Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 99 of 99 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 246)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Urban Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.076
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 12  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1468-2869 - ISSN (Online) 1099-3460
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2468 journals]
  • The Cumulative Impact of Unmet Essential Needs on Indicators of Attrition:
           Findings from a Public University Population-Based Sample of Students in
           the Bronx, NY

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      Abstract: Abstract In recent decades, a growing proportion of college students have experienced financial stress, resulting in unmet essential needs including food insecurity, housing instability, lack of healthcare access, and inadequate mental health treatment. Given that urban-based public universities constitute a substantial proportion of the US college student population, understanding how unmet needs affect academic achievement in this population is crucial for developing strategies that alleviate college failure and dropout. We examined the cumulative impact of unmet essential needs (scored from 0 to 4) on indicators of college attrition (dropout, leave of absence, risk of academic probation). The sample comprised a college population-representative sample of 1833 students attending one of three urban public colleges in the Bronx, NY. Employing adjusted multinomial and binomial logistic regression models, we assessed how total unmet essential needs predict any indicator of college attrition. Each unit increase in unmet need increased the odds of having any attrition indicator by 29% (p < 0.01). Students with two unmet needs had 43% greater odds (p < 0.01), students with three unmet needs had 57% greater odds (p < 0.01), and students with four unmet needs had 82% greater odds (p < 0.01) of having any attrition indicator compared to those without unmet needs. Findings revealed a modest dose–response relationship between the number of unmet needs and the likelihood of experiencing indicators of attrition, suggesting a cumulative impact of unmet needs on students' ability to persist to graduation. Designing interventions aimed at college students with multiple unmet essential needs, and addressing these needs holistically, may assist student retention and graduation.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • Exposure to Crime and Racial Birth Outcome Disparities

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban communities in the United States were transformed at the end of the twentieth century by a rapid decline in neighborhood crime and violence. We leverage that sharp decline in violence to estimate the relationship between violent crime rates and racial disparities in birth outcomes. Combining birth certificate data from US counties with the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting statistics from 1992 to 2002, we show that lower crime rates are associated with substantially smaller Black-White disparities in birth weight, low birth weight, and small for gestational age. These associations are stronger in more segregated counties, suggesting that the impacts of the crime decline may have been concentrated in places with larger disparities in exposure to crime. We also estimate birth outcome disparities under the counterfactual that the crime decline did not occur and show that reductions in crime statistically explain between one-fifth and one-half of the overall reduction in Black-White birth weight, LBW, and SGA disparities that occurred during the 1990s. Drawing on recent literature showing that exposure to violent crime has negative causal effects on birth outcomes, which in turn influence life-course outcomes, we argue that these results suggest that changes in national crime rates have implications for urban health inequality.
      PubDate: 2024-07-02
       
  • Research Translation to Promote Urban Health in Latin America: The
           SALURBAL Experience

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      Abstract: Abstract In highly urbanized and unequal Latin America, urban health and health equity research are essential to effective policymaking. To ensure the application of relevant and context-specific evidence to efforts to reduce urban health inequities, urban health research in Latin America must incorporate strategic research translation efforts. Beginning in 2017, the Urban Health in Latin America (SALURBAL) project implemented policy-relevant research and engaged policymakers and the public to support the translation of research findings. Over 6 years, more than 200 researchers across eight countries contributed to SALURBAL’s interdisciplinary network. This network allowed SALURBAL to adapt research and engagement activities to local contexts and priorities, thereby maximizing the policy relevance of research findings and their application to promote policy action, inform urban interventions, and drive societal change. SALURBAL achieved significant visibility and credibility among academic and nonacademic urban health stakeholders, resulting in the development of evidence and tools to support urban policymakers, planners, and policy development processes across the region. These efforts and their outcomes reveal important lessons regarding maintaining flexibility and accounting for local context in research, ensuring that resources are dedicated to policy engagement and dissemination activities, and recognizing that assessing policy impact requires a nuanced understanding of complex policymaking processes. These reflections are relevant for promoting urban health and health equity research translation across the global south and worldwide. This paper presents SALURBAL’s strategy for dissemination and policy translation, highlights innovative initiatives and their outcomes, discusses lessons learned, and shares recommendations for future efforts to promote effective translation of research findings.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • Neighborhood Racial Composition and Unequal Exposure to Violent Crime in
           Everyday Contexts

