Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Health Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.91
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 59  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1359-1053 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7277
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Disordered eating during COVID-19 pandemic is associated with nutritional
           status, negative mood changes, and body image in university students

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      Authors: Natália Rubim de Medeiros Gottardi, Anna Carolina Di Francesco Pereira, Monica Cattafesta, Luciane Bresciani Salaroli, Fabíola Lacerda Pires Soares
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Our objective was to evaluate disordered eating and associated factors in university students in the early period of the COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil. This is an analytical cross-sectional observational study, and data collection took place between May and June 2020, using an online semi-structured questionnaire. In total, 936 students were evaluated. Present signs/symptoms of the flu syndrome (OR = 1.605), negative mood changes (OR = 1.628), weight gain (OR = 1.739), obesity (OR = 3.089), follow fitness/health profile on social media (OR = 2.050), having inadequate body perception (OR = 2.416), and body dissatisfaction (OR = 2.612) increased the chances of presenting a higher score on the disordered eating scale.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T07:16:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053231151483
       
  • Promoting prosociality toward future generations in antibiotic intake

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      Authors: Ana Paula Santana, Lars Korn, Cornelia Betsch, Robert Böhm
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Understanding individuals’ preferences for antibiotics can help mitigate the acceleration of antibiotic resistance. Similar to the climate crisis, individuals “today” need to appropriately use antibiotics to reduce the negative consequences of antibiotic resistance for individuals “tomorrow.” We use an established—yet novel in this research field—behavioral game approach to investigate individuals’ preferences for antibiotics in the face of a between-generations conflict. In an online study, we investigated whether a between-generations (vs within-generations) conflict in antibiotic intake leads to larger overuse and how to promote appropriate use of antibiotics. Results indicate that overuse in the face of a between-generations (vs within-generations) conflict increased. Eliciting empathy toward future generations in the case of a between-generations conflict decreased overuse. Findings suggest that different representations of this social dilemma can influence people’s preferences for antibiotics, and that empathy-based interventions might promote appropriate antibiotic use.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T07:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221149526
       
  • The psychosocial adjustment of kidney recipients across donation contexts

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      Authors: Sophia Bourkas, Marie Achille
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to investigate kidney recipients’ experiences within deceased and living donation contexts and, in the latter, by donor relationship type, to identify differences by context and mechanisms by which the relationship with the donor may impact recipients’ psychosocial well-being. Individual interviews were conducted with 12 participants and analyzed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. Three themes emerged: (a) salience of and sensitivity toward sacrifice and loss, (b) honoring the sacrifice by honoring the gift, and (c) relational imbalance mirroring perceived burden of donation. Findings were contextualized in relation to the transplantation literature, and their clinical implications discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T10:57:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221149780
       
  • Examining the link between exercise-specific relational processes and
           physical activity, psychological distress, and relationship satisfaction
           among heterosexual and gay male couples

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      Authors: Joshua R Novak, Kristin J August, Menglin Wei, Julie Gast, Terry Peak
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the important role of romantic relationships in physical activity, little research has examined the role of gender and sexual orientation in exercise-specific relational processes. Utilizing cross-sectional, dyadic data from 462 heterosexual and gay couples, the present study examined how exercise encouragement, exercise discouragement, and frequency of exercise disagreements are related to physical activity, psychological distress, and relationship satisfaction. We included important covariates and examined gender and sexual orientation as moderators. Higher exercise encouragement was associated with more frequent physical activity (for gay men only), lower psychological distress (for women only), and higher relationship satisfaction regardless of gender and sexual orientation. Higher exercise discouragement was associated with more physical activity for all participants and higher levels of psychological distress for gay men only. Finally, more frequent exercise disagreements were associated with more psychological distress for all participants. These findings highlight important implications for physical activity promotion, prevention, and intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T12:21:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221150351
       
  • ‘It stretches your body but makes you feel good too’: A qualitative
           study exploring young people’s perceptions and experiences of yoga

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      Authors: Tina Cartwright, Tatjana Doronda
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Whilst research suggests that yoga can positively impact physical and psychological wellbeing, understanding of youth’s experiences is limited with no non-clinical studies in the UK. Ten focus groups explored perceptions and experiences of yoga among 35 youth (10–18 years). Inductive thematic analysis revealed that yoga was viewed as a holistic mind-body practice cultivating greater awareness and enhanced physical performance. Youth described yoga as providing tools that developed confidence, stress-management and emotional self-regulation. Social and relational impacts of yoga were highly valued. Despite the perceived biopsychosocial benefits of yoga, gendered and media representations of yoga may serve as a barrier to uptake.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T10:10:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221146840
       
  • Using a protection motivation theory framework to reduce vaping intention
           and behaviour in Canadian university students who regularely vape: A
           randomized controlled trial

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      Authors: Babac Salmani, Harry Prapavessis
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Using Protection Motivation Theory (PMT), we examined the effect of threat appraisal information (perceived vulnerability-PV and perceived severity-PS) to reduce vaping intentions, and in turn reduce vaping use. Canadian university students (n = 77) who vape regularly were randomized to either PMT or attention control treatment conditions. Data were collected at baseline and 3 time points after the intervention: Day 7, Day 30, and Day 45. Participants assigned to the PMT group showed significant increases in PV, PS, and intentions to vape less (p ⩽ 0.05) compared to those in the attention control group. Less convincing evidence was found between treatment groups for vaping use. PS and PV predicted vaping intentions, whereas vaping intentions did not predict vaping use. It is suggested through this study that the threat appraisal components of PMT can be successfully manipulated to reduce the intentions to vape and to a lesser extent reduce vaping use among University vapers.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T10:06:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221144977
       
  • Understanding the relationship between sleep and quality of life in type 2
           diabetes: A systematic review of the literature

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      Authors: Bróna Laverty, Sreelakshmi Puthezhath Jayanandan, Sinéad Smyth
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) can elicit psychological distress and diminish quality of life (QoL) in patients. Research has also elucidated a link between sleep and quality of life. Thus, the current review aimed to clarify the relationship between sleep and QoL in T2D patients, and determine the prevalence of sleep problems in this cohort. A systematic search across four databases yielded 23 relevant studies, which were synthesized narratively. Between 17.8 and 79% of patients had sleep problems, and a direct, significant relationship was established between sleep and QoL. An indirect relationship between sleep and QoL was established through exacerbation of psychological factors and biological symptoms of T2D. Findings are clinically relevant and highlight the importance of screening for sleep problems during routine patient appointments. Future research should employ either longitudinal or prospective study designs to enable further understanding of the intricacies of this relationship.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T10:32:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221140805
       
  • Cybervictimization and suicidal ideation in adolescents: A prospective
           view through gratitude and life satisfaction

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      Authors: María Teresa Chamizo-Nieto, Lourdes Rey
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Previous research reports that cybervictims are more likely to experience suicidal ideations. Gratitude and life satisfaction have shown to predict suicide risk, but they have rarely been explored in the cyberbullying context. Hence, this study examined the roles of gratitude and life satisfaction in suicide risk in cyberbullying situations. An initial sample of 858 adolescents participated in a prospective study, completing questionnaires assessing gratitude, life satisfaction, cyberbullying experiences and suicidal ideation. Results showed that low levels of gratitude and life satisfaction influence suicidal ideation in cybervictimized adolescents. Limitations and implications of this study are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T10:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221140259
       
  • ‘You get looked at like you’re failing’: A reflexive thematic
           analysis of experiences of mental health and wellbeing support for NHS
           staff

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      Authors: Corinne Clarkson, Hannah R Scott, Siobhan Hegarty, Emilia Souliou, Rupa Bhundia, Sam Gnanapragasam, Mary Jane Docherty, Rosalind Raine, Sharon AM Stevelink, Neil Greenberg, Matthew Hotopf, Simon Wessely, Ira Madan, Anne Marie Rafferty, Danielle Lamb
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Staff in the National Health Service (NHS) are under considerable strain, exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic; whilst NHS Trusts provide a variety of health and wellbeing support services, there has been little research investigating staff perceptions of these services. We interviewed 48 healthcare workers from 18 NHS Trusts in England about their experiences of workplace health and wellbeing support during the pandemic. Reflexive thematic analysis identified that perceived stigma around help-seeking, and staffing shortages due to wider socio-political contexts such as austerity, were barriers to using support services. Visible, caring leadership at all levels (CEO to line managers), peer support, easily accessible services, and clear communication about support offers were enablers. Our evidence suggests Trusts should have active strategies to improve help-seeking, such as manager training and peer support facilitated by building in time for this during working hours, but this will require long-term strategic planning to address workforce shortages.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-04T10:28:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221140255
       
