Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.524
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 19  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1363-4593 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7196
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Epistemic racism in the health professions: A qualitative study with Black
           women in Canada

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      Authors: Brenda L Beagan, Stephanie R Bizzeth, Kaitlin R Sibbald, Josephine B Etowa
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Systemic racism within health care is increasingly garnering critical attention, but to date attention to the racism experienced by health professionals themselves has been scant. In Canada, anti-Black racism may be embodied in structures, policies, institutional practices and interpersonal interactions. Epistemic racism is an aspect of systemic racism wherein the knowledge claims, ways of knowing and ‘knowers’ themselves are constructed as invalid, or less credible. This critical interpretive qualitative study examined the experiences of epistemic racism among 13 healthcare professionals across Canada who self-identified as Black women. It explores the ways knowledge claims and expert authority are discredited and undermined, despite the attainment of professional credentials. Three themes were identified: 1. Not being perceived or portrayed as credible health professionals; 2. Requiring invisible labour to counter professional credibility ‘deficit’; and 3. Devaluing knowledge while imposing stereotypes. The Black women in our study faced routine epistemic racism. They were not afforded the position of legitimate knower, expert, authority, despite their professional credentials as physicians, nurses and occupational therapists. Their embodied cultural and community knowledges were disregarded in favour of stereotyped assumptions. Adopting the professional comportment of ‘Whiteness’ was one way these health care providers strived to be perceived as credible professionals. Their experiences are characteristic of ‘misogynoir’, a particular form of racism directed at Black women. Anti-Black epistemic racism constitutes one way Whiteness is perpetuated in health professions institutions.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T12:37:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221141605
       
  • ‘Madness’ after the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina – challenging
           dominant understandings of distress

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      Authors: Reima Ana Maglajlic, Halida Vejzagić, Jasmin Palata, China Mills
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article reports on the findings from a small-scale co-produced qualitative study on experiences of distress caused by the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH). Inspired by the emerging interdisciplinary field of Mad Studies, the study is novel and unique in two ways. First, it prioritises social understanding and interpretation of madness and distress. Second, an emphasis is placed on experiential knowledge. Beyond interviews with 20 people who experienced distress due to political conflict, this included contextualisation of the study in the knowledge generated through survivor research and within the field of Mad Studies. Study findings highlight the social causes and consequences of distress caused by conflict, such as war-related violence, gender-based violence, experiences of poverty and corruption. Participants stressed the importance of safety and support within their own home, mutual and supportive relationships with their families, friends, other people who experienced distress, the broader community and opportunities to do everyday activities they enjoy. In terms of professional support, the findings suggest that poverty alleviation and protection of people’s right to self-determination through access to human rights advocacy and representation may be as relevant as non-coercive community-based services. This indicates that support for distress caused by political conflict need not be different from any other support for people who experience distress. Emphasis should be placed on survivor-run initiatives and non-coercive, community-based support which addresses social causes of distress and enables people to exercise self-determination.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T12:35:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221139717
       
  • Shared care and gender identity support in Primary Care: The perspectives
           and experiences of parents/carers of young trans people

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      Authors: Zowie Davy, Jack Benson, Abby Barras
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article addresses the complex issues surrounding trans youths’ shared care perceived by parents in primary care settings in the UK. The analyses in this article draws on qualitative data derived from an online survey of 153 parents with trans children. Through the conceptual framework of healthcare assemblages, findings suggest that quality shared care for trans youth is based upon transient service relationships inherent in their healthcare—primary care, gender identity services, endocrinologists, and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAHMS)—and, as such, this complexity must be understood better by GPs in order for quality shared care to be administered. We explored various blockages to quality shared care within primary care surgeries that produced limit situations, such as lack of knowledge, training, or experience with trans healthcare. One other key factor was that there were strong external forces that were limiting trans youths’ quality shared care in the form of abject depictions from beyond the consultation, which all produced negative effects. Despite these blockages, we also demonstrate how and where quality shared care is received. For instance, we show that continuity of care or treatment after an initial diagnosis or assessment contributes to quality shared care as too does personalized care to those youths receiving it. Overall, this research provides insights into the complex perceptions of parents about what quality shared care is and ought to be for trans youth.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-26T10:05:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221138616
       