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      Abstract: Abstract Exposure to violence is a critical aspect of contemporary racial inequality in the United States. While extensive research has examined variations in violent crime rates across neighborhoods, less attention has been given to understanding individuals’ everyday exposure to violent crimes. This study investigates patterns of exposure to violent crimes among neighborhood residents using cell phone mobility data and violent crime reports from Chicago. The analysis reveals a positive association between the proportion of Black residents in a neighborhood and the level of exposure to violent crimes experienced by residents. Controlling for a neighborhood’s level of residential disadvantage and other neighborhood characteristics did not substantially diminish the relationship between racial composition and exposure to violent crimes in everyday life. Even after controlling for violence within residents’ neighborhoods, individuals residing in Black neighborhoods continue to experience significantly higher levels of violence in their day-to-day contexts compared to those living in White neighborhoods. This suggests that racial segregation in everyday exposures, rather than residential segregation, plays a central role in racial inequality in exposure to violence. Additionally, the analysis suggests that neighborhoods with more Hispanic and Asian residents are exposed to less and more violent crime, respectively, compared to neighborhoods with more White residents. However, this is only observed when not adjusting for the volume of visits points of interest receive; otherwise, the finding is reversed. This study offers valuable insights into potentially novel sources of racial disparities in exposure to violent crimes in everyday contexts, highlighting the need for further investigation.
      PubDate: 2024-06-27
       
  • Still Separate, Still Not Equal: An Ecological Examination of Redlining
           and Racial Segregation with COVID-19 Vaccination Administration in
           Washington D.C.

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      Abstract: Abstract Racial residential segregation has been deemed a fundamental cause of health inequities. It is a result of historical and contemporary policies such as redlining that have created a geographic separation of races and corresponds with an inequitable distribution of health-promoting resources. Redlining and racial residential segregation may have contributed to racial inequities in COVID-19 vaccine administration in the early stages of public accessibility. We use data from the National Archives (historical redlining), Home Mortgage Disclosure Act (contemporary redlining), American Community Survey from 1940 (historical racial residential segregation) and 2015–2019 (contemporary racial residential segregation), and Washington D.C. government (COVID-19 vaccination administration) to assess the relationships between redlining, racial residential segregation, and COVID-19 vaccine administration during the early stages of vaccine distribution when a tiered system was in place due to limited supply. Pearson correlation was used to assess whether redlining and racial segregation, measured both historically and contemporarily, were correlated with each other in Washington D.C. Subsequently, linear regression was used to assess whether each of these measures associate with COVID-19 vaccine administration. In both historical and contemporary analyses, there was a positive correlation between redlining and racial residential segregation. Further, redlining and racial residential segregation were each positively associated with administration of the novel COVID-19 vaccine. This study highlights the ongoing ways in which redlining and segregation contribute to racial health inequities. Eliminating racial health inequities in American society requires addressing the root causes that affect access to health-promoting resources.
      PubDate: 2024-06-26
       
  • Interplay of Physical, Psychological, and Social Frailty among
           Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Five European Countries: A Longitudinal
           Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Frailty is a dynamic condition encompassing physical, psychological, and social domains. While certain factors are associated with overall or specific frailty domains, research on the correlations between physical, psychological, and social frailty is lacking. This study aims to investigate the associations between physical, psychological, and social frailty in European older adults. The study involved 1781 older adults from the Urban Health Centres Europe project. Baseline and 1-year follow-up data were collected on physical, psychological, and social frailty, along with covariates. Linear regression analyzed unidirectional associations, while cross-lagged panel modeling assessed bi-directional associations. Participants’ mean age was 79.57 years (SD = 5.54) and over half were female (61.0%). Physical and psychological frailty showed bi-directional association (effect of physical frailty at baseline on psychological frailty at follow-up: β = 0.14, 95%CI 0.09, 0.19; reversed direction: β = 0.05, 95%CI 0.01, 0.09). Higher physical frailty correlated with increased social frailty (β = 0.05, 95%CI 0.01, 0.68), but no association was found between social and psychological frailty. This longitudinal study found a reciprocal relationship between physical and psychological frailty in older adults. A relatively higher level of physical frailty was associated with a higher level of social frailty. There was no association between social and psychological frailty. These findings underscore the multifaceted interplay between various domains of frailty. Public health professionals should recognize the implications of these interconnections while crafting personalized prevention and care strategies. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and investigate underlying mechanisms.
      PubDate: 2024-06-24
       
