Subjects -> MEDICAL SCIENCES (Total: 8185 journals)
    - ALLERGOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY (205 journals)
    - ANAESTHESIOLOGY (105 journals)
    - CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES (334 journals)
    - CHIROPRACTIC, HOMEOPATHY, OSTEOPATHY (19 journals)
    - COMMUNICABLE DISEASES, EPIDEMIOLOGY (227 journals)
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    - ENDOCRINOLOGY (149 journals)
    - FORENSIC SCIENCES (43 journals)
    - GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY (178 journals)
    - GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)
    - HEMATOLOGY (160 journals)
    - HYPNOSIS (4 journals)
    - INTERNAL MEDICINE (177 journals)
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    - SURGERY (388 journals)
    - UROLOGY, NEPHROLOGY AND ANDROLOGY (151 journals)

GERONTOLOGY AND GERIATRICS (125 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 122 of 122 Journals sorted alphabetically
Activities, Adaptation & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Gerontology     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Age and Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 105)
Aging & Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Aging and Cancer     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging Clinical and Experimental Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Aging Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Alzheimer's & Dementia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Alzheimer's & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Anales en Gerontología     Open Access  
Angewandte GERONTOLOGIE Appliquée     Full-text available via subscription  
Annual Review of Gerontology and Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Arthritis und Rheuma     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Journal On Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Ageing Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
B&G Bewegungstherapie und Gesundheitssport     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biogerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BMC Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Canadian Geriatrics Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal on Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Clinical Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Clinics in Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Current Geriatrics Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders Extra     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Drugs & Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
European Geriatric Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Ageing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Aging and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Experimental Aging Research: An International Journal Devoted to the Scientific Study of the Aging Process     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Experimental Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Gait & Posture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Generations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Geriatric Care     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geriatric Medicine in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Geriatric Orthopaedic Surgery Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Geriatrics & Gerontology International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Geriatrie up2date     Hybrid Journal  
Geriatrie-Report : Forschung und Praxis in der Altersmedizin     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerodontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gerokomos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Gerontologia     Open Access  
Gerontology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Gerontology & Geriatrics Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
GeroPsych: The Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
GeroScience : Official Journal of the American Aging Association (AGE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Global Journal of Geriatrics Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Hip International     Hybrid Journal  
I Advance Senior Care     Full-text available via subscription  
Immunity & Ageing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Innovation in Aging     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Ageing and Later Life     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Aging and Human Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
JMIR Aging     Open Access  
Journal for Healthcare Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Adult Protection, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Aging and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Aging and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Angiogenesis Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Gerontology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Elder Abuse & Neglect     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frailty & Aging     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Geriatric Cardiology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Geriatric Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Geriatric Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatrics and Palliative Care     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Gerontological Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mid-life Health     Open Access  
Journal of Military and Veterans Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Parkinsonism and Restless Legs Syndrome     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion Spirituality & Aging     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Work in End-of-Life & Palliative Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Journal of the Indian Academy of Geriatrics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maturitas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Medycyna Wieku Podeszłego (Geriatric Medicine)     Open Access  
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Neurodegenerative Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neuroembryology and Aging     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
NOVAcura     Hybrid Journal  
npj Aging and Mechanisms of Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nursing Older People     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
OA Elderly Medicine     Open Access  
Paediatrics & Child Health in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Palliative Care & Social Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Parkinson's Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Pathobiology of Aging & Age-related Diseases     Open Access  
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Quality of Life Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
RASP - Research on Ageing and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Española de Geriatría y Gerontología     Full-text available via subscription  
Senex: Yaşlılık Çalışmaları Dergisi / Senex: Journal of Aging Studies     Open Access  
The Aging Male     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Gerontologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
The Journals of Gerontology : Series A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Topics in Geriatric Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Translational Medicine of Aging     Open Access  
Work, Aging and Retirement     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Working with Older People     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Zeitschrift fur Gerontologie und Geriatrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Gerontopsychologie und -psychiatrie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für Palliativmedizin     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
The Gerontologist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.038
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0016-9013 - ISSN (Online) 1758-5341
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [419 journals]
  • Measuring the Quality of Care for Older Adults With Multimorbidity:
           Results of the MULTIqual Project

