Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 112 of 112 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 243)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 250)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 103)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health Promotion Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.596
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1524-8399 - ISSN (Online) 1552-6372
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • The Day Disparities Died

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kyrel L. Buchanan
      Pages: 27 - 28
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Volume 25, Issue 1, Page 27-28, January 2024.
      For many, many years, the public health community has grappled with health disparities. Reducing and/or eliminating health disparities are well-established goals, and have become a fixture in the public health space. The focus on health disparity elimination has permeated policy, resources, institutions of higher learning, and research agendas, to name a few. As a Black female public health professional, I believe that we play a central role in moving the country from a place of disparity to equity. Not only are our professional experiences critical for advancing public health, but our lived experiences can also contribute to the transformation that we all seek. This piece, titled “The Day Disparities Died,” reflects this belief. To view the original version of this poem, see the supplemental material section of this article online.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T08:00:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231210510
      Issue No: Vol. 25, No. 1 (2024)
       
  • Stacked Up Against Us: Using Photovoice and Participatory Methods to
           Explore Structural Racism’s Impact on Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive
           Health Inequities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Saharra L. Dixon, Elizabeth Salerno Valdez, Jazmine Chan, Mira Weil, Tiarra Fisher, Alya Simoun, Justine Egan, Elizabeth Beatriz, Aline Gubrium
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      While structural racism has profound impacts on adolescent health, little is known about how youth synthesize racialized experiences and work to dismantle systems of oppression. This article provides an overview of a Youth Participatory Action Research study that used Photovoice and community mapping to explore how structural violence, like racism, impacts the sexual and reproductive health of historically excluded youth as they navigate unjust socio-political landscapes. Youth participants used photography and community maps to identify how the experience of bias, profiling, and tokenism impacted their ability to navigate complex social systems. With youth voices prioritized, participants explored ways to address structural racism in their lives. The importance of co-creating opportunities with and for youth in critical reflection of their lived experience is emphasized. Through an Arts and Cultural in Public Health framework, we provide an analysis of the ways structural racism functions as a gendered racial project and fundamental cause of adolescent sexual and reproductive health inequities, while identifying pathways toward liberation in pursuit of health and well-being.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T07:44:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399241229641
       
  • An Evidence-Based Framework for the Use of Arts and Culture in Public
           Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tasha L. Golden, Jill Sonke, Alexandra K. Rodriguez
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectivesIn recent years, increasing efforts have been made to apply arts- and culture-based strategies to public health concerns. Accumulating studies point to the value of these strategies for addressing social determinants of health in ways that center communities, cultures, and lived experiences. However, this work has lacked a common framework to support application and advancement. The objectives of this study were to examine knowledge, experience, and evidence related to the uses of arts and culture in public health in the United States and to develop a pilot version of an evidence-based framework to guide cross-sector development and research.MethodsUsing a convergent mixed-methods design with sequential elements, this study drew upon findings from a national field survey, seven focus groups, eight structured working-group dialogues, and a five-day structured dialogue and writing process with 12 interdisciplinary thought leaders. Data were integrated to develop a pilot evidence-based framework.ResultsThe study identified six broad ways in which arts and culture can be used in public health and 59 specific outcomes that can be addressed through arts and cultural strategies. The framework identifies evidence supporting the effects of arts and culture on each outcome, along with mechanisms that may mediate or moderate these effects.ConclusionThe pilot framework clearly links arts and culture practices with public health outcomes. In doing so, it provides both a resource for current practice and a model for the continued development of interdisciplinary tools that support health researchers and practitioners in utilizing arts and culture resources to advance community health and health equity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-20T07:34:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399241228831
       
  • Describing the Lived Experience and Resource Needs of Individuals With
           Long COVID

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: David Von Nordheim, Mikayla Johnson, Charlene Caburnay, Sarah Alleman, Matthew Kreuter, Amy McQueen
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Individuals with long COVID report diverse symptoms lasting weeks or months after initial infection, causing significant psychosocial distress. Navigating health care interactions are often difficult for these individuals due to the diffuse nature of their symptoms, a lack of effective treatment options, and skepticism from some providers. To better understand these challenges, this study sought to further describe the lived experience of individuals with long COVID. A survey was conducted with individuals evaluated for long COVID at a specialty clinic (n = 200), which included questions about prior conditions, symptoms, use of medical and support services, and information and resource needs. Participants reported a mean of 10.75 persistent symptoms, the most common being fatigue and difficulty concentrating, with broad effects on daily functioning. Participants saw a mean of 5.92 providers for treatment of their symptoms, and 88.5% identified health care providers as a trusted source of information. Interest in research findings (60.5%) and opportunities for participation (47.5%) were moderate and varied by COVID vaccination status. Unvaccinated individuals (n = 27) also reported less trust in government sources of information, less college education, lower household income, and greater likelihood of having public insurance. Our findings suggest that individuals with long COVID experience many ongoing and complex symptoms with diverse effects on daily living; that health care providers are an important source for public health messaging about long COVID; and that unvaccinated individuals are likely to have differing needs and receptiveness to information than vaccinated individuals with long COVID.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-16T07:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399241228823
       
  • Building Local Capacity in a Low-Resource Setting to Increase Access to
           Health Care: An Evaluation of Blood Pressure Monitoring Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah Weir, Cassandra May, Alexa Wills, Erin Van Zanten, Kathryn Nesbit, Alexander Ngalande, Ruth Kanjirawaya
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension are common and largely uncontrolled in Malawi. In this low-resource setting, Community Health Workers (CHWs) can increase access to home-based blood pressure (BP) monitoring. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a CHW training focused on BP monitoring and referral criteria, as well as the accuracy of referral decision-making and documentation. The participants were a purposive sample of all active home-based palliative care CHWs at St. Gabriel’s Hospital (n = 60) located in Namitete, Malawi, serving over 250,000 people within a 50 km radius. This was a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in December 2020 using both quantitative (descriptive, paired t-test) and qualitative (thematic) analysis. Participants showed significantly greater knowledge on the post-test (M = 8.98, SD = 1.213) compared to the pretest (M = 7.96, SD = 1.231), t (54)-5.0557.475, p < .001. All participants who attended both days of training demonstrated competency on a skills checklist in 100% of the rehabilitation and BP monitoring skills taught. Through document analysis of record books, referral decisions for patients with hypertension were 87.57% accurate and 81.07% of entries (n = 713) were complete. Participants reported the lack of both transportation and equipment as barriers to their work. They reported trainings, supplies, and support from the hospital as facilitators to their work. This study shows that BP can be monitored in remote villages, accurate referrals can be made, and stroke prevention education can be provided. These interventions increase the chances of more equitable care for this vulnerable population in a resource-limited setting.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-10T11:37:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231225444
       
  • Understanding Newcomer Challenges and Opportunities to Accessing Nature
           and Greenspace in Riverdale, Hamilton, Ontario: A Neighborhood-Centered
           Photovoice Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sujane Kandasamy, Matthew Y. Kwan, Parsa K. Memon, Dipika Desai, Russell J. de Souza, Patty Montague, Diana Sherifali, Gita Wahi, Sonia Anand
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAccess to and engagement with greenspace is related to improved health benefits. We sought to collaborate with community members as partners in research and co-creators in knowledge to better understand which components within a newcomer-dense community help or hinder individual and community efforts to access greenspace and nature-based activities.MethodsWe used photovoice methodology to engage with local residents in focus groups, photowalks, and photo-elicitation interviews. Themes were developed using direct content analysis.ResultsA total of 39 participants (ages 11–70 years; median years in Canada of 3.25 years) were engaged in this program of research. From the analysis, we developed four themes: (a) peace and beauty; (b) memories of home; (c) safety and cleanliness; and (d) welcoming strengthened and new opportunities. Participants associated nature with peace, citing it as “under-rated” but “vital” to the neighborhood. Via photographs and stories, participants also shared a multitude of safety concerns that prevent their access to green/outdoor spaces for healthy active living programs or activities (e.g., woodchip-covered playgrounds, ample amounts of garbage littering the park and school grounds, lack of timely ice removal on sidewalks, limited safe biking paths, and unsafe motor vehicle practices at the crosswalks surrounding local parks).ConclusionTo translate the key ideas and themes into an informed discussion with policy and decision-makers, we held an in-person exhibition and guided tour where community members, the lead photovoice researcher, and SCORE! principal investigator shared information about each theme in the form of a pseudo-narrative peppered with prepared discussion questions.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-02-06T07:03:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231225927
       
  • The Radical Welcome Engagement Restoration Model and Assessment Tool for
           Community-Engaged Partnerships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sirry M. Alang, Abby S. Letcher, Mary Louise Mitsdarffer, Autumn Kieber-Emmons, Jose Rivera, Carol Moeller, Nyann Biery, Hasshan Batts
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      People experiencing addiction, houselessness, or who have a history of incarceration have worse health outcomes compared with the general population. This is due, in part, to practices and policies of historically White institutions that exclude the voices, perspectives, and contributions of communities of color in leadership, socio-economic development, and decision-making that matters for their wellbeing. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches hold promise for addressing health inequities. However, full engagement of people harmed by systemic injustices in CBPR partnerships is challenging due to inequities in power and access to resources. We describe how an Allentown-based CBPR partnership—the Health Equity Activation Research Team of clinicians, researchers, and persons with histories of incarceration, addiction, and houselessness—uses the Radical Welcome Engagement Restoration Model (RWERM) to facilitate full engagement by all partners. Data were collected through participatory ethnography, focus groups, and individual interviews. Analyses were performed using deductive coding in a series of iterative meaning-making processes that involved all partners. Findings highlighted six defining phases of the radical welcome framework: (a) passionate invitation, (b) radical welcome, (c) authentic sense of belonging, (d) co-creation of roles, (e) prioritization of issues, and (f) individual and collective action. A guide to assessing progression across these phases, as well as a 32-item radical welcome instrument to help CBPR partners anticipate and overcome challenges to engagement are introduced and discussed.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T09:29:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231223744
       
  • Medication Safety Counseling Practices of Pediatric Primary Care
           Clinicians

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Leticia Manning Ryan, Barry S. Solomon, Michael J. Miller, Eileen McDonald, Anna DiNucci, Elise Omaki, Wendy Shields, Nancy S. Weinfield
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Medication exposures and poisonings are a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality. Unsafe patient practices are well documented despite the American Academy of Pediatrics recommending that pediatric primary care clinicians discuss medication safety with patients. Current clinician counseling practices for pediatric patients are unknown. Studies of adult patients suggest that physician counseling practices often focus on administration but not storage or disposal. To address this gap, we administered a web-based survey to clinically active pediatric primary care clinicians in two mid-Atlantic health care systems. Survey content focused on characteristics of medication safety counseling practices by age group, including safe medication storage, administration, and disposal. Of 151 clinicians emailed, 40 (26.5%) responded. The majority were physicians (93.5%), female (87.1%), and completed residency/clinical training in pediatrics>15 years ago (58.1%). Most (82.5%) reported having>1 pediatric patient (aged < 19 years) in their practice who experienced an unintentional or intentional medication exposure or poisoning event. Reported practices for medication safety counseling often varied by patient age but safe disposal was rarely addressed for any age group. Respondents generally felt less knowledgeable and less comfortable with providing counseling on safe disposal in comparison to safe storage and safe administration. Nearly all respondents (97%) would like to provide more counseling about medication safety, and the majority (81.3%) wanted additional educational resources. In this survey, we identified several modifiable deficits in pediatric medical counseling practices and a need for additional clinician training and resources, most notably in the content area of safe disposal.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T12:49:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399241228242
       
  • Food Insecurity and Psychosocial Burden in a National Community-Based
           Sample of Households Managing Food Allergy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Samantha Sansweet, Anita Roach, Andrea A. Pappalardo, Jennaveve C. Yost, Justine Asante, Christopher Warren
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundExperiencing food allergies and food insecurity has been linked to socioeconomic, physical, and mental health-related challenges, but less is known about the intersection of these experiences. This study aims to better understand the impact of food insecurity on food allergy patients and their caregivers, with the intention of informing ongoing efforts to improve screening for food insecurity and mental health concerns and reducing their burden among households managing food allergy.MethodAs part of a community needs assessment, a cross-sectional survey was administered to a large, national sample (N=5,940) of US households with at least one food-allergic individual, The Hunger Vital Sign was utilized to assess food insecurity, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4) and Food Allergy Independent Measure (FAIM) were leveraged to measure psychosocial outcomes.ResultsAmong respondents, 69.9% screened at-risk of food insecurity on the Hunger Vital Sign, while 5.6% reported very low food security. Both adults and children with food allergy (FA) from households at risk for food insecurity were more likely to report FA-related anxiety, anger, loneliness, fear of eating, and bullying victimization than their counterparts from households not at risk of food insecurity (p < .0001 for all). Among these specific experiences, FA-related anxiety was the most common (25.4%/30.1% of children/adults). Perceived risk of food allergy-related fatality was positively associated with food insecurity status.ConclusionIndividuals with food allergies who are concomitantly experiencing food insecurity are at greater risk of a variety of mental health concerns, including those specific to food allergy as well as more general anxiety and depressive symptoms.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-30T09:33:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231223740
       
  • The Coalition of National Health Education Organizations: Recent Advances
           to Strengthen the Health Education Profession

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Heidi Hancher-Rauch, M. Elaine Auld
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Coalition of National Health Education Organizations (CNHEO) has existed since 1972, with a mission of bringing together national and international health education organizations who serve within the United States to seek joint actions in support of the health education profession. Much success and collaboration have occurred over the last 50 years, including developing and implementing the 2018–2025 strategic plan. The nine member organizations of the Coalition paused to review individual and collaborative work in addressing shared goals and objectives around policy and mandates, preparation and professional development, credentialing, identity and value of health education, health education workforce and diversity, and research and practice. Findings of this mid-progress strategic plan review suggest that great value is provided to the profession via the collaborative work of organizations (sharing of advocacy alerts and work, supporting training and certification efforts, etc.), but areas for improvement exist (more joint policy statements, better study and support for the profession, etc.). This article outlines important Coalition history for the profession, describes goal and objective accomplishments related to the CNHEO 2018–2025 strategic plan, and makes suggestions for future improvement designed to affect the health of the public and the health education profession.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T10:01:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231223103
       
  • Connecting to Community: Violence Prevention Barriers, Geography, and
           Preventionist Perceptions of Community Leadership and Opportunities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Agnes Rieger, Jeanna Campbell, Rachel Garthe
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Violence is a public health concern, negatively impacting individual and community health and safety. Although violence can be prevented, prevention efforts are complex in part because they require addressing community factors. Despite an increase in funding and support for community violence prevention, relatively little is known about what prevention practice barriers may be related to community factors. This study addressed this gap by surveying a statewide sample of violence preventionists. We explored if coordination and logistical barriers and rural geography are associated with perceptions of two community factors: community opportunities and leadership quality. As part of a statewide assessment of violence and prevention efforts, 130 violence preventionists completed surveys. Results showed that both perceived coordination barriers and rural geography were negatively associated with perceptions of existing community opportunities, representative/influential leadership, and leadership commitment. Perceived logistical barriers were positively associated with perceived leadership commitment. Findings suggest that support reducing community coordination barriers in particular—and to support rural violence prevention work more broadly—is needed.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:56:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231222468
       
  • Physical Activity Policy, Systems, and Environment Change Through
           Extension SNAP-Ed: A Multistate Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica Stroope, M. Renée Umstattd Meyer, Kerry Gabbert, Deborah H. John, Debra Kellstedt, Kathryn M. Orzech, Marilyn E. Wende
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education (SNAP-Ed) provides nutrition education and support for healthy living in SNAP-qualifying communities. SNAP-Ed supports policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) efforts to make the healthy choice an easier choice. SNAP-Ed implementers have widely adopted healthy eating PSE supports. However, physical activity (PA) PSE strategies are less common, with limited awareness between states of how other SNAP-Ed implementers approach PA-focused PSE work. Physical Activity Policy, Research, and Evaluation Network (PAPREN) Rural Active Living Workgroup project members sought to explore how Extension-based SNAP-Ed implements PA-focused PSE approaches. A sample of Extension-based SNAP-Ed program (n = 8) leaders were purposefully recruited from eligible universities in six of the seven SNAP-Ed regions. An interview guide to systematically collect information about current Extension SNAP-Ed implementation focused on PA PSE strategies was developed iteratively by the PAPREN Rural Active Living Workgroup Extension PA PSE project team. PA PSE Extension SNAP-Ed implementation efforts occurred at the state, county, and community levels and/or within local organizations. PA PSEs included school PA policy change, shared-use agreements, active transportation promotion, park development, walking challenges, and PA-promoting signage. All interviews highlighted the importance of partnerships at local, county, and state levels for PSE efforts. Extension-based SNAP-Ed shows potential to bring community partners together to plan and implement PA-focused PSE approaches. With a focus on SNAP-eligible people and substantial geographic reach, Extension SNAP-Ed is uniquely situated as a public health partner to broadly implement PA PSE changes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:52:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221779
       
  • My Best Alaskan Life: Addressing Adolescent Mental and Reproductive Health
           in Alaska

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lauren Lessard, Cornelia Jessen, Sara L. Buckingham, Riley Russell, S. Abigail Morgan, Jennifer Baker
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionSince 2020, a multisector research team has coordinated a youth-driven, community-based participatory research project to adapt a reproductive life plan for application in a statewide initiative called My Best Alaskan Life (MBAL). The RLP is adapted for Alaskan youth and is intended to support teens in decision-making processes reflecting cultural priorities, personal goals, and sexual and reproductive health. Background. With 46% of youth in Alaska reporting not having used a condom during their last sexual intercourse and 15% not having used contraception, unintended pregnancy and transmission of STIs will continue. Furthermore, Alaskan youth also cite high rates of hopelessness and suicidality, and research shows that poor mental health among adolescents is correlated with developing and maintaining high-risk sexual behaviors. An intervention focusing on supporting mental wellness and developing personal goals in the context of sexual health decision-making may encourage adolescents to adopt safer sexual health behaviors.MethodsThe MBAL research team completed a statewide pilot assessing the design and implementation of the tool, gathering feedback from over 700 survey responses (youth, ages 14–20); conducted 10 in-depth interviews (adult partners at community organizations and clinics); and hosted two youth-led design review sessions.FindingsQuestionnaire respondents were overwhelmingly positive about the tool (91% “liked or loved” the tool) and its potential applicability in their community (86% cited “very applicable”). Project next steps include incorporating design recommendations, a statewide randomized control trial and ultimately, open source access for all interested parties.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:46:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221769
       
  • The Stress of Advancement: A Nurse Practitioner’s Exploration in
           Providing Culturally Competent Obesity Prevention Counseling in Black
           Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jasmine A. Berry, Joan Cranford, Rachel Powell
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundBlack women are diagnosed, disabled, and die from obesity and associated chronic diseases at higher rates than any other sex or race. Advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) can potentially improve culturally relevant health education and counseling by using health literacy communication tools.ObjectiveExplore individualized barriers and APRNs’ role in providing obesity prevention education and counseling by assessing the efficacy of the Teach-Back Method (TBM) to understand health habits and attitudes.MethodsBlack women aged 18–45, previously diagnosed as overweight or obese, and identified with perceived barriers were recruited from a predominantly Black church in Atlanta. They engaged in weekly, 1-hour educational sessions via Zoom, addressing four common barriers identified in the literature. Sessions ended with a 5–10 minute Teach-Back session. Pre- and post-intervention Readiness to Change Questionnaire (RCQ) were completed. Descriptive statistics and quantitative data from surveys and pre- and post-RCQ were analyzed.ResultsTwenty women completed the intervention. Paired sample t-test revealed no statistical significance or correlation between pre- and post-RCQ scores after using TBM in educational sessions. However, Pearson’s correlation showed positive associations between elevated body mass index levels as one advances their education and annual income, with a p-value of 0.05.DiscussionIncreased rates of obesity are experienced despite higher educational attainment or pay. Stress and high-coping mechanisms contributed to disordered eating, decreased physical activity engagement, and decreased motivation toward habit change. Clinicians should be held accountable for delivering culturally sensitive care using the TBM, addressing social determinants of health, performing routine stress assessments, and checking their implicit biases.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:39:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221767
       
  • Disseminating Community-Engaged Research Involving People Experiencing
           Homelessness and Diabetes Using Participatory Theater

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Preethiya Sekar, Maren Ward, Susan Gust, Becky R. Ford, Moncies Franco, Edward Adair, Annette Bryant, Denita Ngwu, Jonathan M. Cole, Lelis Brito, Marcia Barnes, Tahiti Robinson, Ali ‘Cia Anderson-Campbell, Joel Gray, Esther Ouray, Alphonse Carr, Katherine Diaz Vickery
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      People experiencing homelessness balance competing priorities resulting in reduced capacity to meet the care demands of chronic conditions, including Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Arts-based performances present an avenue to expose others to these challenges. This article describes the process of incorporating qualitative research findings in a community-based participatory theater production to expose audiences to the day-to-day realities of living with T2DM while simultaneously experiencing homelessness. We conducted five focus groups and two individual interviews with people living with T2DM who had experienced homelessness with guidance from a community-engaged research team. We then collaborated with a local theater company to present common themes from these focus groups in a co-created play about the experience of managing T2DM while being homeless. We performed a staged reading of the play and assessed audience members’ perceived stigma through a pre- and post-survey to determine if audience engagement within our theatrical production could reduce stigma toward individuals living with diabetes and/or people experiencing homelessness. This theatrical production is titled “Life Heist: Stealing Hope While Surviving Diabetes and Homelessness.” Our work illustrates the feasibility and effectiveness of using participatory theater to disseminate qualitative research findings.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:26:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221731
       
  • Community and Organizational Readiness to Adopt a Physical Activity
           Intervention in Micropolitan Settings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole Gauthreaux, Rebecca Bucklin, Anna Correa, Eliza Steere, Hanh Pham, Rima A. Afifi, Natoshia M. Askelson
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundAssessing community and organizational readiness is key to successfully implementing programs. The purpose of this study was to assess the baseline readiness of micropolitan communities to adopt an evidence-based physical activity (PA) intervention by exploring three dimensions: (1) attitudes and current efforts toward prevention, (2) community and organizational climate that facilitates (or impedes) change, and (3) capacity to implement change.MethodData were collected from community leaders in 14 communities through an online survey in June 2021 (n = 149). Data were analyzed in aggregate using descriptive statistics for multiple-choice responses and content analysis for open ended responses. One-way repeated analyses of variance were used to compare mean score differences.ResultsIn reference to their attitudes prior to the pandemic, respondents said that addressing PA was “somewhat a priority” in their professional positions (M = 2.01, SD = 0.94), their organizations (M = 2.08, SD = 0.91), and their communities (M = 2.28, SD = 0.88). Current PA efforts included statewide initiatives, community sponsored events/clubs, and youth sports leagues. The community climate included both PA facilitators (mainly outdoor PA resources) and barriers (cost, lack of social services, and an unsupportive PA environment). Individual-level capacity (M = 2.94; SD = 1.21) to adopt a PA program was regarded lower than the community’s capacity (M = 3.95; SD = 0.82), and perceptions of capacity at the community level improved even more if technical assistance (M = 3.96; SD = 0.84) or financial support (M = 4.12; SD = 0.80) were provided.ConclusionReadiness varied by dimension, suggesting the need for tailored implementation supports including technical assistance and financial support.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-24T09:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221728
       
  • Comprehensive Sexual Health Educational Learning Modules for College
           Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alexa Asson, Joni K. Roberts
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Sexual health education in the United States continues to be a controversial topic of discussion with no federal regulations. Due to this, the sex education students receive before college varies greatly. Our team discovered that no mandatory, comprehensive sexual health education is required for students once they enter the California State University system. At Cal Poly specifically, it was found that students were engaging in risky sexual behaviors. For example, the 2021 American College Health Association—National College Health Assessment III Fall 2021 Data Report revealed that less than half (42.1%) of students reported regularly using condoms during vaginal sex, and a mere 5.1% of students reported barrier method use during oral sex. To fill in the noticed gaps in our students’ sexual health education, our team developed a set of 10 comprehensive sexual health educational learning modules. The modules cover topics ranging from condom use and STIs to pleasure, porn literacy, and having difficult conversations with a partner. This anonymous online resource provides students with easy-to-read written material and engaging graphics. Future research will focus on user engagement and the effect of the resource on sexual health best practices across our campus.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-23T10:03:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399241227172
       
  • Assessing the Performance of a Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire With a
           Low Socioeconomic Status Population Using Rasch Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Holly F. Huye, Peter Paprzycki, Carol L. Connell
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Parents and preschool teachers play a key role in shaping children’s dietary behaviors. Knowledge of nutrition and healthy dietary choices is a key component to improve dietary habits and reduce the prevalence of obesity and associated co-morbidities. Using valid and reliable instruments is necessary for accurate assessment of knowledge to tailor interventions and measure effectiveness specific to the population of interest. The objectives of this paper are to (1) identify potential gaps in the baseline nutrition knowledge among parents and teachers using a previously validated questionnaire prior to a preschool obesity prevention intervention; and (2) assess the instrument’s reliability and construct validity for a low socioeconomic status population using a post hoc Rasch analysis. Participants included 177 parents and 75 teachers who participated in a Head Start intervention study. Knowledge scores, instrument reliability, and item fit and difficulty were assessed using a Rasch analysis; t-tests were used to determine differences in scores between parents and teachers. Parents answered 38% of questions correctly while teachers correctly answered 46% of the questions. Adequate item fit and reliability were indicated for Sections 1 and 2 of the Nutrition Knowledge Questionnaire (NKQ). Section 3 demonstrated less adequate reliability. The items were found to adequately and reliably define the unidimensional measures of the three components of knowledge represented in this instrument, providing evidence of construct validity. However, Rasch measures indicated the NKQ overall was difficult for participants. Recommendations for improving the instrument for nutrition education/intervention and research practice areas related to obesity and obesity-related conditions are addressed.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-20T12:07:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231222463
       
  • Utilizing Local Professional Association Chapters as Pathways for
           Leadership Development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole Batista, Deb Risisky, Tara M. Lutz, Ellen Clinesmith, Jahkeeva Morgan
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In 2019, there was no entity specifically dedicated to health promotion and education practitioners in Connecticut or New England. This made it difficult for health promotion practitioners and students to network, collaborate, and engage in professional development. The purpose of this article is to share our experiences developing the new Connecticut Chapter of the Society for Public Health Education (CT SOPHE), including how we leveraged student interns during the first two years to promote organizational growth. To build our membership, it was important to determine who would be interested in joining CT SOPHE and so we focused on three groups: the current workforce/professionals, future workforce/students, and future leaders/interns. Over the course of these two years, three interns were recruited to help with creating a needs assessment (MPH student) and program development (two BS students); the organization was established by an MPH student as her internship project. Three former interns share how their experience working with the CT SOPHE board has helped them develop crucial leadership skills early in their careers. Embedding student interns into the framework and operations of CT SOPHE demonstrates an intentional and strategic commitment to the sustainability of both the organization and the workforce.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-19T11:22:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231225930
       
