Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Community Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.784
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3610 - ISSN (Online) 0094-5145
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Disparities in Asthma Rates Amongst Black Residents of New York City

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      Abstract: Abstract Asthma is a chronic respiratory condition affecting around 300 million people worldwide. In the United States, Black individuals have a higher burden of asthma than White individuals. The goal of this study was to differentiate the burden of asthma between US-born and foreign-born Black residents of New York City (NYC). We use a multivariable Cox proportional hazard model with a robust variance estimate. The results indicate that foreign-born Black NYC residents have a significantly lower asthma prevalence than US-born (PR = 0.40, 95% CI = 0.21–0.76). Additionally, those 65 years and older have a lower prevalence of asthma compared to those 18–34 years old. This study shows that asthma prevalence is higher amongst US-born Black NYC residents than foreign-born, which may indicate that the healthcare needs of the foreign-born may be different from that of the native-born. Further studies are needed to elucidate this result fully.
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
       
  • Women’s Health Maintenance Efforts at a Student-Run Free Clinic in South
           Florida Exceeded National Trends During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic posed a setback to health maintenance screenings worldwide. These delays have impacted minorities and those of low socioeconomic status in the same way that disparities in cancer screenings have historically trended. Here, we evaluated the performance of a student-run free clinic in maintaining women up-to-date with cancer screenings before, during, and after the pandemic in relation to national trends. We identified all women eligible for screening mammography and cervical cancer screenings between 2018 and 2022 at the clinic (N = 185). Adequate adherence to screening was defined according to the American Cancer Society (ACS) recommendations for breast mammography, and the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) guidelines for cervical cancer screenings. For cervical cancer screening, 166 female patients seen between 2018 and 2022 were eligible, and up-to-date proportions were as follows: 81.3% in 2018; 90.9% in 2019; 83.3% in 2020; 93.3% in 2021; 93.8% in 2022. For breast surveillance, 143 women were eligible for screening mammography, and up-to-date proportions were as follows: 66.7% in 2018; 62.5% in 2019; 91.7% in 2020; 73.1% in 2021; 84.1% in 2022. These proportions were higher than or near national averages. In conclusion, adherence remained steady during the pandemic and was not subject to the declines seen nationally. Our clinic represents an effective model for promoting women’s health maintenance and tempering the disparities seen among women of low socioeconomic status.
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
       
  • Mask Adherence to Mask Mandate: College Campus Versus the Surrounding
           Community

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      Abstract: Abstract Adherence to masking recommendations and requirements continues to have a wide variety of impacts in terms of viral spread during the ongoing pandemic. As governments, schools, and private sector businesses formulate decisions around mask requirements, it is important to observe real-life adherence to policies and discern subsequent implications. The CDC MASCUP! observational study tracked mask-wearing habits of students on higher-education campuses across the country to collect stratified data about mask typologies, correct mask usage, and differences in behaviors at locations on a college campus and in the surrounding community. Our findings from a single institution include a significant adherence difference between on-campus (86%) and off-campus sites (72%) across the course of this study as well as a notable change in adherence at the on-campus sites with the expiration of a county-wide governmental mandate, despite continuance of a university-wide mandate. This study, completed on and around the campus of East Tennessee State University in Washington County TN, was able to pivotally extract information regarding increased adherence on campus versus the surrounding community. Changes were also seen when mask mandates were implemented and when they expired.
      PubDate: 2023-01-25
       
  • COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in an Underrepresented Minority Community

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      Abstract: Abstract To assess factors influencing acceptability of COVID-19 vaccine in a population of predominantly indigent, minority, pregnant and non-pregnant people of reproductive age. Cross-sectional survey using a modified Health Belief model administered between January 2021 and January 2022 at four hospitals in Brooklyn. Participants included English-speaking reproductive aged persons attending clinics at the participating sites. Descriptive and univariate data analyses were used for analysis. 283 eligible reproductive persons were approached of whom 272 completed the survey (96%). Three quarters said they would take the vaccine under certain circumstances (“as soon as it is ready” [28.6%], “when my doctor recommends it” [21.3%] or “when enough people have received it to know if it works” [25%]), while 25% said they would never take the vaccine. When comparing persons that would take it under certain circumstances to those that never would, the “never” group was significantly more likely to note that, “they would not trust any COVID vaccine” (71.4% vs. 28.5%; p ≤ 0.0001). This greater level of distrust extended to greater distrust of doctors, government, family, newspapers, and media. However, 36% said they would be influenced by their doctor’s recommendation. Pregnant participants were significantly more likely to wait until their doctor recommended it (17.6% of pregnant persons compared to 3.7% of non-pregnant p < 0.0001). Despite mistrust and other discouraging factors, many persons, under appropriate circumstances (e.g., reassurance about vaccine safety) may be motivated to take the vaccine. Even those who claimed that they wouldn’t take the vaccine under any circumstance may be influenced by their health care providers.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • The Helping Networks of Transgender Women Living with HIV