  • ‘Engaging on a slightly more human level’: A qualitative study
           exploring the care of individuals with back pain in a multidisciplinary
           pain clinic

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      Authors: Karime Mescouto, Rebecca E Olson, Nathalia Costa, Kerrie Evans, Miriam Dillon, Niamh Jensen, Kelly Walsh, Megan Weier, Kathryn Lonergan, Paul W Hodges, Jenny Setchell
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Chronic low back pain is characterised by multiple and overlapping biological, psychological, social and broader dimensions, affecting individuals’ lives. Multidisciplinary pain services have been considered optimal settings to account for the multidimensionality of chronic low back pain but have largely focused on cognitive and behavioural aspects of individuals’ pain. Social dimensions are usually underexplored, considered outside or beyond healthcare professionals’ scope of practice. Employing Actor Network Theorist Mol’s concept multiplicity, our aim in this paper is to explore how a pain service’s practices bring to the fore the social dimensions of individuals living with low back pain. Drawing on 32 ethnographic observations and four group exchanges with the service’s clinicians, findings suggest that practices produced multiple enactments of an individual with low back pain. Although individuals’ social context was present and manifested during consultations at the pain service (first enactment: ‘the person’), it was often disconnected from care and overlooked in ‘treatment/management’ (second enactment: ‘the patient’). In contrast, certain practices at the pain service not only provided acknowledgement of, but actions towards enhancing, individuals’ social contexts by adapting rules and habits, providing assistance outside the service and shifting power relations during consultations (third enactment: ‘the patient-person’). We therefore argue that different practices enact different versions of an individual with low back pain in pain services, and that engagement with individuals’ social contexts can be part of a service’s agenda.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-26T10:00:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221127817
       
  • How the context of reception affects the meaning of RCT evidence

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      Authors: Simon Carmel
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article takes as a case study a set of disagreements in the early 2000s about randomised controlled trial (RCT) evidence for a newly developed drug in the field of intensive care medicine. The interpretation of RCT findings – and in particular, the application of these findings to clinical practice – were contested among research-active intensive care doctors, despite their shared professional and epistemic values. I examine the arguments about scientific interpretation and application to clinical practice advanced by two readily identifiable groups. The analysis documents how four particular aspects of scientific knowledge were perceived and portrayed differently by the two groups, and notes how each group was associated with different kinds of routine work practices and external networks. My argument is that these differences give rise to distinctive hermeneutic frames and orientations towards the scientific results and disparities in their consequential judgements regarding the legitimate use of the newly developed drug, and I introduce the concept situationally specific habitus to make the link between context and hermeneutic frames and orientations. The analysis has implications for furthering our understanding of how the clinical meaning attributed to scientific evidence is affected by the context of reception of results, even where epistemic and professional values are shared.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-05T10:21:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221134011
       
  • Resident training in psychopathology and uncertainty in a clinical
           situation

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      Authors: Alicia Hamui Sutton, María Alejandra Sánchez-Guzmán
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The central theme of this article is the way in which psychiatry physicians-in-training deal with uncertainty in the discussion of clinical cases in Mexico. Methodologically, it is approached from the field of clinical ethnography and the narrative interpretation of plots in performative actions where there are sequences of communicative exchanges. In this way, it focuses on a detailed description of situations where clinical cases are reviewed to decipher, explain, and understand intersubjective meanings in the face of the emergence of uncertainty, its management, and the implications on decisions and actions. The study finds that limitations within the field of psychiatry lie in the nosographic construction of disease and its translation into the diagnostic hypotheses made by clinicians, where there are wide margins of ambiguity. The strategies implemented in the face of uncertainty are use of drugs, the collegiate review of the case, and utilization of intuition as a spontaneous, preconscious daily practice. The specific case described here provides a microscopic observation of the complex scenarios in which uncertainty occurs in educational and teaching processes, clearly revealing how patient care is articulated. The narratives and their interpretation are materials for training/curriculum and psychiatric clinical practice.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T07:19:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221127821
       