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      Pages: 1135 - 1146
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesProviding health care for older adults with multimorbidity is often complex, challenging, and prone to fragmentation. Although clinical decision making should take into account treatment interactions, individual burden, and resources, current approaches to assessing quality of care mostly rely on indicators for single conditions. The aim of this project was to develop a set of generic quality indicators for the management of patients aged 65 and older with multimorbidity that can be used in both health care research and clinical practice.Research Design and MethodsBased on the findings of a systematic literature review and eight focus groups with patients with multimorbidity and their family members, we developed candidate indicators. Identified aspects of quality were mapped to core domains of health care to obtain a guiding framework for quality-of-care assessment. Using nominal group technique, indicators were rated by a multidisciplinary expert panel (n = 23) following standardized criteria.ResultsWe derived 47 candidate quality indicators from the literature and 4 additional indicators from the results of the focus groups. The expert panel selected a set of 25 indicators, which can be assigned to the levels of patient factors, patient–provider communication, and context and organizational structures of the conceptual framework.Discussion and ImplicationsWe developed a comprehensive indicator set for the management of multimorbidity that can help to highlight areas with potential for improving the quality of care and support application of multimorbidity guidelines. Furthermore, this study may serve as a blueprint for participatory designs in the development of quality indicators.
      PubDate: Fri, 28 Jan 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac013
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • The Impact of Changing Social Support on Older Persons’ Onset of
           Loneliness During the COVID-19 Pandemic in the United Kingdom

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      Pages: 1147 - 1159
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesSocial distancing measures aimed at controlling the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are likely to have increased social isolation among those older than 70 instructed to shield at home. This study examines the incidence of loneliness by gender over the first 10 months of the COVID-19 pandemic among persons aged 70 and older in the United Kingdom, and the impact of changing social networks and perceived social support on the new occurrence of loneliness.Research Design and MethodsParticipants (N = 1,235) aged 70 and older with no reports of loneliness before the pandemic who participated in 7 rounds of the Understanding Society: COVID-19 Study (April 2020–January 2021) and the main Understanding Society Study conducted during 2019. Cox regression analyzed the time to a new occurrence of loneliness.ResultsAmong older people who hardly ever/never felt lonely before the pandemic, 33.7% reported some degree of loneliness between April 2020 and January 2021. Living in a single-person household, having received more social support before the pandemic, changes in support receipt during the pandemic, and a deteriorating relationship with one’s partner during the pandemic increased the risk of experiencing loneliness. Older women were more likely than older men to report loneliness, even when living with a partner.Discussion and ImplicationsDuring the 3 COVID-19-related lockdowns in the United Kingdom, changes in older people’s social networks and support resulted in a significant onset of loneliness. Findings highlight the risks of shielding older persons from COVID-19 in terms of their mental well-being and the importance of strengthening intergenerational support.
      PubDate: Wed, 02 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac033
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Shifts in Older Adults’ Social Connections Throughout the Initial Year
           of the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 1160 - 1172
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic exposed older adults to increased health risks, yet social distancing precautions also heightened risks to their social well-being. This mixed-methods study explores changes in older adults’ satisfaction with social engagement and interpersonal connections throughout the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic.Research Design and MethodsA Midwestern sample of 76 older adults aged 70–97 completed a series of 4 interviews from March 2020 through April 2021 about their experiences with COVID-19 social distancing precautions. Participants reported social engagement satisfaction and frequency of contact with family and friends. Additionally, they responded to open-ended questions about social connection experiences.ResultsSatisfaction with social engagement rebounded with significant increases across the year of the pandemic, whereas frequency of contact shifted from high remote contact early in the pandemic to greater in-person contact over time, with nuanced distinctions between family and friends. Qualitative thematic analysis identified themes including: (1) shifts in family support, (2) adaptable and flexible friendships, (3) social isolation fatigue, and (4) communication through technology. Within each theme, perceptions of interpersonal connections shifted over time.Discussion and ImplicationsFindings suggest diverse social connection experiences among older adults, yet general patterns of strong social connections and adaptation over time. Future research should build upon these findings to better understand older adults’ social needs and seek to explore ways to best foster social connections during instances of forced social isolation or historical crises.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac030
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • From Hostile to Benevolent Ageism: Polarizing Attitudes Toward Older
           Adults in German COVID-19-Related Tweets

