary frequency and incontinence; BMI was a negative predictor. The average C-statistic value was 0.65 for the model for any fall and 0.70 for the model for recurrent falls.ConclusionCompared with previous models, the model for recurrent falls performed favorably while the model for any fall performed similarly. Validation and optimization of the models in other populations are warranted.
      PubDate: Mon, 04 Apr 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/gerona/glac080
      Issue No: Vol. 77, No. 7 (2022)
       
 
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