Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health Promotion International
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.812
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 26  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0957-4824 - ISSN (Online) 1460-2245
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • Occupational Health Literacy Scale (OHLS): development and validation of a
           domain-specific measuring instrument

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      Abstract: SummaryOccupational health literacy (OHL) is a domain-specific approach that can empower people to make health-appropriate decisions in the work environment. OHL comprises the knowledge, skills and willingness of people to access and process health-related information and to apply it in work situations. The aim of this study was to evolve a conceptual model and validate a scale for OHL, that can be used in many sectors in the Western industrial countries, which does not yet exist. After piloting, item selection and alteration were carried out in a pretest with n = 163 working adults in diverse small- and medium-sized enterprises in Germany. The resulting OHL items were validated in a main survey with n = 828 participants working in small- and medium-sized enterprises and among them 47.5% people with migration background. The final 12-item questionnaire had good structural characteristics and is reliable and valid for measuring OHL. Using exploratory structural equation modeling, good fit indices (root mean square error of approximation = 0.063, comparative fit index = 0.940) confirmed a two-factor structure: (i) knowledge and skill-based processing of health information (internal consistency α = 0.88) and (ii) willingness and responsibility for occupational health (α = 0.74). The OHL scale fills the gap regarding domain-specific OHL questionnaires for working adults in diverse sectors in Western industrial countries. The Occupational Health Literacy Scale can be used to identify the needs of employees and companies and then to adapt and evaluate health promotion measures. Further research could include validation and use in other countries and large companies.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac182
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Mind the gap: Danish school heads’ ability to implement a national
           physical activity school requirement

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      Abstract: SummaryIn 2014, the Danish government introduced a wide-ranging reform of primary and lower secondary education that applied to all public schools. A distinctive feature was that it became mandatory for schools to provide an average of 45 min of daily physical activity (PA). The capacity for change of local school heads and the schools overall are considered key to fulfilling such a policy-driven requirement. The aim of this study is therefore to explore local school heads’ ability to implement the stated requirement of 45 min of daily PA within their local organizational capacity for change. Eleven semi-structured interviews were conducted across 11 schools. Respondents were school staff with management responsibilities (leading teachers with school management responsibilities, deputy heads and school heads). Results indicate that local school heads are central agents in converting the Danish school requirement of 45 min of daily PA into local action. This includes their ability to advance broad aims into concrete goals, secure supportive structures and organize the implementation strategy. Heads also need to support the staff in building sufficient knowledge capacity on how to arrange and incorporate PA into their daily practice, support the widespread dissemination of this knowledge across the school and reserve work hours for such activities. Assigning local PA ambassadors was particularly highlighted as important implementation support, as they can help build and disseminate knowledge while also broadcasting the school head’s strategy and focus on integrating and upholding students’ PA levels.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac193
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • ‘Football and dancing are in our blood’: culture promoting sports
           practice among immigrants in Europe

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      Abstract: SummaryThe current state of knowledge indicates that regular sports practice helps prevent and treat non-communicable diseases. The promotion of sport is, therefore, an important community health intervention for maintaining and improving the health of individuals and populations. Culture is identified as being associated with sports practice and sedentary behaviour of ethnic and national minorities. This study aims qualitatively to analyse the potential for culture as a basis for the promotion of sport among immigrants in four regions of Mediterranean Europe. Ten focus groups (n = 62) were conducted with immigrants—adults and young people over the age of 11—and people involved in promoting sport. Thematic content analysis was conducted. The results enabled identifying two major issues: sport as a vehicle for cultural expression and synergies between sport and culture. Accordingly, sport serves to express global, local and non-ethno-national cultural belonging. Regarding synergies, culture and sport feed each other positively and contribute to immigrants’ health and cultural well-being. Culture as a strategy for promoting sports practice requires an interdisciplinary approach that involves collaboration between healthcare practitioners and social sciences professionals. There is also a need to use the various axes of cultural definition—global, local and non-ethno-national—of those involved, and for them to take part themselves in designing sports activities. Moreover, promoting sport through non-ethno-national axes of cultural definition may help with immigrants’ social inclusion, as intercultural relations between migrants and newcomers are promoted.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac202
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Attitudes to COVID-19 Vaccines Among Australians During the Delta Variant
           Wave: A Qualitative Interview Study