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      Pages: 1185 - 1195
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesPrevious studies have linked coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to a rise in ageism. While a growing body of research examined hostile ageism during the pandemic, benevolent ageism received less attention. Drawing on the stereotype content theory and the classic tripartite model of attitudes, the current study explored how benevolent and hostile ageism are reflected in the cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions of attitudes toward older adults in German COVID-19-related tweets. The study examined the most prevalent attitudes as well as changes in prevalence between the first and second lockdown period in Germany.Research Design and MethodsSeven hundred and ninety-two German tweets concerning COVID-19 and aging were collected and coded using Mayring’s qualitative content analysis with a dominantly inductive approach. Quantitative methods were used to identify the most prevalent subthemes as well as changes in prevalence.ResultsThe coding resulted in 21 subthemes. Most tweets (60.73%) contained either hostile or benevolent ageist attitudes, with benevolent ageism being more prevalent. The top 5 subthemes in terms of prevalence and reach contained several opposing attitudes, such as devaluation and opposing devaluation. The chi-square tests revealed a shift from a promotion to an evaluation of COVID-19-related policies between the 2 lockdowns.Discussion and ImplicationsResults highlight social media’s polarizing effect and its potential contribution to both hostile and benevolent ageism in the context of COVID-19 in Germany. Results indicate the need to consider the adverse effects of benevolent ageism and use of chronological age as risk factor, when designing COVID-19-related policies.
      PubDate: Tue, 17 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac063
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Hostility Toward Baby Boomers on TikTok

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      Pages: 1196 - 1206
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesThe recent entry of the hashtag #OkBoomer into social media vernacular underscores the collective frustration of younger people with a group whose views they find increasingly incompatible with theirs. Most social media analyses in gerontology focus on the content on Twitter and Facebook, with content on TikTok virtually unexplored. Given the burgeoning popularity of TikTok among younger people, we assess the content of TikTok videos with the hashtags #OkBoomer or #Boomer to distill the undercurrents of hostility expressed by younger people toward Baby Boomers.Research Design and MethodsWe collated TikTok videos (N = 332) with the hashtags #OkBoomer or #Boomer, which received over 5.4 billion views. Both inductive and deductive approaches guided the qualitative content analysis of the videos.ResultsFive themes emerged. Most videos (79%) described “Negative Encounters with Baby Boomers” (Theme 1); 58% were about “Conflicting Values/Beliefs between Baby Boomers and Younger People” (Theme 2); 39% were about “Baby Boomers Antagonizing Younger Generations” (Theme 3); 22% of the videos made references to the “Karen Meme” (Theme 4); and 7% bemoaned the existence of a “Wealth Gap” between Baby Boomers and younger people (Theme 5).Discussion and ImplicationsFindings reveal that the usage of the hashtags #OkBoomer and #Boomer is highly nuanced, at times explicitly ageist, and at others, emblematic of a phenomenon far more complex than ageism. There is a need to leverage social media as a space to foster interaction between older and younger people. Society is ultimately well served by intergenerational interaction.
      PubDate: Tue, 01 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac020
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Not Too Old for TikTok: How Older Adults Are Reframing Aging

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      Pages: 1207 - 1216
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesAlthough reputed for being the virtual playground of teenagers, TikTok has since made its way to older adults, some of whom have become content creators with millions of followers. Despite their immense sway over audiences, as well as their potential to reconfigure socially constructed notions of aging, these older TikTok personalities have been given scant attention in gerontological literature. We fill this gap by exploring how older adults use TikTok to engage in discourses on old age.Research Design and MethodsWe compiled the most viewed videos of users aged 60 and older with at least 100,000 followers, generating 1,382 videos with over 3.5 billion views. Videos that did not feature older adults engaging in discourses on aging were excluded, resulting in 348 videos for content analysis. Both inductive and deductive approaches guided the qualitative analysis.ResultsThree themes emerged: Nearly 3 in 4 videos featured older adults “Defying Age Stereotypes” (71%; Theme 1), 18% featured them “Making Light of Age-Related Vulnerabilities” (Theme 2), and 11% involved older adults “Calling out Ageism” (Theme 3).Discussion and ImplicationsThis is the first known study exploring how older adults consciously engage in discourses of aging through their participation on TikTok. Our findings highlight the potential for older adults to be put at the vanguard of a movement aimed at challenging socially constructed notions of old age.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 May 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac055
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Evaluating the Working With Older Adults Scale With Clinical Psychology
           Doctoral Students