  • Adjusting to the COVID-19 Outbreak in the United States: The impact of
           disruptions on habits and changes in health behaviors

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      Authors: Fernanda C Andrade, Rick H Hoyle, Kaitlyn Burnell
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic provides a naturalistic test of whether pandemic-related disruptions weaken habits and undermine behavior stability. We hypothesized that better capacity to effortfully guide behavior (self-regulation) would buffer this effect and be associated with behavior stability and development of new habits to accomplish daily behaviors. A cross-sectional study of 416 MTurk workers recruited in April 2020 (Mage = 34.60, SD = 11.51) indicated that pandemic-related disruptions generally exceeded people’s capacity to effortfully modify their behavior. Self-regulation related to the development of new habits and to lower likelihood that work productivity decreased. Self-regulation also protected against the effect of disruption on the likelihood that substance use increased. Besides these associations, self-regulation was largely unrelated to health-related behaviors and, in some instances, associated with poorer outcomes. These findings underscore the need to appreciate the impact of contextual disruptions in interpreting and promoting change in health-related behaviors.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-03T11:56:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221144440
       
  • Social support profiles correlate with depressive symptoms among Chinese
           parents during the COVID-19 pandemic: A latent profile analysis

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      Authors: Yashuang Bai, Fan Yang, Minglong Chen, Bo Zhang, Xiaohan Liu, Ning Huang, Madelon ME Riem, Jing Guo
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study explored pandemic-related social support profiles and investigated their relationships with depressive symptoms among Chinese parents during the COVID-19 pandemic. The hypotheses were evaluated in an online cross-sectional survey of 1286 parents. Latent profile analysis identified two profiles of received social support (isolated and integrated support). Three convergent profiles (high, moderate, and low support) and one divergent profile were found in perceived social support. The results revealed that the distribution of age, region, income and educational level varied across these profiles. Only the “high” (β = −0.11, p 
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T09:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221144442
       
  • Beliefs about COVID-19 as a threat to values are related to preventive
           behaviors and fear of COVID-19

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      Authors: Marina Iosifyan, Galina Arina, Valentina Nikolaeva
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated factors related to preventive behaviors and fear of COVID-19: values and beliefs about threat to values because of COVID-19. In two studies, participants reported their own values and evaluated how COVID-19 may threaten values. They also reported their preventive behaviors (washing hands, wearing a facial mask, keeping social distance, and avoiding public places) and fear of COVID-19. COVID-19 is perceived as a threat to personal focused values (openness and self-enhancement values) rather than social focused values (conservation and self-transcendence values). Both value importance and perceived threats to values are related to preventive behaviors and fear of COVID-19. Greater importance of conservation values was related to engaging in preventive behaviors and increased fear of COVID-19. Perceived threats to personal focused values (self-enhancement and openness values) were also related to engaging in preventive behaviors and fear of COVID-19.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T09:02:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221142348
       
  • The feasibility and preliminary effects of a pilot randomized controlled
           trial: Videoconferencing acceptance and commitment therapy in distressed
           family caregivers of people with dementia

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      Authors: Areum Han, Hon K Yuen, Jeremy Jenkins
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) examined preliminary effects of an 8-week videoconferencing acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) program supplemented with psychoeducation materials on distressed family caregivers of persons living with dementia (PLWD) compared to the control group provided with psychoeducation materials only. Nineteen family caregivers of PLWD in the USA were randomly assigned to the ACT group or the control group. Data was collected at pretest, posttest, and 1-month follow-up (F/U). Compared to the control group, the ACT group showed a significantly larger reduction in grief at posttest, with a medium effect size. Small effects of ACT were found in anxiety, psychological quality of life, and engagement in meaningful activities at posttest and grief, engagement in meaningful activities, and psychological flexibility at F/U compared to the control group. These promising findings warrant a full-scale RCT with adequate power to measure the efficacy of videoconferencing ACT for caregivers of PLWD.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2023-01-02T09:00:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221141131
       
  • Correction to “Investigating factors affecting HIV/AIDS knowledge among
           women in Low and Middle-income countries in Asia”

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      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T01:15:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221139087
       
  • Does matching a personally tailored physical activity intervention to
           participants’ learning style improve intervention effectiveness and
           engagement'

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      Authors: Stephanie Alley, Ronald C Plotnikoff, Mitch J Duncan, Camille E Short, Kerry Mummery, Quyen G To, Stephanie Schoeppe, Amanda Rebar, Corneel Vandelanotte
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to compare the effectiveness, engagement, usability, and acceptability of a web-based, computer-tailored physical activity intervention (provided as video or text) between participants who were matched or mismatched to their self-reported learning style (visual and auditory delivery through video or text-based information). Generalised linear mixed models were conducted to compare time (baseline, 3 months) by group (matched, mismatched) on ActiGraph-GT3X+measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and steps. Generalised linear models were used to compare group (matched and mismatched) on session completion, time-on-site, usability, and acceptability. MVPA and steps improved from baseline to 3-months, however this did not differ between participants whose learning styles were matched or mismatched to the intervention they received. Session completion, time-on-site, usability, and acceptability did not differ between matched and mismatched participants. Therefore, aligning intervention delivery format to learning style is unlikely to influence intervention effectiveness or engagement.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T11:19:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221137184
       
  • Using social media to recruit individuals for health-related research:
           Feasibility and lessons learned

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      Authors: Leah E Walsh, Lisa Carter-Bawa
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Online recruitment via social media for health-related research is increasing. Metrics regarding social media recruitment may increase its use in this field. This study evaluates the feasibility of recruiting individuals with a smoking history through targeted advertising on Facebook for a randomized study focused on lung cancer screening. Individuals completed eligibility questions and were randomized to one of two groups. We analyzed advertisement reach and response patterns, advertisement cost, data integrity and sample representativeness. The advertisement was active for 34 days and resulted in 2111 unique clicks on the survey link. Four hundred thirty-three eligibility entries were collected, and 61 entries were excluded due to failure to correctly answer the data integrity check. Two hundred eighty-two participants met eligibility criteria and were randomized, 191 participants completed questionnaires and 10 entries were subsequently excluded due to a failed attention check. Recruitment utilizing targeted advertising on Facebook is an effective and efficient strategy for health-related research.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-23T10:22:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221136928
       
  • Longitudinal assessment of COVID-19 fear and psychological wellbeing in
           the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Martyn Quigley, Seb Whiteford, Gemma Cameron, Daniel V Zuj, Simon Dymond
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact global psychological wellbeing. To investigate the sustained impact of COVID-19 on wellbeing, the current study longitudinally assessed fear of COVID-19, anxiety, depression, intolerance of uncertainty, worry, sleep quality, loneliness and alcohol use during the pandemic in the United Kingdom. Timepoint 1 (T1; N = 445) took place in February 2021 following the highest number of pandemic-related deaths in the UK. Timepoint 2 (T2, N = 198) took place in June 2021 when pandemic-related deaths had declined considerably, and many had been vaccinated. At T1, COVID-19 fear predicted elevated levels of anxiety, depression, intolerance of uncertainty, worry, sleep quality and loneliness. At T2, we observed that levels of COVID-19 fear, depression, loneliness and sleep quality decreased. However, COVID-19 fear continued to predict elevated intolerance of uncertainty, worry and impaired sleep quality. These findings demonstrate the longitudinal impact of COVID-19 fear on psychological wellbeing.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T06:07:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221134848
       
  • Living with Parkinson’s disease: A qualitative study of spousal
           perspectives