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      Abstract: AbstractSince the outbreak of COVID-19 globally, a range of vaccines has been developed and delivered to reduce viral transmission and prevent COVID cases. This article reports findings from a qualitative research project involving telephone interviews with a diverse group of 40 adult Australians about their experiences of the COVID crisis. Interviews were conducted in late 2021 when Australians were dealing with the Delta variant outbreak and following a major effort on the part of government authorities to improve COVID-19 vaccination supplies and take-up. Responses to a question about COVID vaccines revealed that attitudes to and acceptance of COVID vaccines among this group were overwhelmingly positive. All participants had received at least one vaccine dose and the majority expressed views in support of mass vaccination against COVID. People who were hesitant or cautious about accepting COVID vaccination referred to the vaccines’ novelty and potential side effects. While many people were aware of debates about vaccine safety in the news media, trust in science and medical advice about COVID vaccines was strong. Participants wanted to protect themselves and others by accepting the recommended doses. Participants’ locale was a major factor in shaping experiences and stances on vaccines. The setting of government targets and mandates for vaccination was a key motivating factor. The goal of ‘getting back to normal’ was expressed as another reason for accepting vaccination, particularly for those living in areas that had been badly affected by high COVID cases and prolonged lockdowns.
      PubDate: Sat, 04 Feb 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac192
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • School lunchboxes as an opportunity for health and environmental
           considerations: a scoping review

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      Abstract: SummaryVery little research has focussed on children’s school lunchboxes from both a health and environment standpoint. This scoping review explores studies that considered children’s lunchbox food consumption trends at school and the environmental impacts of lunchbox contents. We conducted a scoping review of peer-reviewed literature with a focus on lunchboxes of children in preschool or primary school settings that contained food packed from home, through the lens of food and nutrition in combination with environmental outcomes—particularly food and/or packaging waste. The review included 10 studies, with articles from Australia, USA, Spain, New Zealand and the UK. Half of them were intervention studies aiming to shift knowledge levels and attitudes of teachers, parents and children with regard to reducing packaged food choices and food waste, and improving dietary habits. Acknowledging the complexity of lunchbox packing and consumption practices, this review recommends the consideration of socio-ecological influences on children’s health and sustainability behaviour, and mobilizing their pro-environmental agency.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac201
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Barrier profiles in workplace health promotion in Germany

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      Abstract: Lay SummaryWorkplace health promotion (WHP) is often faced with low-participation rates despite high relevance. This limits the potential for creating positive effects for the organization and its staff. Therefore, we investigated the barriers perceived by employees themselves using a representative sample (regarding age, gender and education) in Germany. Data were collected using a quantitative online questionnaire and then analyzed regarding underlying patterns. We found that there are different barrier types, and their importance differs depending on demographic criteria of the participants and the organizations they work for. These results can help organizations to reduce participation barriers to WHP for their staff.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac125
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Considering social inequalities in health in COVID-19 response: insights
           from a French case study

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      Abstract: SummaryThe COVID-19 pandemic highlighted the impact of social inequalities in health (SIH). Various studies have shown significant inequalities in mortality and morbidity associated with COVID-19 and the influence of social determinants of health. The objective of this qualitative case study was to analyze the consideration of SIH in the design of two key COVID-19 prevention and control interventions in France: testing and contact tracing. Interviews were conducted with 36 key informants involved in the design of the intervention and/or the government response to the pandemic as well as relevant documents (n = 15) were reviewed. We applied data triangulation and a hybrid deductive and inductive analysis to analyze the data. Findings revealed the divergent understandings and perspectives about SIH, as well as the challenges associated with consideration for these at the beginning stages of the pandemic. Despite a shared concern for SIH between the participants, an epidemiological frame of reference dominated the design of the intervention. It resulted in a model in which consideration for SIH appeared as a complement, with a clinical goal of the intervention: breaking the chain of COVID-19 transmission. Although the COVID-19 health crisis highlighted the importance of SIH, it did not appear to be an opportunity to further their consideration in response efforts. This article provides original insights into consideration for SIH in the design of testing and contact-tracing interventions based upon a qualitative investigation.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac173
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Effectiveness of Workplace Health Promotion (WHP) interventions in
           university employees: a scoping review