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      Abstract: Abstract Transgender women living with HIV face significant barriers to healthcare that may be best addressed through community-centered interventions holistically focused on their HIV-related, gender-related, and other important needs. Community health ambassador (CHA) interventions (education and training programs designed to engage communities and community leaders in health promotion) may be an effective option, though information about the natural helping networks of this vulnerable population is too limited to inform the implementation of this approach. This study uses social network analysis to describe the natural helping networks of transgender women living with HIV, their help-seeking patterns for HIV-related, gender-related, and ancillary resources, and the characteristics of potential network ambassadors. From February to August 2019, transgender women living with HIV in the US (N = 231) participated a 30-min online survey asking them to describe their natural helping networks (N = 1054). On average, participants were embedded within natural helping networks consisting of 4–5 people. They were more likely to seek help from informal network members vs. formal service providers (p < .01), and from chosen family and partners/spouses (p < .05) above other social connections. Older network members (p < .01), other transgender women (p < .05), and those with whom they regularly engaged face-to-face (p < .01) (vs. social technology) were identified as potential network ambassadors for HIV-, gender-related, and other important issues. These findings suggest an opportunity to develop CHA interventions that leverage existing help networks and potential network ambassadors to promote equitable access to HIV, gender-affirming, and other crucial resources among this medically underserved group.
      PubDate: 2023-01-20
       
  • A Review of Interventions for Drowning Prevention Among Adults

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      Abstract: Abstract Adult drowning is a complex and multifactorial public health challenge requiring community, national and global efforts to mitigate impacts. This study updates the evidence base for public health interventions that address adult fatal and non-fatal drowning. A systematic review was undertaken of the peer-reviewed literature for English-language primary studies published between 2011 and 2021describing a drowning intervention with adults. Twenty-two studies were included. Most studies (n = 16) were conducted in high-income countries. Yearly trends in drowning prevention intervention publications were analysed with 2015 (n = 6) the peak publishing year. Over half of the study designs were pre-post (n = 15). Intervention duration ranged from 4 hours to 11 years. Ten studies described either behaviour change theory or formative evaluation to inform design. Thirteen studies targeted interventions at a population level, seven at a group level and two at individual level. Studies identified a range of prevention strategies, categorised as behavioural (n = 9) (e.g., swimming lessons), socio-ecological (n = 8) (e.g., mandatory personal flotation devices) and mixed (n = 5) (e.g., awareness campaign and barriers to prevent access to water). A range of outcomes were described including changes in awareness, water safety knowledge, attitudes, water safety behaviours and skills, environmental, policy and regulation changes and drowning rates. Findings indicate a small but important increase in the evaluation and publication of effective interventions to prevent adult drowning. The complexity of the issues surrounding drowning requires multi-strategy and context -specific adult focused prevention interventions. Contemporary evidence that identifies effective interventions that contribute to prevention efforts is an essential first step in addressing the challenge.
      PubDate: 2023-01-19
       
  • Analysis of Socio-demographic, Economic and Individual Reasons for
           COVID-19 Vaccination Hesitancy in Ecuador: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study
           