  • Inclusion of People With Disabilities in Community Health Needs
           Assessments in Florida, United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Logan S. Roberts, Tyler G. James
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Community health needs assessments (CHNAs) play a crucial role in identifying health needs of communities. Yet, unique health needs of people with disabilities (PWDs) are often underrecognized in public health practice. In 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) required the implementation of standardized data collection guidelines, including disability status, among federal agencies. The extent to which guidance from ACA and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has impacted disability inclusion in CHNAs is unknown. This study used a content analysis approach to review CHNAs conducted by local health councils and the top 11 nonprofit hospitals in Florida (n = 77). We coded CHNAs based on mentioning disability in CHNA reports, involving disability-related stakeholders, and incorporating data on disability indicators. Findings indicate that PWDs are widely not included in CHNAs in Florida, emphasizing the need for equitable representation and comprehensive understanding of PWDs in community health planning.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T12:12:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231225642
       
  • The Be REAL Framework: Enhancing Relationship-Building Skills for
           Community Health Workers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amelia M. Jamison, Janesse Brewer, Mary Davis Hamlin, Amanda Forr, Robin Roberts, Aleen Carey, Adriele Fugal, Magda E. Mankel, Yazmine Tovar, Stephanie Adams, Katie Shapcott, Daniel Salmon
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Trust plays an integral part in the effective functioning of public health systems. During the COVID-19 pandemic, distrust of public health fueled vaccine hesitancy and created additional barriers to immunization. Although most Americans have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine, the percentage of fully immunized adults remains suboptimal. To reach vaccine-hesitant communities, it is vital that public health be worthy of trust. As trusted members of their communities, community health workers (CHWs) can serve as ideal messengers and conversation partners for vaccination decision-making. We developed the Be REAL framework and training materials to prepare CHWs to work with vaccine-hesitant communities nationwide. Through the four steps of “Relate,” “Explore,” “Assist,” and “Leave (the door open),” CHWs were taught to prioritize relationship building as a primary goal. In this shift from focusing on adherence to public health recommendations (e.g., get vaccinated) to building relationships, the value of vaccine uptake is secondary to the quality of the relationship being formed. The Be REAL framework facilitates CHWs harnessing the power they already possess. The goal of the Be REAL framework is to foster true partnership between CHWs and community members, which in turn can help increase trust in the broader public health system beyond adherence to a specific recommendation.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-08T12:25:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231218937
       
  • Insights From a Community-Based Strategy to Assess Tobacco and Vape Shop
           Retailers’ Implementation of Tobacco 21 Law in El Paso, Texas

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kristen Garcia, Dara O’Neil, Monica Leal, Laura King, Joan Enderle, Laurel Curran, Whitney R. Garney
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In 2019, the United States Congress passed Tobacco 21 (T21) legislation that raised the minimum legal sales age for tobacco products from 18 to 21. However, although the federal legislation superseded weaker state laws that were already in place in some states, including Texas, local guidance for retailers was inconsistent. Given that retailers are ultimately responsible for policy implementation, the American Heart Association (AHA) initiated a process of assessing retailers knowledge and perceptions of the law through a survey targeting all tobacco retailers and accompanying ethnography of a subset of vape shops in El Paso, Texas. The process yielded lessons learned for assessment of community-based policy implementation including key considerations for personnel and process that are applicable to other community-based assessment processes. While AHA considered an in-person approach ideal, having an alternate online response option was necessary. In addition, a focused approach and in-depth understanding of the purpose was key to responsiveness of the retailers.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T11:43:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231222925
       
  • Advancing Inclusive Communication: Implementing an Audit to Center Equity
           in SNAP-Ed Programming

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pamela Bruno, Colleen Fuller, Hannah Ruhl, Lori Kaley, Patricia Dushuttle
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Public health interventions rely on information exchange to influence health outcomes. Increasingly, practitioners are working to be intentional with public health messaging. The language used to communicate program objectives and health recommendations should reflect the community’s lived experience and avoid perpetuating health and social inequities. Words and tone matter, and both should be inclusive and non-stigmatizing. Prioritizing a health equity lens for communication may require a critical review and revision of existing materials. This Practice Note highlights the development and implementation of an audit tool designed to systematically review a cookbook created to support healthy eating for families and individuals experiencing low income and participating in a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program–Education (SNAP-Ed) intervention in Maine. The purpose of the audit tool and the collaborative review process was to revise the cookbook content to ensure a weight-neutral, empowering approach to supporting the community’s nutritional needs. The audit process resulted in a comprehensive methodology to examine intervention resources for inclusive communication approaches that avoid deficit framing, use person-first language, and do not overemphasize limited resources or appropriate cultures. The instrument and methodology are conceptually replicable and adaptable. In sharing the process and audit results, the authors seek to provide an example for practitioners to draw from for similar critical reviews of public health intervention resources and promotional materials.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T11:42:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221773
       
  • Engaging Participants Through Hybrid Community-Centered Approaches:
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sujane Kandasamy, Riddhi Chabrotra, Zainab Khan, Dania Rana, Noor Suddle, Dipika Desai, Farah Khan, Rochelle Nocos, Scott A. Lear, Sonia S. Anand
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Community-centered research studies can improve trust, cultural appropriateness, and accurate findings through meaningful, in-depth engagement with participants. During the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers shifted to implement pandemic-specific guidelines on top of already existing safety practices; these adjustments gave insight into bettering the structure of forthcoming research studies. At the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI)/McMaster University, the COVID CommUNITY study staff took field notes from their experience at the Ontario (ON) and British Columbia (BC) sites navigating an observational prospective cohort study during the pandemic. These field notes are outlined below to provide insight into culturally responsive, trust-centered, and communication-focused strategies used to improve hybrid research. A significant challenge the team overcame was obtaining blood sample collections by executing socially distanced sample collections outside of participants’ homes, coined “Porch Pickups.” Data collection was made more accessible through phone surveys and frequent virtual contact. To enhance recruitment strategies for sub-communities of the South Asian population, staff focused on cultural interests and “gift-exchange” incentives. Cultural awareness was prioritized through correct name pronunciation, conducting data collection in participant preferred languages, and using flexible approaches to data collection. These strategies were developed through weekly team meetings where improvement strategies were discussed, and concerns were addressed in real-time.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T11:39:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221161
       
  • Implementation of a Booster Sexual Health Education Curriculum for Older
           Adolescents in Rural Communities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nancy F. Berglas, Salish Harrison, Julio Romero, Natasha Borgen, Martha J. Decker
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Ongoing education on sexual health and other health promotion topics is critical as young people transition into adulthood. A “booster” round of education may be an effective strategy to reinforce information previously taught and expand to additional topics relevant later in adolescence. In partnership with a Youth Advisory Council, we co-designed READY, Set, Go!, a booster curriculum for older adolescents with modules covering adult preparation skills, sexual identity, relationships, reproductive health, and mental health. From November 2021 to January 2023, we provided the curriculum to 21 cohorts of 12th grade students (N = 433) in rural communities of Fresno County, CA, and conducted an implementation evaluation to assess its feasibility in school settings, acceptability by participants, and changes in short-term outcomes. Health educators completed implementation logs to track program adaptations. Youth completed pretest/posttest surveys to assess changes in outcomes and participant satisfaction. We used descriptive statistics to examine program adaptations and satisfaction. We used multivariable regression models to examine changes in outcomes, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. Health educators completed most activities as planned, with adaptations occurring in response to youth needs and scheduling limitations. Sexual health knowledge, confidence in adult preparation skills, awareness of local sexual and mental health services, and willingness to seek health services all increased significantly from pretest to posttest. Youth feedback was strongly positive. We conclude that booster sexual health education is a promising strategy to address critical knowledge gaps and support health promotion, especially in rural and other under-resourced communities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-05T11:36:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221156
       
  • Parents’ and Caregivers’ Support for in-School COVID-19 Mitigation
           Strategies: A Socioecological Perspective

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Laura Prichett, Andrea A. Berry, Gabriela Calderon, June Wang, Erin R. Hager, Lauren M. Klein, Lorece V. Edwards, Yisi Liu, Sara B. Johnson
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Informed by the social ecological model, which asserts that health behaviors and beliefs are the result of multiple levels of influence, we examined factors related to parents’ support for in-school COVID-19 mitigation strategies. Using data from a survey of 567 parents/caregivers of public elementary and middle school students in eight Maryland counties, we employed regression models to examine relationships between parent-, child-, family-, school-, and community-level factors and acceptability of mitigation strategies. Acceptance of COVID-19 mitigation strategies was positively correlated with child- and family-level factors, including child racial identity (parents of Black children were more accepting than those of White children, odds ratio [OR]: 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.5, 4.1]), parent receipt of the COVID-19 vaccine (OR: 2.4, 95% CI = [1.5, 3.7]), and parent Democrat or Independent political affiliation (compared with Republican affiliation, OR: 4.2, 95% CI = [2.6, 6.7]; OR: 2.2, 95%CI = [1.3, 3.8], respectively). Acceptance was also positively associated with parents’ perceptions of their school’s mitigation approach, including higher school mitigation score, indicating more intensive mitigation policies (OR: 1.1, 95% CI = [1.0, 1.1]), better school communication about COVID-19 (OR: 1.7, 95% CI = [1.4, 1.9]) and better school capacity to address COVID-19 (OR: 1.9, 95% CI = [1.5, 2.4]). Community-level factors were not associated with acceptance. Child- and parent-level factors identified suggest potential groups for messaging regarding mitigation strategies. School-level factors may play an important role in parents’ acceptance of in-school mitigation strategies. Schools’ capacity to address public health threats may offer an underappreciated and modifiable setting for disseminating and reinforcing public health guidance.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-04T12:28:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221160
       
  • Hormonal Contraceptive Side Effects and Nonhormonal Alternatives on
           TikTok: A Content Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Emily J. Pfender, Kate Tsiandoulas, Stephanie R. Morain, Leah R. Fowler
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The use of hormonal contraceptives is decreasing in the United States alongside a growing interest in nonhormonal contraceptive options. Social media messaging may be contributing to this trend. TikTok thus offers a novel opportunity to understand how people share information about risks and alternatives for pregnancy prevention. To describe the availability and content of information about hormonal contraceptive side effects and nonhormonal contraceptive options on TikTok, we conducted a content analysis of 100 videos using the hashtags #birthcontrolsideeffects and #nonhormonalcontraception. We found that these videos were popular and often framed hormonal contraceptives and patient–provider interactions negatively, with users frequently discussing discontinuation of hormonal contraception and no plans for uptake of another contraceptive. When uptake of a new contraceptive method is mentioned, creators typically mention a fertility awareness–based method, which requires specialized knowledge to use safely and effectively. The risks and side effects of hormonal options were often overemphasized compared with the possible risks and side effects of nonhormonal options. This framing may suggest opportunities for providers and health educators to reassess how they counsel about contraceptive options. We conclude with recommendations for future research on TikTok and consider the policy implications of these findings.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2024-01-03T10:12:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221163
       
  • Digital Volunteers as Trusted Public Health Communicators

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa Dunn Silesky, Jennifer Sittig, Darshana Panchal, Erika Bonnevie
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSocial media influencers are increasingly being positioned by health campaigns as trusted messengers who can share public health information with their communities. There is also an opportunity for campaigns to work with unpaid, digital volunteers (DVs) who want to use their platforms for good, despite not being compensated. DVs are a cost-effective way of supplementing an influencer-driven messaging campaign.Evaluation ApproachOur influencer and DV network, El Beacon, aims to spread pro-COVID-19 vaccination messages on social media to the Hispanic community. Since 2021, 3,001 DVs have been recruited. Process metrics related to DVs are tracked using a variety of software including Facebook ads manager, Sprout Social, and Hubspot. Metrics received include the number of volunteer sign-ups, cost per lead generated, ad performance, organic and paid impressions and engagement of ads and El Beacon social content, newsletter open rates, newsletter clickthrough rates, and newsletter engagement.Implications for practiceUnderstanding best practices for recruiting and retaining DVs for a public health campaign can help other practitioners optimize their experience working with DVs. Some of these best practices include: identify a specific DV target audience that will be most receptive to your message and best reached by your recruitment efforts, be responsive to what resonates with your DVs, be flexible in how you define “network engagement,” and use paid influencers to help build momentum.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T09:02:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221158
       
  • Association Between the United States Department of Health and Human
           Services’ COVID-19 Public Education Campaign and Initial Adult COVID-19
           Vaccination Uptake by Race and Ethnicity in the United States, 2020–2022
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Joseph N. Luchman, Tyler Nighbor, Elissa C. Kranzler, Benjamin Denison, Heather Dahlen, Jae-Eun C. Kim, Christopher Williams, Sarah Trigger, Morgane Bennett, Leah Hoffman, Joshua Peck
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Non-Hispanic Black (Black) and Hispanic/Latino (Latino) populations face an increased risk of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19 relative to non-Hispanic White (White) populations. When COVID-19 vaccines became available in December 2020, Black and Latino adults were less likely than White adults to get vaccinated due to factors such as racial discrimination and structural barriers to uptake. In April 2021, the U.S. HHS COVID-19 public education campaign (the Campaign) was launched to promote vaccination through general and audience-tailored messaging. As of March 2022, Black and Latino adults had reached parity with White adults in COVID-19 vaccine uptake. This study evaluated the relationship between Campaign exposure and subsequent vaccine uptake among Black, Latino, and White adults in the United States and assessed whether participant race/ethnicity moderated the relationship between Campaign exposure and vaccine uptake. Campaign media delivery data was merged with survey data collected from a sample of U.S. adults (n = 2,923) over four waves from January 2021 to March 2022. Logistic regression analysis showed that cumulative Campaign digital impressions had a positive, statistically significant association with COVID-19 vaccine uptake, and that participant race/ethnicity moderated this association. Compared with White adults, the magnitude of the relationship between cumulative impressions and vaccination was greater among Black and Latino adults. Results from a simulation model suggested that the Campaign may have been responsible for closing 5.0% of the gap in COVID-19 vaccination by race/ethnicity from April to mid-September 2021. We discuss implications for future public education campaigns that aim to reduce health disparities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-30T09:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221159
       
  • Building Research for Academic and Community Equity (BRACE): A Toolkit for
           Community Research Partnerships

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jacqueline Dolata, Cyleste Collins, Jeri Jewett-Tennant, Elodie Nonguierma, Julie Merker, Diane Mastnardo, Cathy Vue, Kimberly Kiley, Patricia Terstenyak
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Health and human service community organizations and researchers have important insights and resources to share with each other, yet often have very little information about how to interact in meaningful and equitable ways. Conceptualized by and for community organization professionals wanting to equitably interact with academic researchers, BRACE (Building Research for Academic and Community Equity) is a toolkit easily accessible to community members which explains research information and jargon in clear terms. BRACE uses community-based participatory research (CBPR) principles to guide both community organizations and academics seeking to partner on research. The BRACE toolkit’s two main sections focus on identifying ideal aspects of community-academic research partnerships and writing grant proposals. Tools such as BRACE have the potential to increase the impact of community-engaged research by providing concrete guides for building partnerships and potentially sustaining them through grant funding.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T10:57:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231221157
       
  • Assessing the Impact of Multilevel Comprehensive Programming on SNAP-Ed
           Participant Behaviors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Casey Coombs, Mateja R. Savoie-Roskos, Amria Farnsworth, LaCee Jimenez, Heidi LeBlanc
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:To examine differences in dietary, physical activity, and food selection behaviors of Utah SNAP-Ed participants who had varied breadth of engagement with various components of multilevel programming.Method:SNAP-Ed participants received a survey approximately 1 year after participating in nutrition classes. The survey measured diet, physical activity, and food selection behaviors and breadth of engagement with components of SNAP-Ed programming. Components of programming included nutrition education for adults and youth, nudge programs in food pantries and corner stores, farmers’ market booths, social marketing campaign materials, and social media platforms. Kruskal–Wallis tests assessed differences in behaviors between varying breadths of program engagement.Results:Among the 124 respondents, certain dietary behaviors improved with increased breadth of program engagement including intake of vegetables, low-fat dairy, and lean protein. Food selection behaviors including using MyPlate and preparing healthy foods on a budget, also improved with increased engagement. Physical activity was not impacted by additional breadth of exposure.Conclusions and Implications:Findings suggest that multilevel comprehensive programming may enhance the impact of SNAP-Ed education for certain behaviors. Additional research is warranted on the impact of SNAP-Ed multilevel programming on targeted behaviors and health outcomes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T10:55:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231218938
       
  • Enhancing Workforce Pathways: Insights From a Paid Internship Pilot
           Program Linking Public Health Students and Local Health Departments

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Harshada Karnik, Kari Oldfield-Tabbert, Rachel Schulman, Bonnie Brueshoff, Chelsey Kirkland, Jason Orr
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The persistent understaffing of the governmental public health workforce has led to program cutbacks, staff burnout at local health departments (LHDs), and an urgent need to replenish staffing. To build recruitment pathways into LHDs and build their workforce capacity, we introduced a paid internship initiative connecting Master’s in Public Health students from a Midwestern university with LHDs in the state. This article presents the pilot program developed and the insights gained from it. Program participants included nine LHDs that hosted 10 students for 12-week internships. Internship projects were developed by LHDs with support from the state’s association of county and city health officials. All students completed their internship projects satisfactorily. The experience highlighted that while students contributed to LHDs through short-term projects, with sustained backing and minor adjustments, this model can serve to reinforce the governmental public health sector’s existing and future capacity in the long term.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T10:52:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231217484
       
  • COVID-19 Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE) in Malawi:
           Challenges and Response

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Chiyembekezo Focus Maganga, Flemmings Fishani Ngwira, Goodwin Gondwe, Bester Nyang’wa, Tobias Kunkumbira
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The outbreak of COVID-19 created a global health crisis that has impacted our everyday lives. Risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) is one of the strategic pillars the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends when dealing with public health emergencies like COVID-19. In Malawi, the COVID-19 RCCE response was coordinated by the country’s Ministry of Health and involved various organizations that distributed COVID-19 risk communication materials and engaged communities on important infection preventive practices. Furthermore, the Ministry of Information was involved in ensuring the messages were put across at national and subnational levels. Despite the efforts, most Malawians were reluctant to embrace set public health measures for COVID-19. Guided by a phenomenological approach, we used in-depth interviews with senior officials from 10 organizations, including the Ministry of Health, who were involved in RCCE response in Malawi, to understand the challenges that were faced in the implementation of RCCE activities in Malawi. We also reviewed project reports from three organizations, taken from the same implementing local organizations, to understand the experiences of implementing RCCE strategies in Malawi. We established that misconceptions, poor coordination, lack of political will, low-risk perceptions, and social norms undermined the response in Malawi. The results underscore the need for the authorities in Malawi to invest more in RCCE and strengthen the capacity to handle future epidemics. There is also a need to develop a national RCCE strategy with guidelines and protocols on methods of coordination, flow of communication, responsible ministry, tools for handling dis/misinformation and myths, and community engagement.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-28T10:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231216725
       
  • Health and Social Vulnerabilities Among Unstably Housed and Homeless Young
           Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica A. Heerde, Barbara J. McMorris, Janna R. Gewirtz O’Brien, Jennifer A. Bailey, John W. Toumbourou
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The role of housing as a social driver of health is well-established, with stable housing being an important factor in reducing health inequities. During developmentally critical periods such as young adulthood, unstable housing and related social marginalization have profound effects on development and later health, social, and economic wellbeing. This exploratory study analyzed data from a population-based, longitudinal sample of young adults (average age 31 years) from Washington State (n = 755) to compare health and economic impacts of the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic, with a focus on housing status. Descriptive results suggest the pandemic exposed underlying vulnerabilities for young adults experiencing homelessness and housing instability, with an overall widening of inequities related to financial difficulties and increased risk for poor mental health and social isolation. Findings suggest that these vulnerabilities are magnified in the context of public health crises and strengthen the case for population-based studies investigating potential modifiable causes of housing instability to inform prevention and early intervention at the earliest possible point in a young person’s development. Studies examining the severity of COVID-related hardships on young adult health and social outcomes are vital for establishing an evidence base for strategic policy action that seeks to prevent a rebound in young adult homelessness and housing instability post-pandemic. These studies would bolster both emergency preparedness responses that account for the unique needs of vulnerable populations and upstream population-level prevention approaches beginning long before the imminent risk for housing instability develops.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T06:10:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231217447
       
  • Exploring the Benefits, Barriers, and Facilitators of Physical Activity
           and Interest in Intergenerational Physical Activity Programming Within a
           Hispanic/Latino Community in the Midwest

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Athena K. Ramos, John P. Rech, Karen Schmeits, Marcela Carvajal, Natalia Trinidad, Julie Blaskewicz Boron, Danae Dinkel
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Hispanic/Latino individuals across the lifespan generally do not engage in enough physical activity. Intergenerational programming is an innovative solution that could improve opportunities for physical activity across the lifespan in a culturally relevant manner; however, few studies have explored perceptions of intergenerational physical activity programming among Hispanic/Latino communities. This pre-implementation study aimed to: (a) explore the perceived benefits, barriers, and facilitators of physical activity among an intergenerational sample of Hispanic/Latino community members and stakeholders and (b) assess interest in intergenerational physical activity programming. This qualitative study consisted of a total of eight focus groups (N = 45 participants): Hispanic/Latino youth (2 groups), their parents (2 groups), older Hispanic/Latino adults (3 groups), and community stakeholders who work with older adults (1 group). We used thematic analysis techniques integrating the Framework Method to compare and contrast perspectives between participant groups. We found that all groups identified physical, mental, and/or social benefits to physical activity. Primary barriers included limited physical accessibility, environmental considerations, and time constraints. Primary facilitators included physical accessibility, programming format, environmental supports, and social support. Overall, there was general interest in intergenerational physical activity programming across all groups. Practitioners are encouraged to: (a) be aware of how different age groups may view and respond to program context, fit, and communications; (b) reflect on their capacity for high-quality implementation, and (c) weigh the costs and benefits of various programming decisions. Findings can be used to design culturally, linguistically, and contextually relevant intergenerational physical activity programming and to promote health equity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T06:08:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231216728
       
  • Monkeypox (Mpox) Vaccine Hesitancy Among Mpox Cases: A Qualitative Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Harit Agroia, Emily Smith, Akanksha Vaidya, Sarah Rudman, Monika Roy
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Human mpox has been an increasing concern in the United States and California since late 2022. While the Jynneos vaccine offers a degree of cross-protection against the disease, vaccine hesitancy is common among those recommended for vaccination. The purpose of this study was to assess vaccine knowledge, facilitators, and barriers to vaccine uptake among individuals previously diagnosed with mpox, or mpox cases, in Santa Clara County, California. In-depth interviews were conducted by public health department staff among mpox cases diagnosed in Santa Clara County between July and September 2022. Responses were analyzed using a grounded theory data analysis approach. Among the 47 participants, 36 (77%) had heard of mpox before diagnosis, and of these, 20 (56%) did not think they were at risk of developing mpox, and 28 (78%) were aware that a vaccine was available. Those who did not receive the vaccine stated vaccine access and availability were the main barriers. Among the six participants not interested in the vaccine, the main hesitancies were lack of perceived risk, stigma of being branded by scarring and labeled gay, and vaccine safety. Overall, the following themes were attributed to reasons for vaccine hesitancy: (a) lack of awareness of the disease and vaccine, including perceived risks; (b) lack of vaccine availability and accessibility; and (c) stigma associated with receiving the vaccine, including being publicly labeled as “gay” and the scarring on forearm potentially seen as branding. We recommend tailoring outreach and educational campaigns to address reasons for mpox vaccine hesitancy.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T06:05:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231215054
       
  • Deep-Structure Attitudes and Reasons Toward Healthy Eating and Self-Rated
           Diet and Health in Ethnically Diverse U.S.-Hispanics/Latinos

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Areli Caballero-Gonzalez, Andrea López-Cepero, Josiemer Mattei
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Little is known about deep-structure (i.e., embedded) cultural attitudes toward healthy eating among Hispanics/Latinos in the United States. This study aimed to identify ethnic-specific dietary attitudes of Latino adults and evaluate their associations with self-rated diet and health. Participants (n = 200) were community-based Latinos (25–65 y/o) living in the Boston, Massachusetts metro area who completed a survey assessing agreement with 20 statements on attitudes toward healthy eating (eight positive and 12 negative) and 15 statements on reasons for healthy eating across seven constructs. Multinomial logistic regression models tested the association of sum scores of positive or negative attitudes and reasons for healthy eating with self-rated diet or self-rated health for participants of Caribbean versus Non-Caribbean backgrounds. Most participants of both backgrounds agreed that healthy eating would keep them healthy and make them look good, and that families should eat together. Differences by background were noted in statements regarding eating at special occasions, cost of healthy foods, self-efficacy (i.e., cravings), and cultural beliefs. Negative attitudes were associated with lower odds of better self-rated health for Caribbean, but not for non-Caribbean, participants. Positive attitudes were associated with 1.85 (95% CI [1.10, 3.12]) odds of better self-rated diet for Caribbean participants and 3.13 (95% CI [1.26, 7.81]) for non-Caribbean participants. Non-Caribbean participants were more likely to self-rate very good/excellent diet with higher reasons for healthy eating. Latinos have shared and ethnic-specific deep-structure attitudes toward healthy eating related to their perceived diet quality and health. Programs promoting healthy eating for Latino adults should be deeply tailored by ethnicity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-16T06:02:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231214968
       