  • ‘Don’t freak out if you get a letter saying cancer patient
           

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      Authors: Siri Christine K Næss
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores healthcare professionals’ experiences of their work with patient communication in standardised cancer patient pathways (CPPs). The theoretical and methodological framework for this study is institutional ethnography. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 72 healthcare professionals, including general practitioners, specialist physicians and other hospital staff, in five Norwegian hospitals. The study reveals four aspects of communication work that illuminate how the CPP policy mediates the way healthcare professionals interact with patients through communicating continuity, communicating (by dodging) the dreaded C-word, communicating patient participation, and communicating the relevance of time. Healthcare professionals’ balancing of their different experiential realities run as a common thread through the four aspects of communication work identified in this study. The CPP policy, with its explicit focus on transparency, speed, and time frames creates challenges in an already delicate situation.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T06:49:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221127819
       
  • Keeping the conversation going: How progressivity is prioritised in
           co-remembering talk between couples impacted by dementia

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      Authors: Felicity Slocombe, Elizabeth Peel, Alison Pilnick, Saul Albert
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how partners keep the conversation going with people living with dementia (PLWD) when speaking about shared memories. Remembering is important for PLWD and their families. Indeed, memory loss is often equated with identity loss. In conversation, references to shared past events (co-rememberings) can occasion interactional trouble if memories cannot be mutually recalled. This article analyses partners’ interactional practices that enable progressivity in conversations about shared memories with a PLWD. In previous research, both informal and formal carers have reported that they can find interacting with PLWD difficult. Identifying practices used by partners is one way to begin addressing those difficulties. Analytical findings are based on over 26 hours of video data from domestic settings where partners have recorded their interactions with their spouse/close friend who is living with dementia. The focus is on 14 sequences of conversation about shared memories. We show how particular practices (candidate answers, tag questions and single-party memory of a shared event) structure the interaction to facilitate conversational progression. When partners facilitate conversational progressivity, PLWD are less likely to experience stalls in conversation. Our findings suggest the actual recall of memory is less relevant than the sense of shared connection resulting from the conversational activity of co-remembering, aiding maintenance of individual and shared identities. These findings have relevance for wider care settings.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T12:03:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221127822
       
  • Medical professionals’ agency and pharmaceuticalization:
           Physician-industry relations in Russia

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      Authors: Ekaterina Borozdina, Olga Zvonareva
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In the contemporary world pharmaceuticals have become a go-to answer to a growing number of questions. This process of pharmaceuticalization gives rise to a concern with the increasing influence of the pharmaceutical industry on physicians’ decision-making. Critics suggest that companies’ for-profit-interests might compromise the integrity of medical practice. This article employs qualitative research methodology to explore how Russian physicians deal with the industry’s efforts to expand and shape the use of pharmaceuticals. By bridging perspectives of social studies of science and sociology of professions, we offer a contextualized account of physicians’ daily practices and interpretations related to pharmaceuticalization. The findings question conventional assumptions of physician-industry relations and allow to delineate a new form of medical professionalism that emerges in the context of pharmaceuticalization and cannot be reduced to either “resisting” industry marketing activities or “giving in” to them and thus corrupting biomedical expertise. Instead, the ways in which physicians navigate abundant sources of knowledge and use industry resources to overcome constraints of their organizational environment attest to mundane forms of agency exercised by physicians in their relations with industry.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T11:30:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221116508
       
  • Stigma, shame and family secrets as consequences of mental illness in
           previous generations: A micro-history approach

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      Authors: Eileen Clark, Jennifer Munday, Alison Watts
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In this article we evaluate micro-history as a method for investigating the meaning of stigma, shame and family secrets through generations. We present micro-histories of two Australian soldiers who developed mental illness years after serving in World War 1 and were committed to a psychiatric hospital where they died. Data were drawn from publicly available records and interviews with family members. The contrasting stories held by the families of each man illustrate the transmission of stigma and secrets through families. We explore possible reasons for the differences between the families related to the wider literature on stigma and mental health and show why the family stories people present should be considered social constructions rather than facts. We also address ethical issues that arose during the research, and which have relevance for researchers investigating sensitive or potentially stigmatising topics.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-01T09:30:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221114751
       
  • “Time work”: An analysis of temporal experiences and agentic practices
           in the “good” doctor-patient relationship in general practice