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      Pages: 1217 - 1225
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesThe ongoing workforce shortage in geropsychology requires continued efforts to understand the factors that influence whether or not students choose to enter this field. The current study builds on prior research by replicating the Working with Older Adults Scale (WOAS) model. Further, the scale was expanded to add professional attitudes, adultist concerns, and number of known professionals in the field of aging.Research Design and MethodsGraduate students in clinical psychology (n = 117) completed the WOAS and new items as part of a larger survey of graduate students in an American Psychological Association-accredited doctoral program. Structural equation modeling was used to first replicate the existing WOAS model and then expanded to include new antecedents in a second model.ResultsResults were largely similar to past research validating the WOAS, with the exception that Perceived Behavioral Control was not a significant predictor of Intention in this population. In the expanded model, new items improved the overall model fit and exhibited significant indirect paths to predict intention to work with older adults.Discussion and ImplicationsThese findings further validate use of the WOAS and expand scholarly understanding of the factors influencing the choice of a career in aging. Individuals positioned to encourage careers in aging may wish to address adultist concerns, explore attitudes about such careers, challenge unhelpful assumptions, and provide greater exposure and access to mentors in the field as part of recruitment efforts.
      PubDate: Tue, 29 Mar 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac044
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Late Night Reveals and Heals Generational Divides in the Workplace

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      Pages: 1238 - 1239
      Abstract: Film: Late Night (102 min)
      PubDate: Sun, 03 Jul 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac094
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Guiding Light: A Book Review

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      Pages: 1241 - 1242
      Abstract: PachanaNancy A. , MolinariVictor , ThompsonLarry W. , & Gallagher-ThompsonDolores (Eds.). (2021). Psychological Assessment and Treatment of Older Adults. Hogrefe Publishing, 261 pp., $59 (paper).
      PubDate: Mon, 21 Feb 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnac015
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2022)
       
  • Self-Reported Behavioral Symptoms of People With Dementia: A Pilot Study
           Examining Individuals’ Perceived Illness Experience

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      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesPersons with dementia experience behavioral symptoms, such as agitation and repeating questions, which have been reported as one of the most burdensome and stressful aspects of providing care by dementia caregivers. However, no published studies have assessed the subjective experience of behavioral symptoms and distress from people with dementia.Research Design and MethodsThe current pilot study examined the feasibility of people with dementia providing self-reported behaviors and behavioral-related distress. Data from a larger, ongoing research study was used consisting of people with mild to moderate dementia (n = 12) residing in a long-term memory care facility.ResultsParticipants were able to provide reliable (α = 0.91) self-reported data concerning their own behaviors and behavioral-related distress with variability among responses. The most frequently self-reported behaviors included agitation (66.7%) and complaining/criticizing things (58.3%) while the least-reported behaviors were refusing to be left alone (8.3%) and yelling/swearing (8.3%). The highest behavioral distress reported was agitation (58.3%) while the least was wandering (8.3%).Discussion and ImplicationsUnderstanding the subjective, perceived experience of people with dementia provides valuable information on the illness experience. Additional research is needed to examine the role and impact of self-reported behaviors and the resulting behavioral-related distress on outcomes of well-being. Subjective reports of behavioral-related distress could predict well-being, above and beyond that of traditional objective measures, creating the potential for novel nonpharmacological intervention development for people with dementia.
      PubDate: Sat, 26 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab091
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Psychosocial Aspects of Participation in Competitive Sports Among Older
           Athletes: A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesIn the last decade, sport has been considered a tool in active aging to maintain physical fitness, improve mental well-being, and form social relationships among older people. However, a thorough psychosocial understanding of the phenomenon of older athletes competing in sports events is lacking. Most research has focused on competitive sports participation in the young population. This study analyzes the general state of knowledge of competitive sports participation among athletes aged 50 years and older from a psychosocial perspective.Research Design and MethodsWe followed the 5-step process outlined by Arksey and O’Malley. After the search in 4 electronic databases, 69 peer-reviewed articles met the inclusion criteria.ResultsThe findings indicate that psychosocial research into older people’s participation in competitive sports has grown moderately in the last decade. While intrapersonal and interpersonal aspects have dominated the academic psychosocial discourse on older athletes’ competitive sports participation, aspects related to the environment/community and policy have largely been overlooked.Discussion and ImplicationsWe identified several critical gaps in the literature, classified into conceptual (e.g., lesser attention to personality, emotional, and cognitive aspects), methodological (e.g., longitudinal studies almost absent), and diverse aspects (e.g., focus on a wide indiscriminate age range; few comparisons between types of sports; underrepresentation of some nation or world regions as well as few cross-national comparative studies). These research gaps hint at opportunities that future research on older people’s participation in competitive sports should address.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab083
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • The Nexus of Sensory Loss, Cognitive Impairment, and Functional Decline in
           Older Adults: A Scoping Review