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      Authors: Itay Ressler, Avital Gershfeld-Litvin
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Research has demonstrated that Parkinson’s disease can have adverse psychological effects on caregivers. Very few studies have focused on the experiences of spouses who are not primary caregivers or who do not identify as primary caregivers. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of spouses who are not primary caregivers or do not identify as primary caregivers. Twelve Israeli women, spouses of men with Parkinson’s disease, were interviewed using a semi-structured in-depth approach. Thematic analysis revealed five themes: before diagnosis, at diagnosis, after diagnosis, interpersonal ways of coping, and intrapersonal ways of coping. A dynamic of oscillation between confronting and avoiding losses was indicated. Non-death losses were mostly unacknowledged among spouses’ social circles. Results were interpreted in the context of grieving processes after diagnosis. Findings suggest a need for psychological interventions aimed at creating safe spaces for spouses to engage in a grieving process after diagnosis.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-07T08:42:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221134740
       
  • Material circumstances, health care access, and self-reported health: A
           latent class analysis

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      Authors: Amanda M Mitchell, Hannah K Heitz, Stephen M Leach, Kate J Berghuis
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Latent class analysis was used to explore intersections of material circumstances and health care access among 308 adults, and associations between classes with health outcomes. Good fit was found for a four-class model: Resource Stable (Class 1, 62.43%), Unbalanced Meals with Health Care (Class 2, 16.91%), Resource Insecurity with Delayed Health Care (Class 3, 14.75%), and Resource Stability without Access to Health Care (Class 4, 5.91%). Class 1 reported greater well-being and self-rated health than Class 2 and 3. Class 1 reported lower BMI than Class 2. Findings document intersections among economic marginalization indicators with varying health outcomes among classes.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T09:40:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221132899
       
  • Psychometric and cross-cultural generalizability outcomes of the Chinese
           version of the Kids-Palatable Eating Motives Scale (K-PEMS-C)

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      Authors: Dan Wang, Mary M Boggiano, Ke Huang, Yuzheng Hu, Junfen Fu
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Overeating for non-homeostatic needs contributes to childhood obesity. However, validated measures or eating motives and cross-cultural comparisons are limited. This study aimed to validate the Kids-Palatable Eating Motives Scale (K-PEMS) and its association with body mass index z score (BMIz) in China, and further assess its generalization across Chinese and American youth. Data were from participants aged 8–18 years from Hangzhou, China (n = 426) and Birmingham, AL, U.S (n = 73). The K-PEMS had sound reliability and validation (Cronbach’s α = 0.920 and all factor loadings>0.50) in the Chinese sample. Multi-group nested models CFAs showed that the ∆CFI of model comparisons of measurement weights and structural covariance, variance, and means were ⩽0.01, and ∆TLI of measurement intercepts ⩽0.05. Linear regressions revealed that frequency of consuming palatable foods and drinks for Coping, Reward Enhancement, and Conformity, but not Social motives, were positively associated with BMIz. The K-PEMS had good cross-cultural generalization and could be useful in treating obesity by identifying specific motives for consuming excessive calories.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T09:37:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221129705
       
  • What is the direction of the association between social support and coping
           in cancer patients' A systematic review

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      Authors: Rossella Bottaro, Giuseppe Craparo, Palmira Faraci
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The aims of this systematic review were (a) to analyze recent studies about the association between social support and coping strategies in cancer patients after an established diagnosis; (b) to evaluate the direction of this association; and (c) to highlight any differences among different cancer types. Seven databases were searched for studies reporting the association between coping and social support for cancer patients in the last 51 years. Most of the 52 included studies highlighted the association between coping and social support, regardless of the source. Our findings supported a bidirectional association. No significant differences were found among the different types of cancer. In conclusion, our results sustain the importance of knowledge in studying this association to identify social limits and resources for the well-being of oncological patients. This knowledge could lead to the creation of holistic protocols to prevent poor adjustment to cancer.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T01:28:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221131180
       
  • Intersections of paranoia and the body in the general population

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      Authors: Wei Lin Toh, Andrea Phillipou, Erica Neill, Susan L Rossell
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Negative body image may be associated with heightened feelings of paranoia. The current study aimed to conduct multidimensional assessments of body image and psychosis facets in the general population. Respondents were 407 individuals, who provided basic sociodemographic information, and completed online questionnaires evaluating dysmorphic concerns, body consciousness, paranoia, persecutory and magical ideation and perceptual aberration. Correlation analysis and a series of regressions onto various body image facets (i.e. dysmorphic concerns, private body consciousness, public body consciousness and body competence) were conducted. Distinct patterns of significant associations were uncovered across the range of body image and psychosis facets examined. Paranoia significantly contributed to the severity of dysmorphic concerns, and magical ideation significantly contributed to private and public body consciousness, though effect sizes were modest. Our findings corroborate the relationship between paranoia and dysmorphic concerns, and tentatively suggest that challenging paranoid beliefs could be a useful strategy for managing negative body image.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-29T01:06:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221133890
       
  • Informal caregiver motivations, values, challenges and gains: A photovoice
           and interpretative phenomenological analysis of interrelationships

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      Authors: Mikołaj Zarzycki, Diane Seddon, Val Morrison
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The adoption of a caregiving role in the context of illness and disability is often taken for granted. This study explores caregivers’ motivations to provide care and how these relate to values, and to the challenges and gains of caregiving. Eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with caregivers and photographs were taken by caregivers to exemplify their caregiving experiences. This photo-elicitation method complemented the use of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis when applied to verbatim transcripts. Superordinate themes included: caregiver’s life story; significance of family; caregiving obligations; caring relationship; challenges and gains associated with caregiver motivations. Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations were less distinct in caregivers’ lived experiences than previously suggested, and were influenced by family values and specific challenges and gains of caregiving. The coexistence of different motivations and the nature of single complex motivations is discussed. The importance of caregiver assessment and support planning, and regular breaks from caregiving are highlighted.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T12:32:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221124647
       
  • Investigating factors affecting HIV/AIDS knowledge among women in low and
           middle-income countries in Asia

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      Authors: Jahar Bhowmik, Raaj Kishore Biswas, Dela Dzadey
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Sustainable Development Goal 3 focuses on reducing HIV/AIDS spread, for which disseminating correct information on the disease is required. This study investigated factors associated with HIV/AIDS knowledge among women in several Asian LMICs. Global Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey-6 (MICS-6) for Bangladesh, Lao, Mongolia and Nepal were assessed. Bivariate analysis and generalised linear regression models were fitted. Overall, 60% of the respondents were aware or heard of the existence of HIV/AIDS, with 63.2% having transmission knowledge and 80.4% misconception knowledge. Results revealed that several demographic factors such as wealth index, education and access to information had a significant association with HIV/AIDS knowledge. Mongolia and Nepal have formal programmes in place that may provide policy and implementation advantages compared to Bangladesh and Lao.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T08:43:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221127531
       
  • When do people believe, check, and share health rumors on social
           media' Effects of evidence type, health literacy, and health knowledge
           

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      Authors: Haoning Xue, Laramie Taylor
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Vaccine rumors on social media endanger public health. This study examined how evidence types influenced perceived persuasiveness and relevance and engagement intentions of vaccine rumors. We conducted a 2 (evidence type: anecdotes vs. anecdotal statistics) × 2 (stance: pro-vaccine rumor vs. anti-vaccine rumor) online experiment (N = 551) and surveyed participants’ health literacy and vaccine knowledge. Anecdotal statistics were perceived as more relevant than anecdotes and indirectly influenced perceived persuasiveness and behavior intentions. This finding was confirmed when vaccine rumors were pro-attitudinal. Health literacy positively predicted perceived persuasiveness; health knowledge negatively predicted relevance and behavior intentions. Practical implications and future research directions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-28T07:09:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221125992
       
  • Health psychology and behavioral medicine researchers in Canada: An
           environmental scan

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      Authors: Kharah M Ross, Ryan Hoggan, Tavis S Campbell, Jennifer Gordon, Vincent Gosselin Boucher, Eric Kim, Kim Lavoie, Wolfgang Linden, Joshua A Rash, Codie R Rouleau, Sherry H Stewart, Justin Presseau
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study is to characterize contemporary Canadian health psychology through an environmental scan by identifying faculty, research productivity and strengths, and collaborator interconnectivity. Profiles at Canadian universities were reviewed for faculty with psychology doctorates and health psychology research programs. Publications were obtained through Google Scholar and PubMed (Jan/18–Mar/21). A total of 284 faculty were identified. Cancer, pain, and sleep were key research topics. The collaborator network analysis revealed that most were linked through a common network, with clusters organized around geography, topic, and trainee relationships. Canada is a unique and productive contributor to health psychology.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T08:56:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221124748
       