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      Authors: Elisabeth Assing Hvidt
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to social health research by presenting an analysis of the temporal dimensions of the “good” doctor-patient relationship as perceived and enacted by patients and general practitioners (GPs). The empirical data derive from ethnographic fieldwork comprising participant observation in four general practice clinics in Denmark, and semi-structured interviews with 27 patients and eight GPs. The analysis draws from Michael Flaherty’s sociology of time: notions of temporal agency and “time work” are used as analytical tools to demonstrate that the “good” doctor-patient relationship is constructed in a tension between external temporal structures and internal temporal experiences that are the result of GPs’ and patients’ agentic practices of “doing time.” Thus, the findings illustrate how temporal determinism and self-determinism are equally interwoven when GPs and patients talk about, enact and seek meaningful temporal experiences within the doctor-patient relationship, while resisting and avoiding others that undermine the relationship. The results challenge 1. deterministic conceptions of time demands in today’s healthcare systems that are said to control healthcare providers’ behavior and 2. the taken-for-granted understanding of continuity as a resource in itself.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T09:56:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221116504
       
  • The day program multiple: Noncoherence and ontological politics

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      Authors: Holly Symonds-Brown, Christine Ceci
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Globally, day programs are increasingly proposed in policy as one way to address the support needs of people living at home with dementia and their families. Day programs represent a kind of space that can meet multiple interests and ideologies concerned with sustaining care at home for people living with dementia. In this paper, we draw on findings from an ethnographic study of how day programs work as care in the community for people living with dementia to argue that day programs’ ontological status in research as a “simple location” of care contributes to the ambiguous outcomes and limited evidence available for improving their design and delivery. Using one program as an illustrative case, we demonstrate the multiplicity of a day program and the ontological politics through which the potentialities for care emerge. Robert Cooper’s proximal analysis of organizing’s and Annemarie Mol’s work on ontological politics inform this analysis. Of note in this analysis are the different enactments of a day program and their modes of coordination. We show when these enactments hang together well and when they do not and consider the effects of these politics for care. Of particular concern is how some versions of a day program are easily displaced by the interests of administrative versions and managerial logics. We argue for approaches to research and planning that acknowledge the “day program multiple” and precarious nature of care.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T09:53:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221116501
       
  • Ghosts in the machinery: Living with and beyond radiotherapy treatment for
           gynaecological cancer

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      Authors: Hilary Stewart, Lisa Ashmore, Mette Kragh-Furbo, Vicky Singleton, Daniel Hutton
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores post-treatment experiences of women who have had radiotherapy for gynaecological cancer. Drawing on data from a project which explored post-treatment wellbeing, conceptual metaphors of ghosts/haunting are used to engage with enduring legacies of cancer and ‘neglected matters’ in post-treatment trajectories. Current arrangements of care contribute to the idea that participants are ‘out of the other side of cancer’ once active treatment completes. Despite broader ambitions for holistic cancer rehabilitation, fragilities of body and mind persist, even when the outward representation is one of health, of looking well, of moving on. We show how neglected matters of cancer (visceral late effects, psychological suffering and lives not lived) are part of living with and beyond cancer. These ‘ghosts’ manifest in chronic states of unsettledness that are temporarily relieved by individualised ‘fixes’, such as mobilisation of ‘mind over matter’ discourse and mindfulness. This discourse and its associated tools are a powerful yet impoverished framing of approaches to living with and beyond cancer. We argue for the need to attend to ‘neglected matters’ of post-treatment trajectories differently.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-28T12:29:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221114749
       
  • The critical (micro)political economy of health: A more-than-human
           approach

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      Authors: Nick J Fox
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The critical political economy of health offers different explanations for the social causes of health and the social factors determining the distribution of these causes. However, the relational, post-anthropocentric and monist ontology of the new materialisms overcomes this complexity, while retaining a critical focus. In this perspective, the social, economic and political relations of capitalism act upon bodies and other matter in everyday events, rather than as ‘social structures’. Using a conceptual toolkit of ‘affect’, ‘assemblage’, ‘capacity’ and ‘micropolitics’, the paper asks the question: ‘what does capitalism do'’ The re-analysis of the social and economic relations of capitalism in terms of a production-assemblage and a market-assemblage reveals not only the workings of capitalist accumulation, but also how previously-unremarked more-than-human affects in these assemblages simultaneously produce uncertainty, waste and inequalities. This micropolitical economy of health is illustrated with examples from recent research, including a critical assessment of health inequalities during the Covid-19 pandemic.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-23T04:54:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221113212
       