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      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesThe prevalence of cognitive impairment and sensory loss in hearing or vision increases with age. Based on the Information Processing Model, cognitive impairment coupled with sensory loss may exacerbate disability in late life. Yet this issue has not been systematically studied. The purpose of this scoping review was to examine the literature that studied the relationship between cognitive impairment, sensory loss, and activities of daily living in older adults.Research Design and MethodsTwo reviewers independently screened 1,410 studies identified from 5 electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and Web of Science). The search was completed in June 2020. A study was eligible if it included measurements of cognitive function, vision or hearing, and activities of daily living. Additionally, the data analyses must address how cognitive impairment and sensory loss are related to the performance of activities of daily living.ResultsThe final review included 15 studies. Findings show an additive effect of cognitive impairment and sensory loss on the activities of daily living. Cognitive impairment or vision loss independently relates to the decline in activities of daily living. Hearing loss relates to the decline only when the loss is severe, or if the daily task is hearing - specific.Discussion and ImplicationsOlder adults with coexisting sensory loss and cognitive impairment have the highest risk or prevalence of disability, comparing to cognitive impairment or sensory loss alone. This finding highlights the importance of developing interventions to reduce the risk of disability for older adults experiencing multiple impairments.
      PubDate: Tue, 15 Jun 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab082
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Self-Reported Satisfaction of Older Adult Residents in Nursing Homes:
           Development of a Conceptual Framework

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      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesResident satisfaction is an integral part of nursing home (NH) quality of care. However, there is no uniform categorization framework to classify the self-reported satisfaction of older adult residents in NHs. This scoping review systematically investigated the studies reporting data on older residents’ satisfaction to evaluate the quality of NH service and to create a conceptual model for older residents’ satisfaction.Research Design and MethodsWe used Donabedian’s structure–process–outcome model as a theoretical framework. In 3 electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL), potential studies were searched using specific inclusion criteria identifying original studies that investigated older adult residents’ satisfaction in NHs.ResultsFifteen studies, including 264,133 residents and 15,577 NHs, were selected for this review. Although a wide variety of resident satisfaction measures were used in the included studies, all these indicators reflect 5 primary domains: psychological, clinical, social, environmental, and spiritual, with the common focus of improving the quality of life of residents. Though technical competence is a fundamental aspect of health care service, we found autonomy, environment, meaningful activities, and interpersonal quality of professionals as the most important predictors for the resident’s satisfaction.Discussion and ImplicationsThe current review has synthesized a broad range of satisfaction measures, which will help future researchers and policymakers provide guidance for further improvement of NH care services and as a heuristic device to spur research. Additional research is needed to apply this conceptual framework for comparisons of self-reported resident satisfaction in other institutional settings across countries.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 May 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab061
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Bioethics and Gerontology: The Value of Thinking Together