  • The associations of pandemic-related difficulties with depressive symptoms
           and psychological growth among American older adults: Social support as
           moderators

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      Authors: Mingqi Fu, Jing Guo, Qilin Zhang
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic brought social, health-related, and financial risks to older adults, yet their associations with depressive symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) were not systematically examined. With 3504 respondents aged 60 and over from Health and Retirement Survey, this study found pandemic-related healthcare delay and financial hardship associated with elevated depressive symptoms and decreased PTG, whereas social disruption predicted greater PTG. When confronted with multidimensional difficulties, a higher level of social support buffered depressive symptoms and enhanced PTG following healthcare delay, while those from immediate family members carried the weighing of moderation. Additionally, the moderation effect varied between support types, as exclusive instrumental support engendered more depressive symptoms and squeezed PTG by stimulating a sense of incompetence for older adults. Inversely, receiving both instrumental and emotional support helped individuals of older age against financial-related depressive symptoms. These findings shed light on older adults’ mental health promotion in a pandemic context.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T08:53:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221124374
       
  • Romantic partner undermining of weight loss: Links between overweight
           individuals’ weight management efforts and perceptions of their
           partner’s undermining motivations and behaviors

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      Authors: René M Dailey, Rachel Lloyd, Suzanne Burdick, Zhengyu Zhang, Rebecca Kurlak
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated romantic partners’ undermining of weight management (i.e. hindrance of weight loss efforts) and how perceived motivations behind undermining were associated with weight loss progress. Data from 241 overweight individuals currently cohabiting with a romantic partner and trying to lose weight revealed two overarching undermining factors (i.e. verbal criticism/complaint, behavioral interference) and six perceived motivations (e.g. partner believed weight loss was unnecessary, partner relational fears, weight loss was an imposition on partner). Path modeling showed both undermining behaviors were negatively associated with weight management. Yet, only certain motivations (e.g. imposition on partner, weight loss was unnecessary) were linked to weight management, either directly or indirectly, through undermining. Specifically, whereas criticism/complaint mediated the associations between these motivations and weight management, interference only mediated the association between imposition and weight management. Findings are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical value of distinguishing undermining behaviors and their underlying motivations.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T08:48:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221123842
       
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder in youth exposed to the Syrian conflict: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis of prevalence and determinants

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      Authors: Jebraiel Kanan, Teresa Leão
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      A decade of ongoing armed conflict in Syria has damaged the physical and mental health of millions of adults and children. This study aimed to systematically review the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder among youth exposed to the Syrian conflict, and understand its individual and contextual determinants. The screening procedure resulted in 26 studies, with a total of 11,400 Syrian children and adolescents. The prevalence was 36% (95% CI (0.29–0.43), p < 0.001). Loss of family members or acquaintances, witnessing violence, and social withdrawal increased the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder, while social trust and social support were protective factors.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T08:46:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221123141
       
  • Do what matters, no matter what! Factorizing positive activities during
           COVID-19 lockdown

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      Authors: Philipp Yorck Herzberg, Tanja Stender, Janina Charlotte Gabriela Dechmann, Jasmin Čolić, Jürgen Hoyer
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Behavioral activation (BA) interventions systematically encourage positive and value-based activities. Engaging in them is an effective way to counteract negative affect, but it is unknown whether there are subtypes of activities that may have differential effects on mood. This study investigated the factorial structure of 99 potentially rewarding activities used in an online BA intervention during the COVID-19 lockdown. About 3624 German-speaking participants evaluated a list of 99 activities that were easy to apply. We analyzed the initially 99 activities by means of confirmatory factor analysis. Since activities can either be seen as reflective or formative indicators, a reflective as well as a formative model was analyzed. Although the range of chosen activities differed clearly between respondents, a one-factor model provided the best fit. It seems that a general “activity” factor is more important for explaining whether people choose a certain activity or not, than specific characteristics of the activity itself.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-20T08:40:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120967
       
  • A theory based examination of factors associated with male body hair
           removal

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      Authors: Patricia Obst, Thomas Juillerat, Katherine White
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Male body hair removal has implications for men’s mental health such as anxiety about body image. Based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and relevant additional constructs, this research examined factors associated with young men’s upper body and pubic hair removal. Young men residing in Australia completed a pilot survey, online survey (N = 655) of predictors of intention (plans) to remove body hair and a 4-week follow up survey (n = 222) reporting body hair removal behaviour. Attitudes about body hair removal, pressure from others, perceptions of control and similarity to prototypical young men who removed body hair were associated with intention for upper body (60%) and pubic (48%) hair removal. Intention was significantly associated with body hair removal behaviours. These findings indicate social pressure was associated with young men’s decisions to remove body hair, pointing to sources of potential intervention.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-16T09:41:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120969
       
  • The different impacts of COVID-19 on the mental health of distinct health
           care worker categories

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      Authors: Arthur Viana Machado, Raquel Menezes Gonçalves, Camila Monteiro Fabricio Gama, Liliane Maria Pereira Vilete, William Berger, Roberta Benitez Freitas Passos, Mauro Vito Mendlowicz, Gabriela Guerra Leal Souza, Mirtes Garcia Pereira, Izabela Mocaiber, Leticia de Oliveira
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The present study sought to explore the factors associated with the odds of having probable depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to traumatic COVID-19 experiences and their impact on health care workers in distinct categories. In this cross-sectional study, 1843 health care workers (nurses, nurse technicians, physicians, physical therapists, and other healthcare workers) were recruited via convenience sampling. A survey was administered to obtain information regarding sociodemographic, occupational, and mental health status. Descriptive statistics and multivariable logistic regression were used for the analyses. Being a nurse technician was associated with an odds ratio of 1.76 for probable PTSD. No relation was observed between health care worker categories and the odds of probable depression. Additionally, being female and not receiving adequate PPE were related to greater odds of having probable PTSD and depression.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-15T12:20:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120968
       
  • COVID-19: Sports activity and health-related quality of life of Swiss
           children and adolescents before and during the initial stay at home period
           

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      Authors: Cäcilia Zehnder, Claudio R Nigg, Valentin Benzing
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study was to investigate sports activity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of Swiss children and adolescents (7–16 years) during the national COVID-19 stay at home (SaH) period. In total, 237 parent-child pairs gave information about HRQoL and sports activity (duration and type) before and during SaH. Results show that sports activity decreased during SaH and was also positively related to HRQoL. These findings indicate that sports activity of children and adolescents should be promoted during SaH, for which innovative home-based interventions may be useful.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-09T06:32:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221122722
       
  • Resilience factors during the Coronavirus pandemic: Testing the main
           effect and stress buffering models of optimism and positive affect with
           mental and physical health

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      Authors: Harshitha Venkatesh, Amber M Osorno, Julia K Boehm, Brooke N Jenkins
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigates associations between resilience factors (optimism and positive affect) and self-rated health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Longitudinal data were collected (N = 292) across five assessments. Multilevel modeling tested main effects of the resilience factors and how they interacted with stress to predict health. Greater optimism and positive affect were prospectively associated with fewer depressive symptoms (ps < 0.01) and a lower burden of physical health symptoms (ps
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T07:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120340
       
  • Social media exposure, interpersonal network, and tampon use intention: A
           multigroup comparison based on network structure

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      Authors: Yin Yang, Xin Ma, Jessica Gall Myrick
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The scarcity of tampons in China has attracted scholarly attention. Extending the theory of planned behavior with social network structure, this cross-sectional online survey (N = 763) found that exposure to tampon-related information on social media was positively related to Chinese women’s tampon use intentions. This association was mediated through attitudes, descriptive norms, and self-efficacy toward using tampons. Furthermore, the effects of social media exposure differed among people with different network structures. Our findings shed light on the promotion of nonconventional feminine hygiene products, which, in turn, may enhance Chinese women’s well-being and gender equity across the globe.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T07:09:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120332
       