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      Abstract: SummaryWorkplace Health Promotion (WHP) interventions proved to be effective in several workplace contexts. Currently, the effectiveness of such interventions in the academic workplace is lacking, albeit evidence suggests similar patterns to those occurring in other workplace sectors. The aim of this study was to review WHP interventions in the university workplace that led to improve health- and work-related outcomes. Articles were selected using Pubmed, Web of Science, Scopus, Embase, PsycInfo, Cinhal and FSTA, using search strings focused on health- and/or work-related outcomes and involving University WHP interventions published between January 2010 and July 2021. The majority of the 12 studies selected reported positive results in their individuality, especially regarding health-related outcomes [biological such as weight loss, physical activity, mental health and lifestyle habits] and work-related outcomes concerning improvements either for the employee or for the working system. Studies on economic advantage and Return on Investment were limited and reported contrasting results. In conclusion, we have highlighted how the studies on effectiveness of WHP interventions in the university context are few and heterogeneous and need to be encouraged further research in order to build specific guidelines that are effective.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac171
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Women, alcohol consumption and health promotion: the value of a critical
           realist approach

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      Abstract: SummaryResearch on women’s drinking occurs in largely disparate disciplines—including public health, health promotion, psychology, sociology, and cultural studies—and draws on differing philosophical understandings and theoretical frameworks. Tensions between the aims and paradigmatic underpinnings of this research (across and within disciplines) have meant that knowledge and insight can be frequently disciplinary-specific and somewhat siloed. However, in line with the social and economic determinants of the health model, alcohol research needs approaches that can explore how multiple gender-related factors—biological, psycho-social, material, and socio-cultural—combine to produce certain drinking behaviours, pleasures and potential harms. We argue that critical realism as a philosophical underpinning to research can accommodate this broader conceptualization, enabling researchers to draw on multiple perspectives to better understand women’s drinking. We illustrate the benefit of this approach by presenting a critical realist theoretical framework for understanding women’s drinking that outlines interrelationships between the psychoactive properties of alcohol, the role of embodied individual characteristics and the material, institutional and socio-cultural contexts in which women live. This approach can underpin and foster inter-disciplinary research collaboration to inform more nuanced health promotion practices and policies to reduce alcohol-related harm in a wide range of women across societies.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac177
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Culture-centric narratives of influenza vaccination among high-risk groups
           in Hong Kong

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      Abstract: SummaryDespite the effectiveness of influenza vaccination, the vaccine coverage rate among high-risk groups in Hong Kong is less than optimal. Guided by the Health Belief Model (HBM) and culture-centric narrative approach, we examined the role of cultural specificities in implicit assumptions held by at-risk individuals when the individuals decided whether to receive the vaccine. Data were collected from 29 in-depth interviews with people from high-risk groups in Hong Kong. From their decision narratives, it is evident that the local socio-cultural characteristics and collectivistic ideology are useful in understanding the perceptions of influenza severity, susceptibility to infection, perceived barriers and benefits, and self-efficacy of accepting or rejecting the vaccine among the high-risk individuals. Implications of vaccination message designs are discussed.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac184
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Health education in conservatoires: what should it consist of'
           Findings from workshops with experts (Part II)

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      Abstract: SummaryAlthough health education programmes have been implemented in higher music education (HME) and their evaluations published in peer-reviewed journals, guidelines as to what ought to be included in these programmes are still missing. This study aimed to document expert discussions on the content of an ideal health education curriculum for HME students in the UK, integrating critical thinking. Four interdisciplinary workshops were conducted, where 67 experts in relevant fields took part, and were asked to discuss four lists of topics and concepts created based on literature reviews (cognitive biases, logical fallacies, critical appraisal tools and health topics). Only the list on health topics is relevant here. Notes taken by the participants and ourselves were thematically analysed. Four themes were identified, two of which are reported in this paper: (i) The health education curriculum and (ii) A settings-based approach to health. Part I of this project (published elsewhere) is focussed on the critical thinking content of health education for conservatoire students. The present paper focusses on the ideal health education curriculum and its implications for the wider context of health promotion.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac179
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Walking and perception of green space among older adults in Japan:
           subgroup analysis based self-efficacy