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      Pages: 1097 - 1103
      Abstract: AbstractThe interdisciplinary field of bioethics focuses on what it means to be a person, flourish as a person, and be respected as a person in different conditions of health, illness, or disability. Bioethics and policy research considers normative questions such as how a good society, through its priorities and investments, should demonstrate its commitments to the lives of different populations. Bioethics and humanities scholarship, often known as “health humanities,” shares affinities with age studies and disability studies and with narrative-based approaches to the study of human experience. Gerontology is concerned with the many aspects of life that affect how people age, including social structures and values that influence the experience of growing old. In this article, we briefly explore the evolution of bioethics, from a discourse that emerged in relation to developments in biomedicine, bioscience, and biotechnology; to research ethics; to broader ethical questions emerging from real-world conditions, with attention to how bioethics has considered the experience of aging. Until recently, most age-focused work in bioethics has concerned age-associated illness, particularly end-of-life decision making. Given the reality of population aging and the ethical concerns accompanying the shift in age for most places in the world, the further evolution of bioethics involves greater attention to the support of flourishing in late life and to social justice and health equity in aging societies. We argue that the discourses of bioethics and critical gerontology, in dialogue, can bring a new understanding of privilege and preference, disparity and disadvantage, and reflection and respect for aging individuals.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab186
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Exploring Challenges and Strategies in Partnering With Community-Based
           Organizations to Advance Intervention Development and Implementation With
           Older Adults

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      Pages: 1104 - 1111
      Abstract: AbstractMinoritized older adults face multiple health inequities and disparities, but are less likely to benefit from evidence-based health care interventions. With the increasing diversity of the U.S. aging population, there is a great promise for gerontology researchers to partner with racial/ethnic minority organizations and underrepresented communities to develop and implement evidence-based health interventions. Community-Based Participatory Research and Implementation Science offer guidance and strategies for researchers to develop and sustain community partnerships. However, researchers partnering with community organizations continue to face challenges in these collaborations, study outcomes, and sustainability. This may be especially true for those junior in their career trajectory or new to community-engaged research. The purpose of this forum article is to detail critical challenges that can affect gerontology researcher–community partnerships and relationships from the perspective of researchers. Seven challenges (pre- or mid-intervention design, implementation, and postimplementation phases) described within the Equity-focused Implementation Research for health programs framework are identified and discussed. Potential solutions are also presented. Planning for potential obstacles of the researcher–community partnerships can inform innovative solutions that will facilitate successful partnerships, thereby promoting the advancement of collaborative research between academic institutions and community organizations to improve older adult health outcomes.
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab190
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Strengthening Resident, Proxy, and Staff Engagement in Injury Prevention
           in Skilled Nursing Facilities

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      Pages: 1112 - 1123
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesEngaging residents, their proxies, and skilled nursing facility (SNF) staff through effective communication has potential for improving fall-related injury prevention. The purpose of this study was to understand how multiple stakeholders develop and communicate fall-related injury prevention plans to enhance sustained implementation.Research Design and MethodsDescriptive qualitative study using framework analysis applied to open-ended semistructured interviews (n = 28) regarding experiences of communication regarding fall-related injury prevention, guided by the Patient and Family Engaged Care framework. Participants included residents at high risk of injury and their proxies, nursing assistants, nurses, and a nurse practitioner from 3 SNFs in the Eastern United States (Massachusetts and North Carolina).ResultsInterdisciplinary teams were viewed as essential for injury prevention. However, the roles of the interdisciplinary team members were sometimes unclear. Communication structures were often hierarchical, which reduced engagement of nursing assistants and frustrated proxies. Practices that enhanced engagement included knowing the residents, active listening skills, and use of strategies for respecting autonomy. Engagement was inhibited by time constraints, lack of proactive communication among staff, and by challenges eliciting the perspectives of residents with dementia. Resident barriers included desire for autonomy, strong preferences, and language differences.Discussion and ImplicationsStrengthening team meeting processes and cultivating open communication and collaboration could facilitate staff, resident, and proxy engagement in injury prevention planning and implementation. Skill building and targeting resources to improve communication can address barriers related to staff practices, resident characteristics, and time constraints.
      PubDate: Fri, 31 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab193
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Survey Deficiencies as Quality Indicators in Oregon Assisted Living
           Communities