  • Social support and pre-operative anxiety in patients undergoing elective
           surgical procedures: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Xiu Ling Florence Kok, J Timothy Newton, Elinor M Jones, Susan J Cunningham
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Pre-operative anxiety may adversely affect post-operative recovery and treatment satisfaction. This systematic review assessed the impact of social support on pre-operative anxiety in elective surgery patients. MEDLINE via Ovid, Embase, PsycINFO, Web of Science, CINAHL Plus, Emcare and LILACS were searched for publications (1950–2021). Fourteen studies were included for descriptive analysis and five for meta-analysis. The pooled estimate in the meta-analysis was r = −0.372 (95% CI: −0.578 to −0.122). Stronger social support was weakly associated with reduced pre-operative anxiety, but the quality of available evidence was low. The findings suggest potential benefit in enhancing utilisation of support networks before elective surgery.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T07:07:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221116969
       
  • Fear of COVID-19 and the career maturity of Chinese international high
           school students: The mediating effect of the intolerance of uncertainty

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      Authors: Qishan Chen, Liuying Lu, Huixin Huang, Yuan Fang
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the influencing mechanism underlying the relationship between the fear of COVID-19 and Chinese international high school students’ career maturity by investigating the mediating role of the intolerance of uncertainty. The results indicated that the fear of COVID-19 and the intolerance of uncertainty are negatively associated with international high school students’ career maturity. Moreover, intolerance of uncertainty plays a mediating role in the relationship between the fear of COVID-19 and career maturity. The findings contribute to the literature on mental health and have important practical implications for international high school students’ mental health and career development.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-09-01T07:06:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221116678
       
  • Pregnant in a Pandemic: Connecting Perceptions of Uplifts and Hassles to
           Mental Health

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      Authors: Stephanie M Reich, Nestor Tulagan, Melissa Dahlin, Sina Labaff, Nikil Dutt, Amir Rahmani
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      How women experience pregnancy as uplifting or a hassle is related to their mental and physical health and birth outcomes. Pregnancy during a pandemic introduces new hassles, but may offer benefits that could affect how women perceive their pregnancy. Surveying 118 ethnically and racially diverse pregnant women, we explore (1) women’s traditional and pandemic-related pregnancy uplifts and hassles and (2) how these experiences of pregnancy relate to their feelings of loneliness, positivity, depression, and anxiety. Regressions show that women who experience more intense feelings of uplifts than hassles also feel more positive, less lonely, and have better mental health. Findings suggest that focusing on positive aspects of being pregnant, in general and during a pandemic, might be beneficial for pregnant women’s mental health.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-29T09:56:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221120115
       
  • Do healthy habits regulate the relationship between psychosocial
           dysfunction by COVID-19 and bidimensional mental health'

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      Authors: Pilar Rico-Bordera, Raquel Falcó, Verónica Vidal-Arenas, José Antonio Piqueras
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has affected mental health and well-being. Lifestyles are relevant to understand the impact of psychosocial dysfunctions. The objective was to examine the role of healthy habits in the relations between psychosocial dysfunction and psychological well-being/distress during COVID-19. Participants completed measures of psychosocial dysfunction, healthy habits, life satisfaction, well-being, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Psychosocial dysfunction was associated with distress symptoms, while health habits were associated with well-being. Healthy habits were mediators: greater psychosocial dysfunction was associated with less healthy habits, which in turn were associated with lower overall well-being, and greater depression. Programs addressing healthy habits can be of great utility.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-24T06:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221116627
       
  • Vested in support: Applying vested interest theory to increase support for
           close others with depression

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      Authors: Alexander Marshburn, Jason T Siegel
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Guided by vested interest theory, we assessed whether a lack of stake explains the discrepancy between people having positive attitudes toward their loved one’s recovery from depression and the provision of support. We further investigated whether increasing the perceived personal consequences of providing support (i.e. stake) increased willingness to provide support. A stake-boosting message had no direct, but significant indirect effects on willingness to provide support when compared to a control and comparison condition. In summary, increasing stake in a loved one’s recovery indirectly increases intentions to provide support.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-12T05:55:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221115626
       
  • Suicide risk assessment and depressive symptoms among Spanish adolescent
           bully-victims: Evidence for the importance of emotional intelligence and
           sex

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      Authors: Cirenia Quintana-Orts, Lourdes Rey, Sergio Mérida-López, Natalio Extremera
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this study is to explore a model examining how emotional intelligence (EI), sex, depressive symptoms and suicidal thoughts and behaviours (STB) may interact. The sample included 380 Spanish adolescent bully-victims (61.6% boys; mean age = 14.38 years). The results indicated that EI is a significant negative predictor of decreased STB and that this relation is fully mediated by depressive symptoms. This effect was moderated by sex, such that the mediation is stronger for girls compared to boys. The promotion of EI may be core in the development of prevention programmes for suicide, especially among female bully-victims.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T09:55:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221116021
       
  • Exploring typologies of appraisals, involvement, and distress in type 2
           diabetes family members

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      Authors: Josh R Novak, Kristin J August, Jan Kavookjian, Heather Whitley, Donna Burnett
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The present study conducted a latent profile analysis from a US national sample of 446 family members to identify and predict unique clusters of family members’ PWD illness appraisals, involvement, and psychological distress. Time since diagnosis, diabetes adherence, the relationship with the PWD, age, gender, race/ethnicity, income, and economic pressure were included as predictors. Class membership was used to predict the family members’ own health behaviors (sleep quality, days of physical activity, and diet quality). Results revealed four distinct classes: Moderately Concerned, Involved, and Distressed (32.51%), Least Concerned, Distressed, and Involved (27.13%), Less Concerned and Distressed, Moderately Involved (23.77%), and Most Concerned, Involved, and Distressed (16.82%). The significant predictors and outcomes of class membership revealed interesting patterns in associations with class membership. Consequently, in addition to involving family members, health promotion and intervention efforts must consider the psychological health and illness appraisals of family members rather than a one-size-fits-all approach.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-08-04T11:59:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221115326
       
  • Stigma related to breast cancer among women and men: The case of the Druze
           minority in Israel

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      Authors: Avital Gershfeld-Litvin, Samer Halabi, Keith M Bellizzi
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of this study was to explore stigma related to breast cancer among Druze women and men and identify factors associated with low screening rates among Druze women. A sample of 270 Druze women and men completed an online questionnaire adapted to detect breast cancer stigma and internalized breast cancer stigma. Independent samples t-test results showed higher scores for men compared to women, at a significant level, on four of the Breast Cancer Stigma scales: awkwardness, avoidance, policy opposition, and personal responsibility. Independent samples t-test results also showed higher scores for men compared to women, at a significant level, on two of the Internalized Breast Cancer Stigma scales: stereotype endorsement and discrimination experience. These results suggest a need for psychoeducation about breast cancer screening for minority groups such as the Druze, with male partners of women who are diagnosed with breast cancer being the main target recipients.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-27T10:40:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221115619
       
  • Moral distress during COVID-19: The importance of perceived organizational
           support for hospital nurses

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      Authors: Abigail L Latimer, Melanie D Otis, Gia Mudd- Martin, Debra K Moser
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Moral distress, or the inability to act congruent with moral beliefs, has been of concern for healthcare professionals especially since the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospital nurses are particularly affected in their roles with mounting administrative pressures and demands. We examined whether general and COVID-specific support in employing healthcare organizations predicted moral distress in a sample of inpatient hospital nurses. A total of 248 nurses completed the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals, Survey of Perceived Organizational Support, COVID Organizational Support survey, and the Hospital Ethical Climate Scale. We found that general and COVID-related organizational support were predictors of moral distress after controlling for age, gender, working in an intensive care unit setting, and ethical climate. Findings support the need for a comprehensive strategy to address moral distress, including institutional efforts to convey support and commitment. Strategies moral distress may be experienced differently based on gender identity.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:29:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221111850
       
  • The psychological impact on perioperative healthcare workers during
           Victoria’s second COVID-19 wave: A prospective longitudinal thematic
           analysis