  • Engagement With a Youth Community Advisory Board to Develop and Refine a
           Facebook HPV Vaccination Promotion Intervention (#HPVvaxtalks) for Young
           Black Adults (18–26 years old)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adebola Adegboyega, Diane B. Francis, Charis Ebikwo, Tristan Ntego, Melinda Ickes
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain suboptimal among young Black adults (18–26 years). Research focused on HPV vaccination among young Black adults is limited. Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, we developed #HPVvaxtalks, a theoretically grounded and culturally appropriate Facebook intervention in collaboration with a youth community advisory board (YCAB) to increase awareness of HPV risk factors, risk perception, HPV vaccine-related knowledge, vaccination intention, and uptake for Black individuals. Engagement with YCAB members fostered opportunity to discuss priorities reflecting the community’s interest and make #HPVvaxtalks more relevant. This article describes the YCAB engagement and collaborative process in the development and refinement of posts/messages for #HPVvaxtalks. Five young Black adults (18–26 years of age) were invited to become members of a YCAB. YCAB reviewed the preliminary version of #HPVvaxtalks intervention materials and provided critiques and suggestions for refinement. Following the completion of the collaborative process, YCAB members completed individual interviews to reflect on the process. Feedback from YCAB participants focused on the relevance, engagement, clarity, and organization of the content and the media utilized. Participants suggested using “memes” to improve cultural relevance and engagement for young Black individuals. All YCAB members expressed satisfaction with the development process. Collaboration with a YCAB was crucial in developing a culturally relevant and acceptable #HPVvaxtalks intervention, which includes 40 messages/posts for young Black adults. Undergoing the iterative process of intervention development and refinement with the priority population can be an essential component in the design and implementation of health promotion activities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T12:20:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231216731
       
  • Tailor Made: A Pilot Virtual Weight Loss Intervention Individually
           Tailored for African American Men

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Derek M. Griffith, Emily C. Jaeger, Jacquelyn S. Pennings, Andrea R. Semlow, Jennifer M. Ellison, Leah R. Alexander
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study tests the acceptability and feasibility of the first virtual weight loss study individually tailored for middle-aged African American men. Tailor Made is a 3-month randomized controlled pilot of a weight loss intervention that included 58 overweight or obese African American men (mean age of 50.4; SD = 7.9). Control group participants received a Fitbit activity tracker and Bluetooth-enabled scale and copies of the self-led Tailor Made curriculum. Intervention group participants received the same Fitbit, Bluetooth-enabled scale, and curriculum and also participated in weekly, 45-minute virtual small group, professional-led education sessions using the Tailor Made curriculum and received three SMS text messages weekly: (a) a message individually tailored on African American Manhood that links men’s values, goals, and motivation to health-promoting behavior; (b) a goal-tracking message to monitor physical activity, healthier eating, and lifestyle changes; and (c) a reminder 24 hours before their session. Participation rates in weekly small group sessions, randomization, and attendance at the assessments suggest that Tailor Made was feasible and acceptable. Only among intervention group participants, we found a small and significant decrease in BMI between baseline and final. In addition, active minutes of physical activity decreased for the control group while active minutes for the intervention group remained steady throughout the intervention. In sum, we demonstrated that a virtual, individually tailored weight loss intervention is feasible and acceptable to African American men. Participants valued the convenience of a virtual intervention, but there were a number of ways we may be able to enhance the potential benefits of this approach.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T12:18:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213347
       
  • Intervening in the Cancer Care System: An Analysis of Equity-Focused Nurse
           Navigation and Patient-Reported Outcomes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ida Griesemer, Nisha C. Gottfredson, Kari Thatcher, Christine Rini, Sarah A. Birken, Aneri Kothari, Randall John, Fatima Guerrab, Thomas Clodfelter, Alexandra F. Lightfoot
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundNurse navigation can improve quality of cancer care and reduce racial disparities in care outcomes. Addressing persistent structurally-rooted disparities requires research on strategies that support patients by prompting structural changes to systems of care. We applied a novel conceptualization of social support to an analysis of racial equity-focused navigation and patient-reported outcomes.MethodWe applied an antiracism lens to create a theory-informed definition of system-facing social support: intervening in a care system on a patient’s behalf. Participants were adults with early-stage breast or lung cancer, who racially identified as Black or White, and received specialized nurse navigation (n = 155). We coded navigators’ clinical notes (n = 3,251) to identify instances of system-facing support. We then estimated models to examine system-facing support in relation to race, perceived racism in health care settings, and mental health.ResultsTwelve percent of navigators’ clinical notes documented system-facing support. Black participants received more system-facing support than White participants, on average (b = 0.78, 95% confidence interval [CI]: [0.25, 1.31]). The interaction of race*system-facing support was significant in a model predicting perceived racism in health care settings at the end of the study controlling for baseline scores (b = 0.05, 95% CI [0.01, 0.09]). Trends in simple slopes indicated that among Black participants, more system-facing support was associated with slightly more perceived racism; no association among White participants.DiscussionThe term system-facing support highlights navigators’ role in advocating for patients within the care system. More research is needed to validate the construct system-facing support and examine its utility in interventions to advance health care equity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T12:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213042
       
  • Health-Related Social Needs Screening: Promising Practices From the
           Accountable Health Communities Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alyssa Bosold, Toni Abrams Weintraub, Kelsey Cowen, Maya Talwar-Hebert, Katherine Abowd Johnson, Natalia Barolín
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Health-related social needs (HRSNs), such as food insecurity and housing instability, drive health and well-being. The socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic increased the prevalence of HRSNs and highlighted the critical need for strategies to address those needs, particularly in communities experiencing health disparities. Implementing HRSN screening requires adopting effective strategies to overcome common challenges. This report synthesizes promising implementation approaches and lessons learned from the Accountable Health Communities Model, a national effort funded by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center to systematically screen for and address HRSNs in clinical settings. Key strategies include increasing patient engagement and building trust through culturally tailored language and outreach; using and sharing data for monitoring and improvement; using technology to expand access to screening and referrals; dedicating staff to screening roles; integrating screening into existing workflows; and building buy-in among staff by communicating the impact of screening and encouraging peer connections.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-12-04T05:50:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213582
       
  • Adverse Childhood Experiences and Psychological Correlates of Substance
           Use Disorders Among Black Sexual Minority Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Shemeka Thorpe, Kaylee A. Palomino, Natalie Malone, Danelle Stevens-Watkins
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the influence of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on Black sexual minority women’s mental health and substance use disorders in adulthood. Secondary data analysis was conducted using N = 149 Black sexual minority women’s reports from the Generations Study. Study variables included psychological distress, chronic strains, stressful life events, ACEs, and substance use disorders, including alcohol use disorder and drug use disorder. Quantitative data analysis consisted of descriptives and bivariate correlations. Participants’ total ACE scores were positively significantly correlated with increased alcohol misuse, chronic life strains, and stressful life events. Exposure to household interpersonal violence and household mental illness during childhood were significantly correlated with alcohol misuse. Black sexual minority women with ACEs are at higher risk for mental health concerns throughout their lifespan and maladaptive coping strategies (e.g., substance use). Implications for counselors and therapists are provided.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-24T08:48:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213041
       
  • And Harm Reduction for All

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Celina D. Herrera
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Harm Reduction Act, a groundbreaking piece of legislation in New Mexico, provided for the legal use of paraphernalia by New Mexican residents so long as they could present their yellow sharps cards. Unfortunately, tribal governments in New Mexico were not consulted in these changes in harm reduction practices. As a result, Native American persons in New Mexico cannot access harm reduction services as freely as any other New Mexican can—and harm reduction programs are desperately needed in New Mexico. In this commentary, I examine the impact that the Harm Reduction Act has had on Native American populations in New Mexico and suggest opportunities for improving collaboration between state and tribal governments and community-based organizations.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T12:54:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213353
       
  • A Virtual COVID-19 Youth Ambassador Program: The UI Health CHAMPIONS
           Experience

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natalia Suarez, Jennifer Plascencia
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic continues to exacerbate socioeconomic and educational hardships rooted in systemic inequities for youth across the United States. (Virtual) youth resilience and health promotion efforts are viable mechanisms to address these hardships in the context of a double pandemic: COVID-19 and structural racism. Health professions training programs hold a unique opportunity to incorporate COVID-19 health education to train and empower youth to become community health ambassadors. Grounded on a Grow-Your-Own (GYO) approach, UI Health CHAMPIONS spearheaded the development of the COVID-19 Youth Ambassador Program (COVID-19 YAP), a virtual multistage and multipartner effort. Its mission is to equip youth with knowledge, perspective, and tools to have empathetic, informative conversations within their networks about COVID-19. Via e-learning, modules cover viruses and the immune system; vaccine development; health disparities/equity; and health advocacy. Participants are introduced to Human-Centered Design Thinking to guide the development of advocacy projects. COVID-19 YAP’s uniqueness lies in the team of program coordinators consisting of (pre-)health professional student workers with a desire to engage in health equity efforts and community health ambassadorship. Freirean principles are applied across program design and delivery; Dialogical Education encourages the educator to become the student and the student to become an educator. This co-learning process empowers students and educators to become agents of social change. COVID-19 YAP can serve as a collaborative effort addressing a public health priority, contributing toward digital health equity, and creating community resilience while encouraging youth to pursue a health profession and become community health advocates.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T12:53:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231213351
       
  • Implementation of Overdose Prevention in Maryland: Implications for
           Resource Allocation, Program Scale-Up, and Evaluation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Catherine Tomko, Saba Rouhani, Renee M. Johnson, Ryoko Susukida, Himani Byregowda, Taylor Parnham, Kristin E. Schneider, Marianne Gibson, Teresa Heath, Robin Rickard, Christine E. Boyd, Ju Nyeong Park
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Overdose mortality in the United States continues to climb, with Maryland being one of the hardest hit states. We summarized implementation of overdose prevention and response programs in Maryland and identified associations between opioid overdose deaths by jurisdiction in 2019 and implementation of overdose programs by 2021. Data on program implementation are from Maryland’s Opioid Operational Command Center (OOCC) Program Inventory. OOCC coordinates the state’s response to overdose, and their Program Inventory tracks implementation of 145 programs across 12 domains (e.g., public health, education, and judiciary), including 10 programs designed to broaden naloxone access. The level of program implementation was dichotomized as substantial implementation versus other levels (i.e., partial, planned, and none). We estimated associations between per capita opioid overdose deaths and substantial implementation of: all 145 programs in the Inventory, programs within each of 12 domains, and 10 naloxone programs. Data on program implementation and overdose mortality are summarized at the jurisdiction level. Across jurisdictions, the median proportion of programs with substantial implementation was 51% across all programs and 70% among naloxone programs. Overdose mortality was associated with subsequent substantial implementation of programs within the public health domain (p = .04), but not in the other 11 domains. We did not find evidence that per capita overdose deaths in 2019 spurred overdose program implementation by 2021, with the exception of public health programs. The OOCC Program Inventory is a novel way to track implementation across jurisdictions. Findings can inform the implementation and evaluation of overdose programs in other jurisdictions across the United States.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-22T12:24:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231209935
       
  • More Diverse and Equal: Insights on Moving From “Real-Life” to
           “Remote” Practicum Experiences and Career Development From
           Undergraduate Global Public Health Students During COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rebecca L. Upton
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      A key facet to typical undergraduate or graduate global public health programs is an applied practice experience (a practicum) that culminates in shared results and public presentations (e.g., research posters, conference and working papers, needs assessments). Requirements vary by program but may be between 80 and 200 hours of experiential learning. While not required by all undergraduate programs in global public health, a practicum occurs as part of a semester of coursework or internship experience after students have declared the major/minor or have completed an expected number of courses. Some students report that the practicum experience, while essential to their career development and future opportunities, presents certain challenges in terms of access. Practicum opportunities can be rife with assumptions that social networks, privilege, and implicit bias affect and even predict the ability to secure an effective, doable, and career-advantageous project. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic meant that much of the applied and experiential aspects of a practicum were necessarily shifted from “realworld” experiences to virtual and “remote” contexts. This article highlights insights from students enrolled in undergraduate global public health programs who were planning “real-life”, more “traditional” practicum experiences, and had to necessarily move to “remote” and online engagement. These cases suggest that participation in virtual fieldsites is seen as legitimate, fulfilling for students and stakeholders, and can increase diversity, equity, and inclusion in the public health curricula; fostering best practices in career development.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T06:16:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231211540
       
  • Using a CBPR Approach to Guide Successful Recruitment for an Online
           Questionnaire: The Measurement Approaches to Partnership Success (MAPS)
           Case Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Eliza Wilson-Powers, Megan Jensen, Adena Gabrysiak, Barbara L. Brush, Chris M. Coombe, Barbara Israel, Shoou-Yih D. Lee, Al Richmond, Laurie Lachance
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Measurement Approaches to Partnership Success (MAPS) study team effectively used a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to recruit 55 long-standing CBPR partnerships to participate in an online questionnaire to assess factors associated with partnership success. Our recruitment was guided by interconnected values of collaboration, transparency, and relationship-building to maintain fidelity to CBPR principles throughout the process. We operationalized these values into a series of strategies to recruit partnerships and sustain their involvement, including establishing primary points of contact, offering incentives for completion, personalizing recruitment materials, and practicing flexibility in our approach. We aim to inform public health researchers on the strategies that enabled our team to achieve 100% of our study recruitment goal, with the intent that our recommendations can be applied by others to enhance their recruitment efforts and reach their data collection goals for future public health research.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-20T06:14:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231211532
       
  • Multilevel Barriers to Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Uptake: A
           Narrative Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melissa Goldin Evans, Rebekah E. Gee, Stephen Phillippi, Melinda Sothern, Katherine P. Theall, Joan Wightkin
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Unintended pregnancies, which occur in almost half (45%) of all pregnancies in the United States, are associated with adverse health and social outcomes for the infant and the mother. The risk of unintended pregnancies is significantly reduced when women use long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), namely intrauterine devices and implants. Although LARCs are highly acceptable to women at risk of unintended pregnancies, barriers to accessing LARCs hinder its uptake. These barriers are greater among racial and socioeconomic lines and persist within and across the intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, and policy levels. A synthesis of these barriers is unavailable in the current literature but would be beneficial to health care providers of reproductive-aged women, clinical managers, and policymakers seeking to provide equitable reproductive health care services. The aim of this narrative review was to aggregate these complex and overlapping barriers into a concise document that examines: (a) patient, provider, clinic, and policy factors associated with LARC access among populations at risk of unintended pregnancy and (b) the clinical implications of mitigating these barriers to provide equitable reproductive health care services. This review outlines numerous barriers to LARC uptake across multiple levels and demonstrates that LARC uptake is possible when the woman is informed of her contraceptive choices and when financial and clinical barriers are minimized. Equitable reproductive health care services entail unbiased counseling, a full range of contraceptive options, and patient autonomy in contraceptive choice.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T08:26:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231211531
       
  • Does Brand Choice Matter: Associations Between Usual E-Cigarette Brands
           and E-Cigarette Use Patterns Among U.S. Youth, 2021

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julia Chen-Sankey, Maryam Elhabashy, Kevin R. J. Schroth
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background.To inform youth about e-cigarette use prevention, it is important to understand whether using e-cigarette products from certain brands is associated with youth’s differential e-cigarette use patterns and willingness to quit e-cigarettes.Methods.Data for this study come from the 2021 U.S. National Youth Tobacco Survey (NYTS). The sample was current (past-30-day) e-cigarette users (unweighted n = 1,436). We examined the associations between users’ usual e-cigarette brands (Puff, Vuse, Smoke, JUUL, and others) and e-cigarette use patterns (use frequency, use with nicotine, use with flavors) and willingness to quit, controlling for covariates.Results.In 2021, 25.6%, 9.7%, 8.1%, and 6.5% of users reported Puff, Vuse, Smok, and JUUL as their usual brands, respectively. Having Smok as a usual brand increased the odds of frequent e-cigarette use compared with other brands. Using Puff, Vuse, and Smok increased the odds of using e-cigarettes with nicotine. Using Puff and Smok increased the odds of using e-cigarettes with any flavors and fruit flavors, and using Smok and JUUL increased the odds of using mint flavors. Finally, using Vuse reduced the odds of having a willingness to quit e-cigarettes.Conclusion.Puff products, which are likely to be used infrequently and with fruit flavors, were the most endorsed usual brand by youth users. Vuse and Smok brand users demonstrated problematic use patterns, including high-frequency use of nicotine and reduced willingness to quit. The high prevalence of using flavors, especially banned flavors (e.g., mint for JUUL products), suggests the need for tightened restrictions on youth’s access to flavored e-cigarettes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-18T08:23:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231210511
       
  • Policy for Equity: Associations Between Community Mental Health Agency
           Policies and Clinicians’ Cultural Competence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Noah S. Triplett, Jasmin L. Blanks Jones, Yasmin Garfias, Natasha D. Williams, Shannon Dorsey
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Systemic reform is needed to address racism as a root cause of mental health inequities, such as understanding how community mental health (CMH) agencies’ practices and policies may impact care provided to racially minoritized populations. This study described and examined associations between CMH clinicians’ multicultural knowledge and awareness and agency practices and policies to improve care for Clients of Color. CMH clinicians (N = 119) across Washington State reported on their multicultural competence and agencies’ practices and policies in an online survey. Multicultural competence was assessed with the Multicultural Counseling Knowledge and Awareness Scale (MCKAS), which assesses respondents’ knowledge of multicultural counseling frameworks and awareness of multicultural counseling issues. Agency policies were examined with an adapted version of the Multiculturally Competent Service System (MCSS) Assessment Guide, which asked respondents to endorse the degree to which their agencies had taken specific steps to better serve racially and ethnically minoritized populations across 11 domains, including policies, linguistic diversity in services, and quality monitoring and improvement. Multicultural knowledge and awareness were generally high across the sample. Clinicians commonly endorsed that their agencies had mission statements that were committed to cultural competence. Endorsement of concrete steps to improve services for non-English speaking clients was associated with greater multicultural knowledge and awareness, and practices to monitor and improve care provided to Clients of Color were associated with lower scores. Addressing mental health inequities requires multifaceted solutions. Results highlight the potential of examining agency practices and policies as one solution to improve care for Clients of Color.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T09:16:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231208422
       
  • Lights, Facts, and Goals: A Novel Framework to Enhance Community Health
           Messaging Campaign Design, Implementation, and Assessment

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James S. Brooks, Luz Claudio, Faven Araya, Muhammed Y. Idris, Kristelle Pierre, Maya Korin
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The spread of health misinformation has made the task of health communicators more difficult. However, the success of health messaging hinges not only on meaningful message content but also on the credibility of who is delivering the message. “Trusted messengers,” like local leaders and community-based organizations, have a greater ability to influence improvements in community health, due to their shared cultural experience with their communities. Health communication agencies should empower trusted messengers with the tools they need to succeed in health communication. One tool critical for their success is a succinct health messaging framework to plan and implement health messaging. Marketing has “See, Think, Do”—a simple, practical framework used to influence consumer purchases. As a more trustworthy corollary, we propose the “Lights, Facts, and Goals” framework, a concise, authentic, and transparent method for planning, implementing, and assessing health messaging campaigns that influence health improvements. “Lights” refers to different methods of reaching communities like trusted messengers, advertisements, and text messages. “Facts” refers to key sourced scientific information relevant to a specific aspect of community health. “Goals” refers to actions community members can take to improve their health in connection with the communicated health facts. This article describes how the “Lights, Facts, and Goals” framework both simplifies the creation and communication of scientifically sound health messaging and strengthens the partnership between health agencies and trusted messengers in the community. Through “Lights, Facts, and Goals,” community-based organizations, community leaders, and their partners will be more effective at improving community health through messaging.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:19:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231209028
       
  • A Digital Diabetes Storytelling Intervention for the Hmong Community: A
           Pilot Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathryn M Brown, Cassandra Silveira, Serena Xiong, Nirmal Lumpkin, Caroline Carlin, Catherine J Pang, Katherine Montag Schafer
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Hmong-Americans experience higher rates of diabetes and poorer diabetes-related health outcomes than their White peers. Traditional methods of diabetes education do not reach Hmong patients effectively due to known socioeconomic and literacy barriers. The purpose of this study is to examine the acceptability of a culturally informed diabetes self-management education video tool, using digital storytelling that was created using a community-engaged approach, administered in a single academic clinic that sees a large percentage of Hmong patients. The video tool was successful in the areas of acceptability, story transformation, and story identification; 96% of participants stated that the video felt like something from their community, 88% stated that they could identify with the story, 79% stated that they wanted to know what happened next, and 70% of participants reported that they were motivated to do something different after watching. New methods to improve diabetes education and improve health outcomes in Hmong communities are needed. Culturally informed digital storytelling is one tool, which may be used to improve diabetes health outcomes in this population.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-11-07T07:15:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231208990
       
  • Implementing a Prenatal Oral Health Program for Dental Students: Lessons
           Learned

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer L. Brame, Rocio B. Quinonez, Brittney P. Ciszek, Jane A. Weintraub
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Prenatal Oral Health Program (pOHP) was developed to educate dental students on prenatal oral health and promote access to dental care for pregnant women. Program advancement has occurred in support of quality improvement. This mixed-methods design combined quantitative data from fourth-year dental students who participated the pOHP (N = 81) and qualitative data from a student-faculty-staff focus group discussion (N = 7). Different clinical structures, appropriate leveling in the curriculum, management with a patient care coordinator, and inclusion of interprofessional learning experiences (IPE) were compared. The survey response rate was 96.4% (N = 81). Trends were noted between students who provided clinical care for a pregnant patient (31%) versus those who did not. Results indicated that an integrated clinic was preferred, though students who had treated a pOHP patient showed greater support for a standalone clinic model. Survey and focus group data agreed that pOHP should occur during the third-year dental school training; however, students with patient experience favored second-year placement. Survey and focus group data emphasize the importance of a patient care coordinator for clinical management and IPE as an essential learning element. Innovating new clinical models requires a period of evolution to determine preferred and sustainable infrastructure. Results reveal the advantages and disadvantages of various program implementation models and demonstrate that student perceptions were influenced by their clinical experiences. Study findings will inform implementation and guide other programs as they create and modify existing curricula to enhance prenatal oral health.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T07:11:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231207070
       
  • Virtual Workshops as an Effective and Engaging Policy Implementation
           Strategy: Lessons From the National Youth Sports Strategy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison Vaux-Bjerke, Malorie Polster, Lewissa Swanson, Sonja Armbruster, Katrina L. Piercy
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background.Implementation is an important piece of effective policymaking, but connecting local organizations with federal policy can be challenging. A virtual workshop structure can help engage implementation partners, especially when in-person events are not possible. The workshops described here leveraged virtual outreach and facilitation methods to foster community engagement, forge connections, and build relationships at the regional, state, and local levels.Methods.This article focuses on five virtual workshops. The planning phase consisted of selecting the geographic scope of each workshop, developing outreach and facilitation materials, and supporting event logistics. The execution and summary phase included tailoring materials, hosting the events, and producing follow-up materials. Networking, resource sharing, collaboration, and active facilitation were employed to promote engagement.Results.Registration for the virtual workshops included 223 individuals representing organizations in 28 states. Participants shared 133 resources. In a post-event evaluation, 93% of respondents indicated they could identify at least one new resource to support their efforts to increase youth sports participation in their community, and 94% indicated they plan to follow up and explore potential partnerships/collaborations with others they met or heard from at the workshop. Networking and resource sharing were identified as the most useful aspects of the workshops.Conclusions.With careful planning and collaboration, virtual workshops represent a useful community engagement mechanism to bring policy into practice. Creating events focused on the participant experience supports health promotion professionals, engages communities, and takes a policy off the page and out to the people.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T07:07:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231206081
       
  • Bag Lady: A Soulful and Scientific Reflection on Black Women’s
           Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Rhoda Moise
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      At the intersection of sexism and racism, Black women experience undue burden of poor health. Established literature in both scientific and artistic arenas archive health disparities facing Black women such as mental health and suicidality. Using poetry, this piece serves as a channel to express the joys and pains of the human experience as well as inspire healing and synergy through honest examination of societal structures. This mixed media artistry (intended to be sung and spoken) weaves together lyrical and literary works, featuring by quotes from Erykah Badu’s Bag Lady; Dr. Maya Angelou’s many works; Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have considered suicide / when the rainbow is enuf; and Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry’s Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America. It ultimately articulates how to journey across the arc of triumph for well-being synergizing mind, body, and spirit.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-31T06:24:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231207068
       
  • Understanding Libraries as Part of the Rural Active Living Environment:
           Evidence From a Content Analysis of Library Facebook Posts Made in Summer
           2022

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Noah Lenstra, Nancy Tompkins O’Hara, Dina L. Jones, Zachary Townsend, Sandra Slater, Andrew C. Pickett, Kelsey R. Day, M. Renee Umstattd Meyer, Cynthia Perry
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      As both public health and public libraries continue to evolve, there are opportunities for collaboration focused on building policies, systems, and environments that support communities making healthy choices easy choices. Given the health disparities related to physical inactivity, such as diabetes and heart disease in rural America, public libraries within rural communities are emerging as important settings for health promotion and disease prevention. This study sought to better understand how rural libraries promote physical activity opportunities on Facebook. Based on a content analysis of Facebook posts of a random sample of 118 libraries made during the Summer of 2022, 47 of the 118 had at least one post related to physical activity and 42 had multiple posts. The most frequent offering was events or classes; libraries also supported physical activity by lending equipment and making changes to the built environment. This study provides evidence that some rural libraries are offering physical activity opportunities through community health partnerships, particularly for youth and families. Considering this evidence, public health professionals are encouraged to collaborate with local libraries to promote physical activity and advance rural health equity. Researchers are invited to continue to develop the evidence base around promoting physical activity with rural libraries.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T06:39:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231206085
       
  • The Black Church and Co-occurring Pandemics

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: LaNita S. Wright, John A. Reed
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Black people represent less than 13% of the population in the United States, but over 15% of COVID-19 deaths, with a mortality rate two times higher than White people. The Black Church system has historically been in a unique position to serve Black communities, particularly during times of crisis. The deep-rooted connection of the Black Church system within Black communities was largely shaped by slavery and segregation. However, there have been questions about the relevance of the Black Church system today. The objective of this commentary is to describe the intersectionality of ministry and health that has been illuminated in a profound way during this pandemic. Those in leadership had to evaluate and disseminate COVID-19 information to congregants, recognizing mistrust of the medical and public health systems still permeates throughout Black communities. Moreover, the death of George Floyd sparked international outcry, which launched church leaders to respond to a second pandemic: systemic racism. Understanding ways the Black Church responded to COVID-19, and systemic racism, is significantly important to public health and medical communities as it addresses the relevance of this system and ways to appropriately support during another public health crisis.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-21T06:36:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231204589
       