  • To What Extent Are Informal Healthcare Providers in Slums Linked to the
           Formal Health System in Providing Services in Sub-Sahara Africa' A 12-Year
           Scoping Review

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      Abstract: Abstract The contributions of informal providers to the urban health system and their linkage to the formal health system require more evidence. This paper highlights the collaborations that exist between informal providers and the formal health system and examines how these collaborations have contributed to strengthening urban health systems in sub-Sahara Africa. The study is based on a scoping review of literature that was published from 2011 to 2023 with a focus on slums in sub-Sahara Africa. Electronic search for articles was performed in Google, Google Scholar, PubMed, African Journal Online (AJOL), Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), ScienceDirect, Web of Science, Hinari, ResearchGate, and yippy.com. Data extraction was done using the WHO health systems building blocks. The review identified 26 publications that referred to collaborations between informal providers and formal health systems in healthcare delivery. The collaboration is manifested through formal health providers registering and standardizing the practice of informal health providers. They also participate in training informal providers and providing free medical commodities for them. Additionally, there were numerous instances of client referrals, either from informal to formal providers or from formal to informal providers. However, the review also indicates that these collaborations are unformalized, unsystematic, and largely undocumented. This undermines the potential contributions of informal providers to the urban health system.
      PubDate: 2024-06-14
       
  • Historical Structural Racism in the Built Environment and Physical Health
           among Residents of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

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      Abstract: Abstract Historical structural racism in the built environment contributes to health inequities, yet to date, research has almost exclusively focused on racist policy of redlining. We expand upon this conceptualization of historical structural racism by examining the potential associations of probable blockbusting, urban renewal, and proximity to displacement from freeway construction, along with redlining, to multiple contemporary health measures. Analyses linked historical structural racism, measured continuously at the census-tract level using archival data sources, to present-day residents’ physical health measures drawn from publicly accessible records for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Outcome measures included average life expectancy and the percentage of residents reporting hypertension, stroke, coronary heart disease, smoking, insufficient sleep, sedentary behavior, and no health insurance coverage. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to examine separate and additive associations between structural racism and physical health measures. Redlining, probable blockbusting, and urban renewal were associated with shorter life expectancy and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular conditions, risky health behaviors, and residents lacking health insurance coverage. Probable blockbusting and urban renewal had the most consistent correlations with all 8 health measures, while freeway displacement was not reliably associated with health. Additive models explained a greater proportion of variance in health than any individual structural racism measure alone. Moreover, probable blockbusting and urban renewal accounted for relatively more variance in health compared to redlining, suggesting that research should consider these other measures in addition to redlining. These preliminary correlational findings underscore the importance of considering multiple aspects of historical structural racism in relation to current health inequities and serve as a starting point for additional research.
      PubDate: 2024-06-10
       
  • Development of Neighborhood Trajectories Employing Historic Redlining and
           the Area Deprivation Index

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      Abstract: Abstract The role of historic residential redlining on health inequities is intertwined with policy changes made before and after the 1930s that influence current neighborhood characteristics and shape ongoing structural racism in the United States (U.S.). We developed Neighborhood Trajectories which combine historic redlining data and the current neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics as a novel approach to studying structural racism. Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC) neighborhoods for the entire U.S. were used to map the HOLC grades to the 2020 U.S. Census block group polygons based on the percentage of HOLC areas in each block group. Each block group was also assigned an Area Deprivation Index (ADI) from the Neighborhood Atlas®. To evaluate changes in neighborhoods from historic HOLC grades to present degree of deprivation, we aggregated block groups into “Neighborhood Trajectories” using historic HOLC grades and current ADI. The Neighborhood Trajectories are “Advantage Stable”; “Advantage Reduced”; “Disadvantage Reduced”; and “Disadvantage Stable.” Neighborhood Trajectories were established for 13.3% (32,152) of the block groups in the U.S., encompassing 38,005,799 people. Overall, the Disadvantage-Reduced trajectory had the largest population (16,307,217 people). However, the largest percentage of non-Hispanic/Latino Black residents (34%) fell in the Advantage-Reduced trajectory, while the largest percentage of Non-Hispanic/Latino White residents (60%) fell in the Advantage-Stable trajectory. The development of the Neighborhood Trajectories affords a more nuanced mechanism to investigate dynamic processes from historic policy, socioeconomic development, and ongoing marginalization. This adaptable methodology may enable investigation of ongoing sociopolitical processes including gentrification of neighborhoods (Disadvantage-Reduced trajectory) and “White flight” (Advantage Reduced trajectory).
      PubDate: 2024-06-05
       