  • Information gaps in persuasion knowledge: The discourse regarding the
           Covid-19 vaccination

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      Authors: Tamar Israeli, Ariela Popper-Giveon, Yael Keshet
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Persuasion knowledge is personal knowledge about persuasion attempts that has an effect on the way people respond to these attempts. Persuasion attempts are made to effectively handling the Covid-19 pandemic, which is dependent on high public compliance with vaccination programs. Drawing on the idea of persuasion knowledge, we aimed at elaborating the various categories of perceived information gaps experienced by vaccine hesitants during the Covid-19 vaccination campaign. At the beginning of 2021 we conducted 20 in-depth interviews with Israelis who had decided not to be vaccinated against Covid-19. Analysis of the interviews revealed three main categories of information gaps experienced by the interviewees: missing information, manipulated information, and discrepant information. We analyzed how these are associated with distrust and may impair the persuasion efforts of governments and health authorities. Perceived information gaps, as part of persuasion knowledge, may increase negative responses, and therefore constitute an important factor in persuasion campaigns.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-19T12:01:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221113208
       
  • Calibrating logics: How adolescents and young adults calibrate
           often-competing logics in their daily self-management of type 1 diabetes

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      Authors: Emilie Mølholm Kjærulff, Natasja Kingod, Mirjam Due Tiemensma, Ayo Wahlberg
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes must manage a demanding chronic condition in their daily lives, but adequate self-management remains a major challenge. In this article, we explore the logics invoked in shaping daily type 1 diabetes self-management among adolescents and young adults and propose an analytical view of self-management as a matter of ‘calibrating logics’. Drawing on Annemarie Mol’s concept of logic, our analysis of in-depth interviews with 21 adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes suggested that three main logics collectively shaped their self-management: biomedical, embodied and social. Biomedical logics appeared in the form of routinised insulin therapy, frequent blood glucose testing, and carbohydrate counting, all of which emphasise controlling blood glucose levels. Embodied logics emerged as refined practices such as ‘thinking insulin units’ and ‘listening’ to blood glucose fluctuations. Finally, social logics were at play when discreet or postponed self-management practices were used to adjust to social situations. While these logics may complement each other, study participants invoked how these logics often competed in daily life, generating tensions. We therefore propose viewing self-management as a matter of calibrating logics in which often-competing logics are at play. This can provide nuanced insights into the effort and challenges related to the daily self-management of type 1 diabetes for adolescents and young adults, in contrast to the prevailing dichotomy of adherence versus nonadherence to prescribed treatment regimens.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-16T06:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221113211
       
  • Conducting member checking within a qualitative case study on
           health-related behaviours in a large European city: Appraising
           interpretations and co-constructing findings

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      Authors: Ignacio de Loyola González-Salgado, Jesús Rivera-Navarro, Marta Gutiérrez-Sastre, Paloma Conde, Manuel Franco
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Although member checking is a well-established strategy for appraising credibility, there is a lack of research reporting procedures and outcomes when using this strategy. In recent years, scholars have implemented new member checking strategies along with several epistemological stances. In this work, researchers conducted member checking in three neighbourhoods with different socioeconomic status in Madrid, Spain. Attendance at member checking meetings was lower than expected. Member checking meetings were conducted in public halls within each neighbourhood and lasted approximately 2 hours. During the first hour, researchers introduced the aim of the meetings and shared summarized research findings with attendees using a slideshow. During the second hour, attendees had the opportunity to comment on any aspect of the research. Researchers used grounded theory coding strategies and a constructivist approach informed the analysis of the transcribed member checking meetings. One core category emerged, and it was named ‘Co-constructing findings and side effects of the interaction between researchers and participants in member checking’. Member checking attendees contributed to co-constructing findings by means of underscore and disagreement. It is possible that these meetings might have caused side effects such as unintended comparisons between neighbourhoods and negative health-related behaviours. Attendees wondered how the findings could improve their neighbourhoods. The meetings allowed interaction between participants and researchers and resulted in appraising and co-constructing qualitative research findings. More research is needed to advance knowledge about member checking.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-13T10:01:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221109682
       
  • Creating an (ethical) epistemic space for the normalization of clinical
           and “real food” oral immunotherapy for food allergy