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      Abstract: Abstract The current outbreak of SARS-Cov-2, a virus responsible for COVID-19, has infected millions and caused a soaring death toll worldwide. Vaccination represents a powerful tool in our fight against the transmission of SARS-CoV-2. Ecuador is one of the Latin American countries most impacted by COVID-19. Despite free COVID-19 vaccines, Ecuadorians still hesitate to get vaccinated. A multivariate binary logistic regression was used to analyze data from the Ecuadorian National Institute of Statistics and Censuses. This study investigated socio-demographics, economic, and individual reasons associated with a person having “no intention” to receive COVID-19 vaccine across the study period of October 2021 to March 2022. The survey revealed an increase of unvaccinated people having no intention of COVID-19 vaccination from 57.4% (October-December 2021) to 72.9% (January-March 2022). COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was dependent on factors like sex, age and ethnicity. Socio-economic characteristics and education level were not found to be statistically significant in lack of vaccine intention, but most vaccination hesitancy was due to distrust in the COVID-19 vaccine. People who believed that the vaccine could be unsafe because of possible side effects represented half of the surveyed participants, a proportion that barely diminished during the progress of the vaccination campaign across October-December 2021 (57.04%) and January-March 2022 (49.59%) periods. People who did not believe that the vaccine was effective enough increased from 11.47 to 18.46%. Misbeliefs about effectiveness and safety of vaccines should be considered in the implementation of public health initiatives of communication, education and intervention to improve vaccination campaigns.
      PubDate: 2023-01-18
       
  • Comparing Message Appeals Employed in Efforts to Prevent E-cigarette Use
           Among Students in a US University

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      Abstract: Abstract College students tend to underestimate the risk associated with e-cigarette use while overestimating the prevalence of this behavior. The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived effectiveness of social norms messages to other theoretical appeals regarding the prevention of e-cigarette use. Researchers surveyed 586 college students who assessed five messages. Different appeals were featured in each message. A Rasch Rating Scale Model (RSM) was used to calibrate students' responses to seven items assessing each communication message. The results from the multiple regression models revealed that vape-users were less receptive to the messages than abstainers, and among vape users, males expressed lower message endorsement than females. Overall, the clinical appeal received the highest endorsement in Rasch calibrated logit unit measures, (M = 3.36 for abstainers and M = 2.41 for vape-users), whereas the social norms message was the least favored (M = 1.41 for abstainers and M = 0.22 for vape-users). Qualitative analyses revealed common themes of skepticism and a need for credible scientific information. Findings suggest college students prefer clinical evidence over normative information. An experimental design is needed to determine the extent to which messages influence behavior change.
      PubDate: 2023-01-09
       
  • Interpersonal Firearm Injury and Death in Portland, Oregon: 2018 Through
           2021

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      Abstract: Abstract The annual number of firearm injuries in Portland, Oregon has been higher in the years since 2020 than in any prior year in the city’s history. This descriptive study analyzed data from Gun Violence Archives (GVA) from January 1, 2018, to December 31, 2021. All incidents in GVA of interpersonal firearm injury that occurred in Portland during this period were analyzed for location, number of people injured or killed, and demographic information for those injured or killed. Comparisons in firearm injury rates were made with Seattle and San Francisco. Interpersonal firearm injuries began to rise after the first COVID-19 case in Oregon; July 2020 had the most injuries in the four-year period. Black men suffered the highest rate of interpersonal fatalities, with more than 11-fold higher rate per 100,000 than White men in every year studied. Portland had a higher rate of total interpersonal firearm injuries and a higher rate of firearm fatalities from 2018 through 2021 compared to Seattle and San Francisco. Neighborhoods near Downtown and those on the Eastside of the city had the highest rates of interpersonal injuries and deaths from firearms, whereas those in the Southwest had the lowest. Defining the burden of disease from interpersonal firearm injuries is a fundamental step in designing future public health research and implementing interventions to curb the trauma brought by interpersonal firearm injury.
      PubDate: 2023-01-08
       
  • The Role of Physician Advocacy in Supporting Policy Change That Reduces
           Leaded Aviation Gasoline Emissions

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      Abstract: Background Leaded aviation gasoline (AvGas) accounts for 70%, or 935,082 pounds, of total lead emissions in the United States and has been repeatedly linked to elevated blood lead levels (BLLs) in those living in the vicinity of airports using AvGas. The well-established link between lead exposure and adverse health outcomes provided a platform ripe for environmental health advocates and pediatric health experts to assist a local environmental health organization in addressing lead waste from a local airport, Montgomery-Gibbs Executive Airport (MYF). Method We detail the steps we took, as a physician clean-air advocacy group. We provide a qualitative analysis of our efforts in addressing leaded air pollution through targeted and creative environmental health advocacy through three main avenues: government, public awareness, and academia. Objectives Our actions were taken to ensure the City of San Diego installed an unleaded fuel tank at MYF to reduce leaded aviation gasoline usage and subsequently lead air pollution in the surrounding area. Discussion Ultimately, the identified objective of an unleaded fuel tank was added to the San Diego City budget and scheduled for construction. We hope our actions can serve as a framework to provide concrete steps for clinicians and other advocates to enact change in their communities.
      PubDate: 2023-01-07
       