  • SWOT Analysis and Recommendations for Community Health Workers and
           Stakeholders Responding to COVID-19 Health Inequities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: I. Niles Zoschke, Alejandro Betancur, Sara Ehsan, Jill D. TenHaken, Justin R. Rahman, Kim King-Tezino, Megan Kramer-Najjar, Carlos A. Bravo, J. Michael Wilkerson
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background. By 2023, 1,080,000 cases of COVID-19 have been reported in Harris County. Systemic inequity and vaccine hesitancy have contributed to COVID-19 disparities. Community Health Workers provide health education and instrumental support to alleviate health disparities among vulnerable communities. We conducted an analysis of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT) analysis in June 2022 among a broad coalition of Community Health Work stakeholders to better understand the local landscape in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods. We recruited 33 community health workers and industry stakeholders in Harris County, Texas, to participate in the SWOT analysis. Participants were asked to describe their opinions on the SWOT facing the Community Health Work landscape and then rank the outcomes of the analysis to prioritize action. Results. A total of 19 themes were identified. Weaknesses included lack of respect and resources for Community Health Workers and poor coordination and capacity among the workforce infrastructure. Limited funding and lack of appreciation for Community Health Workers were deemed important threats. Diversity and community connection were critical strengths, and strong education, training, and raising awareness for community health work were considered opportunities to overcome identified weaknesses and threats. Discussion. Increased funding, greater coordination, greater respect, and amplified training can improve capacity for Community Health Workers and, therefore, improve public health outcomes for respiratory illness and viral infections such as COVID-19. This analysis helps fill an important research gap on the topic Community Health Workers responding to public health crises with racially disparate outcomes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T10:40:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201131
       
  • The Measurement Approaches to Partnership Success (MAPS) Questionnaire and
           Facilitation Guide: A Validated Measure of CBPR Partnership Success

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Barbara L. Brush, Barbara Israel, Chris M. Coombe, Shoou-Yih D. Lee, Megan Jensen, Eliza Wilson-Powers, Adena Gabrysiak, P. Paul Chandanabhumma, Elizabeth Baker, Marita Jones, Laurie Lachance
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Partnerships that effectively engage in certain key structural and process functions are more likely to meet their research goals and contribute to longer-term health equity outcomes. Ongoing evaluation of partnerships’ level of achievement of these key functions, along with their fidelity to the guiding principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR), is therefore essential to understand how they can achieve desired partnership outcomes. This article describes the validated Measurement Approaches to Partnership Success (MAPS) Questionnaire and the use of an accompanying Facilitation Guide in helping members of CBPR partnerships evaluate their partnership’s state of development and interpret findings to improve its structure, processes, and outcomes. We describe the conceptual framework guiding the development of the MAPS Questionnaire and its 81-item across seven key outcome dimensions, along with 28 items measuring precursor characteristics of CBPR partnership outcomes. The Facilitation Guide provides general guidelines for sharing, interpreting, and applying results within partnerships using a participatory process, definitions and items for each dimension, an example of presenting summary means, and dimension-specific reflective questions for discussion. We offer recommendations for practical uses of the MAPS Questionnaire and Facilitation Guide. Whether used as a comprehensive tool or by dimension, the MAPS Questionnaire is conceptually sound and empirically validated for evaluating how CBPR partnerships can achieve long-standing success. CBPR partnerships at any stage of development will find the MAPS Questionnaire and Facilitation Guide useful in measuring and interpreting indicators of partnership success, sharing results, and improving their ability to contribute to achieving health equity goals.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T06:04:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231206088
       
  • Facilitating Factors and Barriers to the Implementation of the Icelandic
           Prevention Model of Adolescent Substance Use in Chile: A Focus Group Study
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Carolina Sepúlveda, Carlos Ibáñez, Nicolás Libuy, Viviana Guajardo, Ana María Araneda, Lorena Contreras, Paula Donoso, Adrian P. Mundt
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The use of alcohol and other drugs is a major public health problem in adolescence. The implementation of evidence-based prevention strategies is still scarce in the global south. This study aimed to evaluate facilitators and barriers to the implementation of the Icelandic prevention model of adolescent substance use (IPM) in Chile. We conducted a qualitative study of stakeholders during the implementation process of the IPM in six municipalities of the Metropolitan Region of Santiago, Chile. We convened six focus groups with parents and professionals from schools and municipal prevention teams (38 participants). Recordings were transcribed and submitted to a six-step thematic analysis. The following facilitators emerged: Participants valued the contribution of the IPM to articulate existing programs and teams, its community focus, and the local data obtained through the survey. There were also several barriers: Those included resistance to adopting a foreign model, the tension between generating local strategies and looking for measures to ensure the fidelity of the implementation, socioeconomic differences between and within municipalities, low-risk perception and supervision of parents in Chile, and a culture that generally does not discourage adolescent substance use. Implementation of the IPM was largely accepted by the stakeholders who agreed with the community approach of the model. The main barriers to consider were related to cultural and socioeconomic factors that need to be addressed in further research and may limit the effects of the model in Chile.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-17T06:02:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201551
       
  • A Pandemic Adaptation and Its Aftermath: Using AI and In-Person
           Facilitation for Community Health Education in Liberia and the United
           States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jasmine L. Blanks Jones, Laura Quaynor, Stephanie Njeri, Yasmine Bolden
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Health promotion commonly focuses on supporting youth wellness, as health behaviors acquired in childhood and adolescence tend to have a significant impact on an individual’s future. Adolescent health education is associated with positive health and educational outcomes, yet young people experience barriers to fully engaging in learning about health issues that are often unique to their social location. Barriers for successful engagement in health education for African diaspora youth in North American and European contexts may include school initiatives built around engagement models that do not center Black youth; for Black youth in majority-Black societies, barriers may include access to resources or exclusionary practices based on other social characteristics. Global health promotion has used a variety of multimodal educational tools from radio to more recently online engagement, especially in African contexts, to reach young people. This essay shares experiences using AI and in-person facilitation to engage in community health education with youth in Liberia and the United States. In our practice, we found that there are far more underlying systemic and structural similarities to the inequities experienced between African and Black American youth and that utilizing AI tools alongside of in-person discussion may contribute to better outcomes for youth health education.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-16T11:33:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201137
       
  • Applying an Implementation Framework to the Dissemination of a
           School-Based Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kate Guastaferro, Stacey L. Shipe, Christian M. Connell, Kathleen M. Zadzora, Jennie G. Noll
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Since the 1980s, school-based child sexual abuse (CSA) prevention programs have been the prevailing prevention strategy in the United States. Despite demonstrated effectiveness, there is a lack of infrastructure and educational policy ensuring all students receive these programs. A pragmatic application of the RE-AIM implementation framework, this study provides an overview of a multi-county implementation effort of the school-based CSA prevention program, Safe Touches. Implementation efforts across five counties in a Mid-Atlantic state are described at three levels: organizational (school districts), child, and program facilitator. Children’s CSA-related knowledge was measured at four time points: pre-workshop, immediately post-workshop, and then 6 and 12 months post-workshop. Facilitators completed an anonymous survey post-implementation. Over the course of one and a half academic years, Safe Touches was implemented in 718 public school districts, reaching in total 14,235 second-grade students. Students’ significantly increased knowledge from pre- to post-workshop and gains were maintained at 6 and 12 months (ps
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T11:09:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201537
       
  • Experiences With and Access to Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs
           for Older American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Peoples

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R. Turner Goins, Collette Adamsen, Becky Bendixen, Melody Woodrich-Fernando, Jennie R. Joe, Robin Besse, Kathleen Zuke
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence-based programs (EBPs) work effectively for participants whose characteristics match those of the EBP research participants. However, EBPs have been almost exclusively developed and evaluated for the general U.S. population with limited American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian (AI/AN/NH) community engagement. Thus, an AI/AN/NH Evidence-Based Program Advisory Council sought to identify AI/AN/NH peoples’ experiences with and access to EBPs. We held 20 listening sessions with AI/AN/NH Elder services program staff (n = 118) and with AI/AN/NH Elders (n = 82) and conducted a self-administered online survey with Title VI Directors (n = 63). The six themes that emerged from the listening sessions with staff included misunderstanding community engagement, valuing fidelity over flexibility, lack of cultural awareness, assumptions about available infrastructure, unrealistic implementation timelines, and funding restrictions. Listening session themes with Elders included definitions of aging well, participation motivators, preferred activities, participation barriers, and unmet needs. Survey data indicated that programming of greatest interest for Elders as identified by Title VI Directors and staff included and/or addressed cultural activities (81%), socialization (75%), diabetes (73%), caregiving (68%), and nutrition (68%). Seventy-six percent of survey respondents had heard of EBPs and 24% indicated that EBPs were not being implemented in their community. The Advisory Council developed specific action steps with the goal of improving AI/AN/NH communities’ access to culturally appropriate and feasible EBPs. The steps require collective action from federal agencies, national partners, EBP program developers and administrators, local organizations, and Elders to ensure EBPs are accessible and culturally appropriate for AI/AN/NH Elders.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-10-10T10:49:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201552
       
  • Building Public Health Competencies for Cross-Sector Leadership: Results
           From the National Leadership Academy for the Public’s Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maggie Jones, Elena Kuo, Abbie Lee, Craig A. Sewald, Karya Lustig, Carmen Rita Nevarez
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Context. The public health workforce is increasingly being asked to provide leadership in addressing complex community health needs. Effective leadership requires adaptiveness and cross-sector collaboration in developing solutions to address community needs. Program. An annual yearlong public health leadership development program, which engages cross-sector teams and uses an iterative design to build competencies for adaptive and collaborative leadership across sectors (e.g., public health, business, education, nonprofits). Implementation. The program engages cross-sector teams through a national retreat, coaching, site visits, interactive webinars, readings, and a community-based action learning project. As of 2020, the program was offered to nine cohorts, serving more than 100 communities across the United States. Results. Results from a mixed-methods evaluation found that high proportions of participants reported increased leadership skills, cross-sector collaboration, continued use of tools and concepts, and positive impact on their communities after participating in the program. Across all cohorts, participants rated themselves on five leadership domains and 17 leadership competencies focused on by the program. All domains and all competencies had statistically significant improvements from the beginning to the end of their program year. Discussion. The improvements in leadership skills were seen across all cohorts, geographies, roles, and sectors. The success of the program suggests the need for leadership programs that emphasize adaptive and collaborative leadership to advance community health and equity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-30T01:20:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231201152
       
  • Decision-Making Regarding Elective Child and Adolescent Vaccinations Among
           Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Parents in Orange County

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cynthia L. Fok, Melenaite Fifita, Sora Park Tanjasiri
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPIs) in aggregate experience greater health burdens than non-Hispanic Whites, such as a higher incidence of cervical cancer and COVID-19. Given the importance of vaccinations in preventing and reducing the severity of diseases, such as the flu, cervical cancer, and COVID-19, the receipt of vaccines during childhood and adolescence is crucial. Therefore, this qualitative study aimed to explore the factors associated with NHPI parents’ decisions regarding vaccinating their children with these elective vaccinations—that is, vaccinations not required for child care, preschool, or K-12 admissions in California but highly recommended. A total of 15 NHPI parents were recruited through a community-based organization. Semi-structured interviews explored parents’ reasons for accepting or denying each vaccine for their child(ren). Results demonstrated variable acceptance of each vaccine, though consistent themes included protection and concerns over side effects. This study also found two general types of parents—those who treat vaccines the same and those with varying opinions about each vaccine. Results from this study demonstrate the family- and community-oriented nature of NHPI communities, suggesting that future interventions target not only parents but also their families and communities to cultivate vaccine acceptance through social networks. Furthermore, addressing all three vaccines during well-child visits may benefit parents who view each vaccine as separate entities with individual pros and cons. Such interventions could contribute toward reducing the burdens of particularly chronic health disparities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T08:11:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193707
       
  • Schools and Wastewater Surveillance: Practical Implications for an
           Emerging Technology to Impact Child Health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Gwendolyn Johnson, Angelina Espàrza, Elizabeth Stevenson, Lauren Stadler, Kathy Ensor, Stephen Williams, Komal Sheth, Catherine Johnson, Loren Hopkins
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, wastewater surveillance has emerged as a public health tool that supplements traditional surveillance methods used to detect the prevalence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in communities. In May 2020, the Houston Health Department (HHD) partnered with a coalition of municipal and academic partners to develop a wastewater monitoring and reporting system for the city of Houston, Texas. The HHD subsequently launched a program to conduct targeted wastewater sampling at 52 school sites located in a large, urban school district in Houston. Data generated by this program are shared with school district officials and nurses from participating schools. Although initial feedback from these stakeholders indicated that they considered the wastewater data valuable, the emergency nature of the pandemic prevented a systematic evaluation of the program. To address this gap in knowledge, the HHD and Rice University conducted a study to determine how wastewater data are used to make decisions about COVID-19 prevention and mitigation practices in schools. Our findings indicate that maximizing the utility of wastewater data in the school context will require the development of communication strategies and education efforts tailored to the needs of specific audiences and improving collaboration between local health departments, school districts, and school nurses.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-21T05:45:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231196857
       
  • Engaging Appalachian Youth: Lessons Learned From a Virtual Tobacco
           Prevention and Advocacy Training

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Courtney Martin, Julia Estes, Melinda Ickes
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Engaging youth is recommended as a key component of comprehensive tobacco control to bring voice to youth perspective and to connect to community impact. Yet, limited research exists to showcase practical lessons learned in supporting skill development and engagement of youth. This practice note describes how a tailored prevention and advocacy virtual training can serve to engage and empower rural Appalachian high school students to participate in tobacco control efforts. Specifically, we describe the implementation and practical lessons learned from a two-session virtual tobacco prevention and advocacy training led by college facilitators. Participating high school students (N = 20) strongly agreed that tobacco use was a major problem facing their community and that addressing tobacco use should be prioritized. After participating in the training, students’ interpersonal confidence improved and participation in self-reported advocacy increased. Students also liked the virtual platform, interaction with college students, and the opportunity to apply information learned. Youth-focused tailored training promotes skill-building and enhances self-efficacy to engage in tobacco control. Youth engagement should be integral to supporting community health initiatives, including tobacco prevention.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T10:09:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231196858
       
  • Intergenerationology: The Scientific Study of Circular Movement Between
           Generations

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Whitney Nesser, Eun-Hye Grace Yi
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we propose a new term, “intergenerationology.” Intergenerationology is proposed as a unified term to describe the numerous research and practice models concerning many aspects of circular movement between generations. We define the term intergenerational, with historical context related to research, practice, and policy in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. We also describe how different disciplines have interacted with regard to generations from different yet complementary points of view. Having the term intergenerationology will (a) enable the acceleration and unification of intergenerational studies and practice across disciplines by promoting easy communication among disciplines, (b) encourage more research from diverse science disciplines by giving a name to a popular area of study within them, and (c) provide a recognized term for researchers and practitioners to define their specific teaching, practice, and research interests.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T06:56:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231199712
       
  • Key Lessons From a Systematic Behavior Change Communication Process Used
           in a Pneumonia Prevention Program in Five African Countries

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Libertad González Hernández, Selam Jiffaro Seje, Abiyot Mitiku Gosa, Helena Goroi Goro, Lotte Heuberger, Chelsea Giles-Hansen
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundA systematic behavior change communication (BCC) process was designed to enable local partners to effectively conduct formative research and develop a comprehensive BCC strategy, as part of a pneumonia prevention and control program implemented from 2017 to 2021 by the Red Cross Red Crescent in Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, Mali, Sudan, and Zambia.MethodsQualitative content analysis was used to identify, categorize, and summarize key results, lessons, and recommendations related to the BCC process from country evaluation data.ResultsKey elements to success of a locally implemented BCC process include: (1) through simple formative research, understanding household decision-making dynamics for timely health seeking and coexistence of modern and traditional medicine; (2) explicitly analyze motivators for uptake of protective behaviors, with strong and deliberate community participation to validate and tailor BCC messages and channels; (3) ensuring that the challenges to access basic services, such as water and sanitation facilities, are adequately addressed as critical enabling factors for behavior change. Other implications include a need for innovative solutions to physical and economic barriers in areas where large distances, lack of transportation, or cost hinder caregivers seeking care for sick children.ConclusionsCommunity health programs that apply a BCC process through local partners can be effective in achieving behavioral outcomes. Participatory planning and involvement of the community in iterative rounds of validation improved the relevance, appropriateness, and impact. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of different communication methods and sustained impact on health outcomes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-13T06:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231198793
       
  • Supporting Diverse Family Caregivers: Key Stakeholder Perspectives

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Pamela Nadash, Shan Qu, Eileen J. Tell
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study aimed to understand the perspectives of key stakeholders regarding strategies for better supporting culturally and ethnically diverse family caregivers, aiming to incorporate them into the Recognize, Assist, Include, Support, and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Advisory Council’s proposed National Strategy. The Strategy, published in 2022, identified priority actions to support the growing population of people providing unpaid care to people of all ages with disabilities, with a goal of improving the health and well-being of both the family caregiver and the person receiving support. Researchers conducted extensive outreach to purposively diverse stakeholder organizations, using six stakeholder strategy sessions with representatives from 42 groups in December 2020 to identify preliminary themes. During July–October 2021, 17 key informant interviews and 16 stakeholder listening sessions were held, involving 103 different organizations. Qualitative data analysis using an inductive approach was used to identify key themes. A significant issue for diverse caregivers is widespread lack of self-identification as caregivers, which is tied to a lack of awareness of potentially helpful services and supports; culturally appropriate outreach is critical to ensure access to services, as well as access to centralized resources and funding for community- and faith-based organizations. A community health worker model was recommended. Tailored activities, involving trusted community- and faith-based groups, as well as investments in caregiver- and culturally-specific supports, are critical for reaching the diverse family caregivers who most need supports. Raising awareness of caregiving among and taking advantage of the expertise of professionals working with diverse communities is also crucial.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-09-11T09:24:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231196854
       
  • Substance Use and Mental Health Screening Within an Emergency
           Department-Based HIV Screening Program: Outcomes From 1 Year of
           Implementation

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer L. Brown, Nicole K. Gause, Robert Braun, Brittany Punches, David Spatholt, T. Dylanne Twitty, Joel G. Sprunger, Michael S. Lyons
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionThe emergency department (ED) may be an optimal setting to screen for substance use disorders (SUDs) and co-occurring psychiatric disorders (CODs). We report on the frequency of problematic substance use and comorbid elevated mental health symptoms detected during a 1-year implementation period of an ED-based SUD/COD screening approach within an established ED HIV screening program.MethodsPatients (N = 1,924) were approached by dedicated HIV screening staff in an urban, Midwestern ED. Patients first completed measures assessing problematic alcohol (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test-Concise [AUDIT-C]) and substance use across 10 categories of substances (National Institute on Drug Abuse–Modified Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test [NIDA-Modified ASSIST]). Patients with positive alcohol and/or substance use screens completed measures assessing symptoms of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9]), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 [GAD-7]), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (PTSD Checklist-Civilian [PCL-C]).ResultsPatients were predominantly male (60.3%) with a mean age of 38.1 years (SD = 13.0); most identified as White (50.8%) or Black (44.8%). A majority (58.5%) had a positive screen for problematic alcohol and/or other substance use. Of those with a positive substance use screen (n = 1,126), 47.0% had a positive screen on one or more of the mental health measures with 32.1% endorsing elevated depressive symptoms, 29.6% endorsing elevated PTSD-related symptoms, and 28.5% endorsing elevated anxiety symptoms.ConclusionsAmong those receiving ED HIV screening, a majority endorsed problematic alcohol and/or other substance use and co-occurring elevated mental health symptoms. Substance use and mental health screening programs that can be integrated within other ED preventive services may enhance the identification of individuals in need of further assessment, referral, or linkage to substance use treatment services.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T12:55:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193005
       
  • The C-CAP Process: A Comprehensive Approach to Community Resource Mapping

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Amy Mowle, Bojana Klepac, Therese Riley, Melinda Craike
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionPlace-based systems change approaches are gaining popularity to address the complex problems associated with locational disadvantage. An important stage of place-based systems change involves understanding the context that surrounds (re)produces a target problem. Community resource mapping can be used to establish the context and identify the strengths of a community that might be leveraged through systems change efforts. Approaches to community resource mapping draw on a range of philosophical assumptions and methodological frameworks. However, comprehensive, practical guidance for researchers and practitioners to conduct community resource mapping is scarce.MethodDrawing on the learnings from a literature review, scoping workshops, and reflective practice sessions, we developed a flexible, methodologically robust process called the Contextualize, Collect, Analyze, and Present (C-CAP) process: a four-phase approach to preparing for, conducting, and reporting on community resource mapping. The C-CAP process was co-developed by researchers and practitioners and was tested and refined in two different communities.ResultsThe C-CAP process provides robust guidance for conducting and reporting on a community resource mapping project. The C-CAP process can be applied by public health practitioners and researchers and adapted for use across different communities, problems, and target groups. We encourage others guided by differing theoretical perspectives to apply C-CAP and share the learnings.ConclusionApplication of the C-CAP process has the potential to improve the comparability and comprehensiveness of findings from community resource mapping projects and avoids duplication of effort by reducing the need to design new processes for each new community resource mapping activity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T10:31:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193696
       
  • Qualitative Assessment of Key Implementation Factors in a Faith-Based
           Response to Intimate Partner Violence

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beata Debinski, Mark Bittle, Caitlin E. Kennedy, Vanya Jones, Andrea Carlson Gielen
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundFaith-based organizations (FBOs) have a scant history in the literature of implementing intimate partner violence (IPV) initiatives, though many members of faith communities consider it an important issue. Furthermore, the limited studies on this topic have not explored organizational factors that are important in the implementation of such efforts.PurposeTo investigate factors that influence the implementation of IPV prevention and response by one Catholic organization at both diocesan and parish levels.MethodsWe conducted sixteen semi-structured interviews with members of Archdiocese of Chicago Domestic Violence Outreach (ACDVO) leadership. Using deductive content analysis, we drew on all 14 constructs and sub-constructs from the inner setting domain of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) for coding transcripts and characterizing factors influencing implementation success.ResultsSeven CFIR constructs were useful in identifying factors that influenced implementation success of ACDVO. At the diocesan level, the organization’s leadership structure, their driven culture, and in-kind available resources propelled their work. At the level of parish ministries, successful implementation was facilitated by networking and communication among parishes. At the diocesan-level, access to knowledge and information through ACDVO’s Parish Support Committee, compatibility with parish values, leadership engagement, and available resources from parishes supported implementation.ConclusionsWe identified modifiable and reproducible inner setting factors that influence implementation of a Catholic IPV initiative at the diocesan-level and support parish ministries in their local activities. Future work should validate these findings in other dioceses and examine non-Catholic FBO settings.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T06:43:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193693
       
  • Local Health Department Values and Organizational Authorities Guiding
           Cross-Sector Work During COVID-19

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Karl Johnson, Caitlin B. Biddell, Katherine Gora Combs, John Wiesman, Monica Valdes Lupi, Kristen Hassmiller Lich
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      ObjectiveThe COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the role that local health departments (LHDs) have in cross sector can address alone, including the work of value alignment and the strategic use of organizational authorities. The practices by which LHDs used their authorities to conduct cross-sector work during the pandemic need exploration.MethodWe conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 public health leaders from metropolitan LHDs across the United States. Our interview guide assessed the values that LHD leadership prioritized in their cross-sector work as well as the range of organizational authorities they leveraged to influence external decision-making in other sectors.ResultsWe found that LHDs approached cross-sector work by leaning on diverse values and authorities, each with unique implications for their work. The LHDs emphasized their approach to value alignment on a sector-by-sector basis, strategically using diverse organizational authorities—economic, political, moral, scientific, and logistical. While each authority and value we assessed was present across all interviewees, how each shaped action varied. Internally, LHDs emphasized certain authorities more than others to the degree that they more closely aligned with prioritized core values.ConclusionOur findings highlight the ongoing need for LHD leadership to improve their ability to effectively communicate public health values and the unique authorities by which health-supporting work can be facilitated, including how this message must be adapted, depending on the specific sectors with which the LHD needs to partner and the governance arrangement in which the LHD is situated.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T06:40:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231192989
       
  • Mandating COVID-19 Vaccination on Campus: A Qualitative Analysis of a
           Cross-Sectional Study of California College Students

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Anji Buckner-Capone, Marcelle Dougan
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to examine college student perceptions related to institutional vaccine mandates. We utilized qualitative data (n = 2,212) from five open-ended questions in a cross-sectional study of students enrolled or intending to enroll in an institute of higher education in California in fall 2021. Data were collected between June and August 2021. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze student beliefs, and four themes were developed from the data: (1) Polarizing views and language; (2) deciding who to trust; (3) conveying rights and risk; and (4) staying focused on education. The themes represented vaccinated and nonvaccinated student perspectives, capturing views about trust, rights, and risk. Many responses were polarizing and included language that was emotional and political. Despite the range of responses, most students expressed appreciation and approval of the vaccination mandate on college campuses. Findings illustrate the important contributions of qualitative research and suggest opportunities for public health practitioners to lead and engage in critical dialogue about science and public health practices as we aim to promote public perceptions of vaccination programs and health promotion practice.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-24T08:09:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231192997
       
  • Laundromats: Community-Based Partnerships to Increase Reproductive Health
           Literacy Outreach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Roxanne Mirabal-Beltran, Kelsey Rondini, Laura Linnan
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Laundromats are a regularly visited, highly localized community venue, especially in underserved communities. Few health literacy and health-promotion programs have taken place in laundromats, and there have been no efforts to apply community-based participatory research approaches in this setting. Literacy programs and cancer-prevention initiatives have been held in laundromats, but little data exist on the empirical outcomes of such initiatives or whether the programs have been fashioned as a collaboration between community and researchers. In this paper, we present a brief overview of literacy and cancer-prevention initiatives that have taken place in laundromats and introduce our Wash and Spin Toward Health/Washington Avanzando la Salud Hispana (W.A.S.H.) project. We describe how we applied community-based participatory research principles to launch this effort and identify both benefits and challenges of this approach. We hope this project will stimulate greater interest in laundromat settings for outreach and education efforts, especially those addressing disparities in health literacy and access.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T07:10:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193004
       
  • Virtual Implementation of a Photovoice Project With Youth in Baltimore
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ohemaa B. Poku, Bianca D. Smith, Abigail M. Pollock, Breyanna Dabney, Shan Wallace, Subira Brown, Eugenia Eng, Tamar Mendelson, Haneefa T. Saleem, Sabriya L. Linton
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This article describes the virtual implementation of Photovoice activities conducted as part of a project that sought to gather youths’ perspectives on neighborhood and housing conditions, community redevelopment, and health and well-being in Baltimore. We discuss the original in-person design and how activities were implemented virtually, in light of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) physical distancing guidelines. Challenges to virtual implementation included establishing rapport with youth and families during recruitment and data collection, encouraging active participation during discussion sessions, and varying technological skills among youth. Facilitators of virtual implementation included partnering with a community organization, piloting virtual sessions to assess participant’s technology skills, and providing various ways for youth to participate during discussion sessions, engage in group activities, and receive hands-on instruction. This article showcases the ways in which virtual implementation of Photovoice activities can be successfully implemented with youth and provides recommendations for future Photovoice projects that include virtual activities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T07:05:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231193002
       