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      Authors: Stephanie A Nairn
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Researchers and sociologists have argued the consequences of standardization vis-à-vis clinical practice guidelines are diverse and argue they should be explored empirically. Sociologists have also argued that “best evidence” for the development of clinical practice guidelines is not restricted to randomized controlled trials and that other forms of knowledge should be embedded in and inform CPGs. There is little research concerning how other types of knowledge are mobilized and taken up in CPGs. This article presents the results of an ethnographic investigation in Canada between 2015 and 2020 of the development of a clinical practice guideline for immunotherapy for food allergy. My research shows that immunotherapy has become the source of controversy regarding whether immunotherapy should be offered in the clinic or remain experimental and whether it should be offered using food or commercial products. I argue that the clinical practice guideline for oral immunotherapy reaffirms what has been previously noted by sociologists; guidelines can serve normative purposes and are not merely technical documents. This case study is unique as it demonstrates how guidelines can serve as “community-making devices” to consolidate “epistemic communities” through the explicit and formal mobilization of ethical principles alongside other forms of “traditional” evidence. The mobilization of a multi-criteria approach that included ethical principles was mobilized in part to counter the de-legitimization and peripheralization of clinical and real food oral immunotherapy.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-08T10:41:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221109679
       
  • Maintaining a medical institution in a context of materiality change:
           Lessons from a Canadian university hospital

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      Authors: Nassera Touati, Charo Rodríguez, Marie-Pierre Moreault, Claude Sicotte, Liette Lapointe
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This research aimed to better understand how institutions are maintained, and the role of materiality in this institutional work. More specifically, the present qualitative case study analyzed how different actors in a large academic hospital in Canada worked together (i.e. accomplished institutional work) to maintain the institution of medical record keeping as a new clinical information system (computerized physician order entry-the material entity) was enacted. The study reveals that, to maintain the institution at stake, the intertwinement of processes of creating and maintaining institutions took place. In fact, different forms of institutional work interact Results also strongly suggest that the design of computerized physician order entry and its implementation (i.e. the materiality involved in this institutional change) played an important role in the maintenance of the institution of medical record keeping: on the one hand, it was particularly present in three types of institutional work, namely enabling, policing, and deterring; on the other hand, it appeared to be an essential component of the routinization of work by allowing a better fit between the new technology and the organization of work
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-06T06:05:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221109680
       
  • A psychosocial exploration of resistances to service user involvement in
           United Kingdom National Health Service (NHS) mental health services

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      Authors: Timothy Moore, Laetitia Zeeman
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Policy promotes the active participation of those with lived experience of mental health difficulties in UK NHS mental health services, from the level of collaborative care-planning to service delivery, leadership and development. However, research indicates different forms of resistance to the implementation of such service user involvement. This article reports the findings of a qualitative, interview-based study which used Foucauldian discourse analysis and psychoanalytic theory to understand how resistances are produced through the interplay of clinical mental health professionals’ subjectivity and their organisational context. Service user involvement was found to highlight conflicts within clinicians’ roles. Central to this conflict was an ambivalent relationship to the power associated with these roles. Power could protect professionals from work related stresses, but could also be used to dominate, silence and coerce service users in ways that conflicted with the core function of providing care. Whilst important, raising awareness of such conflict will arouse discomfort and resistance where psychological defences are challenged. A parallel is drawn with psychotherapeutic change, in which resistance must be understood and worked with as part of meaningful change.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-08T11:49:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221099103
       
  • Disparities in the prevalence of ADHD diagnoses, suspicion, and medication
           use between Flanders and Québec from the lens of the medicalization
           process

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      Authors: Marie-Christine Brault, Emma Degroote, Mieke Van Houtte
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The prevalence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) diagnoses and medication use has increased over time around the world, but significant regional differences remain. This paper aims to determine and explain disparities in ADHD prevalence and medication use among school-aged children in two distinct school systems, in Flanders (Belgium) and Québec (Canada). We present detailed descriptive and comparative analyses of data from 35 schools, 114 teachers, and 1046 parents (children) that were collected as part of a comparative international project. The data concern teacher and parent suspicions, teachers’ ratings of ADHD-related behaviors in children, teachers’ views of medication use, and teachers’ beliefs about ADHD. The results show that, compared with Flanders, Québec had significantly more children diagnosed with ADHD and more frequent suspicions of ADHD in children by teachers and parents. We refer to the conceptual, institutional, and interactional levels of medicalization to interpret our findings and conclude that social and cultural readings of children’s behaviors differ greatly between regions. Medicalization of children’s behaviors is more common in Québec than in Flanders.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T09:43:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221093492
       