  • Evaluation of the Community Health Worker Model for COVID-19 Response and
           Recovery

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      Abstract: Abstract Community health workers (CHWs), or promotores de salud, have long played a role in health promotion, but the COVID-19 pandemic has brought renewed attention to the functions, sustainability, and financing of CHW models. ¡Andale! ¿Que Esperas' was a 12-month (June 2021–May 2022) campaign that expanded the CHW workforce to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates in structurally vulnerable, Latinx communities across California. This mixed-methods evaluation aims to elucidate (1) the role of CHWs in COVID-19 response, recovery, and rebuilding and (2) the importance, needs, and perils of CHW models in the COVID-19 era and beyond. CHWs facilitated 159,074 vaccinations and vaccine appointments by countering mis/disinformation, addressing mental health and social needs, building digital competencies, and meeting people where they are, all of which expanded access and instilled confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine. CHWs’ success in engaging the community lies in their shared lived experience as well as their accessibility and recognition in the community, enabling their role in both immediate response and long-term recovery. Funding instability imperils the advances made by CHWs, and efforts are needed to institutionalize the CHW workforce with sustainable funding models. While Medicaid reimbursement models exist in some states, these models are often limited to healthcare services, overlooking a critical function of the CHW model: building community resilience and mobilizing the community for social change.
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
       
  • Adolescent Obesity and Type Two Diabetes in Young Adults in the Minority
           Muslim Bedouin Population in Southern Israel

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      Abstract: Abstract Minority populations suffer from adolescent obesity at increasing rates and develop diabetes type 2 at a younger age. To assess the prevalence of adolescent obesity in the minority Bedouin population of Israel and its association with obesity and diabetes type 2 during young adulthood. A retrospective cohort study, based on computerized medical records. The study cohort was comprised of Bedouin adolescents, born in 1988–1990, who had BMI measurements at ages 14–19 years in their medical records (N = 3310). The prevalence of obesity was 17.3% in middle adolescence, and 9.6% in late adolescence. The ORs for obesity in young adulthood were 30.1 (95% CI 19.1–49.3) and 40.9 (95% CI 25.7–69.1) for the middle and late adolescent groups, respectively. The incidence of diabetes type 2 per 105 person-years was 494.88 (95% CI 263.55–846.27) vs. 23.06 (95% CI 4.76–67.40) and 446.93 (95% CI 223.11–79 9.68) vs. 113.13 (95% CI 74.55–164.59) among adolescents with and without obesity in the middle and late adolescence groups, respectively. Interventions are needed to reduce the prevalence of adolescent obesity in the vulnerable Muslim Bedouin population in southern Israel.
      PubDate: 2022-12-20
       
  • Firearm Mortality Among Pre-school Age Children, 2010–2020

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      Abstract: Abstract Firearms are a substantial cause of death for pre-school children (ages 0–5 years). The purpose of this study was to characterize fatal firearm violence in this age group. The Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS) data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) were analyzed for the years 2010–2020. There were 1,220 firearm deaths during the study period with a 75% increase in the rate of deaths per 100,000 population. Most deaths (two-thirds) were among males. Non-Hispanic Blacks comprised 56.4% of all deaths in 2020, a 172% increase from 2010 and the rate for non-Hispanic Whites increased by 15.4% from 2010 to 2020. The majority of the deaths occurred in the South. Almost two-thirds (65.9%) of all firearm deaths were homicides, 30% were unintentional, and 4.1% were undetermined. Homicides were also the majority of deaths for non-Hispanic Blacks (64.9%), non-Hispanic Whites (60.8%), and Hispanics (81.3%). The years of potential life lost before 80 years of age were 94,105, with a plurality (43.3%) of losses occurring among non-Hispanic Black children. Sustained awareness campaigns should be implemented to make parents and guardians aware of the profound dangers of unlocked and loaded or unsafely stored firearms in the home. Child healthcare providers should counsel parents and guardians on firearm safety in households. Public health professionals should advocate for laws that can help protect children from firearm violence (e.g., Domestic Violence Restraining Orders, Child Access Prevention laws, and Extreme Risk Protection Order laws).
      PubDate: 2022-12-20
       
  • Community Health Workers as Puentes/Bridges to Increase COVID-19 Health
           Equity in Latinx Communities of the Southwest U.S.