  • Period Poverty: an Epidemiologic and Biopsychosocial Analysis

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Allison R. Casola, Kierstin Luber, Amy Henderson Riley
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In the United States, approximately one in five persons experience period poverty, defined as the inability to obtain resources needed for healthy, safe, and dignified menstrual management. Limited access to an inadequate number of menstrual supplies may lead to longer-than-recommended use, which can increase skin chafing, disruption of vaginal flora, and intravaginal toxin overgrowth. However, period poverty goes beyond simply having enough menstrual products and can encompass the embarrassment, stigma, shame, and barriers in conversation surrounding menstruation. Discussion and critical examination of the multilayered attributes surrounding period poverty have been intermittent in academic literature, particularly from a domestic lens. Thus, this narrative review and theoretical analysis aimed to describe the epidemiology of period poverty and analyze its biological, socio-emotional, and societal implications. We applied a descriptive epidemiology approach of person, place, and time, and employed a social-ecological lens to examine risk factors. Our findings describe the incidence, distribution, and possible ways to alleviate period poverty. Practitioners, medical providers, and public health professionals may have limited knowledge of period poverty, what it entails, and who it impacts, but they have great potential to address it and associated menstrual inequities in their work. With its widespread implications for psychosocial and community-level health, this phenomenon needs urgent attention to promote menstrual equity as an issue of human rights and social justice. We conclude with research and policy recommendations for alleviating period poverty.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-22T06:58:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231192998
       
  • Attitudes Toward Injection Practices Among People Who Inject Drugs
           Utilizing Medical Services: Opportunities for Harm Reduction Counseling in
           Health Care Settings

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dinah Applewhite, Susan Regan, Karen Donelan, Wendy L. Macias-Konstantopoulos, Laura G. Kehoe, Dawn Williamson, Sarah E. Wakeman
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Hospitals are an important setting to provide harm reduction services to people who inject drugs (PWID). This study aimed to characterize PWID’s injection practices, the perceived risk and benefits of those practices, and the immediate IDU risk environment among individuals seeking medical care. Surveys were administered to 120 PWID seeking medical services at an urban hospital. Poisson regression was used to examine the effect of perceived risk or importance of injection practices on the rate of engaging in those practices. The mean participant reported “often” reusing syringes and “occasionally” cleaning their hands or skin prior to injection. 78% of participants reported that syringes were extremely risky to share, which was associated with lower likelihood of sharing them (ARR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.36-0.95). 38% of participants reported it was extremely important to use a new syringe for each injection, and these participants were more likely to report never reusing syringes>5 times (ARR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.11-2.35). Other factors that may influence injection practices—including fear of arrest, withdrawal, lack of access to supplies, and injecting outdoors—were common among participants. In conclusion, practices that place PWID at risk of injury and infection are common, and risk-benefit perception is associated with some, but not all, injection practices. Injecting in challenging environments and conditions is common. Therefore, harm reduction counseling in medical settings must be accompanied by other strategies to reduce risk, including facilitating access to supplies. Ultimately, structural interventions, such as affordable housing, are needed to address the risk environment.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T08:50:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231192996
       
  • Bridges to Elders: A Program to Improve Outcomes for Older Women
           Experiencing Homelessness

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kimberlee Flike, Roseanna H. Means, Jiyin Chou, Ling Shi, Laura L. Hayman
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Homelessness among older individuals is increasing and women experiencing homelessness have been previously shown to have poorer health outcomes than their male counterparts. To address these concerns, the Bridges to Elders (BTE) program was developed to improve health and social outcomes for older women experiencing or at risk for homelessness. BTE consisted of a nurse practitioner (NP) and community health worker (CHW) dyad who provided intensive case management services for women 55+ with housing instability. This evaluation used a pretest/posttest design to examine three main outcomes from BTE: change in housing status, enrollment with a primary care provider (PCP), and diagnosis of uncontrolled chronic condition. The sample included 96 BTE participants enrolled from January 2017 to December 2018. The average age of participants was 66 years and had a mean BTE enrollment time of 7.6 months. Statistically significant improvements were achieved in all three outcomes measured: 17% (p < .009) increase in stable housing, 35% (p < .001) increase in PCP enrollment, and 47% (p < .001) decrease in the diagnosis of an uncontrolled chronic condition. The results indicated an NP/CHW dyad improved housing status, primary care access, and targeted health outcomes for older women who are experiencing or at risk for homelessness. Future studies examining the impact of NP/CHW dyads on additional social determinants of health and their impact on health outcomes are recommended.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-17T08:48:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231192992
       
  • Vaping—Know the Truth: Evaluation of an Online Vaping Prevention
           Curriculum

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth C. Hair, Shreya Tulsiani, Madeleine Aseltine, Elizabeth K. Do, Rebecca Lien, Daniel Zapp, Molly Green, Donna Vallone
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundUnacceptably high levels of e-cigarette use among youth paired with growing research about the dangers of vaping demonstrate a critical need to develop interventions that educate young people to reject e-cigarette use and promote cessation for current users. Vaping: Know the Truth (VKT) is a free digital learning experience prioritizing middle and high school students that aims to improve students’ knowledge about the dangers of using e-cigarettes and provide quitting resources for those who already vape. The current study was designed to evaluate whether students receiving the curriculum increased knowledge of the dangers of vaping.MethodsThe outcome measures were calculated as the change in the number of correct responses from the pre- to post-module assessments among middle and high school students who completed four modules of the VKT curriculum (N = 103,522). Linear regression was performed to determine the association between the student’s pre-module assessment score and the knowledge change score after completion of the four modules.ResultsStudents’ e-cigarette knowledge significantly improved by an average of 3.24 points (SD: 3.54), following implementation of the VKT curriculum. This indicates that participants answered more than 3 additional questions correctly, on average, after the intervention.ConclusionFindings demonstrate that the Vaping: Know the Truth curriculum is an effective resource for increasing knowledge among youth about the harms associated with e-cigarette use. Further research is needed to evaluate whether the intervention is associated with behavioral outcomes over time.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-07T07:16:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231191099
       
  • Operationalizing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s
           Vaccinate With Confidence Framework During the COVID-19 Emergency Response
           in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kathleen Holmes, Margaret Gutierrez-Nkomo, John Donovan, Brian J. Manns, Stephanie Griswold, Regina Edwards, Stephen A. Flores, Amy Parker Fiebelkorn
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In December 2020, 11 months after identifying the first laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 in the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authorized emergency use of two COVID-19 vaccines. To prepare the public for a large-scale vaccination campaign and build confidence in COVID-19 vaccines, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funded more than 200 partners and developed a national Vaccinate with Confidence (VwC) COVID-19 framework to support Americans in their decision to get vaccinated. The evolving nature of the pandemic and highly variable confidence in vaccines across populations has resulted in many unique complexities and challenges to reaching universally high vaccination coverage. Here, we describe how 23 professional health associations and national partner organizations, focused solely on building vaccine confidence, operationalized CDC’s VwC COVID-19 framework from February 2021 to March 2022. Capturing how partners deployed and adapted their activities to meet a shifting pandemic landscape, which began with high demand for vaccines that waned over time, is an important first step to understanding how this new strategy was utilized and could be implemented for future surges in COVID-19 cases and other routine immunization efforts. Going forward, evaluation of partner activities should be prioritized to capture learnings and assess VwC program effectiveness.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-08-01T05:14:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231188106
       
  • Sleeping Healthy, Living Healthy: Using Iterative, Participatory Processes
           to Develop and Adapt an Integrated Sleep Hygiene/Mind-Body Integrative
           Health Intervention for Urban Adolescents

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Samantha Garbers, April J. Ancheta, Melanie A. Gold, Malia Maier, Jean-Marie Bruzzese
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Racial and ethnic minority adolescents living in urban settings experience sleep disparities. Few interventions have been developed to address these disparities. Guided by principles of participatory design and inclusion, our team developed a novel intervention that combined sleep hygiene education with mind-body integrative health (MBIH) practices to improve sleep quality among adolescents in New York City. The goal of this article is to describe our iterative development and design process, the final product, and future directions. Our participatory approach incorporated information from formative work with adolescents having lived experience, practitioners, and syntheses of published literature. The final intervention—Sleeping Healthy, Living Healthy—consists of six, 40-minute group sessions and one 20-minute individual session designed for high school students. Each session has a set of learning objectives, combining instruction, group activities, and discussions on sleep hygiene and MBIH topics. Our manualized intervention includes handouts created by a graphic design team that served as a review and reminder for home practice. We describe intervention implementation to two unique cohorts and detail our methods used to fine-tune the intervention between cohorts. Our partnership with and insights from both adolescents and practitioners serve as a guide for researchers aiming to use participatory methods to develop interventions to decrease health disparities in specific populations.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-26T06:42:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231184453
       
  • A Community-Defined Approach to Address Trauma Among Cambodian Immigrants
           and Refugees

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Parichart Sabado, Kimthai Kuoch, Susana Sngiem, Vattana Peong, Ladine Chan, Chan Hopson, Tongratha Veng, Gary Colfax, Lavyn Tham, Amina Sen-Matthews, Virak Ung, Pearun Tieng, Crystal Siphan, Jessica Dance, Kyle Change, Jasmine Doxey, Jefferson Wood, Laura D’Anna
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Asian American and Pacific Islanders are one of the fastest growing and most diverse groups in the United States. Yet, they are often aggregated as a single group, masking within-group differences in rates of disease and demographic characteristics commonly associated with elevated health risk. While more than four decades have passed since the Khmer Rouge genocide, Cambodians continue to experience trauma-related psychiatric disorders, including post-traumatic stress disorder and major depression. Funded by the California Department of Public Health Office of Health Equity, the Community Wellness Program (CWP) aimed to reduce mental health disparities among Cambodians in Long Beach and Santa Ana, California, using community-defined approaches. The 6-month program comprised community outreach, educational workshops, strengths-based case management, and social and spiritual activities. Our study aimed to examine the effects of the CWP on trauma symptoms. Program evaluation followed an incomplete stepped wedge waitlist design with two study arms. A linear mixed models analysis revealed that participants reported fewer trauma symptoms as a result of participation in the CWP and that participants experienced fewer symptoms over time. This is an especially important finding, as trauma can lead to long-term individual health effects and to social and health repercussions on an entire cultural group by way of intergenerational trauma. As the number of refugees and displaced individuals continues to grow, there is an urgent need for programs such as the CWP to prevent the lasting effects of trauma.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-24T06:29:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231184450
       
  • Impacts of the COVID-19 Public Health Crisis on Caring for Sex-Trafficked
           Persons

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Frances Recknor, C. Emma Kelly, Danielle Jacobson, Frances Montemurro, Rhonelle Bruder, Robin Mason, Janice Du Mont
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundSex trafficking of persons, a pervasive public health issue disproportionately affecting the most marginalized within society, often leads to health as well as social consequences. Social service provision to meet the resulting needs is critical, however, little is known about the current pandemic’s impact on providers’ capacity to deliver requisite care.MethodTo examine social service providers’ perspectives of care provision for domestically sex-trafficked persons in Ontario, Canada, during the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 providers and analyzed these using Braun and Clarke’s analytic framework.ResultsImpacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on social service care provision were connected to individuals’ increased vulnerability to trafficking, difficulties safely and effectively providing services to sex-trafficked persons amid pandemic restrictions, and reduction in in-person educational activities to improve providers’ capacity to serve this client population. Securing safe shelter was particularly difficult and inappropriate placements could at times lead to further trafficking.ConclusionThe pandemic created novel barriers to supporting sex-trafficked persons; managing these sometimes led to new and complex issues. Future efforts should focus on developing constructive strategies to support sex-trafficked persons’ unique needs during public health crises.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T09:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231186639
       
  • Barriers and Facilitators to Integrating Depression Treatment Within a TB
           Program and Primary Care in Brazil

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Annika Claire Sweetland, Claudio Gruber Mann, Maria Jose Fernandes, Fatima Virginia Siqueira de Menezes Silva, Camila Matsuzaka, Maria Cavalcanti, Sandra Fortes, Afranio Kritski, Austin Y. Su, Julio Cesar Ambrosio, Bianca Kann, Milton L. Wainberg
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Tuberculosis (TB) and depression is common and is associated with poor TB outcomes. The World Health Organization End TB Strategy explicitly calls for the integration of TB and mental health services. Interpersonal Counseling (IPC) is a brief evidence-based treatment for depression that can be delivered by non-mental health specialists with expert supervision. The goal of this study was to explore potential barriers and facilitators to training non-specialist providers to deliver IPC within the TB Control Program and primary care in Itaboraí, Rio de Janeiro state. Data collection consisted of six focus groups (n = 42) with health professionals (n = 29), program coordinators (n = 7), and persons with TB (n = 6). We used open coding to analyze the data, followed by deductive coding using the Chaudoir multi-level framework for implementation outcomes. The main structural barriers identified were poverty, limited access to treatment, political instability, violence, and social stigma. Organizational barriers included an overburdened and under-resourced health system with high staff turnover. Despite high levels of stress and burnout among health professionals, several provider-level facilitators emerged including a high receptivity to, and demand for, mental health training; strong community relationships through the community health workers; and overall acceptance of IPC delivered by any type of health provider. Patients were also receptive to IPC being delivered by any type of professional. No intervention-specific barriers or facilitators were identified. Despite many challenges, integrating depression treatment into primary care in Itaboraí using IPC was perceived as acceptable, feasible, and desirable.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-21T09:53:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231183400
       
  • COVID-19 Health Education Activities: An Analysis of a National Sample of
           Certified Health Educations Specialists (CHES®/MCHES®) in Response to
           the Global Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beth H. Chaney, Michael L. Stellefson, Melissa Opp, Marianne Allard, J. Don Chaney, Kylie Lovett
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The National Commission of Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC) created the Category 1 COVID-19 Claim Form Opportunity to document how Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES®) and Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES®) assisted communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using data submitted by CHES®/MCHES® (n = 3,098 claim forms), the purpose of this study was to (a) describe the settings where CHES® and MCHES® completed their pandemic work and (b) assess differences in the type of pandemic work completed by CHES® compared with MCHES® based on specific Areas of Responsibility (AOR) for Health Education Specialists. Findings showed that CHES® and MCHES® engaged in seven AOR during the pandemic, with the largest proportion of CHES® (n = 859; 33%) and MCHES® (n = 105; 21.9%, documenting COVID-19-related activities in health departments. CHES® reported higher engagement than MCHES® in activities such as COVID-19 reporting/tracking, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 27.3, p < .001; outbreak response, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 4.3, p = .039; and vaccination, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 5.2, p = .023. Conversely, MCHES® reported higher participation than CHES® in screening/testing, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 174.2, p < .001; administration of budgets/operations, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 30.1, p < .001; and adapting educational activities at college/universities, χ2 (1, N = 3,098) = 46.1, p < .001. CHES® were more likely than MCHES® to indicate working in all AOR except for Area 2—Plan Health Education/Promotion. Results support that employer-verified health education skills in all AOR were transferable during COVID-19, especially for CHES® employed within state/county health departments.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-19T10:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231184447
       
  • Defining “Arts Participation” for Public Health Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jill Sonke, Alexandra K. Rodriguez, Aaron Colverson, Seher Akram, Nicole Morgan, Donna Hancox, Caroline Wagner-Jacobson, Virginia Pesata
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Arts participation has been linked to positive health outcomes around the globe. As more research is taking place on this topic, there is heightened need for definitions for the complex concepts involved. While significant work to define “arts participation” has taken place in the arts sector, less work has been undertaken for the purpose of researching the arts in public health. This study developed a definition for “arts participation” to guide a national arts in public health research agenda and to advance and make more inclusive previous work to define the term. A convergent mixed-methods study design with sequential elements was used to iteratively develop a definition that integrated the perspectives of field experts as well as the general public. Literature review was followed by four iterative phases of data collection, analysis, and integration, and a proposed definition was iteratively revised at each stage. The final definition includes modes, or ways, in which people engage with the arts, and includes examples of various art forms intended to frame arts participation broadly and inclusively. This definition has the potential to help advance the quality and precision of research aimed at evaluating relationships between arts participation and health, as well as outcomes of arts-based health programs and interventions in communities. With its more inclusive framing than previous definitions, it can also help guide the development of more inclusive search strategies for evidence synthesis in this rapidly growing arena and assist researchers in developing more effective survey questions and instruments.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-17T09:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231183388
       
  • The More Things Change, the More They Stay the Same: HIV/AIDS Myths and
           Misinformation in the Rural United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stacy W. Smallwood, Fayth M. Parks
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Approaches to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment have made significant advances since the beginning of the epidemic. However, HIV myths and misinformation continue to persist, stymieing efforts to end the epidemic in the United States, particularly in rural areas. The present study’s purpose was to identify prevalent myths and misinformation about HIV/AIDS in the rural United States. Rural HIV/AIDS health care providers (n = 69) were asked via an audience response system (ARS) to provide responses to questions about HIV/AIDS myths and misinformation in their respective communities. Responses were analyzed qualitatively using thematic coding. Responses were grouped into four thematic categories: risk beliefs, consequences of infection, populations affected, and service delivery. Many responses were consistent with myths and misinformation from the start of the HIV epidemic. Study findings support the need for sustained fundamental HIV/AIDS education and stigma reduction efforts in rural areas.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-07T06:03:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231180592
       
  • Advancing Inclusion of Transgender and Gender-Diverse Identities in
           Clinical Education: A Toolkit for Clinical Educators

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Whitney Linsenmeyer, Katie Heiden-Rootes, Theresa Drallmeier, Rabia Rahman, Emily Buxbaum, Willow Rosen, Beth Gombos, Ashton Otte
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Clinical education programs are positioned to train future health care professionals to provide excellent health care for transgender and gender-diverse patients. The purpose of this resource, Advancing Inclusion of Transgender and Gender-Diverse Identities in Clinical Education: A Toolkit for Clinical Educators, is to facilitate critical inquiry among clinical educators regarding their approach to teaching about sex, gender, the historical and sociopolitical context of transgender health, and how to prepare their students to apply standards of care and clinical care guidelines set forth by national and international professional organizations.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-07-05T09:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231183643
       
  • The Pre-Implementation Phase of a Project Seeking to Deliver a
           Community-Based CVD Prevention Intervention (SPICES-Sussex): A Qualitative
           

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Thomas Grice-Jackson, Imogen Rogers, Elizabeth Ford, Harm Van Marwijk, Catherine Topham, Geofrey Musinguzi, Hilde Bastiaens, Linda Gibson, Mark Bower, Papreen Nahar
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background.Community-led health care interventions may be an effective way to tackle cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, especially in materially deprived communities where health care resources are stretched and engagement with institutions is often low. To do so effectively and equitably, interventions might be developed alongside community members through community engagement.Objectives.The aim of this project was to carry out stakeholder mapping and partnership identification and to understand the views, needs, experiences of community members who would be involved in later stages of a community-based CVD prevention intervention’s development and implementation.Methods.Stakeholder mapping was carried out to identify research participants in three communities in Sussex, United Kingdom. A qualitative descriptive approach was taken during the analysis of focus groups and interviews with 47 participants.Findings.Three themes were highlighted related to intervention design (a) Management: the suitability of the intervention for the community, management of volunteers, and communication; (b) Logistics: the structure and design of the intervention; and (c) Sociocultural issues, the social and cultural expectations/experiences of participants and implementers.Conclusions.Study participants were open and willing to engage in the planned community-based intervention, particularly in elements of co-design and community-led delivery. They also highlighted the importance of sociocultural factors. Based on the findings, we developed recommendations for intervention design which included (but were not limited to): (a) a focus on a bottom-up approach to intervention design, (b) the recruitment of skilled local volunteers, and (c) the importance of fun and simplicity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-30T07:00:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231182139
       
  • Evaluation of a Mandatory Professional Development on Supporting
           Transgender, Nonbinary, and Gender-Nonconforming Students in Chicago
           Public Schools

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elizabeth Jarpe-Ratner, A. Bloedel, D. Little, M. DiPaolo, K. Belcher, M. Mangiaracina, B. Marshall
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      To address the reality that LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and others) students remain more likely to experience harm, harassment, and violence at school as well as miss school due to feeling unsafe and the fact that students identifying as transgender, nonbinary, and gender-nonconforming (TNBGNC) are at even greater risk of bullying, harassment, and significant mental health concerns, Chicago Public Schools’ (CPS) Office of Student Health and Wellness (OSHW) created a novel professional development (PD) requirement in 2019, entitled “Supporting Transgender, Nonbinary, and Gender Nonconforming Students.” The PD, a recorded webinar encouraging independent time for reflection and planning, takes an intersectional approach and is required of all CPS staff members across the entire district. A pre- and postevaluation of the PD, guided by the Kirkpatrick model, was completed by 19,503 staff members. The findings from this evaluation show that staff members significantly increased their knowledge, showed statistically significant gain in self-reported skills, and articulated key actions they could take toward sustaining an environment that fosters skill implementation and culture change more broadly. Findings reveal that a culture that supports staff members in learning from their mistakes can help to encourage staff members to employ gender-inclusive behaviors such as asking individuals for their pronouns and using gender-neutral pronouns. This districtwide mandatory PD approach shows value in influencing staff members’ thinking and behaviors known to be supportive of TNBGNC students and may serve as a model for other school districts looking to build capacity to support TNBGNC students.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-27T01:20:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231182161
       
  • Mississippi School Food Service Directors’ Interest and Experience With
           Local Food Procurement and Farm to School Activities

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jessica L. Thomson, Alicia S. Landry, Tameka I. Walls
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background.The purpose of this study was to collect updated school food service purchasing practices from K-12 public school food service directors (SFSD) in Mississippi and to determine their current abilities, experiences, and desires to engage in Farm to School (F2S) activities.Methods.The online survey was created using questionnaire items from existing F2S surveys. The survey opened in October 2021 and closed in January 2022. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data.Results.Of the 173 SFSD sent email invitations, 122 (71%) completed the survey. The most common fresh fruit and vegetable purchasing practices included Department of Defense Fresh Program (65%) and produce vendor (64%). Forty-three percent of SFSD purchased at least one locally sourced fruit and 40% purchased at least one locally sourced vegetable, while 46% did not purchase any locally sourced foods. The most common challenges for purchasing from farmers included no relationship with farmers (50%) and food safety regulations (39%). Sixty-four percent of SFSD were interested in at least one F2S activity.Conclusions.Most SFSD do not purchase local foods directly from farmers and almost half do not purchase any local foods regardless of source. Lack of connection with local farmers is a significant challenge to F2S. Recently proposed framework by USDA for shoring up the food supply chain and transforming the food system may help reduce or remove ongoing challenges to F2S participation.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-21T10:54:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231178543
       
  • “Better Than Any DARE Program”: Qualitative Analysis of Adolescent
           Reactions to EVALI Television Storylines

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Beth L. Hoffman, Jaime E. Sidani, Elizabeth Miller, Jennifer A. Manganello, Kar-Hai Chu, Elizabeth M. Felter, Jessica G. Burke
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction. Research suggests that awareness of e-cigarette, or vaping, product-use associated lung injury (EVALI) among adolescents is associated with increased harm perception of e-cigarettes. The depiction of EVALI on three primetime medical dramas offers an opportunity to examine the use of these storylines for tobacco prevention education. Methods. We conducted four focus groups with seventh- and eighth-grade students at an urban middle school. Participants viewed three clips of scenes followed by a facilitated discussion as to the influence of the clips on knowledge and perceptions of e-cigarettes and the use of clips for tobacco prevention education. Two research assistants double-coded notes from the focus groups using a qualitative content analysis approach. Results. Our final sample included 78 adolescents; we obtained self-reported demographic information for 75. The majority of participants were 13 to 14 years of age (82.7%) and identified as cisgender female (52.0%) and Black (52.0%). No participants had knowledge of EVALI prior to viewing the clips. Comments made both during and after watching suggest the clips may have reinforced knowledge and perceptions of harm; participants stated that the clips could be a useful intervention tool. Viewing the clips also generated unprompted discussion about flavored products, tobacco advertising, other television programs, and marijuana. Conclusions. Clips featuring the depiction of EVALI on medical dramas may be an effective tool for raising awareness of e-cigarette use-related harms. These results offer a promising first step for future collaborative research between public health, adolescents, and schools to develop tobacco prevention education utilizing these clips.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-14T04:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231177049
       
  • Empowering Youth Vaccine Ambassadors to Promote COVID-19 Vaccination in
           Local Communities: A 7-Step Approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Princilla A. Minkah, Amy Borg, Grace W. Ryan, Melissa Goulding, Domenica Perrone, Matilde Castiel, Milagros C. Rosal, Stephenie C. Lemon
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the availability of COVID-19 vaccines for youth since 2021, vaccine hesitancy has resulted in suboptimal uptake. Public health campaigns that empower local youth ambassadors as trusted messengers who share their personal narratives related to getting vaccinated hold promise for promoting COVID-19 vaccination. We used a seven-step approach to develop, implement, and evaluate a youth-led ambassador campaign to promote COVID-19 vaccine uptake in communities experiencing COVID-19 disparities in Worcester, MA. The seven steps included (1) engaging with key partners; (2) determining a community of focus; (3) identifying trusted sources; (4) determining campaign components; (5) training the vaccine ambassadors; (6) disseminating the campaign; and (7) evaluating the campaign. We trained nine youth as vaccine ambassadors. Ambassadors were guided through self-reflection of motivations for COVID-19 vaccination and the resulting personal narratives became the campaign messaging. English/Spanish vaccine messages developed by youth ambassadors were disseminated through social media platforms (n = 3), radio (n = 2), local TV (n = 2), flyers (n = 2,086), posters (n = 386), billboards (n = 10), and local bus ads (n = 40). Qualitative youth feedback indicate participation in the campaign was a positive and empowering experience which reinforces the importance of engaging youth in public health messaging. Youth empowerment through personal narratives (and storytelling) holds promise for future public health campaigns.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-12T06:12:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231178542
       
  • Mixed-Methods Evaluation of Father Participation in an Adolescent Obesity
           Prevention Program With Multiple Delivery Methods