  • Neighborhood Safety and Neighborhood Police Violence Are Associated with
           Psychological Distress among English- and Spanish-Speaking Transgender
           Women of Color in New York City: Finding from the TURNNT Cohort Study

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      Abstract: Abstract Transgender women of color (TWOC) experience high rates of police violence and victimization compared to other sexual and gender minority groups, as well as compared to other White transgender and cisgender women. While past studies have demonstrated how frequent police harassment is associated with higher psychological distress, the effect of neighborhood safety and neighborhood police violence on TWOC’s mental health is rarely studied. In this study, we examine the association between neighborhood safety and neighborhood police violence with psychological distress among TWOC. Baseline self-reported data are from the TURNNT (“Trying to Understand Relationships, Networks and Neighborhoods among Transgender Woman of Color”) Cohort Study (analytic n = 303). Recruitment for the study began September 2020 and ended November 2022. Eligibility criteria included being a TWOC, age 18–55, English- or Spanish-speaking, and planning to reside in the New York City metropolitan area for at least 1 year. In multivariable analyses, neighborhood safety and neighborhood police violence were associated with psychological distress. For example, individuals who reported medium levels of neighborhood police violence had 1.15 [1.03, 1.28] times the odds of experiencing psychological distress compared to those who experienced low levels of neighborhood police violence. Our data suggest that neighborhood safety and neighborhood police violence were associated with increased psychological distress among TWOC. Policies and programs to address neighborhood police violence (such as body cameras and legal consequences for abusive officers) may improve mental health among TWOC.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • A Statistical Analysis of the Impact of Gun Ownership on Mass Shootings in
           the USA Between 2013 and 2022

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      Abstract: Abstract Mass shootings (incidents with four or more people shot in a single event, not including the shooter) are becoming more frequent in the United States, posing a significant threat to public health and safety in the country. In the current study, we intended to analyze the impact of state-level prevalence of gun ownership on mass shootings—both the frequency and severity of these events. We applied the negative binomial generalized linear mixed model to investigate the association between gun ownership rate, as measured by a proxy (i.e., the proportion of suicides committed with firearms to total suicides), and population-adjusted rates of mass shooting incidents and fatalities at the state level from 2013 to 2022. Gun ownership was found to be significantly associated with the rate of mass shooting fatalities. Specifically, our model indicated that for every 1-SD increase—that is, for every 12.5% increase—in gun ownership, the rate of mass shooting fatalities increased by 34% (p value < 0.001). However, no significant association was found between gun ownership and rate of mass shooting incidents. These findings suggest that restricting gun ownership (and therefore reducing availability to guns) may not decrease the number of mass shooting events, but it may save lives when these events occur.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Structural Determinants of Health and Markers of Immune Activation and
           Systemic Inflammation in Sexual Minority Men With and Without HIV

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      Abstract: Abstract Among sexual minority men (SMM), HIV and use of stimulants such as methamphetamine are linked with immune activation and systemic inflammation. Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, SMM encountered financial challenges and structural obstacles that might have uniquely contributed to immune dysregulation and systemic inflammation, beyond the impacts of HIV and stimulant use. Between August 2020 and February 2022, 72 SMM with and without HIV residing in South Florida enrolled in a COVID-19 prospective cohort study. Multiple linear regression analyses examined unemployment, homelessness, and history of arrest as structural correlates of soluble markers of immune activation (i.e., sCD14 and sCD163) and inflammation (i.e., sTNF-α receptors I and II) at baseline after adjusting for HIV status, stimulant use, and recent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Enrolled participants were predominantly Latino (59%), gay-identified (85%), and with a mean age of 38 (SD, 12) years with approximately one-third (38%) of participants living with HIV. After adjusting for HIV status, SARS-CoV-2 infection, and recent stimulant use, unemployment independently predicted higher levels of sCD163 (β = 0.24, p = 0.04) and sTNF-α receptor I (β = 0.26, p = 0.02). Homelessness (β = 0.25, p = 0.02) and history of arrest (β = 0.24, p = 0.04) independently predicted higher levels of sCD14 after adjusting for HIV status, SARS-CoV-2 infection, and recent stimulant use. Independent associations exist between structural barriers and immune activation and systemic inflammation in SMM with and without HIV. Future longitudinal research should further elucidate complex bio-behavioral mechanisms linking structural factors with immune activation and inflammation.
      PubDate: 2024-06-03
       