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      Authors: Michelle Ku, Irene Ng, Elizabeth Barson, Caroline Fisher, Reny Segal, Daryl Lindsay Williams, Roni Benjamin Krieser, Paul Mario Mezzavia, Keat Lee, Yinwei Chen, Teresa Sindoni, Toni Withiel
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has had a profound psychological impact on our frontline healthcare workers. Throughout the entire second COVID-19 wave at one major tertiary hospital in Melbourne Australia, longitudinal qualitative data between perioperative staff members, and analyses of intrapersonal changes were reported. Inductive analysis of three open-ended questions generated four major themes: Organisational Response to the Pandemic, Psychological Impact, Changes in Feelings of Support Over Time and Suggestions for Changes. Understanding the challenges, perception and suggestions from this longitudinal study allows us to provide a range of support services and interventions to minimise the long-term negative psychological impact and be better prepared should another similar situation arises again.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:28:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221111021
       
  • Cognitive decline in mid-life: Changes in memory and cognition related to
           hypothyroidism

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      Authors: Mark Stern, Alyse Finch, Kelly B. Haskard-Zolnierek, Krista Howard, Rebecca G. Deason
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study assessed specific cognitive impairments within a primarily female, hypothyroid population, while controlling for factors that commonly contribute to cognitive decline. Participants (N = 739) included 461 individuals with hypothyroidism. This study involved an online survey assessing several aspects of memory and cognition. Those with hypothyroidism generally scored worse on self-assessments of memory, higher perceived stress, high rates of depression and anxiety, greater fatigue, poorer concentration, and less motivation. A Receiver Operating Characteristic curve indicated that the cognitive questionnaires are successful at classifying hypothyroidism and a mediation analysis showed fatigue is a mediating symptom of these cognitive outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T07:07:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221107745
       
  • The Pandemic Anxiety Inventory: A validation study

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      Authors: Irvin Sam Schonfeld, Tasmyn Prytherch, Mark Cropley, Renzo Bianchi
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The Pandemic Anxiety Inventory (PAI) assesses anxiety symptoms individuals attribute to the presence of a pandemic. We conducted this study of 379 British adults during the COVID-19 pandemic and found that the PAI exhibited excellent reliability and solid criterion validity. Pandemic anxiety was associated with reduced social support, anticipated life changes, financial strain, job loss, economic insecurity, and the hospitalization or death of a close friend or relative. Using correlational and bifactor analyses, we found that the PAI demonstrated solid convergent and discriminant validity. The findings suggest that the PAI can be used in research and clinical practice.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T09:28:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221106129
       
  • #Bodypositive surpasses 1 billion engagements

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      Authors: Sarah Graham, Eva Newell, Justin B. Phillips, Gareth J. Treharne, Damian Scarf
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The body-positive movement (#bodypositive) champions body acceptance by celebrating a diverse - visual - array of body types and shapes online. Sparked out of collective resistance to unrealistic bodies on social media, the #bodypositive community has assembled a considerable following: having now surpassed one billion engagements on Instagram. To mark this milestone, we highlight the problem, the promise, and the peril of image-focused movements on Instagram. On balance, we argue #bodypositive content on Instagram likely has a positive impact. As the movement continues to grow though, advocates can look to strengthen the content’s positive impact with some careful, research-informed, messaging adjustments.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:04:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221107746
       
  • Emotionally subjective reactivity to cervical cytology pictures is
           modulated by expertise

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      Authors: Jacqueline Alfenas de Oliveira, Miriam de Cássia Souza, Laila Fernandes da Cunha, Bruna Eugênia Ferreira Mota, Mariana Trevisan Rezende, Claudia Martins Carneiro, Mirtes Garcia Pereira, Izabela Mocaiber, Gabriela Guerra Leal Souza
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Our aims were to create a catalog of cytological pictures and to evaluate the valence (level of pleasantness/unpleasantness) and arousal (level of calm/excitement) of these pictures in individuals with different occupations. The sample consisted of medical and law college students and cytopathologists. Valence and arousal score for general pictures were not modulated by expertise in cytology. However, students judged the cytological pictures to be lower in valence and in arousal than the cytopathologists. The cytopathologists classified cytological pictures with lesions as lower in valence and higher in arousal than cytological pictures without lesions.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T06:02:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221106023
       
  • Role of personality traits in determining the association between social
           participation and mental health: A cross-sectional study in Japan

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      Authors: Mari Yamashita, Takumi Abe, Satoshi Seino, Yu Nofuji, Yasuhiro Sugawara, Shoji Shinkai, Akihiko Kitamura, Yoshinori Fujiwara
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The role of personality in determining the association between social participation and mental health was examined by a cross-sectional study. We analyzed data from 4981 older adults aged 65–84 years who were recruited via a mail survey in one region of Japan. We defined poor mental health using a score ≤12 points on the World Health Organization-Five Well-Being Index-Japanese. Personality traits were measured by 10 Item Personality Inventory-Japanese. In women, higher openness positively moderated the association between private group participation (volunteering, sports, hobby, and learning) and mental health, while higher neuroticism negatively moderated it. This study contributes to knowledge about mental health, personality, and participation. The findings provide provisional evidence about recommending private group participation for women with high openness but not those with high neuroticism.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:53:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221105350
       
  • Past lesson works: SARS memory moderates the relationship between media
           use and protective behavior during COVID-19 pandemic in China

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      Authors: Haihong Li, Xin He, Tian-Yi Hu, Xiaofei Xie
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has become one of the top global health concerns. The present research examined the relationship between media use and protective behavior. The moderating role of SARS memory was also examined. A cross-sectional study found that media use was associated with more protective behaviors (i.e. preventive behavior, and avoidant behavior). We further found that SARS memory moderated the association between media use and avoidant behavior. Moreover, the moderating role of SARS memory on the relationship between daily media use and daily protective behavior was again tested using a daily design in Study 2. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-23T05:50:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221105349
       
  • The impact of positive reinforcement on teamwork climate, resiliency, and
           burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic: The TEAM-ICU (Transforming Employee
           Attitudes via Messaging strengthens Interconnection, Communication, and
           Unity) pilot study

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      Authors: Jack Green, Carl T Berdahl, Xin Ye, Jeffrey C Wertheimer
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Burnout is an internationally recognized occupational phenomenon that negatively impacts the healthcare workforce and its recipients. The aim of this pilot study was to test whether positive reinforcement and integrating a language of support among co-workers can enhance resiliency, facilitate psychological wellness, and encourage hope. This embedded mixed methods prospective, behavioral, interventional study evaluated the effects of positive feedback on wellness among intensive care unit clinicians during the COVID-19 pandemic in a single center, quaternary care medical center. The deliberate positive feedback paradigm has the potential to augment resiliency and improve attitudes toward a teamwork climate. The routine use of deliberate positivity may represent a scalable, low-cost initiative to enhance wellness in a healthcare organization.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-20T10:45:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221103640
       
  • Relationships between experiencing anti-fat microaggressions, body
           appreciation, and perceived physical and mental health

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      Authors: Elizabeth A O’Neill, Kate Trout, Virginia Ramseyer Winter
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined whether body appreciation mediates the relationships between anti-fat microaggression experiences and perceived physical and mental health. Using a cross-sectional survey design, our study included 384 adult cisgender women in the United States. We found that anti-fat microaggression experiences had a negative association with body appreciation, and perceived physical and mental health. Body appreciation had a positive relationship to perceived physical and mental health. Our study further suggests that body appreciation is an important modifiable factor that mediates the relationships between anti-fat microaggression experiences and perceived mental and physical health. Implications for practice and research are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-14T12:25:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221103421
       
  • Putting the ‘teachable moment’ in context: A view from
           critical health psychology

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      Authors: Abigail Locke
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The concept of ‘Teachable Moment’ (TM) is an increasingly used term within mainstream health psychology in relation to interventions and health behaviour change. It refers to a naturally occurring health event where individuals may be motivated to change their behaviours from unhealthy ones to healthier choices. Pregnancy is seen as a key time for behaviour change interventions, partly due to the idea that the mother has increased motivations to protect her unborn child. This paper proposes a Critical Health Psychological (CHP) re-examination of the concept and explores the ‘teachable moment’ within a wider framing of contemporary parenting ideologies in order to offer a more critical, nuanced and contextual consideration of pregnancy and the transition to motherhood. The paper locates these discussions using an example of alcohol usage in pregnancy. In doing so, this paper is the first of its kind to consider the ‘teachable moment’ from a critical health psychological perspective.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:15:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221101750
       