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ghaffar Ali Hurtado Choque, Matthew R. Rodriguez, Darya Soltani, Aysegul Baltaci, Sayaka Nagao-Sato, Silvia Alvarez de Davila, Javiera Monardez, Alejandro Omar Peralta Reyes, Marla Reicks
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Padres Preparados, Jóvenes Saludables was a Latino family-based obesity prevention intervention implemented from 2017 to 2020 across eight programs in-person only, in a blended format (online/in-person), and online only. The intervention aimed to enhance father parenting skills to improve adolescent diet and activity behaviors. Mothers were encouraged to attend. Factors associated with participation were explored using a mixed-methods, qualitative (focus group/individual interviews by Zoom) and quantitative (process evaluation) design. Eleven focus group and 24 individual interviews were completed after participation with 24 fathers, 27 mothers, and 40 adolescents with responses not sorted by delivery method before analysis. Binomial logistic regression models examined associations between fathers’ program completion and predictor variables of delivery characteristics, father demographic characteristics, and family attendance patterns. Parents were married (96% fathers, 76% mothers), had low income, a high school education or less (68% fathers, 81% mothers), and had lived in the United States a mean of 19 years. Parents were motivated to participate to improve health, and to be involved with and improve communication with their child. Common barriers to participation were work and life priorities and programmatic factors including scheduling conflicts and technological issues. Participation was greater for fathers attending sessions in-person compared with online only (OR = 11.6). Fathers were more likely to participate if they attended sessions with family members vs. not attending with family members (OR = 7.2). To maximize participation, findings suggest involving multiple parents/caregivers and adolescents, addressing contextual and programmatic barriers, and promoting benefits of better health and relations with family members.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-10T05:05:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231177300
       
  • Virtual Health Promotion Work–Integrated Learning Placements: A COVID-19
           Consequence or Preparation for the Future'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Teagan Ostrognaj, Claire Bristow, Stavroula Zandes, Dragan Ilic, Bethany Howard
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      We explored student and industry supervisors’ experiences of virtual work-integrated learning (vWIL) health promotion placements during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a descriptive phenomenological qualitative methodology, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eight students and eight supervisors of undergraduate health promotion–related placements at community, not-for-profit and government organizations. We asked participants about the aspects of their placement they found most enjoyable and challenging, their preparation, workload, and thoughts on placement structure. We audio-recorded and had the interviews transcribed. Our thematic analyses revealed four key themes: (1) the impact of COVID-19 on work and study, (2) benefits of vWIL (real-world application and career clarification, transcending barriers and saving time, and feeling less intimidated), (3) challenges of vWIL (experiencing workplace culture, providing support and guidance to students, and relationship building), and (4) recommendations on the evolution of vWIL (increased preparation and consider a hybrid model). Our findings suggest that vWIL is a viable and sound mode of delivery for health promotion–related placements, particularly in situations that inhibit face-to-face learning. It has the capacity to enhance the work-readiness of health promotion graduates while adding flexibility to professional preparation workplace-based training programs, providing opportunity for capacity building locally across rural and remote areas, as well as globally. Future research should examine the effectiveness, practicality, and feasibility of implementing placements across different models including face-to-face, virtual and hybrid.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-09T05:46:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231180560
       
  • Intervention Fidelity to VITAL Start (Video Intervention to Inspire
           Treatment Adherence for Life) in a Randomized Controlled Trial Among Women
           Living With HIV in Malawi

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tapiwa A. Tembo, Christine M. Markham, Steven P. Masiano, Rachael Sabelli, Elizabeth Wetzel, Saeed Ahmed, Mtisunge Mphande, Angella M. Mkandawire, Mike J. Chitani, Innocent Khama, Rose Nyirenda, Alick Mazenga, Elaine J. Abrams, Maria H. Kim
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Intervention effectiveness in a randomized controlled trial is attributed to intervention fidelity. Measuring fidelity has increasing significance to intervention research and validity. The purpose of this article is to describe a systematic assessment of intervention fidelity for VITAL Start (Video intervention to Inspire Treatment Adherence for Life)—a 27-minute video-based intervention designed to improve antiretroviral therapy adherence among pregnant and breastfeeding women.Method:Research Assistants (RAs) delivered VITAL Start to participants after enrolment. The VITAL Start intervention had three components: a pre-video orientation, video viewing, and post-video counseling. Fidelity assessments using checklists comprised self (RA assessment) and observer (Research Officers, also known as ROs) assessment. Four fidelity domains (adherence, dose, quality of delivery, and participant responsiveness) were evaluated. Score scale ranges were 0 to 29 adherence, 0 to 3 dose, 0 to 48 quality of delivery and 0 to 8 participant responsiveness. Fidelity scores were calculated. Descriptive statistics summarizing the scores were performed.Results:In total, eight RAs delivered 379 VITAL Start sessions to 379 participants. Four ROs observed and assessed 43 (11%) intervention sessions. The mean scores were 28 (SD = 1.3) for adherence, 3 (SD = 0) for dose, 40 (SD = 8.6) for quality of delivery, and 10.4 (SD = 1.3) for participant responsiveness.Conclusion:Overall, the RAs successfully delivered the VITAL Start intervention with high fidelity. Intervention fidelity monitoring should be an important element of randomized control trial design of specific interventions to ensure having reliable study results.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T05:45:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231177303
       
  • Remote Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs During COVID: A National
           Evaluation of Reach and Implementation for Older Adult Health Equity

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lesley Steinman, Erica Chavez Santos, Kelly Chadwick, Caitlin Mayotte, Selisha (Snowy) Johnson, Marlana Kohn, James Kelley, Paige Denison, Clarissa Montes, Lesha Spencer-Brown, Kate Lorig
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction.Evidence-based health promotion programs (EBPs) support older adults where they live, work, pray, play, and age. COVID-19 placed a disproportionate burden on this population, especially those with chronic conditions. In-person EBPs shifted to remote delivery via video-conferencing, phone, and mail during the pandemic, creating opportunities and challenges for older adult health equity.Method.In 2021–2022, we conducted a process evaluation of remote EBPs by purposively sampling diverse U.S. organizations and older adults (people of color, rural, and/or with disabilities). The Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance (RE-AIM) + Equity framework was used to understand program reach and implementation, including FRAME to describe adaptations for remote delivery. Analyses include descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of participant and provider surveys and interviews, and joint display tables to compare learnings.Results.Findings from 31 EBPs through 198 managers/leaders and 107 organizations suggest remote delivery increases EBP reach by improving access for older adults who are underserved. For programs requiring new software or hardware, challenges remain reaching those with limited access to—or comfort using—technology. Adaptations were to context (e.g., shorter, smaller classes with longer duration) and for equity (e.g., phone formats, autogenerated captioning); content was unchanged except where safety was concerned. Implementation is facilitated by remote delivery guidelines, distance training, and technology support; and hindered by additional time, staffing, and resources for engagement and delivery.Conclusions.Remote EBP delivery is promising for improving equitable access to quality health promotion. Future policies and practices must support technology access and usability for all older adults.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-07T05:42:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231175843
       
  • Using Plan, Do, Study, Act Cycles to Improve a Maternal Self-Care
           Intervention With Audience Input

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Savannah Hobbs, Laura L. Bellows, J. Douglas Coatsworth, Susan L. Johnson
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Maternal self-care, including healthy eating, physical activity, and stress management behaviors, is influenced by environmental, social, and individual factors. Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) Cycling is an effective quality improvement process using rapid cycling to refine interventions to fit audience-specific contexts and to address socioecological influences on behavior change. To refine components of the Healthy EnviROnmentS Self-Care intervention, a mindful self-care program for mothers of preschool-aged children in rural communities, PDSA cycles were used to examine: (A) acceptability of content, (B) suitability of implementation strategies, and (C) feasibility of digital supports across three stages of program development. Stage 1 included a group discussion with an expert panel (n = 8). Stage 2 used brief interviews and group discussion with a convenience sample (n = 5). Stage 3 included in-depth interviews with the focal population (n = 6). In-depth interviews were transcribed and analyzed using a directed approach, and data were compiled from group discussion notes and assessed for congruence and analyzed for emergent themes. PDSA cycles relating to content led to the addition of activities to introduce mindfulness and foster social support and the revision of handouts. Implementation strategies were refined with respect to workshop duration, activity order, and meeting type. Digital supports resulted in refinement to the study website and tablet applications. Utilization of PDSA cycles allowed for input from the focus population at every point of intervention design and considered socioecological factors that can influence behavior change.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T06:12:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231177305
       
  • Cultural Predictors of Self-Esteem Among Black Women With Criminal Justice
           Involvement and Herpes Simplex Virus

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Natalie Malone, Jardin N. Dogan-Dixon, Shemeka Thorpe, Shawndaya S. Thrasher, Paris Wheeler, Danelle Stevens-Watkins, Carrie B. Oser
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Black women have disproportionately alarming HSV-2 infection rates yet receive little attention in sexual health literature. Using a strengths-based resilience framework, this study sought to determine culturally relevant protective predictors of self-esteem for Black women who are justice-involved and have HSV-2. The authors conducted secondary data analysis on data from the “Black Women in the Study of Epidemics (B-WISE) Project,” a longitudinal prospective study investigating health disparities and health services utilization among Black women with justice involvement. At baseline, N = 151 Black women with HSV-2 who were incarcerated or on probation completed survey measures assessing self-esteem, ethnic identity affirmation and belonging, perceived social support, and John Henryism Active Coping. Hierarchical linear regression analyses revealed ethnic identity affirmation and belonging and John Henryism Active Coping were significant predictors of self-esteem at 6-month follow-up. Implications are provided for current health professionals.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-06-02T10:07:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231171951
       
  • Achieving Our Moemoeā: Community-Led Food Security Strategy
           Development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Manawatū Food Action Network, Christina Severinsen, Angelique Reweti
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Manawatū Food Action Network (MFAN) is a collective of social service and environmental organizations and community stakeholders that work together to promote collaboration, education and awareness of issues surrounding food security, food resilience, and localization in the local community. In 2021, the 4412 neighborhood was identified as requiring urgent assistance, with approximately one third of residents experiencing food insecurity. The 4412 Kai Resilience Strategy was developed with the community to move from food insecurity to food resilience and sovereignty. Recognizing that food security is complex and based on multiple causes, six interwoven workstreams were identified to create a multifaceted, coordinated strategy. This includes education, food economy, community, food support, māra kai, and social enterprise. The strategy cultivates local ownership and commitment to change. It creates a broader constituency of support, balancing the urgent need to feed people today with the long-term need to change systems through step-change initiatives. Through this approach, communities can better make sustainable and meaningful changes to their lives and circumstances rather than relying on external resources.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-26T08:16:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231177051
       
  • A WIC-Based Behavior Change Intervention for Postpartum Women With
           Overweight and Obesity: A Pilot Feasibility Randomized Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Darcy A. Thompson, Matthew A. Haemer, Nancy F. Krebs, Rocio I. Pereira, Angela Moss, Anna L. Furniss, Jill Bonczynski, Jacinda M. Nicklas
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Postpartum weight retention is a risk factor for obesity and is particularly important among Hispanic women who have an increased rate of obesity. Given its broad reach, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) program provides an ideal setting to implement community-based interventions for low-income postpartum women. Purpose. To examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of a multicomponent intervention delivered by staff within the WIC program designed to promote behavior changes in urban, postpartum women with overweight/obesity. Method. This was a 12-week pilot trial randomizing participants to a health behavior change (Intervention) or control (Observation) group. The Intervention included monthly visits with trained WIC staff providing patient-centered behavior change counseling, with multiple touchpoints between visits promoting self-monitoring and offering health behavior change support. Results. Participants (n = 41), who were mainly Hispanic (n = 37, 90%) and Spanish-speaking (n = 33, 81%), were randomized to the Intervention (n = 19) or Observation (n = 22) group. In the Intervention group, 79% (n = 15) of eligible participants were retained for the study duration. All Intervention participants endorsed that they would participate again. Regarding physical activity, participant readiness to change and self-efficacy improved for Intervention participants. About one-quarter of women in the Intervention group (27%, n = 4) had a 5% weight loss compared with one woman (5%) in the Observation group; this difference was not statistically significant (p = .10). Conclusions. This pilot demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of delivering a low-intensity behavior change intervention within the WIC setting for postpartum women with overweight/obesity. Findings support the role of WIC in addressing postpartum obesity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-25T09:41:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231173704
       
  • A Unique Model and Workforce to Address Health-Related Social Needs and
           Health Equity: Regional Health Connectors in Colorado

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer K. Carroll, Douglas H. Fernald, Tristen L. Hall, Hannah M. Groves, Gillian Grant, Ashley Sherrill, Kristin Crispe, Ashlie Brown, Sarah Lampe, W. Perry Dickinson
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Unmet health-related social needs contribute to high morbidity and poor population health. Improving social conditions are likely to reduce health disparities and improve the health of the overall U.S. population. The primary objective of this article is to describe an innovative workforce model, called Regional Health Connectors (RHCs), and how they address health-related social needs in Colorado. This is a program evaluation that analyzed field notes and interview data from 2021-2022. We applied our findings to the framework developed by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s (NASEM’s) report on strengthening social care integration into health care (2019). We found that RHCs address the following health-related social needs most commonly: food insecurity (n = 18 of 21 regions or 85% of all regions), housing (n = 17 or 81% of all regions), transportation (n = 11 or 52% of all regions), employment opportunities (n = 10 or 48% of all regions), and income/financial assistance (n = 11 or 52% of all regions). RHCs interacted across many sectors to address health-related social needs and provided multiple types of support to primary care practices at the organizational level. Examples of emerging impact of RHCs are described and mapped onto the NASEM framework. Findings from this program evaluation add to the growing landscape of knowledge and importance of detecting and addressing health-related social needs. We conclude that RHCs are a unique and emerging workforce that addresses multiple domains needed to integrate social care into health care.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-24T11:08:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231173703
       
  • Developing a Youth Participatory Action Research Program for Latine Youth
           in an Emerging Community

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christina Huerta, Benjamin Gutschow, Josefina Bañales, Hillary Boyzo, Veronica Jenkins, Patricia Document, Sharon E. Taverno, Sara Goodkind, Maya I. Ragavan
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In this practice note, we document the development of a youth participatory action research (YPAR) program designed by and for Latine youth residing in a small but rapidly growing Latine community. Our community–academic team partnered to cocreate a YPAR curriculum focused on supporting Latine youth in learning about research and developing their own research projects. Participants in the pilot year worked on Photovoice projects centered on topics they identified, including preventing colorism and machismo and increasing access to mental health services. We reviewed lessons learned from this work, including challenges engaging young people and creating linguistically inclusive spaces.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-22T09:41:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231176248
       
  • Multi-Level Influences of Smoke-Free Policies in Subsidized Housing:
           Applying the COM-B Model and Neighborhood Assessments to Inform Smoke-Free
           Policies

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Maya Vijayaraghavan, Marlena Hartman-Filson, Priyanka Vyas, Toshali Katyal, Tram Nguyen, Margaret A. Handley
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Smoke-free policies in multi-unit housing are associated with reduced exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS); however, attitudes toward comprehensive smoke-free policies among residents in subsidized multi-unit housing are unknown. In this mixed-methods study, we explored the socio-ecological context for tobacco and cannabis use and attitudes toward policies restricting indoor use of these products through interviews with residents (N = 134) and staff (N = 22) in 15 federally subsidized multi-unit housing in San Francisco, California. We conducted a geo-spatial and ethnographic environmental assessment by mapping alcohol, cannabis, and tobacco retail density using ArcGIS, and conducted systematic social observations of the neighborhood around each site for environmental cues to tobacco use. We used the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation behavior (COM-B) model to identify factors that might influence implementation of smoke-free policies in multi-unit housing. Knowledge and attitudes toward tobacco and cannabis use, social norms around smoking, neighborhood violence, and cannabis legalization were some of the social-ecological factors that influenced tobacco use. There was spatial variation in the availability of alcohol, cannabis, and tobacco stores around sites, which may have influenced residents’ ability to maintain smoke-free homes. Lack of skill on how to moderate indoor smoking (psychological capability), lack of safe neighborhoods (physical opportunity), and the stigma of smoking outdoors in multi-unit housing (motivation) were some of the barriers to adopting a smoke-free home. Interventions to increase adoption of smoke-free policies in multi-unit housing need to address the co-use of tobacco and cannabis and commercial and environmental determinants of tobacco use to facilitate smoke-free living.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-20T12:50:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231174925
       
  • Designing and Evaluating Opioid Misuse Prevention Training for Rural
           Communities and Health Care Providers

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cheryl L. Eschbach, Bengt B. Arnetz, Judith E. Arnetz
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Through Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration funding, Michigan State University (MSU) Extension partnered with MSU’s Family Medicine and Health Department of Northwest Michigan to implement trainings for community members and health care providers to increase awareness and improve prevention efforts addressing opioid use disorder (OUD) in rural areas. We formed the Michigan Substance Use Prevention, Education and Recovery (MiSUPER) project to design and evaluate opioid misuse prevention trainings. A socio-ecological prevention model was an underlying conceptual framework for this project and drove strategies used in trainings, products created, and measurement. The purpose of this study is to determine the effectiveness of one-time online educational training events for rural community members and health care providers on community OUD issues, treatment options, and supports for those in recovery. Between 2020 and 2022, rural participants completed pre- and posttraining, and 30-day follow-up evaluation surveys. We report the demographic characteristics of community (n = 451) and provider (n = 59) participants, self-reported knowledge gained, and overall perceptions of the trainings. Findings show community members’ knowledge increased from pre- to posttraining (p < .001) and was maintained at 3 months, while providers’ knowledge was unchanged over time. Posttraining, community participants felt more comfortable speaking about addiction with family and friends (p < .001), and providers had better knowledge of local resources for patients who could not afford opioid misuse treatments (p < .05). All participants reported gaining knowledge of community resources for opioid misuse prevention, treatment, and recovery (p < .01). Opioid misuse prevention trainings may be most effective when adapted to leverage local resources.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T09:54:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231174920
       
  • Using Grand Rounds to Train and Prepare a Local Public Health Workforce To
           Manage COVID-19 Outbreaks During the 2020–2021 Pandemic Winter Upsurge

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Lori Fischbach, Lisa V. Smith, Jan King, Moira Inkelas, Tony Kuo
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      In response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health (DPH) expanded its workforce by>250 staff during Fall 2020 to manage the expected volume of outbreaks, which ultimately peaked. The workforce included reorganized groups of physicians, nurses, outbreak investigators from several DPH programs, and a 100+ member data science team tasked with designing and operating a data system and information flow process that became the backbone infrastructure of support for field investigation and outbreak management in real-time. The accelerated workforce expansion was completed in 3 months. To prepare new and reassigned permanent staff for fieldwork, DPH and several faculty from the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health adopted a flexible, skills-based series of medical Grand Rounds. These 16 sessions were grounded in practice- and problem-based learning principles using case studies, interactive scenarios, and didactic presentations based on scientific and public health practice information to teach knowledge and skills that were needed to manage COVID-19 outbreaks in different sectors. The evaluation suggests positive experience with the training series as well as impact on job performance.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-17T11:29:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231171952
       
  • Using Community-Based Participatory Research to Conduct a Collaborative
           Needs Assessment of Mental Health Service Users: Identifying Research
           Questions and Building Academic-Community Trust

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jonathan Delman, Diana Arntz, Anne Whitman, Hannah Skiest, Katherine Kritikos, Paul Alves, Valeria Chambers, Ryan Markley, Jacqueline Martinez, Cynthia Piltch, Sandra Whitney-Sarles, Julia London, Derri Shtasel, Corinne Cather
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Attempts to meaningfully engage people with serious mental illnesses (SMI) as allies in conducting research have often failed because researchers tend to decide on the research topic without including community members. Academic researchers can avoid this pitfall by collaborating with community members to conduct a needs assessment to identify relevant research topics and build trust. Here, we report on the results of a psychosocial needs assessment for adult mental health service users in Massachusetts conducted by an academic-peer research team. The project was initiated as part of an academic mental health center’s efforts to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) with a group of people with SMI. People with SMI were hired and trained to co-lead research projects and the development of the listening group guide, and they conducted 18 listening groups with 159 adults with mental health conditions. The data were transcribed, and rapid analysis employing qualitative and matrix classification methods was used to identify service need themes. Six themes emerged from qualitative analysis: reduce community and provider stigma, improve access to services, focus on the whole person, include peers in recovery care, have respectful and understanding clinicians, and recruit diverse staff. The policy and practice implications of these findings include creating a stronger culture of innovation within provider organizations, developing specific plans for improving recruitment and retention of peer workers and a multicultural workforce, enhancing training and supervision in cultural humility, communicating respectfully with clients, and including peers in quality improvement activities.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T07:14:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231171144
       
  • Equity Lens Protocol: Reflecting on Harms From the COVID-19 Response and
           Mitigation Strategies Implemented in a Local Public Health System

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Stephen Fawcett, Christina Holt, Orielle Solar-Hormazabal, Gerry Eijkemans, Dan Partridge, Sonia Jordan, Charlie Bryan, Aihua Zhu, Alex Kimball Williams, Ruaa Hassaballa-Muhammad, Erica Hill
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This report describes an Equity Lens Protocol and its use to guide partners’ systematic reflection on harms and mitigation strategies of the COVID-19 response in a local public health system. This process evaluation tool is based on the Guidance document for assuring an equitable response to COVID-19 prepared by the Pan American Health Organization. We used a participatory approach to engage public health partners in systematically reflecting on harms, mitigation strategies, and lessons learned and implications for practice. Outputs from using this tool included identified: (a) specific harms (e.g., loss of income and challenges to learning) related to particular COVID-19 response measures (e.g., home confinement and school closure) and (b) mitigation strategies implemented to reduce harms. In response to the protocol’s guiding questions, partners also identified lessons learned and practice recommendations for strengthening equity work in public health responses (e.g., an equitable response requires an investment in people, structures, and relationships before a crisis). This report—and accompanying protocol—illustrates use of a practical method for systematic reflection on public health responses through an equity lens.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-13T07:04:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231173702
       
  • Local Implementation of Move Your Way—A Federal Communications Campaign
           to Promote the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Kate Olscamp, Malorie Polster, Elizabeth Y. Barnett, Mikaela A. Momot, Rachel N. Oziel, Frances Bevington
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) developed the Move Your Way campaign to help more Americans increase their physical activity. The campaign includes more than 80 English and Spanish materials that can be used to promote physical activity. HHS also developed a community-based implementation strategy for the campaign. Methods. HHS collaborated with eight community-based organizations from across the United States to pilot campaign implementation in their communities. A mixed-methods process evaluation was conducted to assess events, partnership involvement, material distribution, and social media engagement. Results. More than 168,000 people participated in 55 campaign events, initiatives, and programs hosted by lead organizations and their 175 partners. More than 37,000 campaign materials were distributed, and there were over 72 million social media impressions. Conclusion. The community-based implementation strategy was effective at reaching the intended audience and driving traffic to Move Your Way resources. The flexibility of the Move Your Way materials and messages allowed communities to incorporate the campaign into diverse physical activity–promotion strategies. Findings demonstrate that the federal government and local community organizations can successfully work together to promote physical activity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T11:30:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231172468
       
  • An Implementation of a Community-Engaged, Group-Level Mental Health Pilot
           for Black and Latina Transgender Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hale M. Thompson, Ketzel Feasley, Reyna Ortiz, Karen Reyes, Amanda Seanior, Niranjan S. Karnik
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The primary aim is to assess the implementation of an eight-session, group therapy pilot for Black and Latina transgender women in Chicago in terms of implementation outcomes regarding intervention effectiveness, acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. The Exploration Preparation Implementation Sustainment (EPIS) framework guided implementation processes, including community engagement as an implementation strategy, and an implementation taxonomy was used to evaluate outcomes of acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility, in addition to intervention effectiveness regarding anxiety and community connectedness. Two rounds of the pilot were completed in 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, at a community-based organization serving LGBTQ+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning) youth on Chicago’s West Side. Participants (N = 14) completed a baseline and postintervention assessment and evaluations after each of eight intervention modules. Descriptive statistics show improvement across measures of anxiety and community connectedness, and high mean scores across domains of acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility. Pilot findings indicate intervention effectiveness, acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility to address mental health and social support of Black and Latina transgender women. Additional resources are needed for transgender community-engaged mental health programs and research to establish core and adaptable intervention elements, scaled-up evidence for clinical effectiveness, and, most importantly, to improve mental health outcomes and the sustainability of such interventions.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-12T11:27:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231172191
       
  • Factors That Help and Hinder the Implementation of Community-Wide Behavior
           Change Programs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Marc Harris, Diane Crone, Samantha Hughes
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Novel community-wide approaches that gamify physical activity through challenges and competition have become increasingly popular in recent years. However, little is known about the factors that help or hinder their implementation. This qualitative study aimed to address this gap in the literature by systematically investigating the facilitators (organizational and experiential) and barriers to successful implementation of a community-wide intervention delivered in Gloucester, the United Kingdom. A two-phased process evaluation was conducted. Phase 1 involved the thematical analysis of open question feedback from n = 289 adults. Phase 2 included three focus groups conducted with n = 12 participants. This research showed that promoting the initiative through primary education settings was fundamental to enhancing awareness and participation. Social elements of the intervention were identified as a motivating factor for, and a consequential outcome of, participation. A lack of promotion to wider-reaching proportions of the community was perceived to be a significant barrier to implementation, potentially limiting inclusivity and participation in the activity. Game dynamics, timing, and fears regarding sustainability represented further difficulties to implementation.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-11T09:18:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231172760
       
  • Cultivating a Sense of Belonging in Allied Health Education: An Approach
           Based on Mindfulness Anti-Oppression Pedagogy

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Francoise A. Knox-Kazimierczuk, Brandelyn Tosolt, Kevin V. Lotz
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      To address accreditation standards and to meet a need due to a disparity in health care providers engaged in direct patient care, many institutions of higher education have focused on initiatives to increase the numbers of ethnic and racial minority populations. Despite these efforts, there remains a dearth of diversity in health care. For many underrepresented minority populations (URM), numerous barriers exist to becoming a health professional. Greater levels of discrimination and bias reduce belonging and agency in URM students impacting recruitment and retention. Research has shown that discrimination and bias are antithetical to feeling a sense of belonging on college campuses for URM students. The sense of belonging for URM students has been positively linked to retention and other academic outcomes. Faculty interaction and campus environment have been correlated to sense of belonging. Thus, faculty members as mentors, advisors, and shapers of campus climate have an important role to play in supporting URM students. However, due to socialization in an oppressive society, narratives about race and racism can become entrenched. The entrenchment of racial ideologies, without tools to examine, deconstruct, and reflect, leads to little forward progress. Incorporation of mindfulness anti-oppression pedagogy provides a needed paradigm shift for allied health educators to act with intentionality as they cultivate spaces of belonging for URM students.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-09T07:08:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231172761
       