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      Abstract: SummarySelf-efficacy is the key factor for promoting physical activity. Older adults with low self-efficacy tend to be physical inactive than those with high self-efficacy, and an approach is needed to promote physical activity. Among several approaches, increasing the perception of green space may be an effective approach for low self-efficacy not high self-efficacy, but no study has investigated. This study investigated the association between walking and perception of green space among older adults with high and low self-efficacy, respectively. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 204 community-dwelling older adults (mean age = 78.3 years, 62.3% females). Using the median split, the participants were divided into high and low self-efficacy groups based on the median score of 12. Walking was measured using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and ‘more walking’ was defined as ≥150 min of walking time per week. Perception of green space was measured using an 8-item questionnaire. We performed logistic regression analysis to investigate the association between walking and perception of green space adjusted for age, gender, years of education, living with someone and income level. For all participants, 94 participants (46.1%) fell under low self-efficacy. After adjustment, higher perception of green space is associated with more walking among older adults with low self-efficacy [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.00–1.15], but not among those with high self-efficacy (aOR = 1.09, 95% CI= 0.99–1.20). To increase perception of green space, experts should design/improve green spaces considering beneficiaries’ characteristics.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac175
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Attending sporting mega events during COVID-19: mitigation and messaging
           at UK EURO 2020 matches

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      Abstract: SummaryThe UEFA EURO 2020 football tournament was one of the largest Sporting Mega Events (SMEs) to take place during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mitigating the risk of virus transmission requires a multi-layered approach for any large event, more so in this case due to staging the tournament across eleven host countries. Yet, little is known about COVID-19 risks and mitigation from attending an event of this scale and nature. We examined the implementation of mitigation and messaging at EURO 2020 matches hosted at venues in the UK. The tournament was postponed from the summer of 2020 and played in June and July of 2021. Structured observations were conducted by 11 trained fieldwork-supporters at 10 matches played at Wembley Stadium, London, or Hampden Park, Glasgow. Fieldwork-supporters observed one-way systems and signage, and hand sanitizing stations inside the stadia, but reported significant variation in the implementation of staggered timeslots, testing upon entry, and procedures for exit. Adherence to planned measures by ticket holders and implementation by stewards waned as the tournament progressed culminating in an absence of enforced measures at the final. The non-compliance with COVID-19 mitigation measures was likely to have led to a significantly increased risk of transmission. Future events should consider how COVID-19 mitigation measures could become ‘new norms’ of fan behaviour, learning from what is already known about football fandom. Tournament organizers of SMEs can use these findings to promote clearer messaging on pandemic-driven changes in fan behaviour and best practices in mitigating risk at future sporting and cultural events.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac176
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Associations of health literacy with missed free influenza immunization in
           people with chronic diseases

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      Abstract: SummaryThere is a gap in understanding specific features of health literacy that might be associated with adherence to influenza immunization. The aim of this study was to examine the association of health literacy with avoidance of influenza immunization and beliefs about the influenza vaccine among people with chronic diseases. Selection of study participants was based on a case–control study design in a population of people with chronic illnesses living in the Foča region (Republic of Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina) and who were entitled to receive a free influenza shot in season 2017/2018. The cases represented all non-vaccinated people (a total of 146) and the controls were vaccinated people (a total of 149) matched according to town of residence. Participants were interviewed in person from April to December 2018 using a socio-demographic questionnaire, Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) and Health Belief Model Applied to Influenza (HBMAI). Better score on ‘Feeling understood and supported by healthcare providers’, ‘Social support for health’ and ‘Ability to actively engage with healthcare providers’ was associated with more perceived benefits of influenza immunization in men, but not in women. Perceiving more Barriers to influenza immunization was associated with lower scores on ‘Feeling understood and supported by healthcare providers’, ‘Have sufficient information to manage health’, ‘Social support for health’ and ‘Ability to actively engage with healthcare providers’ in both men and women. Health literacy may be associated with the perception of susceptibility to influenza, benefits and barriers to influenza immunization and motivations to receive influenza vaccine.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac180
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Health(care) matters: where do the transgender individuals of Kashmir
           situate themselves'