  • Implications and Lessons Learned While Using Social Media Advertisements
           to Promote Longitudinal Social Network Study Participation in Latino Men
           Who Have Sex with Men (LMSM): A Brief Report

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      Abstract: Abstract We assess the effectiveness of paid ads on social media platforms as a research recruitment tool with Latino men who have sex with men (LMSM). We deployed four paid ad campaigns July–September 2022 in English and Spanish on Meta and Grindr featuring happy or risqué images of LMSM, documenting engagement and cost metrics. The four campaigns generated a total of 1,893,738 impressions and 1078 clicks (0.057 click-through rate) with a total cost of $7,989.39. Of the 58 people who accessed the study screener, 31 completed it (53.4%), 13 were eligible (22.4%), but none enrolled. Comparing platforms, Meta had higher engagement metrics than Grindr, while Grindr had higher proportions of those who completed the screener (57.9%) and were eligible (26.3%) than Meta (52.6% and 21.0%, respectively). Challenges to using paid ads as an LMSM recruitment tool included intersecting pandemics (Mpox, COVID-19), and limited connection between platforms and staff for study enrollment.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • HealthyPlan.City: A Web Tool to Support Urban Environmental Equity and
           Public Health in Canadian Communities

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      Abstract: Abstract Urban environmental factors such as air quality, heat islands, and access to greenspaces and community amenities impact public health. Some vulnerable populations such as low-income groups, children, older adults, new immigrants, and visible minorities live in areas with fewer beneficial conditions, and therefore, face greater health risks. Planning and advocating for equitable healthy urban environments requires systematic analysis of reliable spatial data to identify where vulnerable populations intersect with positive or negative urban/environmental characteristics. To facilitate this effort in Canada, we developed HealthyPlan.City (https://healthyplan.city/), a freely available web mapping platform for users to visualize the spatial patterns of built environment indicators, vulnerable populations, and environmental inequity within over 125 Canadian cities. This tool helps users identify areas within Canadian cities where relatively higher proportions of vulnerable populations experience lower than average levels of beneficial environmental conditions, which we refer to as Equity priority areas. Using nationally standardized environmental data from satellite imagery and other large geospatial databases and demographic data from the Canadian Census, HealthyPlan.City provides a block-by-block snapshot of environmental inequities in Canadian cities. The tool aims to support urban planners, public health professionals, policy makers, and community organizers to identify neighborhoods where targeted investments and improvements to the local environment would simultaneously help communities address environmental inequities, promote public health, and adapt to climate change. In this paper, we report on the key considerations that informed our approach to developing this tool and describe the current web-based application.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Cumulative Police Exposures, Police Violence Stress, and Depressive
           Symptoms: A Focus on Black LGBQ Youth in Baltimore City, Maryland

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      Abstract: Abstract The present study investigates associations between cumulative police exposures, police violence stress, and depressive symptoms among Black youth, and whether LGBQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer) identities moderate these associations. Data come from the Survey of Police-Adolescent Contact Experiences (SPACE), a cross-sectional survey of a community-based sample of Black youth ages 12–21 in Baltimore City, Maryland (n = 345), administered from August 2022 to July 2023. We used multivariable ordinary least squares regression to estimate direct associations and product-term analysis to test for effect modification by sexual identities. We also calculate covariate-adjusted predicted depressive symptoms scores by cumulative police exposures and police violence stress across sexual identities. Findings indicate that LGBQ youth collectively reported higher levels of police violence stress than heterosexual youth. Still, LGBQ youth varied in their cumulative police exposures, which were significantly higher among bisexual and queer youth than lesbian or gay youth. Associations between cumulative police exposures, police violence stress, and depressive symptoms were significantly moderated by LGBQ identity, with the largest associations emerging for bisexual and queer youth. Police exposures and police violence stress also compounded to worsen depressive symptoms among the subsample of LGBQ youth. Collectively, our findings suggest that LGBQ youth–especially bisexual and queer youth–may be particularly vulnerable to the mental health harms of cumulative police exposures and police violence stress. Intersectional, public health approaches that combine prevention and treatment strategies are needed to mitigate LGBQ mental health inequities stemming from cumulative police exposures and police violence stress.
      PubDate: 2024-06-01
       