  • Firearm Safe Storage in Rural Families: Community Perspectives About
           Ownership and Safety Messaging

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Cynthia Ewell Foster, Sarah Derwin, Lindsay A. Bornheimer, Christina Magness, Eskira Kahsay, Meredith Eis, Juliann Li Verdugo, Tayla Smith, Lynn Massey, Frederick P. Rivara, Cheryl A. King
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Firearm-related injuries are the leading cause of death among youth in the United States, and rates of firearm-related suicide in rural youth are more than double those in urban youth. Although safe firearm storage has been shown to reduce firearm injuries, little is known about how to culturally tailor such interventions for rural families in the United States. Informed by community-based participatory methods, focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted to design a safe storage prevention strategy for rural families. Participants included a broad array of community stakeholders (n = 40; 60% male, 40% female; age 15–72, M = 36.9, SD = 18.9) who were asked to identify acceptable messengers, message content, and delivery mechanisms that were perceived as respectful to the strengths of rural culture. Independent coders analyzed qualitative data using an open coding technique. Emerging themes included (1) community norms, values, and beliefs about firearms; (2) reasons for ownership; (3) firearm safety; (4) storage practices; (5) barriers to safe storage; and (6) suggested intervention components. Firearms were described as a “way of life” and family tradition in rural areas. Owning firearms for hunting and protection influenced family storage decisions. Intervention strategies that use respected firearm experts as messengers, refer to locally derived data, and that reflect community pride in firearm safety and responsible ownership may improve the acceptability of prevention messages in rural areas.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-05-06T10:14:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231166418
       
  • Implementation of Quitline Financial Incentives to Increase Counseling
           Sessions Among Adults Who Use Menthol Tobacco Products

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Dana E. Bourne, Rhonda Williams, Lisa Osbahr, Maria Roemhildt, Andrea C. Villanti
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Since 2017, the Vermont Tobacco Control Program (VTCP) has worked to reduce the impact of flavored tobacco products on Vermonters. With the proposed U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules banning menthol cigarettes and flavored cigars and proposed legislation banning sales of all menthol and flavored tobacco products in Vermont, VTCP prioritized resources to support cessation among Vermonters who use menthol tobacco products. In March 2021, VTCP began offering a tailored quitline protocol for adults who use menthol tobacco, including financial incentives, for completed coaching sessions. From March 2021 to May 2022, 66 quitline callers enrolled in the menthol incentive protocol, representing 8% of all quitline callers and 25% of participants in the state’s quitline incentive programs. A greater proportion of callers in the menthol incentive program completed three or more quitline calls (58% vs. 38%) and enrolled in phone and text support (61% vs. 32%). Quitline callers enrolled in any incentive protocols (menthol, Medicaid/uninsured, or pregnant) were more likely to request one or two forms of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). Quitlines remain an effective, evidence-based method of tobacco cessation, especially in reaching vulnerable populations. Given the targeted marketing of menthol brands to Black and African American populations, LGBTQ+ populations, youth, and neighborhoods with lower incomes, addressing menthol cigarette use is key to improving health equity and health of Vermonters. Early data indicates that the use of financial incentives can increase engagement with a state quitline among menthol tobacco users through greater completion of cessation coaching calls, enrollment in text message support, and NRT usage.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-29T06:35:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231171143
       
  • Healing Baltimore: Creating Support for VALUE (Vaccine Access &
           Acceptance, Lives in Unity, Education & Engagement) Baltimore Ambassadors
           as They Serve During the COVID-19 Pandemic

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mackessa Holt, Evelyn Ruiz-Aguilera, Gloria Ngeno, Yvonne Bronner
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      VALUE (Vaccine Acceptance & Access Lives in Unity, Engagement & Education) Baltimore began in February 2021 with the vision of helping underserved communities in Baltimore City value COVID-19 vaccination and have access to the vaccine. VALUE dispatched ambassadors to provide COVID-19 education and risk-mitigation strategies in their communities. Once the project was implemented, we noticed that our ambassadors were often overwhelmed by misinformation in the community and our priority populations faced deeper issues relating to the social determinants of health (SDOH) and social needs such as food, transportation, job loss, and housing.To help our ambassadors cope with and address these issues, we created Healing Baltimore in April 2021. Healing Baltimore aims to support our VALUE ambassadors as they contribute toward improving the wellbeing of Baltimore now and after COVID. Healing Baltimore has four elements: (1) Weekly Self-Care Tips, (2) Weekly Positive Facts about Baltimore, (3) SDOH Referral to Baltimore City Health Department Services, and (4) Webinars to teach us about the VALUE communities while offering the opportunity to discuss historical trauma. We share our lessons learned from Healing Baltimore, which include (1) increasing ambassador input, (2) engagement, (3) co-creation, (4) collaboration, and (5) community appreciation.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-19T06:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231166714
       
  • “Did You Wash Your Hands'” The Socioeconomic Inequalities Preventing
           Youth From Adopting Protective Behaviors During COVID-19 in South Africa

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nicole De Wet-Billings
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Behavior change has been a critical factor in slowing the spread of COVID-19. In South Africa where infection rates are high, research is needed on the protective behaviors adopted by youth who have low infection rates but are carriers of the virus. Aims. The purpose of this study is to (1) identify the protective behaviors young people adopted during the pandemic and (2) to estimate the probability of positive behavior change by demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Methods. The study uses data from the South African National Income Dynamics—Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey 2020. The sample includes 985 (n) youth aged 15–24 years. The outcome of interest is behavior change due to the Coronavirus. Cross-tabulations and an adjusted binary logistic regression model showing odds ratios, are fit to the data. Results. Not all youth adopted protective behaviors. The most prevalent behaviors adopted include washing hands (67.75%) and staying at home (54.02%). Youth in households with six or more members are more likely to change their behaviors (ORs = 1.67 and 1.64, both p-values < .05). However, youth who do not have access to water to wash hands (OR = 0.71), reside in households with food insecurity (OR = 0.94), and those living in nonformal housing (OR = 0.69) are less likely to adopt behavior change. Conclusion. Due to the socioeconomic inequalities associated with behavior change, there is need for more tailored approaches to address youth living in impoverished households in the country.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-15T11:19:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231166713
       
  • Elevating Women’s Voices: The Illinois Maternal Health Digital
           Storytelling Project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abigail Holicky, Anne Elizabeth Glassgow, Allison Myers, April J. Bell
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Numerous initiatives at the national, state, and local levels are focused on addressing the U.S. maternal health crisis. However, most efforts fail to center women’s voices and personal perspectives about pregnancy experiences and complications. This article describes the Illinois Maternal Health Digital Storytelling Project conducted by the University of Illinois at Chicago, in partnership with StoryCenter, a storytelling nonprofit organization based in Berkeley, California. The project aimed to elevate voices (stories) to complement other sources of data on maternal outcomes. We relied on partners to help recruit storytellers with a self-identified perinatal-related challenge. We screened interested individuals using a trauma-informed approach and a social worker provided storytellers with support during the project. Two groups participated in this project, one in 2021 and another in 2022, culminating with 10 digital stories. Both instances were conducted virtually and included group and individual skills-based sessions where storytellers learned to create and edit their digital stories. The storytellers own their digital stories and provided consent to include them in ongoing dissemination efforts. In September 2021, a webpage was launched to house the stories, and this resource is being shared widely. Evaluation efforts of the webpage are ongoing to understand how these digital stories are being used to inform maternal health efforts. Digital stories add richness to ongoing maternal health prevention work and may serve as a powerful tool to elicit understanding among providers, practitioners, and constituents.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-11T05:44:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231166422
       
  • Evaluation of a Brief Online Sexual Health Program for Adolescents: A
           Randomized Controlled Trial

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jordyn McCrimmon, Laura Widman, Hannah Javidi, Julia Brasileiro, Jeffrey Hurst
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents are at increased risk of acquiring sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and experiencing unintended pregnancy. In particular, adolescents from marginalized communities experience significant sexual health disparities compared to their more advantaged peers. Digital sexual health programs, such as HEART (Health Education and Relationship Training), may be effective in reducing these risks and addressing these disparities. HEART is a web-based intervention focused on the promotion of positive sexual health outcomes, such as sexual decision-making skills, sexual communication skills, sexual health knowledge, and sexual norms and attitudes. The current study evaluates the efficacy of HEART, and examines whether effects were moderated by gender, socioeconomic status (SES), race, English as a second language, and sexual orientation to ensure the program is effective for diverse groups of adolescents. Participants were 457 high school students (Meanage=15.06, 59% girls, 35% White, 78% heterosexual, 54% receive free or reduced-price lunch). Students were randomized to HEART or an attention matched control and assessed at pretest and immediate posttest. HEART was effective in increasing sexual assertiveness, sexual communication intentions, HIV/STI knowledge, condom attitudes, and safer sex self-efficacy compared to the control condition. There were no significant interactions by gender, SES, race, English as a second language, or sexual orientation, suggesting the program worked equally well for all groups of youth. The findings of this study suggest that HEART may be a promising avenue for the promotion of positive sexual health outcomes for diverse groups of youth.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-04-04T06:05:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231162379
       
  • Toward a Politics of Care: Southeast Asian Refugee Organizing, Kinship,
           Care, and Reunion

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: James Huỳnh, Victoria Huỳnh, mads lê, Sheila Sy
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      From a critical refugee studies orientation, our article redefines care within the context of myriad forms of state violence impacting Southeast Asian post-war refugee communities. Research reveals how harm is compounded at every step of Southeast Asian refugee journeys: war, forced displacement, resettlement, family separation, inherited health conditions, and generational trauma. How do we reckon with refugee trauma without conceding to it as an unchangeable fact of our lives' What knowledge might we gain by attending to the everyday work of survival in refugee communities' To answer these questions, the authors conceptualize care through (a) abolitionist organizing, (b) queer kinship and affective labor, (c) historiographic caretaking, and (d) refugee reunion.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-31T10:57:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231164411
       
  • The Opioid Response Project: An Effective Learning Collaborative for Local
           Communities'

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Melanie Livet, Chloe Richard, Emily Williamson Gangi
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The Opioid Response Project (ORP) was designed as an intensive 2-year health promotion learning collaborative grounded in the Collective Impact Model (CIM) to prepare ten local communities to address the opioid crisis. The purpose of this evaluation was to describe the ORP implementation, provide a summary of the evaluation results, share insights, and discuss implications. Results were informed by multiple data sources, including project documents, surveys, and interviews with members of the ORP and community teams. Based on process evaluation results, 100% of community teams reported being satisfied with the ORP and recommended this experience to others. ORP participation outputs ranged from new opioid response programs, to strengthened community teams, to receipt of additional funding. Based on the outcome evaluation, the ORP was effective at increasing community knowledge and capacity, promoting collaboration, and facilitating sustainability. This initiative is an example of an effective learning collaborative to curb the opioid epidemic at the community level. Participating communities found great value in working together as part of a larger cohort and reported benefits from the peer learning and support provided by the ORP. In particular, access to technical assistance, identification of engagement strategies within and across community teams, and a focus on sustainability are key practice components to be included in learning collaboratives designed to address large-scale public health issues.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-31T10:55:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231162378
       
  • Creating a Narrative for Change: Health Promotion Students’ Perspectives
           on the Power of Photovoice Research

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Breanna De Leon, Fatawu Mahama, Ashley Raymond, Cheryl A Palmer, Jean M. Breny
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The use of Critical Race Theory, Photovoice, and Community-Based Participatory Research has helped uncover the root causes of issues such as systemic racism in the fields of public health and health promotion. Often, we see studies using traditional research methods to investigate potential causal factors of disparities in minoritized communities report only quantitative data. While these data are imperative for understanding the severity of disparities, quantitative-only approaches cannot address nor can they improve the critical root causes of these disparities. As a team of BIPOC graduate students in public health, we conducted a community-based participatory research project using Photovoice methodology to explore inequities in Black and Brown communities exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The participatory nature of this research revealed cumulative challenges across the social determinants of health in New Haven and Bridgeport, Connecticut. It allowed us to engage in local-level advocacy to promote health equity as our findings illuminated the need for community-led and community-engaged action. Health and racial inequities cannot be effectively addressed if public health research and programming do not collaborate with the community to build community capacity, empowerment, and trust. We describe our experiences doing community-based participatory research to investigate inequities and provide reflections on their value for public health students. As responses to health inequities and disparities become more politically polarized in the United States, it is critical for public health and health education students to use research methodologies that elevate communities that have been historically marginalized and neglected. Together, we can catalyze equitable change.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-31T10:41:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231162373
       
  • Pediatric Residents’ Outpatient Firearm Screening and Safety Counseling
           Practices (Or Lack Thereof): A Retrospective Chart Review

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tyler Lennon, Jake Ruddy, Brittany Badesch, Christine Krueger, Barry Solomon, Katherine Hoops
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children and adolescents be universally screened for access to firearms and exposure to violence. The purpose of this study was to characterize how often pediatric residents at one institution document screening for firearm access and violence risk factors and provide risk reduction counseling in the primary care setting. A retrospective chart review was conducted at two primary care clinics in Baltimore, Maryland, for patient ages 10 to 25 years who were seen by resident physicians for well care between October 2019 and December 2020. We reviewed 169 patients’ charts meeting the inclusion criteria. Forty (24%) patients had a documented history of exposure to violence or history of suicidal ideation. Based on resident documentation, one (
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-30T01:18:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231164909
       
  • Program Factors Affecting Weight Loss and Mobility in Older Adults:
           Evidence From the Mobility and Vitality Lifestyle Program (MOVE UP)

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Xinran Liu, Lori A. Kieffer, Jennifer King, Brandi Boak, Janice C. Zgibor, Kenneth J. Smith, Lora E. Burke, John M. Jakicic, Linda N. Semler, Michelle E. Danielson, Anne B. Newman, Elizabeth M. Venditti, Steven M. Albert
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The Mobility and Vitality Lifestyle Program (MOVE UP) is a behavioral weight-management intervention for improving mobility among community-dwelling older adults. We examined program factors that affect implementation outcomes and participant-level health outcomes. Methods. The MOVE UP program was implemented in the greater Pittsburgh area from January 2015 to June 2019 to improve lower extremity performance in community-dwelling older adults who were overweight or obese. Thirty-two sessions were delivered over 13 months. All sessions were designed to be 1-hour in length, on-site, group-based, and led by trained and supported community health workers (CHWs). Participants completed weekly Lifestyle Logs for self-monitoring of body weight, diet, and physical activity. We evaluated the MOVE UP program using the RE-AIM framework, and collected quantitative data at baseline, 5-, 9-, and 13-months. Multilevel linear regression models assessed the impacts of program factors (site, CHW, and participant characteristics) on implementation outcomes and participant-level health outcomes. Results. Twenty-two CHWs delivered MOVE UP program to 303 participants in 26 cohorts. Participants were similar to the target source population in weight but differed in some demographic characteristics. The program was effective for weight loss and lower extremity function in both intervention and maintenance periods (Ps < .01), with an independent effect for Lifestyle Logs submission but not session attendance. Discussion. CHWs were able to deliver a multi-component weight loss intervention effectively in community settings. CHW and site characteristics had independent impacts on participants’ adherence. Lifestyle Log submission may be a more potent measure of adherence in weight loss interventions than attendance.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-28T12:53:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231162377
       
  • WITHDRAWAL—Administrative Duplicate Publication: Mural Painting to
           Collect Sensitizing Data and Encourage Research Participation Among U.S.
           Latinos

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-24T09:51:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231157343
       
  • Toitū te Tiriti: A Tiriti o Waitangi-led Approach to Public Health
           Curriculum Development

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christina Severinsen, Bevan Erueti, Linda Murray, Suzanne Phibbs, Christine Roseveare, Charles Egwuba
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      At Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa (Massey University), Aotearoa New Zealand, we have declared our stance as a Te Tiriti o Waitangi-led institution. This necessitates the embodiment and enactment of the principles and provisions of Te Tiriti o Waitangi and the embedding of Indigenous Māori knowledge, values and belief systems in curriculum design and implementation. This article outlines the beginning of our journey toward indigenizing our postgraduate public health curriculum at Te Kunenga ki Pūrehuroa. We describe the redevelopment of the Master of Public Health curriculum that embeds mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), te reo Māori (Māori language), tikanga Māori (Māori values and belief systems), and Māori pedagogy (culturally sustaining teaching and learning practices). Here, we focus on how curriculum redevelopment and pedagogy have enabled the utility of Māori knowledge and processes to be reflected at every level of the program and give life and relevancy to Te Tiriti o Waitangi. Te Tiriti o Waitangi guides our teaching practice and ensures that students can safely develop their confidence in Māori ways of knowing, being, and doing to effectively partner with Māori as Tangata Whenua. Our program aims to produce agentic graduates who are champions and advocates for Māori aspirations in health.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-22T01:14:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231163565
       
  • Pintura Mural para Recolectar Datos Sensibilizantes y Fomentar la
           Participación en la Investigación Entre los Latinos de EE. UU

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Adrienne Martinez-Hollingsworth, Jacqueline Hernández, Cristina Edwards, Keosha Partlow
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Proposito. Describir una intervención de murales implementadas con comunidad envecindarios Latinos para elevar conciencia de barreras delreclutamiento/retención de Latinos en EE. UU. en la investigación clínica,y aumentar acceso de los investigadores a conceptos de sensibilización críticos para el riguroso diseño de estudios. Fondo. Latinos en EE. UU. sufren desproporcionada de varias enfermedadescrónicas, pero son subrepresentados como investigadores y participantesen investigaciones financiadas por Institutos Nacionales de Salud. Faltade representación inhibe conciencia de necesidades Latinas para la saludy obstaculiza esfuerzos para abordar la falta de equidad en comunidadesdiversas. Las intervenciones de arte en comunidades Latinas siguensiendo reconocidas por capacidad a cerrar brechas e incrementar lacalidad y cantidad de asociaciones de investigación entre investigadores y Latinos. Método. Este artículo describe una intervención de murales puesta a prueba endos vecindarios mayormente Latinos entre 2016 y 2020. El método deldiseño fue guiado por prácticas de investigación participativas con lacomunidad enfocadas en Evaluación-Diagnóstico Planificación- Implementación-Evaluación. Resultados. Los murales abordaron muchos desafíos de participación que a menudo se asocian con la subrepresentación de los Latinos en la investigación académica y permitió entrevistas de sensibilización con miembros clave de la comunidad sobre temas de interés para investigación. Conclusión. Los métodos de investigación que reconocen las formas de arte tradicionales, como murales, crean espacio para generar confianza e iniciar interés en la participación en investigaciones, y aumentan acceso
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-22T01:13:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231156609
       
  • Schools as a Source of Mental Health Literacy: Adjusting and Validating a
           Mental Health Literacy Scale

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Hanne Nissen Bjørnsen, Gunnar Bjørnebekk, Christian Brandmo
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Over the last decade, there has been a growing interest in mental health literacy (MHL) in health promotion, largely motivated by increased awareness of MHL as a modifiable determinant of mental health. Accordingly, MHL has been associated with the health-promoting school approach emerging over the last 20 years. To succeed in promoting MHL, it is of vast importance to evaluate working strategies and interventions to address MHL using validated instruments. The current study describes the revision and psychometric testing of a modified version of the 10-item adolescents’ positive MHL measure, the MHPK-10, the only identified instrument measuring adolescents’ positive MHL. The MHPK-10 was adjusted to address the previously documented ceiling effects and was further optimized for use in schools by reworking it to measure learning rather than self-reported knowledge, becoming the new nine-item Mental Health Learning Scale (MHLS-9). The MHLS-9 was tested on a national sample of N = 2,012 Norwegian ninth graders. Data were analyzed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and tests of reliability and validity. The revised CFA model for the MHLS-9 showed an improved fit over the original CFA model for the MHPK-10. The MHLS-9s’ CFA model revealed excellent factor determinacy (.95) and scale reliability (ω = .91). Thus, the MHLS-9 is an improved measure for the positive component of MHL for use in school settings, enabling researchers and practitioners to evaluate and focus positive MHL interventions in schools using a short, reliable, and valid measure for adolescents’ learning about the factors promoting good mental health.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-21T06:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231161090
       
  • Physical Activity and Social Comparison: The Importance of Group
           Composition in an Employee Fitbit Intervention

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer R. Wentz, Sonja Wilhelm Stanis
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This study examined the impact of group composition of a 6-week group-based employee Fitbit intervention on daily physical activity steps. Group composition comprised heterogenous and homogeneous groupings based on variations in baseline high, medium, and low steppers. The intervention included weekly step leaderboard information, motivational and informative messages, and the ability to participate in group step challenges. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) examined differences in change of steps across time, step-level groups (low, medium, and high), and group composition (low/high, similar, and mixed), and replicated with a subgroup of participants who participated in group step challenges. While group and step level did not emerge as significant interactions in the overall sample, when focused within the group step challenge subsample, relationships among time, the group composition, and participant step-level categories emerged. Overall, the greatest increases in steps occurred at the mid-point time period, among lower steppers, and within the low/high comparison group. This study provides evidence of the importance of group composition in physical activity interventions as well as the fidelity of intervention design in facilitating group comparisons.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-18T06:53:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160152
       
  • Exploring Food and Nutrition Programming for People Living With HIV/AIDS:
           Interviews With Service Providers in Nova Scotia, Canada

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abigail Clarke, Winta Tesfatsion, Jessica Mannette, Barbara-Ann Hamilton-Hinch, Patricia Williams, Shannan Grant, Phillip Joy
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      There is a lack of nutritional programming and resources available for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in Nova Scotia, Canada. This is problematic for several reasons, including that adequate food and nutrition knowledge is integrated to effective medical therapy and wellness for PLWHA. The aim of this research was to explore and describe the beliefs, values, and experiences of HIV-service providers involved programming for PLWHA in Nova Scotia. Using a post-structuralist lens, semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine service providers. Thematic analysis of interview transcripts identified four main themes: (1) recognizing the social determinants of health, (2) acknowledging and disrupting layered stigma, (3) understanding the commensality, and (4) navigating and utilizing networks of care. These findings suggest that those developing, delivering, and evaluating food and nutrition-related programming must engage in community-inclusive approaches that recognize the varied social determinants of health that shape the lived of PLWHA, leverage existing networks and resources, and actively disrupt layered stigma. Also, in agreement with existing evidence, participants stressed the value of communicating and supporting the practice of eating together (commensality) and cultivating networks of care.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-17T12:30:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160758
       
  • Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Implementing Occupational Health
           Recommendations Among Immigrant-Owned Nail Salons in the Greater
           Philadelphia Region

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Trân B Huỳnh, Dương (Tina) Nguyễn, Nga Vũ, Amy Carroll-Scott, Chanina Wong, Catherine Freeland, Claudia Parvanta
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction. Immigrant nail salon owners and employees face multiple barriers to accessing occupational health training and services. We formed an academic-community-based organization–business owner partnership—unique in that all partners were culturally congruent—to develop a pilot intervention program for the nail salon community. Methods. Eighteen individuals (nine salon owners and nine employees) from the Greater Philadelphia region received the training in their native language and provided feedback through in-depth qualitative interviews. Interview guide was developed using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Themes of perceived benefits and barriers were identified and aligned with relevant CFIR constructs to gain better understanding of the implementation challenges. Results. Reported benefits of program were improved knowledge of the workplace hazards and safety practices, and the potential to attract more customers and retain employees. Perceived barriers to implementing recommended practices were limited availability of safer products and high cost, challenges communicating with customers, lack of engagement from some owners, organizational management practices affecting employees’ motivation, and limited partnership with local government to assist small immigrant-owned businesses. Conclusions. Our study revealed multiple factors that pit long-term health protection of nail salon workers against the economic viability of the businesses that employ them. Our research highlights the need to (1) advocate for federal policies making safer products to be more accessible to the masses, (2) establish local policy and culturally appropriate technical support programs that engage community-based organizations, and (3) develop economic opportunities and mentorship for immigrant entrepreneurs to operate profitable healthy salons.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-16T09:28:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160461
       
  • Formative Research to Inform College Health Communication Campaigns About
           COVID-19 Prevention Behaviors

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Holli H. Seitz, Antonio J. Gardner, Leah B. P. Pylate
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This research aimed to inform the development of a health communication campaign to increase the uptake of COVID-19 prevention behaviors among university students. Twenty-eight students attending a mid-sized public university in the southeastern United States and 84 parents or guardians of university students were recruited. The study included an online survey assessing COVID-19 prevention behaviors, perceived susceptibility to COVID-19, perceived severity of COVID-19, and semi-structured interviews to elicit beliefs on COVID-19 prevention behaviors. Students and parents/guardians reported that getting COVID-19 was possible but not necessarily likely. COVID-19 was seen as serious and at least somewhat severe. Dominant interview themes for benefits, barriers, response efficacy, and self-efficacy related to prevention behaviors are reported. Overall, perceptions of behavioral benefits, barriers, and response efficacy were often shared by parents and students but varied across behaviors. These data provide insights for future campaign development for the control of infectious diseases among college students.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T06:55:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160768
       
  • Perceived Health Needs of Church Leaders and Members: A Secondary Data
           Analysis of the Mid-South Congregational Health Survey

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Nathan T. West, Latrice C. Pichon, Kenneth D. Ward, Emily Rose N. San Diego, Meredith Ray, Fedoria Rugless, Terrinieka W. Powell, Bettina Campbell, Jonathan C. Lewis, Lauren McCann, Sterling McNeal, Brook E. Harmon
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Needs assessments have been successful in helping communities and congregations focus their health ministry efforts; however, most have used leader perceptions of congregational health needs. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the self-reported needs of both church leaders and members to be addressed by their congregation. Church leaders (n = 369) and members (n = 459) from 92 congregations completed the 2019 Mid-South Congregational Health Survey. Frequencies and generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were performed to examine the top 10 self-reported needs and associations by church role, respectively. Of the top 10 congregational needs, anxiety or depression, high blood pressure, stress, and healthy foods were ranked identically regardless of church role. Church leaders perceived obesity and diabetes to be important congregational health needs, whereas members perceived affordable health care and heart disease to be important congregational health needs. GLMM, controlling for within-church clustering and covariates, revealed church leaders were more likely than members to report obesity (odds ratio [OR]: 1.93, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.39, 2.67], p < .0001) and diabetes (OR: 1.73, 95% CI = [1.24, 2.41], p = .001) as congregational needs. Findings display similarities and differences in needs reported by church role. Including many perspectives when conducting congregational health needs assessments will assist the development of effective faith-based health promotion programs.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-15T06:52:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160158
       