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      Abstract: SummaryWhile employing a phenomenological perspective, the present study aimed to explore the varied experiences of transgender individuals in Kashmir, concerning their health-seeking behavior, and the constraints they face while accessing healthcare resources on a day-to-day basis in their life world. Participants were recruited through the purposive and snowball sampling strategies and the sufficiency of sample size was determined by data saturation. Data were collected using face-to-face in-depth interviews and analyzed through Colaizzi’s procedure of extracting recurrent themes and their interwoven relationships in qualitative research. Three main themes of awareness and the preferences for healthcare, gender identity and persistent stigmatization in care settings, and intra-community support and the resultant caregiving were prominent. Results of the study revealed that the transgender individuals in Kashmir experience inappropriate health-seeking behaviour primarily due to their unawareness regarding health, diseases and public healthcare programs/schemes, financial constraints, social exclusion, improper support and social stigma. They often prefer treating their health issues, mostly through local pharmacies or patent medicine vendors (PMVs), instead of visiting the medical professionals in the organized sector. Moreover, in many instances, they were also found to delay their decisions to seek care or simply decided to remain far from any medical intervention. As a result, the transgender individuals in Kashmir usually experience underutilization of formal healthcare services, which undermines their right to proper health and well-being.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac186
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Qualitative exploration of the reasons for not using nutritional warnings
           after policy implementation in Uruguay

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      Abstract: SummaryNutritional warnings have gained popularity, particularly in the region of the Americas, to facilitate the identification of products with excessive content of nutrients associated with non-communicable diseases and encourage healthier food choices. Although warnings have been shown to be effective, an in-depth understanding of the reasons why some consumers do not use them is still lacking. The aim of the present work was to explore self-reported use of nutritional warnings and to identify the reasons for not considering nutritional warnings for making food purchase decisions after policy implementation in Uruguay. A non-probabilistic sample of 858 Uruguayan participants was recruited using an advertisement on Facebook and Instagram. Through an online survey, self-reported use of nutritional warnings was asked using a closed-open ended questions. Participants who reported not considering warnings to make their purchase decisions were asked to explain the reasons why using an open-ended question. Responses were analysed using deductive coding, based on the Behavioural Drivers Model. Thirty seven percent of the participants stated that the warnings had not influenced their purchase decisions. Motives for not being influenced by the warnings were related to lack of interest, attitudes, lack of perceived self-efficacy, cognitive biases and limited rationality when making purchase decisions. In addition, structural barriers, such as availability, cost and trust in the food industry also emerged from participants’ responses. Strategies to encourage the use of warnings should include communication campaigns and policies to address structural barriers related to the perceived availability and affordability of healthy foods.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac174
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Challenges in evaluating implementation and effectiveness in real-world
           settings: evaluation proposal for school-based health-promoting
           intervention

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      Abstract: SummaryThere are various research designs and approaches to investigate how health-promoting activities are implemented in complex, real-world systems, and to identify potential health effects that might occur following implementation. Although literature describes guidelines to perform and report about implementation research and effect evaluations, no specific guidelines exist on analysing and reporting about the combination of effectiveness data and implementation data collected as part of intervention evaluation in complex and diverse settings. This paper describes the evaluation of primary school-based health-promoting activities in complex systems. Furthermore, an approach for data categorization inspired by Rogers’ Diffusion of Innovations theory is presented that can facilitate structuring the study’s results and relating the degree of implementation to any impact on effectiveness outcomes that might be observed. Researchers interested in using this approach for data categorization have to ensure that the following three conditions are met: (i) data on an intervention’s efficacy in a controlled setting with optimal implementation is available; (ii) key points that define an intervention’s optimal implementation are available and (iii) an evaluation study is performed, collecting both effectiveness data and implementation data in a real-world context. This data categorization approach can be useful to generate more insight into an intervention’s effectiveness under varying circumstances, and optimal support and advice can be provided to stakeholders to achieve maximum impact of population-based health-promoting interventions in complex, real-world systems. However, the proposed approach is a first suggestion and further testing and adaptation is necessary to increase its usefulness. Knowledge and experience sharing among researchers performing comparable research can increase the knowledge base regarding this subject.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Jan 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/heapro/daac185
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 1 (2023)
       
 
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