  • Imperatives of health or happiness: Narrative constructions of long-term
           smoking after undergoing lung screening

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      Authors: Rebecca E Olson, Ek; Xuan Wen, Zoe Staines, Felicia Goh, Henry M Marshall
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Tobacco control policies reinforce a health imperative that positions citizens as duty-bound to manage their health by abstaining from or quitting smoking. Limited attention is paid to the repercussions – especially for lung screening – of anti-smoking rhetoric emphasising individual responsibility. Drawing on interviews with 27 long-term smokers involved in an international lung screening trial, this study analysed Australian smokers’ narratives of smoking. By attending to stigma and the use of public health rhetoric within personal narratives, we show how narratives underscoring individual responsibility for quitting were layered with conflicting explanations of biological responsibility and normative expectations. Ironically, narratives of individual responsibility potentially undermine smoking cessation. In positioning smokers as responsible for their own healthy choices, such rhetoric also positions smokers as responsible for managing their emotional health, which some did through smoking. Thus, anti-smoking campaigns pit the neoliberal imperative of health against the happiness imperative. These findings have implications for the design and delivery of lung screening campaigns. They also support calls to move beyond health messaging emphasising individual choice, towards acknowledging the moral power of structures and public health campaigns to discipline citizens in unintended ways.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-07T05:51:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221099108
       
  • ‘Is it in your basic personality'’ Negotiations about traits and
           context in diagnostic interviews for personality disorders

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      Authors: Maarit Lehtinen, Liisa Voutilainen, Anssi Peräkylä
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      What does it mean to claim that somebody’s personality is disordered' The aim in this paper is to examine how the process of diagnosing personality disorders (PD) unfolds on a practical level. We take an in-depth look at PD interviews, paying close attention to the occasional discrepancies in the clinicians’ and the patients’ approaches to generalising the behaviour of patients to describe their personality. Clinicians are guided by the medical model and structured interviews in their approach. We regard the interview situation as interplay between the institution, the clinician and the patient – and the final diagnosis as an interactional construction between them. Our data consists of video-recorded interviews in Finland with 10 adult patients and three psychiatric nurses. The collection was compiled from 22 excerpts in which the participants orient differently to the generalisability of personality traits. Our observations show that, in these interviews, patients frequently make sense of their behaviour differently from what is expected – not as a reflection of their personality traits, but as an outcome of many situational factors. Our understanding leads us to emphasise the importance of making visible the practices that shape the diagnostic process in psychiatry.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-24T10:53:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221094701
       
  • On care infrastructures and health practices: How people in health
           promotion programmes try to change their everyday life

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      Authors: Francesco Miele
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to challenging common behavioural or cognitive explanations for health and wellbeing outcomes, focussing on social practices through which people, with the help of other subjects, try to improve their health conditions. To renew the debate about health promotion, my work is placed at the intersection between the sociology of health and illness and science and technology studies, adopting the concepts of care infrastructures and health practices that are introduced in the next section. With this goal, my paper draws on a qualitative study concerning a Workplace Health Promotion programme aimed at reducing the risks of Type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases among sedentary workers. The findings illustrate how a care infrastructure in the field of health promotion is designed, put to work, repaired and ‘put aside’ in relation to two health practices (‘doing physical activity’ and ‘following the Mediterranean diet’). Drawing on the presented case, I show how the change in daily habits in the fields of nutrition and physical activity is a collective effort involving different spheres of life, connecting human and non-human elements and bringing out affective intensities among them.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-19T06:14:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221093503
       
  • Involuntary psychiatric treatment and the erosion of consent: A critical
           discourse analysis of mental health legislation in British Columbia,
           Canada