  • Assessing depressive symptoms and diabetes distress in Type 1 diabetic
           adults: A comparison of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII)
           and multiple daily injections (MDI) users

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      Authors: Ella Dowling, David W Maidment
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This cross-sectional observational study assesses differences in depressive symptoms and diabetes-distress between adults with type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) or multiple daily injections (MDI) insulin delivery methods. Two-hundred and seventy-one adults with type 1 diabetes were recruited who used CSII (n = 104) or MDI (n = 167). Results show that, compared to CSII users, scores on the Severity Measure for Depression – Adult questionnaire and Management and Physician subscales on the Type 1 Diabetes Distress Scale were significantly lower in users of MDI. Thus, MDI users may require greater targetted support to improve these aspects of psychological wellbeing.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T05:00:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221098498
       
  • Corrigendum to “A qualitative investigation of reasoning behind
           decisions to decline participation in a research intervention: A
           study-within-a-trial”

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T12:02:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221094665
       
  • Examining health experiences and body dissatisfaction in two unique
           samples of patients with type 2 diabetes

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      Authors: Kristin J August, Maggie R Albright-Pierce, Charlotte H Markey
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Using cross-sectional data from two samples of adult patients with type 2 diabetes (n = 123 and n = 111), we used an embodiment perspective to examine whether health experiences were related to the extent of individuals’ dissatisfaction with their bodies. The nature and strength of associations differed across the two unique samples examined, but weight status had the strongest and most robust association with body dissatisfaction in both samples. None of the associations differed as a function of gender or age. These findings contribute to an understanding of the complex relationship between physical and mental health in the context of diabetes.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-27T01:31:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221091610
       
  • Black (patients’) lives matter: Exploring the role of identity-safety
           cues in healthcare settings among Black Americans

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      Authors: Veronica Derricks, India R Johnson, Evava S Pietri
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Two online experiments investigated whether hypothetical physicians’ use of an identity-safety cue acknowledging systemic injustice (a Black Lives Matter pin) improves Black Americans’ evaluations of the physician and feelings of identity-safety. Across studies, findings showed that when a White physician employed the identity-safety cue, Black Americans reported stronger perceptions of physician allyship and increased identity-safety (e.g. trust). As predicted, use of the identity-safety cue produced smaller or non-significant effects when employed by a Black physician. These benefits emerged regardless of physicians’ perceived motivation for employing the cue (e.g. whether the physician was personally motivated to employ the cue or his medical practice encouraged use of the cue; Study 2). Furthermore, analyses revealed that exposure to the identity-safety cue promoted a greater sense of identity-safety for Black Americans due to increased perceptions that the physician is an ally for Black individuals. Implications of identity-safety cues for racially discordant medical interactions are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T07:14:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221090850
       
  • The mediating role of vaccine hesitancy in the relations of COVID-19
           

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      Authors: Matt C. Howard, Maggie M. Davis
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs have a powerful detrimental influence on COVID-19 vaccine perceptions and behaviors. We investigate an expanded range of outcomes for COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs, and we test which vaccine hesitancy dimensions mediate these relations. Our results show that COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs relate to COVID-19 vaccination willingness and receipt, flu vaccination willingness and receipt, as well as vaccine word-of-mouth. Many of these relations are mediated by vaccine hesitancy dimensions that represent perceptions that vaccines pose health risks as well as perceptions that vaccines are not needed because the respondent is healthy. Our discussion identifies directions for future research.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-11T10:52:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221096013
       
  • Adherence to social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic in Italy: The
           role of autonomous motivation and defiance

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      Authors: Maria Elena Magrin, Marta Guarischi, Francesca Liga, Matilde Nicolotti, Ilenia Pielich
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      To maintain social distancing in the long term, in the current COVID-19 scenario, people’s motivation must be strong and of high quality. Many governments adopted measures enforcing social distancing. Enforcement, however, can produce feelings of defiance and backfiring effects. The present work aims at investigating the relationship between autonomous motivation and intentions to maintain social distancing, through adherence to recommendations and feelings of defiance. A sample of 502 Italian residents, from different parts of Italy, completed an online survey assessing their present behavior, levels of autonomous motivation and feelings of defiance, as well as intentions to observe social distancing in the short and long term. Results support the hypotheses that autonomous motivation is related to stronger intentions to maintain social distancing, particularly in the long term, and that feelings of defiance mediate this relationship. These results underline importance of promoting understanding and internalizing reasons for social distancing, beyond norms.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T09:49:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221093447
       
  • Quality of social sharing of emotions alleviates job burnout: The role of
           meaning of work

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      Authors: Stephanie Delroisse, Bernard Rimé, Florence Stinglhamber
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Past research has demonstrated that finding meaning in work is a dynamic process during interactions with colleagues and supervisors and protects against job burnout. At the same time, past studies have shown that the need to achieve meaning motivates people to share their emotions. Building on this, we hypothesized that workers who have more experience of quality social sharing of emotions about their work with relatives, colleagues, and supervisors are less at risk of job burnout. A cross-sectional survey of 611 working-aged adults in Belgium (mean age 39.25 years) supported this primary hypothesis. In addition, the hypothesis that meaning of work mediates the relationships between experience of quality social sharing of emotions and job burnout was also supported. The study provides evidence that social sharing of emotions reduces job burnout by helping to make sense of work situations and reinforcing relationships with others.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-05-05T09:47:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221091039
       
  • Examining behavioural intention towards organ donation in Hong Kong

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      Authors: Tina L Rochelle, Judy SC Ng
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Although many people report favourable attitudes towards organ donation, Hong Kong has one of the lowest rates of organ donation globally. The present study examined behavioural intention towards organ donation. A convenience sample of 225 Hong Kong Chinese adults (118 = female) aged 18–82 years were recruited to an online survey. Behavioural intention, attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy, knowledge and altruism were examined. ANOVA was conducted to examine key differences based on behavioural intention, regression then examined predictors of behavioural intention to donate before exploratory analysis examined the mediating role of subjective norms on the relationship between self-efficacy and behavioural intention. Findings revealed over one third (38%) of respondents were actively registered as organ donors. Women were significantly more likely to be registered as organ donors. Subjective norms and self-efficacy were strong predictors of behavioural intention to donate, and subjective norms significantly mediated the relationship between self-efficacy and behavioural intention to donate.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T05:21:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221092857
       
  • Perceived similarity determines social comparison effects of more and less
           physically active others

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      Authors: Iris Perey, Joerg Koenigstorfer
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This research tested whether the effects of physical activity (PA) comparisons depend on the perceived similarity to comparison standards. In 3 experimental studies, participants compared themselves to a more or a less physically active person. Results showed that perceived similarity determined comparison outcomes: Participants’ PA self-evaluation and self-efficacy were higher when focusing on similarities with more (vs less) (Study 1) and dissimilarities with less (vs more) active others (Study 1 and 2). Considering the opposite of the impression that less active others are similar and more active others are dissimilar increased participants’ PA self-evaluation, self-efficacy, and intention (Study 3).
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-19T06:59:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221086759
       
  • Associations between perceived everyday discrimination and health among
           college students at a Hispanic-serving institution

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      Authors: Jacqueline Hua, Angela E Johnson, Maryam Hussain, Jennifer L Howell
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Despite efforts by universities to promote racial/ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic diversity, college students continue to report discrimination. In two studies, we examined the frequency, predictors, and health consequences of experiencing everyday discrimination at a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Findings show the majority of students reported experiencing discrimination at the university, with most experiences attributed to their gender and aspects of their physical appearance. More frequent discrimination was associated with poorer physical and psychological health. Furthermore, most participants cited other students as the source of their discrimination. These findings offer important insight into students’ experiences of everyday discrimination at a diverse setting.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T07:23:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221083739
       