  • Relationship between Civilian Injuries Caused during Contact with Law
           Enforcement and Community-Level Sociodemographic Characteristics

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      Abstract: Abstract Civilian injuries caused during contact with law enforcement personnel erode community trust in policing, impact individual well-being, and exacerbate existing health inequities. We assessed the relationship between ZIP code-level rates of civilian injuries caused during legal interventions and community-level sociodemographic characteristics using Illinois hospital data from 2016 to 2022. We developed multivariable Poisson regression models to examine whether legal intervention injury rates differed by race-ethnicity and community economic disadvantage across three geographic regions of Illinois representing different levels of urbanization. Over the study period, 4976 civilian injuries were treated in Illinois hospitals (rate of 5.6 per 100,000 residents). Compared to non-Hispanic white residents, non-Hispanic Black residents demonstrated 5.5–10.5 times higher injury rates across the three geographic regions, and Hispanic-Latino residents demonstrated higher rates in Chicago and suburban Cook County, but lower rates in the rest of the state. In most regions, models showed that as the percent of minority residents in a ZIP code increased, injury rates among non-Hispanic Black and Hispanic-Latino residents decreased. As community economic disadvantage increased at the ZIP code level, civilian injury rates increased. Communities with the highest injury rates involving non-Hispanic white residents were significantly more economically unequal and disadvantaged. While the injury rates were consistently and substantially higher among non-Hispanic Black residents throughout the state, the findings illustrate that the association between overall civilian injuries caused during contact with law enforcement and community sociodemographic characteristics varied across regions. Data on local law enforcement agency policies and procedures are needed to better identify appropriate interventions.
      PubDate: 2024-05-28
       
  • Community-Academic Partnership to Assess the Role of Physical
           Disinvestment on Firearm Violence in Toledo, OH

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      Abstract: Abstract Reversing physical disinvestment, e.g., by remediating abandoned buildings and vacant lots, is an evidence-based strategy to reduce urban firearm violence. However, adoption of this strategy has been inconsistent across US cities. Our community-academic partnership sought to support adoption in Toledo, OH, USA, by generating locally relevant analyses on physical disinvestment and firearm violence. We used a spatial case–control design with matching. Physical disinvestment measures were derived from a citywide parcel foot audit conducted by the Lucas County Land Bank in summer 2021. Firearm violence outcomes were incident-level shootings data from the Toledo Police Department from October 2021 through February 2023. Shooting locations were matched to controls 1:4 on poverty rate, roadway characteristics, and zoning type. Exposures were calculated by aggregating parcels within 5-min walking buffers of each case and control point. We tested multiple disinvestment measures, including a composite index. Models were logistic regressions that adjusted for the matching variables and for potential spatial autocorrelation. Our sample included N = 281 shooting locations and N = 1124 matched controls. A 1-unit increase in the disinvestment score, equal to approximately 1 additional disrepair condition for the average parcel within the walking buffer, was associated with 1.68 times (95% CI: 1.36, 2.07) higher odds of shooting incidence. Across all other measures, greater disinvestment was associated with higher odds of shooting incidence. Our finding of a strong association between physical disinvestment and firearm violence in Toledo can inform local action. Community-academic partnership could help increase adoption of violence prevention strategies focused on reversing physical disinvestment.
      PubDate: 2024-05-21
       
  • “I am a survivor!”: Violently Injured Black Men’s Perceptions of
           Labeling After a Violent Firearm Injury