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      Abstract: Abstract This study documents the pivotal role that Community Health Workers (CHW) played while supporting underserved Latinx communities affected by COVID-19-related health inequities. With the support of CHWs’ agencies historically serving three Latinx-dense counties in Arizona, we recruited CHWs who participated in a state-wide COVID-19 testing project. Using phenomenology and narrative qualitative research methods, five focus groups were facilitated in Spanish between August and November 2021. Bilingual research team members conducted the analysis of the Spanish verbatim transcripts and CHWs reviewed the results for validity. Three interconnected themes reflected the CHWs experiences: (1) CHWs as puentes/bridges with deep community embeddedness through shared experiences and social/cultural context, (2) CHWs as communication brokers and transformational agents, playing a pivotal role in responding to the health and socioeconomic challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, (3) CHWs satisfaction and frustration due to their dual role as committed community members but unrecognized and undervalued frontline public health workers. These findings emphasize the CHWs’ commitment towards supporting their communities, even amidst the stressors of the pandemic. It is important to continue to integrate the role of CHWs into the larger healthcare system as opposed to relegating them to short term engagements as was the case during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article provides a set of practice, policy, and future research recommendations, emphasizing the need to allocate greater budgetary and training resources in support of CHWs.
      PubDate: 2022-12-19
       
  • Parental and Other Caregiver Loss Due to COVID-19 in the United States:
           Prevalence by Race, State, Relationship, and Child Age

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      Abstract: Abstract The more than one million COVID-19 deaths in the United States include parents, grandparents, and other caregivers for children. These losses can disrupt the social, emotional, and economic well-being of children, their families, and their communities, and understanding the number and characteristics of affected children is a critical step in responding. We estimate the number of children who lost a parent or other co-residing caregiver to COVID-19 in the U.S. and identify racial, ethnic, and geographic disparities by aligning COVID-19 death counts through mid-May 2022 with household information from a representative sample of individuals. We estimate that 216,617 children lost a co-residing caregiver to COVID-19; 77,283 lost a parent and more than 17,000 children lost the only caregiver with whom they lived. Non-White children were more than twice as likely as White children to experience caregiver loss, and children under 14 years old experienced 70% of caregiver loss. These losses are a salient threat to the functioning of families and the communities in which COVID-19 deaths are concentrated, compounding additional challenges to physical and mental health and economic stability disproportionately imposed by the pandemic on historically disadvantaged populations. Policymakers and systems should take steps to ensure access to appropriate supports.
      PubDate: 2022-12-14
       
  • Factors of Overweight and Obesity Among Employees of Petrochemical
           Manufacturing Companies

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      Abstract: Abstract The high prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major contributor to the global burden of disease, and create an economic burden for nations, including both direct and indirect costs. Although the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is rapidly industrializing and the economy is now less dependent on oil, oil industry is still the main contributor to the Saudi labor force (41%). However, the productivity growth lags behind many developing countries. No studies have been conducted to explore the factors that can be associated with the lower productivity in this population of Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of overweight/obesity and examine the association between overweight/obesity and lifestyle habits among employees of petrochemical manufacturing companies in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 1000 employees were surveyed. Chi-square test and logistic regression were used to predict odds ratios for obesity. About 47% of the sample was normal weight, while 28.5% was overweight and 21.2% was obese. Four factors were found to be predictive of obesity: feelings about weight, age, marital status, and childhood region. More than 52% of employees reported being happy with their weight. Those unhappy with their weight had more than six times greater odds of obesity as compared to those happy with their weight. Married employees were about twice as likely as unmarried to be obese. The findings of high prevalence of overweight and obesity among employees of petrochemical manufacturing suggest that more efforts are needed to promote healthy behaviors among employees. Workplace wellness programs and educational campaigns are recommended to encourage healthy lifestyle habits at both the workplace and in the community.
      PubDate: 2022-12-12
       