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      Pages: 1124 - 1134
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesLicense inspection data have commonly been used as a quality measure for nursing homes but have not yet been used to assess the quality of assisted living/residential care (AL/RC) communities. Drawing on resource dependency theory, we test the hypothesis that structural and environmental characteristics influence AL/RC quality as measured by deficiency citations (“deficiencies”) issued during license inspections.Research Design and MethodsUsing data from 526 licensed AL/RC communities in Oregon that received a license inspection visit between 2008 and 2016, we examined the prevalence of deficiencies by type and year. We estimated regression models to identify structural and environmental characteristics associated with the number of deficiencies.ResultsMost (79%) inspections resulted in at least one deficiency. The most common deficiencies concerned medications and treatments (57%), change of condition and monitoring (48%), and resident health services (45%). Structural characteristics associated with higher odds of receiving one or more deficiencies included larger size, memory care designation, shorter administrative tenure, and for-profit status. Environmental characteristics associated with higher odds of receiving one or more deficiencies included rural location, lower unemployment, and market concentration. The number and likelihood of a given community receiving a deficiency decreased over time.Discussion and ImplicationsResource dependency theory constitutes a useful framework to consider the role of structural and environmental factors that affect AL/RC quality, including resident needs, institutional knowledge, resource availability, and market pressure. License inspection data are a viable option for assessing the quality of AL/RC communities.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab176
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Couples’ Experiences Managing Young-Onset Dementia Early in the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Pages: 1173 - 1184
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesThe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created unexpected stressors for society and could disproportionately affect more vulnerable groups. One such group is couples facing young-onset dementias (YOD), who experience pandemic-induced stressors alongside ongoing YOD-related stressors (e.g., progressive symptoms, increased caregiving needs). Using a qualitative design, our objective was to characterize the experiences of couples living with YOD early in the COVID-19 pandemic and the impact on couples’ ‘relationships’ and well-being.Research Design and MethodsCouples (N = 23) of persons with YOD and their spousal caregivers participated in a 1 hour live video, joint interview during the early COVID-19 pandemic. We used a hybrid inductive–deductive coding approach to thematic analysis to extract findings within 2 a priori domains: (a) psychosocial stressors experienced during the early pandemic and (2) the impact of early pandemic stressors on couples’ relationships and well-being.ResultsThematic analyses revealed 6 main themes: (a) increased caregiving responsibilities, (b) increased uncertainty, (c) increased social isolation and disruptions in social support and medical care, (d) loss of meaningful activities and routines, (e) changes to the couple’s relationship, and (f) heightened emotional distress.Discussion and ImplicationsThe COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated relationship strain and distress among couples managing YOD. This population may face negative outcomes due to the dual impact of YOD- and pandemic-related stressors. It is imperative to provide timely resources and psychosocial support to couples facing YOD to mitigate the negative impact of such stressors on individual health and well-being and the couples’ relationship together.
      PubDate: Fri, 05 Nov 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab162
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Human-Centered Design of an Advance Care Planning Group Visit for Mild
           Cognitive Impairment

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      Pages: 1226 - 1237
      Abstract: AbstractBackground and ObjectivesWhile advance care planning (ACP) is critical for ensuring optimal end-of-life outcomes among individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), many individuals who may benefit from ACP have not initiated this process. This article aims to describe the iterative design of an MCI group visit-based intervention and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention.Research Design and MethodsWe used human-centered design, rapid-cycle prototyping, and multiple methods to adapt an ENgaging in Advance Care planning Talks (ENACT) Group Visits intervention. We convened an advisory panel of persons with MCI and care partners (n = 6 dyads) to refine the intervention and conducted a single-arm pilot of 4 MCI ENACT intervention prototypes (n = 13 dyads). We used surveys and interviews to assess outcomes from multiple perspectives.ResultsThe advisory panel affirmed that ACP is a priority for individuals with MCI, described the need for ACP in a group setting, and suggested refinements to ACP resources for the MCI ENACT intervention. Feasibility of recruitment was limited. MCI ENACT intervention participants strongly agreed that group discussions provided useful information and recommended the intervention. Themes supporting acceptability included (a) feedback on acceptability of the intervention, (b) previous experiences with ACP, and (c) reasons for participation, including desire for discussions about MCI and how it relates to ACP.Discussion and ImplicationsDespite stakeholders’ positive ratings of acceptability of the MCI ENACT intervention, future work is needed to enhance the feasibility of recruitment to support implementation into clinical settings.
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Dec 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab181
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
  • Taking Care of Our Loved Ones is Not Menial Labor

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      Pages: 1240 - 1241
      Abstract: SchweidRichard. (2021). The Caring Class: Home Health Aides in Crisis. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY, 192 pp., $26.95 (hardcover)/$12.99 (ebook).
      PubDate: Sat, 16 Oct 2021 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/geront/gnab153
      Issue No: Vol. 62, No. 8 (2021)
       
 
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