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      Abstract: Abstract Self-appraisal after a life-altering event is a critical process for individuals, often comprised by assigned labels that may not align with an individuals’ perceptions of themselves or of their situation. Existing research within this victim-survivor dichotomy largely rests in the interpersonal violence space, with a victim assuming legal recourse and wrongdoing, and a survivor associating with positive personal characteristics like grit and resilience. Much existing literature on self-appraisal after interpersonal injury is heavily concentrated within the sexual violence literature, and this study applies these concepts to a sample of Black men injured by firearms. Ten Black men enrolled in a hospital-based violence intervention program (HVIP) were interviewed to understand how they label their experience of firearm injury, and if their perceptions aligned with common labels seen among other populations and/or in other areas of study (e.g., cancer, domestic violence). Each participant assigned themselves their own label, with three labels emerging: survivor, victim and survivor, and neither victim nor survivor. The results illustrate the nuance of experiences beyond the victim-survivor dichotomy, and how labels and personal identities may shift following injury into new terms and considerations of resilience and trauma processing. More research is warranted to understand the factors that shape self-labeling within this population, including influences of masculine norms, racialized stereotypes, community context, and availability of services. Findings support public awareness campaigns to reframe surviving violence as a strength, and for community partners and practitioners to increase access to culturally competent and trauma-informed mental healthcare.
      PubDate: 2024-05-20
       
  • Advancing Health Equity through 15-min Cities and Chrono-urbanism

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      Abstract: Abstract Implementing the 15-min city and chrono-urbanism aims to improve sustainability and quality of life by ensuring residents’ proximity to essential services. The 15-min city model is gaining global traction, with localized adaptations to suit communities’ needs. Beyond environmental motivations, 15-min cities can benefit public health through enhanced walkability, social cohesion, and universal accessibility. However, research examining the intersection of health and equity among chrono-urbanism and the 15-min city remains limited. This study aims to develop a framework to integrate health and equity into chrono-urbanism and 15-min city plans. We describe the potential benefits and risks of the 15-min approach for urban planning, daily behaviors, and health outcomes. Potential benefits of 15-min cities for health equity include proximity to destinations, increased physical activity, strengthened social capital, reduced emissions, and traffic calming. Risks that must be mitigated include gentrification, variable proximity definitions, infrastructure upgrades, and inadequate cultural sensitivity. Recommendations to integrate 15-min cities into planning activities include conducting comprehensive baseline assessments, aligning goals with sustainability, economic development, flexible zoning, inclusive public spaces, and diverse community engagement tactics. We recommend interventions targeting marginalized communities and developing standardized measurement tools for comparison, monitoring, and evaluation. A nuanced, equitable approach to implementing 15-min cities can help urban plans support health equity across diverse populations.
      PubDate: 2024-05-14
       
  • Trends in Suicidality and Bullying among New York City Adolescents across
           Race and Sexual Identity: 2009–2019

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite evidence showing rising suicidality among lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) and Black adolescents, separately, there is scant research on suicide risk trajectories among youth groups across both racial and sexual identities. Thus, we examined trajectories of self-reported suicidal ideation and attempt and their associations with bullying among New York City-based adolescents. We analyzed 2009–2019 NYC Youth Risk Behavior Survey data. We ran weighted descriptive and logistic regression analyses to test for trends in dichotomous suicidal ideation, suicide attempt, bullying at school, and e-bullying variables among students across both race/ethnicity and sexual identity. We assessed associations between suicidality trends and bullying with logistic regressions. Models controlled for age and sex. Suicidal ideation and attempt were 2 and 5 times more likely among LGB than heterosexual participants, respectively. Bullying at school and e-bullying were 2 times more likely among LGB than heterosexual participants. Black LGB participants were the only LGB group for which both suicidal ideation (AOR = 1.04, SE = .003, p < .001) and attempt (AOR = 1.04, SE = .004, p < .001) increased over time. Both increased at accelerating rates. Conversely, White LGB participants were the only LGB group for which both suicidal ideation (AOR = 0.98, SE = .006, p < .001) and attempt (AOR = 0.92, SE = .008, p < .001) decreased over time. These changes occurred in parallel with significant bullying increases for Black and Latina/o/x LGB adolescents and significant bullying decreases for White LGB adolescents. Bullying was positively associated with suicidal ideation and attempt for all adolescents. Findings suggest resources aimed at curbing rising adolescent suicide should be focused on Black LGB youth.
      PubDate: 2024-05-10
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 99 of 99 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 246)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 206)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


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