  • Food Insecurity and Stress Among Rural Residents in South Carolina: The
           Moderating Influences of Household Characteristics, Neighborhood Social
           Environment and Food Environment

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      Abstract: Abstract Food insecurity is linked with poor physical and mental health outcomes, including anxiety, depression and stress. Rural residents in particular face unique challenges obtaining healthy food; the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the relationship between food insecurity and mental health outcomes. This study examines the relationship between food insecurity and stress, and the moderating influence of household characteristics, neighborhood social environment and food environment on this relationship, using a sample of 630 rural South Carolina (SC) residents during COVID-19. Two measures of stress were used in this study: current levels of stress and changes in stress since COVID-19. Results showed a gradient pattern between food insecurity and stress: rural residents with high food insecurity were 6.1 times more likely and those with moderate food insecurity were 3.4 times more likely to report higher level of general stress than those with low food insecurity; rural residents with high food insecurity were 3.3 times more likely and those with moderate food insecurity were 2.0 times more likely to report greater increase in stress after COVID-19 than those with low food insecurity. Neighborhood social environment and food environment provided a buffering effect on the relationship between food insecurity and stress. A stronger social environment after COVID-19 and higher levels of easiness in food access mitigated the negative impacts of food insecurity on stress. Efforts to ameliorate food insecurity should address these broader contextual variables, involving community-level factors.
      PubDate: 2022-12-05
       
  • Addressing Financial Barriers to Health Care Among People Who are
           Low-Income and Insured in New York City, 2014–2017

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      Abstract: Abstract While health care-associated financial burdens among uninsured individuals are well described, few studies have systematically characterized the array of financial and logistical complications faced by insured individuals with low household incomes. In this mixed methods paper, we conducted 6 focus groups with a total of 55 residents and analyzed programmatic administrative records to characterize the specific financial and logistic barriers faced by residents living in public housing in East and Central Harlem, New York City (NYC). Participants included individuals who enrolled in a municipal community health worker (CHW) program designed to close equity gaps in health and social outcomes. Dedicated health advocates (HAs) were explicitly paired with CHWs to provide health insurance and health care navigational assistance. We describe the needs of 150 residents with reported financial barriers to care, as well as the navigational and advocacy strategies taken by HAs to address them. Finally, we outline state-level policy recommendations to help ameliorate the problems experienced by participants. The model of paired CHW–HAs may be helpful in addressing financial barriers for insured populations with low household income and reducing health disparities in other communities.
      PubDate: 2022-12-03
       
  • Correction to: Factors Responsible for Healthcare Avoidance Among Rural
           Adults in the Eastern Region of North Carolina

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      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10900-022-01134-z
       
  • Self-reported anxiety and depression problems and suicide ideation among
           black and latinx adults and the moderating role of social support

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      Abstract: Abstract Suicide is a critical public health problem. Over the past decade, suicide rates have increased among Black and Latinx adults in the U.S. Though depression is the most prevalent psychiatric contributor to suicide risk, Black and Latinx Americans uniquely experience distress and stress (e.g., structural adversity) that can independently operate to worsen suicide risk. This makes it important to investigate non-clinical, subjective assessment of mental health as a predictor of suicide ideation. We also investigate whether social support can buffer the deleterious impact of poor mental health on suicide ideation. We analyzed data from 1,503 Black and Latinx participants of the Washington Heights Community Survey, a 2015 survey of residents of a NYC neighborhood. Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to examine the effect of subjectively experienced problems with anxiety and depression on suicide ideation independent of depression diagnosis, and the role of social support as a moderator. Estimated prevalence of past two-week suicide ideation was 5.8%. Regression estimates showed significantly increased odds of suicide ideation among participants reporting moderate (OR = 8.54,95% CI = 2.44–29.93) and severe (OR = 16.84,95% CI = 2.88–98.46) versus no problems with anxiety and depression, after adjustment for depression diagnosis. Informational support, i.e., having someone to provide good advice in a crisis, reduced the negative impact of moderate levels of anxiety and depression problems on suicide ideation. Findings suggest that among Black and Latinx Americans, subjective feelings of anxiety and depression account for a significant portion of the suicide ideation risk related to poor mental health. Further, social support, particularly informational support, may provide protection against suicide ideation.
      PubDate: 2022-12-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10900-022-01127-y
       
 
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