  • Men’s and women’s endorsement of hegemonic masculinity and
           responses to COVID-19

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      Authors: Nathaniel EC Schermerhorn, Theresa K Vescio
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Using a gendered psychology of health approach, we examine the effects of the culturally idealized form of masculinity—hegemonic masculinity—for both men and women’s health attitudes and behaviors. Using data collected across four studies (N = 805) during the COVID-19 pandemic, we found that stronger endorsement of hegemonic masculinity related to health attitudes antithetical to mitigation strategies (e.g. more engagement in risky behaviors, less support for federal mandates) and evaluations of how political leaders have responded to COVID-19. These effects did not differ by gender suggesting that hegemonic masculinity has implications for both men and women’s health.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-11T10:47:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221081905
       
  • An exploration of at-risk youths’ resilience within the context of a
           correctional centre in Eswatini

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      Authors: Sifiso B Shabangu, Vicki Koen
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Literature highlights that youth in correctional centres face multiple risk factors which can be buffered by resilience. This study aimed to explore and describe the experiences of at-risk youth in a juvenile correctional centre in Eswatini regarding their resilience. The participants were purposively sampled and engaged in individual (n = 41) and group (n = 25) data collection. Following thematic analysis, the findings revealed four main themes: Understanding of resilience, protective factors to resilience, risk factors to resilience and youth’s recommendations for resilience. This study provides insight into resilience of youth from youth’s perspective that may be useful in rehabilitation or programme development.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-02-22T10:53:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221079951
       
  • Assessing psychosocial distress associated with homelessness in Ghana: A
           springboard for interventional policy design

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      Authors: Nelly BF Amissah, Christopher M Amissah, Benjamin Amponsah
      First page: 3085
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated the causes of homelessness in Ghana and associated psychosocial distress. A sample of 86 homeless participants listed perceived causes of their homelessness and completed measures of psychosocial distress, and 97 non-homeless participants completed the same measures psychosocial distress. Causes of homelessness among the participants included poverty (30.1%), migration (10.4%), unemployment (2.2%), parental demise (2.2%), parental neglect (0.5%), and parental divorce (0.5%). Multivariate analysis revealed higher psychosocial distress among the homeless than the non-homeless. Homeless females reported higher levels of stress and suicidality than their male counterparts. The study demonstrates the need for timely and effective implementation of interventions such as provision of affordable housing, financial assistance, job-creation, and skill training for the homeless directly related to known causes of homelessness and accounting for gender differences.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-15T12:24:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221082767
       
  • Predicting health behaviors across Belgium and France during the first
           wave of COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Mathias Schmitz, Robin Wollast, Alix Bigot, Olivier Luminet
      First page: 3097
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      The objective of the current research was to investigate how a series of psychological factors may underlie two COVID-19 health behaviors, and how a contextual factor (country of residence) could shape their influence. Cross-sectional results from the first pandemic wave (NBelgium = 4878, NFrance = 1071) showed that handwashing and social contacts limitation are predicted by a unique set of psychological variables that holds across Belgium and France, despite their distinct lockdown-policies strictness. In practice, policy-makers could leverage on these unique predictors and fine-tune their strategies accordingly to promote adherence to each measure while generalizing it across similar nations.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-17T10:22:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221083819
       
  • Long Covid at the crossroads: Comparisons and lessons from the treatment
           of patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome
           (ME/CFS)

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      Authors: Joanne Hunt, Charlotte Blease, Keith J Geraghty
      First page: 3106
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Whilst parallels have been drawn between Long Covid and myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), there is a well-documented history of negative stereotyping and marginalisation of patients with ME/CFS. A socio-politically oriented comparison of scientific, clinical and societal responses to Long Covid and ME/CFS is thus important to prevent similar harms arising among Long Covid patients. We identify four reasons for injustices in the treatment of ME/CFS patients, and discuss the risk of Long Covid following a similar trajectory. We conclude with policy and practice recommendations to help prevent such injustices arising again, including consideration of critical reflexivity in medical education.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T07:24:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221084494
       
  • Health-related quality of life in endometriosis: The influence of
           endometriosis-related symptom presence and distress

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      Authors: Leesa Van Niekerk, Lucy Johnstone, Mandy Matthewson
      First page: 3121
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This international cross-sectional study examined the relationships between endometriosis-related symptom experience and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in 318 women with endometriosis. Measures of symptom burden and distress, pain, psychological wellbeing, and HRQoL were collected via an online survey. Age, symptom duration, burden, and distress were associated with lower psychological wellbeing and HRQoL, with small to medium effect sizes. Somatic concern, depression, pain, dysmenorrhea, clitoral pain, dyspareunia, and bloating were found to be significant correlates of HRQoL. The findings highlight the importance of considering a broader range of endometriosis-related symptoms than pain alone and the ongoing need to reduce diagnostic delay in endometriosis.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-03-27T07:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221085051
       
  • Improving older adults’ vaccination uptake: Are existing measures of
           vaccine hesitancy valid and reliable for older people'

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      Authors: Nicola Cogan, Allyson J Gallant, Louise A Brown Nicholls, Susan Rasmussen, David Young, Lynn Williams
      First page: 3136
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      We sought to establish whether two recently developed measures, the 5C scale and the Vaccination Attitudes Examination (VAX) were reliable and valid for use with older adults. A total of 372 UK-dwelling participants (65–92 years, M = 70.5 years, SD = 4.6) completed a cross-sectional survey measuring health and socio-demographic characteristics in relation to vaccine uptake for influenza, pneumococcal and shingles. The 5C and VAX scales were administered to test their reliability, validity and dimensionality. Both scales showed good internal reliability and convergent, discriminant and concurrent validity. Their factor structures were also confirmed, supporting their use with older adult populations.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:51:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221089104
       
  • A model to understand COVID-19 preventive behaviors in young adults:
           Health locus of control and pandemic-related fear

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      Authors: Dora Bianchi, Antonia Lonigro, Anna Di Norcia, Daniele Di Tata, Sara Pompili, Marta Zammuto, Eleonora Cannoni, Emiddia Longobardi, Fiorenzo Laghi
      First page: 3148
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      This study investigated COVID-19 preventive behaviors in young adults, exploring the predictive roles of health locus of control and pandemic fear. A sample of 188 Italian young adults (Mage = 22.76, SDage = 1.95; 85% girls) completed an anonymous online survey assessing preventive behaviors, health locus of control styles (i.e. internal, chance, powerful others), and two dimensions of pandemic fear. Fear for COVID-19 consequences—but not general fear for contagion—significantly predicted prevention behaviors, and it also moderated the relationships between each health locus of control style and preventive behaviors. Our findings have relevant implications for research and social policies.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-12T06:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221089722
       
  • “I’m an adult now”: Health risk behaviors and
           identifying as an adult

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      Authors: Elizabeth Culatta, Jody Clay-Warner
      First page: 3164
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      Is identifying as an adult associated with lower rates of participation in risky behaviors' This study focuses on how identity affects health behaviors for young adults. We use an original sample of over 500 18- to 29-year-olds in the United States to explore how self-identification as an adult is associated with three clusters of health risk behaviors: substance use, risky sexual behavior, and risky driving behavior. Consistent with our predictions, we find that viewing oneself as an adult is associated with lower levels of participation in each of the health risk behavior outcomes.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-15T05:11:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221086184
       
  • Advance care planning: End-of-life hopes and fears among community
           dwelling adults

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      Authors: Alissa Dark-Freudeman, Benjamin A Bensadon
      First page: 3177
      Abstract: Journal of Health Psychology, Ahead of Print.
      End-of-life (EOL) medical care in the United States often does not align with patients’ goals and preferences. This study explored EOL hopes and fears among 86 community-dwelling adults and examined medical and psychological predictors of death anxiety. Common EOL hopes included absence of suffering, closure, and personal fulfillment. Common EOL fears included suffering, lack of competence, and specific types of death. Fear of the dying process was greater than fear of death itself. Health predicted death anxiety; age alone, did not. Advance care planning and clinical decision making should include these psychological insights and explicitly address EOL hopes and fears.
      Citation: Journal of Health Psychology
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T10:39:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13591053221089726
       
 
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