  • A Model of Stakeholder Engagement with American Indians and Alaska Natives
           from the Native-CHART Study

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Tassy Parker, Norman James Cooeyate, Nathania Tsosie, Allyson Kelley
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) community stakeholder engagement has the power to transform health research. However, the engagement and dissemination process is challenging in AIAN communities due to the historical and current negative experiences of AIAN populations in health research (Dillard et al., 2018). Whereas there is a paucity of recommendations about how to engage stakeholders in health research, from agenda-setting to proposal development, study design, recruitment, data collection, analysis, results, and dissemination (Concannon et al., 2014), there is limited information about how these recommendations are operationalized within the context of AIAN health research and practice (Concannon et al., 2014; Forsythe et al., 2016). For the purposes of this article, stakeholders are individuals, organizations, or communities who have a direct interest in the process and outcomes of a project, research, or policy effort (Boaz et al., 2018). Stakeholder engagement is a systematic process involving stakeholders, which provides opportunities for consultation, input, reviews, reactions, support, and assistance with dissemination. Dissemination focuses on how, when, by whom, and under what circumstances evidence spreads throughout agencies, organizations, states, counties, communities, tribes, researchers, policy makers, and service organizations.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T10:41:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160563
       
  • Public Health Training Centers: More Relevant Than Ever

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Matthew Fifolt, Lisa C. McCormick, Melissa Alperin
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Interest in and awareness of public health in the United States has grown due to COVID-19; however, state and local health departments have seen a mass exodus of leadership since the beginning of the pandemic. Based on the results of the de Beaumont Foundation’s most recent Public Health Workforce Interests and Needs Survey (PH WINS), nearly one in three public health employees say they are considering leaving the profession due to stress, burnout, and low pay. One viable strategy for ensuring a diverse and competent public health workforce is the national network of Public Health Training Centers (PHTCs). This commentary describes the Public Health Training Center Network, with a specific focus on Region IV, and discusses challenges and opportunities for advancing the public health agenda in the United States. The national PHTC Network continues to provide invaluable services in terms of training, professional development, and experiential learning for the current and future public health workforce. However, increased funding would allow PHTCs to have a greater impact and reach through bridge programs for public health workers and others, additional field placement experiences, and expanded outreach to non-public health professionals in training activities. PHTCs have shown great adaptability over time and can once again pivot to meet the needs of a rapidly changing public health landscape demonstrating that PHTCs are truly more relevant than ever.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-03-06T12:55:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399231160144
       
  • Developing and Evaluating a School-Based Tobacco and E-Cigarette
           Prevention Program for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Youth

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alison K. Herrmann, Burton Cowgill, Debra Guthmann, Jessica Richardson, L. Cindy Chang, Catherine M. Crespi, Everett Glenn, Michael McKee, Barbara Berman
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      School-based programs are an important tobacco prevention tool. Yet, existing programs are not suitable for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing (DHH) youth. Moreover, little research has examined the use of the full range of tobacco products and related knowledge in this group. To address this gap and inform development of a school-based tobacco prevention program for this population, we conducted a pilot study among DHH middle school (MS) and high school (HS) students attending Schools for the Deaf and mainstream schools in California (n = 114). American Sign Language (ASL) administered surveys, before and after receipt of a draft curriculum delivered by health or physical education teachers, assessed product use and tobacco knowledge. Thirty-five percent of students reported exposure to tobacco products at home, including cigarettes (19%) and e-cigarettes (15%). Tobacco knowledge at baseline was limited; 35% of students knew e-cigarettes contain nicotine, and 56% were aware vaping is prohibited on school grounds. Current product use was reported by 16% of students, most commonly e-cigarettes (12%) and cigarettes (10%); overall, 7% of students reported dual use. Use was greater among HS versus MS students. Changes in student knowledge following program delivery included increased understanding of harmful chemicals in tobacco products, including nicotine in e-cigarettes. Post-program debriefings with teachers yielded specific recommendations for modifications to better meet the educational needs of DHH students. Findings based on student and teacher feedback will guide curriculum development and inform next steps in our program of research aimed to prevent tobacco use in this vulnerable and heretofore understudied population group.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-02-10T05:44:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221151180
       
  • Kenya’s Experience: Factors Enabling and Impeding the COVID-19
           Response

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jemimah Mwakisha, Ben Adika, Susan Nyawade, Peter Malekele Phori, Noemie Nikiema Nidjergou, Cleph Silouakadila, Stephen Fawcett
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This case study describes the country-level response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Kenya between February 2020 and May 2021. We organize the presentation of COVID-19 response strategies across the five stages of (a) engagement, (b) assessment, (c) planning, (d) action/implementation, and (e) evaluation. We describe the participatory monitoring and evaluation (M&E) process implemented in collaboration with the WHO Regional Office for Africa Monitoring and Evaluation Team. The M&E system was used to organize and make sense of emerging data regarding specific response activities and changing COVID incidence. We share the results of that collaborative sensemaking, with particular attention to our analysis of the factors that facilitated and those that impeded our pandemic response. We conclude with lessons learned and practical implications from Kenya’s experience to help guide future country-level responses to rapidly changing public health crises.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T11:05:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221117566
       
  • The Cost of Diversity: An Analysis of Representation and Cost Barriers in
           Stock Photo Libraries for Health Education Materials, 2021

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Zachary A. Chichester, Michelle A. Jewell, Catherine E. LePrevost, Joseph G. L. Lee
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction. Ineffective health communication can drive health disparities and limit the effectiveness of interventions to reduce them. Stock photo libraries are a critical tool for developers of patient education, health education, and intervention materials. It is not clear how well stock photo libraries represent communities bearing disproportionate burdens of disease. Method. We conducted a search using five popular stock image libraries (Adobe Stock Images, Canva, Getty Images, Microsoft Office Image Library, and Pixabay) in November 2021 to evaluate diversity and representation in health-related stock photos. We searched for the following five key preventive health topics: healthy eating, exercising, quitting smoking, vaccination, and pregnancy. The images (N = 495) were coded for age, gender presentation, representation of perceived minoritized racial/ethnic identity, skin color using the Massey–Martin skin color scale, markers of high socioeconomic status (SES), and access costs. Results. The representation of perceived minoritized people, darker skin color, and inclusion of markers of high SES varied greatly by the search term and library. Images predominately portrayed young adults and adults, with limited representation of other age groups. Images in libraries with any paywall were significantly more likely to depict a person of perceived minoritized racial/ethnic identity and depict darker skin colors, and were significantly less likely to contain markers of high SES identity than images in libraries that were free to use. Discussion. We found that it costs more to develop culturally relevant health education materials for minoritized populations and groups that do not represent high SES populations. This may hinder the development of effective communication interventions.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-02-01T09:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221150788
       
  • Understanding Physical Distancing and Face Mask Use Across High-Risk
           African American Subgroups During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Application of
           Health Belief Model

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jamal Moss, Leah Alexander, Iman Barré, Imari Parham, Taneisha Gillyard, Jamaine Davis, Jennifer Cunningham-Erves
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Physical distancing and face masks remain frontline prevention strategies due to suboptimal vaccine uptake and the highly infectious COVID-19 variants. Communities of color are disproportionately impacted by a chronic disease burden that places them at higher risk of severe COVID-19 disease. Therefore, they can greatly benefit from face mask use and physical distancing, especially if the individual(s) have not received the vaccine. We applied the Health Belief Model to explore barriers and motivators influencing physical distancing and face mask use among high-risk, Black American subgroups during the early COVID-19 pandemic stages. We conducted 62 semi-structured interviews among four Black American subgroups: young adults, individuals with underlying medical conditions, essential workers, and parents. Thematic analysis, guided by the Health Belief Model, yielded six themes: (1) Knowledge on Face Mask Use and Physical Distancing, (2) Perceived Susceptibility and Severity Varies by Subgroup, (3) Experience with and Perceived Self-Efficacy to Engage in Preventive Behavior, (4) Perceived Benefits to engaging in preventive behaviors, (5) Perceived Barriers to engage in preventive behaviors, and (6) Cues to action to increase participation. Each subgroup’s unique experience informed multilevel, tailored approaches that can be used by health promotion practitioners to improve face mask use and physical distancing among uniquely vulnerable Black American subgroups in the current and future pandemic.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-30T06:22:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221151176
       
  • A Community Participatory Approach to Creating Contextually Tailored
           mHealth Notifications: myBPmyLife Project

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Abby Katherine Hellem, Amanda Casetti, Kaitlyn Bowie, Jessica R. Golbus, Beza Merid, Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, Michael P. Dorsch, Mark W. Newman, Lesli Skolarus
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Just-in-time adaptive interventions (JITAIs) are a novel approach to mobile health (mHealth) interventions, sending contextually tailored behavior change notifications to participants when they are more likely to engage, determined by data from wearable devices. We describe a community participatory approach to JITAI notification development for the myBPmyLife Project, a JITAI focused on decreasing sodium consumption and increasing physical activity to reduce blood pressure. Eighty-six participants were interviewed, 50 at a federally qualified health center (FQHC) and 36 at a university clinic. Participants were asked to provide encouraging physical activity and low-sodium diet notifications and provided feedback on researcher-generated notifications to inform revisions. Participant notifications were thematically analyzed using an inductive approach. Participants noted challenging vocabulary, phrasing, and culturally incongruent suggestions in some of the researcher-generated notifications. Community-generated notifications were more direct, used colloquial language, and contained themes of grace. The FQHC participants’ notifications expressed more compassion, religiosity, and addressed health-related social needs. University clinic participants’ notifications frequently focused on office environments. In summary, our participatory approach to notification development embedded a distinctive community voice within our notifications. Our approach may be generalizable to other communities and serve as a model to create tailored mHealth notifications to their focus population.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T09:08:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221141687
       
  • Using a Community-Informed Translational Model to Prioritize Translational
           Benefits in Youth Concussion Return-to-Learn Programs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Julian Takagi-Stewart, Aspen Avery, Shyam J. Deshpande, Stephanie Andersen, Todd Combs, Monica S. Vavilala, Laura Prater
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundThe Translational Science Benefit Model (TSBM) was developed to broadly capture systematic measures of health and societal benefits from scientific research, beyond traditional outcome measures. We aimed to develop a systematic process for the application of the TSBM and to then provide an example of a novel application of the TSBM to an ongoing Return-to-Learn (RTL) after youth concussion project involving partnerships with community stakeholders.MethodsWe invited investigators, project advisory board, and participants of the RTL project to participate in a modified Delphi process. We first generated a list of potential translational benefits using the indicators of the TSBM as guideposts. We then prioritized the benefits on an adapted Eisenhower matrix.ResultsWe invited 35 concussion care or research experts to participate, yielding 20 ranked translational benefits. Six of these recommendations were ranked high priority, six were regarded as investments, and eight were ranked as either low yield or low priority.DiscussionThis study found that activities such as education and training of stakeholders, development of policy and consensus statements, and innovation in dissemination, were perceived as higher priority than other activities. Our approach using a modified Delphi process and incorporating the TSBM can be replicated to generate and prioritize potential benefits to society from research studies.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T06:03:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221150911
       
  • “We’re Here to Take Care of Our Community”: Lessons Learned From the
           U.S. Federal Health Center Covid-19 Vaccine Program

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Johanna T. Crane, Rachel Fabi, Danielle Pacia, Carolyn P. Neuhaus, Nancy Berlinger
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Equitable access to vaccination is crucial to mitigating the disproportionate impact of Covid-19 on low-income communities and people of color in the United States. As primary care clinics for medically underserved patients, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) emerged as a success story in the national effort to vaccinate the U.S. public against Covid-19. In February 2021, the Federal Health Center Covid-19 Vaccine Program began allocating vaccine supply directly to FQHCs in an effort to improve vaccine equity. This qualitative study documents how FQHCs in two states successfully mitigated barriers to vaccine access, responded to patient concerns about vaccination, and worked to maintain and grow community trust in a climate of uncertainty and fear during early vaccine roll-out to the general population. Using a socio-ecological model, we show how FQHCs intervened at multiple levels to advance vaccine equity, revealing valuable lessons for health promotion practice in primary care settings or underserved communities. Our findings provide descriptive context for existing quantitative evidence showing FQHCs’ greater success in vaccinating people of color, and foreground valuable and innovative strategies for trustworthy health communication practices and equitable resource allocation to medically underserved patients and populations.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T10:52:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221151178
       
  • Grounding the Work of Grassroots MCH Leaders in Storytelling

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Ashley Irby, Erin Macey, Naomi Levine, Jenna Rae Durham, Jack E. Turman
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Our Grassroots Maternal and Child Health (MCH) Initiative works to build the capacity of individuals and organizations in zip codes with persistently high infant mortality rates to bring about systems change that will improve maternal and child health (MCH) outcomes. Foundational to the Initiative is the training and mentoring of local women to become Grassroots MCH Leaders. We greatly honor that these women possess community expertise, essential to the Initiative’s success. Our training equips them with strategies they can use to bring about changes in social, economic, political, and/or cultural systems that underlie poor birth outcomes. One impactful strategy they learn is the use of critical narrative intervention (CNI). This approach, grounded in the crafting and sharing of stories, complements statistical, behavioral, and medical approaches to improve MCH outcomes. This article describes the impact of CNI within the Grassroots MCH Initiative. Drawing from 14 Grassroots MCH Leaders’ narratives, we present five significant maternal traumas and influential supports in their surrounding contexts. We explore the leaders’ reflections on the impact of story development and dissemination. Our findings reveal that situating CNI within the context of a grassroots initiative provides opportunities for leaders to use their stories to advocate for systems change. Personal MCH narratives provide a powerful and respectful approach to public health promotion, as they highlight important systems-level failures that need to be addressed to sustainability improve MCH outcomes.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T10:50:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221151175
       
  • Group-Based Medical Mistrust in Adolescents With Poorly Controlled Asthma
           Living in Rural Areas

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Sarah I. Leonard, Connor T. Pizii, Yihong Zhao, Amarilis Céspedes, Sharon Kingston, Jean-Marie Bruzzese
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Black youth and rural adolescents are two groups who experience asthma disparities. Racism and discrimination in health care likely lead to group-based (systems-level) medical mistrust for some adolescents. Group-based medical mistrust, one pathway by which racism drives health inequities, is associated with poorer outcomes for patients with chronic conditions. Despite its potential importance in adolescent asthma, previous research has not considered group-based medical mistrust in this population. To fill this gap, we characterize group-based medical mistrust among rural adolescents with poorly controlled asthma, examining demographic differences. We analyzed baseline data from a school-based clinical trial in which 164 adolescents (mean age = 16.3; 76.2% Black) completed the Group-Based Medical Mistrust Scale (GBMMS). Using linear regression, we tested associations with race, gender, and age, controlling for recent medical visits and insurance status. The total GBMMS mean score was 2.3 (SD = 1.22); subscale scores ranged from 2.3 to 2.4. Black adolescents reported significantly higher total GBMMS scores (β = .45, p = .003) and significantly higher scores on two GBMMS subscales: suspicion of health care providers (β = .56, p = .007) and lack of support from health care providers (β = .36, p = .007). Gender and age were not associated with GBMMS scores. Health care providers need to consider medical mistrust and its role in their clinical care. Together with their institutions, health care providers and researchers should work toward changing systems that perpetuate racism to build trust as a means of reducing asthma disparities among adolescents.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T11:37:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221150913
       
  • Inoculating Black/African American and LGBTQ Communities Against the
           Tobacco Industry: The Role of Community Connectedness and Tobacco
           Denormalization Beliefs

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Christopher W. Wheldon, Chris Skurka, Nicholas Eng
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      The purpose of this study was to explore how connectedness to Black/African American or lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) communities can promote anti-tobacco industry beliefs and to examine the role of targeted anti-tobacco industry messaging (i.e., tobacco industry denormalization [TID] messages).We hypothesized that community connectedness would predict anti-tobacco industry motivation (H1) and that this effect would be mediated by community-specific anti-industry beliefs (H2). We also hypothesized that these effects would be greater (i.e., moderated) for individuals exposed to targeted TID messages (H3). This study was a secondary analysis of data from a web-based experiment focused on the effects of counter-industry messages (data collected in 2020). The sample consisted of 430 Black/African Americans and 458 LGBTQ young adults. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling. In support of hypothesis 1, community connectedness was associated with anti-tobacco industry motivation for both the LGBTQ and Black/African American subsamples. Hypothesis 2 was also supported. The associations between community connectedness and anti-industry motivations were partially mediated by anti-industry beliefs. Hypothesis 3 was not supported. Exposure to counter-industry messages did not modify the structural model; however, counter-industry messages increased anti-industry beliefs in both subsamples. Fostering community connectedness may help to mobilize community-based tobacco control efforts. Furthermore, interventions targeting anti-tobacco industry beliefs may be effective at reducing tobacco-related disparities. Anti-tobacco industry beliefs can be increased using brief targeted TID messages. Collectively, these findings suggest that community-based approaches rooted in consciousness-raising action may provide a useful model for future tobacco control interventions.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-17T11:49:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221146553
       
  • Distracted and Impaired Driving Among U.S. Adolescents, 2019, USA

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: R. Andrew Yockey, Tracey E. Barnett
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Distracted driving, the act of focusing on something else while operating a vehicle, is a significant health problem among adolescents. Although some studies have reported on prevalence among adolescents in the United States, limited studies have examined differences by sexual identity status. The purpose of the present study was to examine past 30-day distracted driving by sexual identity status among a large, national sample of adolescents ages 14 to 18 years. A secondary analysis was conducted on the 2019 Youth Risk Behavioral Surveillance System (YRBSS) data, and associations between distracted driving and demographics (e.g., biological sex, age, race/ethnicity) were assessed with weighted logistic regression analyses. A total of 13,590 adolescents ages 14 to 18 years were part of the final analytic sample. Twenty-three percent of adolescents reported distracted driving in the past 30 days. Compared with heterosexual adolescents, gay/lesbian (14.3%), bisexual (18.1%), and questioning (12.9%) adolescents reported lower distracted driving in the past 30 days. Findings through a health equity approach may inform harm reduction efforts and behavioral interventions.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T05:17:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221150814
       
  • A Worksite Health Promoting Program for Early Head Start and Head Start
           Workforce

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Alma D. Guerrero, Ariella Herman
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Early Head Start (EHS) and Head Start (HS) staff comprise a large segment of the public sector workforce and experience numerous risk and chronic factors for medical conditions or symptoms. Few health and wellness workplace interventions, however, specifically focus on EHS/HS staff.Methods:A train-the-trainer (TTT) approach was used to build capacity among directors and staff from 57 EHS/HS programs on how to strategically plan and implement a health promoting worksite program focusing on improving nutrition and physical activity practices among EHS/HS staff. Baseline and 3-month post-training questionnaires assessed EHS/HS staff changes on knowledge and practices related to nutrition and physical activity. Paired t-tests or chi2 statistics assessed changes in questionnaire responses over time.Results:1,363 staff from 57 programs completed baseline and follow-up surveys. Staff had high knowledge regarding healthful dietary patterns at baseline. Over one-third of staff reported drinking soda with meals and almost 50% identified soda as their most common drink. Roughly one-third of staff also reported no physical activity in the prior week at baseline. Staff demonstrated significant improvements in dietary, nutrition, and physical activity practices. Staff also improved grocery shopping behaviors.Implications for Practice:The TTT approach to disseminate an EHS/HS staff-focused health promotion program, “Eat Healthy, Stay Active!’ provides a potentially promising strategy to build upon and disseminate more broadly to reach the over>300,000 EHS/HS staff workforce.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T05:13:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221142897
       
  • Effectiveness of a Breast Cancer Education Screening and NavigaTion (BEST)
           Intervention among Hispanic Women

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer C. Molokwu, Alok Dwivedi, Adam Alomari, Navkiran Shokar
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      BackgroundIn the United States, breast cancer remains one of the most diagnosed cancers among females and remains the second leading cause of cancer death. In addition, breast cancer is most likely diagnosed at an advanced stage among Hispanic females in the United States due to lower mammogram utilization.AimsThe objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a multilevel, multicomponent community-based breast cancer screening intervention called the Breast Cancer Education Screening and NavigaTion (BEST) program. The primary outcome was the completion of a screening mammogram 4 months post-intervention.MethodWe used a pragmatic approach for evaluation, utilizing a quasi-experimental delayed intervention design. We recruited women from the community aged between 50 and 75, uninsured or underinsured, and overdue for screening.ResultsSix hundred participants were recruited (300 intervention and 300 control). Among completers, the screening rate was 97% in the intervention group and 4.4% in the control group (RR = 22.2, 95% CI: 12.5–39.7, p < .001). In multivariable analysis, age ≥ 65 (RR = 1.29, p = .047), perceived benefits (RR = 1.04, p = .026), curability (RR = 1.24, p < .001), subjective norms (RR = 1.14, p = .014), and fatalism (RR = .96, p = .004) remained significantly associated with screening outcome.ConclusionA multicomponent, bilingual, and culturally tailored intervention effectively facilitated breast cancer screening completion in an underserved population of Hispanic women. Individuals with improved screening outcomes were more likely to have higher positive beliefs. Our study has important implications regarding using multicomponent interventions in increasing breast cancer screening completion in poorly screened populations. It also highlights differences in health belief motivation for breast cancer screening completion.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-13T05:10:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221135762
       
  • Charitable Pharmacies as Catalysts for Coordinated Care: Pharmacist
           Management of Blood Glucose Among Under-Resourced Patients With Type 2
           Diabetes

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jennifer Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Fallon Richie, Marlena Kelley, Candice Selwyn, Shearie Archer, Emily Blejwas
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      This community-academic-pharmacy partnership evaluated the impact of a pharmacist-led approach to diabetes management in under-resourced charitable pharmacy patients. Charitable pharmacies serve a large volume of under-resourced patients; pharmacist involvement may improve blood glucose management due to the frequency with which patients access the pharmacy for medications. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a pharmacist-led approach to diabetes management (measured by blood glucose levels) by providing medication therapy management (MTM) and leveraging communication between the pharmacist and patients’ primary care providers (PCPs). Study participants were Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) patients with type 2 diabetes who obtained free diabetes-related medications from the pharmacy. Participants were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU), MTM, or MTM plus coordinated care between the pharmacist and the patient’s PCP. The blood glucose levels of patients who received MTM remained stable throughout the duration of the study while blood glucose levels for TAU patients significantly increased. A previously non-existent communication channel between pharmacists and FQHC providers was established and recommendations were exchanged. This relatively small investment on behalf of the pharmacy (e.g., routinely checking blood glucose, sharing medication recommendations) led to a return on health outcomes for a high-risk, low-resource patient population. This study yielded a beneficial change in practice as the pharmacy has institutionalized measuring at-risk patients’ blood glucose levels during pharmacy visits. The pharmacy has also continued to enhance their relationship with the FQHC to provide integrated, patient-centered care to this shared vulnerable patient population.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T05:14:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221115082
       
  • COVID-19 Disparities Among Arab, Middle Eastern, and West Asian
           Populations in Toronto: Implications for Improving Health Equity Among
           Middle Eastern and North African Communities in the United States

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Mienah Z. Sharif, Neda Maghbouleh, Andrew S. Baback Boozary
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Equity-oriented efforts to mitigate and prevent COVID-related disparities are hindered due to methodological limitations of the categorization of racial and ethnic groups, including Arabs and Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) communities, which remain invisible in national data collection efforts. This study highlights the disparities in COVID-related outcomes in Toronto, Canada and supports ongoing calls to collect public health data among MENA communities in the United States.Methods:Data on racial/ethnic identity and hospitalizations were collected by the Toronto Public Health (TPH) of the Ontario Ministry of Public Health Case between May 20, 2020, and September 30, 2021 from people with a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19.Results:The reported COVID-19 infection rate for Arab, Middle Eastern, West Asians (i.e., categories used to self-identify as MENA in Canada) relative to Whites in Toronto was 3.51. The age-standardized hospitalization rate ratio between Arab, Middle Eastern, West Asians and Whites was 4.59.Discussion:Data from Toronto highlight that Arab, Middle Eastern, and West Asians have higher rates of COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations than their White counterparts. Comparable studies are currently not possible in the United States due to lack of data that can disaggregate MENA individuals. This study underscores the critical need to collect data among MENA communities in the United States to advance our field’s goal of promoting and advancing equity.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T06:59:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221142898
       
  • Implementation and Process Evaluation of Alcohol Free for 40:
           Community-Based Programming to Reduce Alcohol Consumption

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Jala Lockhart, Megan B. Knapp, Amy K. Feehan, Savanna Latimer, Anna Walter, Brittany N. Craft, Yvette P. Quantz, Hope Frugé, Maria Sylvester Terry, Erin E. Arceneaux, Molly Kimball
      Abstract: Health Promotion Practice, Ahead of Print.
      Alcohol consumption is known to increase risk for chronic diseases and other negative health outcomes. Abstinence, even temporary, from alcohol consumption can have positive health impacts. In this article, we describe implementation and process evaluation of Ochsner Eat Fit’s Alcohol Free for 40 (AFF40), an annual, 40-day voluntary alcohol abstinence challenge that takes place in six regions of Louisiana. Participants are challenged to abstain from alcohol consumption for 40 days to promote behavior change. To support participants’ success, staff conduct pre and post metrics (physical and laboratory) and host community-based events to encourage replacement behaviors. Process evaluation included measures of reach, recruitment, dose, and fidelity through tracking of participant registrations, an exit survey, media analytics, and program activity logs. In 2021, 493 participants enrolled in AFF40, with 347 completing laboratory metrics and 298 completing physical metrics. Majority of exit survey respondents (74.5%) reported no alcohol consumption during the 40-day challenge and that they planned to participate in AFF40 2022 (90.9%). The Eat Fit team documented moderate engagement (48.7% of enrolled participants) in program events. Social and digital impressions and page views recorded 23,591 hits while print media resulted in over 750,000 impressions. AFF40 has shown to be highly engaging for participants and effective in supporting temporary abstinence from alcohol. Incorporating stronger methods and evaluation will enhance future program implementation and community impact. Lessons learned and implications for practice are transferable to other community-based efforts to reduce alcohol consumption.
      Citation: Health Promotion Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-05T06:50:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/15248399221142633
       
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.175
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-
JournalTOCs
 
 
  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 112 of 112 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 243)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 190)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 250)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 103)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Similar Journals
HOME > Browse the 73 Subjects covered by JournalTOCs  
SubjectTotal Journals
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
 


Your IP address: 18.207.129.175
 
Home (Search)
API
About JournalTOCs
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-