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      Authors: Maja Kolar, Colleen Varcoe, Helen Brown, Rochelle Einboden
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The Mental Health Act (1996) is legislation that directs voluntary and involuntary psychiatric treatment for people experiencing mental health issues in British Columbia (BC), Canada. This critical discursive analysis explores how BC’s Mental Health Act (1996) and the Guide to the Mental Health Act (2005) structure involuntary psychiatric treatment and illustrates how the discourses within these texts constitute people experiencing mental health issues as passive recipients of care. Understandings of people experiencing mental health issues as pathological, incapable, vulnerable and dangerous justify their need for protection and the protection of others. Protection is identified as a central legitimising discourse in the use of involuntary psychiatric treatment. Further, these texts define the roles and responsibilities of police, physicians and nurses in authorising and implementing involuntary psychiatric treatment. This analysis describes how this legislation erodes consent and entrenches social marginalisation. Alternatively, discourses of equity have potential to transform health care practices and structures that reproduce discourses of deficit, vulnerability and dangerousness, shifting towards promotion of the rights and safety of people experiencing mental health issues and crises.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-09T09:14:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221096241
       
  • Luckily—I am not the worrying kind: Experiences of patients in the
           Danish cancer patient pathway for non-specific symptoms and signs of
           cancer

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      Authors: Christina Sadolin Damhus, John Brandt Brodersen, Mette Bech Risør
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In Denmark, due to the implementation of the Non-specific Symptoms and Signs of Cancer-Cancer Patient Pathway (NSSC-CPP), more people with symptoms such as fatigue and weight loss are informed that their symptoms might indicate cancer and they are referred to the pathway. But what do patients in the NSSC-CPP experience, in particular, with respect to being in an affective state of anticipation of a cancer diagnosis' We conducted participant observation and semi-structured interviews with patients to investigate their experience of the NSSC-CPP with a specific focus on their perception of symptoms and their thoughts on worrying about cancer. We found that the phrase ‘worried about cancer’ was not recognised by the participants, but worry was visible in their increased healthcare use and their interpretation of bodily sensations. Our study indicates the need to explore the impact of anticipation and potential cancer worries in participants’ everyday lives, as this context mediates their moral roles and responsibilities and restructures their social lives, while keeping uncertainty and probabilities on the table.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:13:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221096244
       
  • Causation, historiographic approaches and the investigation of serious
           adverse incidents in mental health settings

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      Authors: Sahil Bhandari, Øyvind Thomassen, Rajan Nathan
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      To improve the safety of healthcare systems, it is necessary to understand harm-related events that occur in these systems. In mental health services, particular attention is paid to harm arising from the actions of patients against themselves or others. The primary intention of examining these adverse events is to inform changes to care provision so as to reduce the likelihood of the recurrence of such events. The predominant approach to investigating adverse incidents has relied on the cause-and-effect conceptualisation of past events. Whilst the merits of approaches which are reliant on cause-and-effect narratives have been questioned, alternatives models to explain adverse incidents in health settings have not been theoretically or empirically tested. This novel article (i) examines the notion of causation (and the related notion of omission) in the context of explaining adverse events in mental health settings, and (ii) draws on a long-established discipline devoted to the study of how the past is interpreted (namely historiography) to theoretically investigate the innovative application of two historiographical approaches (i.e. counterfactual analysis and historical materialism) to understanding adverse events in mental health settings.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-03T09:00:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221094703
       
  • ‘The day you start lifting is the day you become forever small’:
           Bodybuilders explain muscle dysmorphia

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      Authors: Mair Underwood, Roberto Olivardia
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Muscle dysmorphia (MD) is a pathological preoccupation with muscularity characterised by negative body image, compulsive behaviours, and obsessive thoughts. Since its first identification academics have suggested that it is caused by sociocultural factors. Despite this there has been very little research exploring the role of sociocultural factors in the development and maintenance of MD, and no research that examines MD from within its cultural context. Instead the medical model of MD has dominated understanding. This model presents professionals as the experts on this disorder, and sufferers as pathological individuals in need of expert treatment. This renders cultural context largely irrelevant to understandings of MD. In this paper we present a different kind of expertise with regards MD. We describe the expertise of those most likely to suffer from MD, and upon whom medical descriptions of MD are based: bodybuilders. Specifically, we describe how bodybuilders explain MD (their definition, theory of aetiology and experience of MD, as well as their suggested management strategies), and compare these explanations to the dominant medical model. Through a consideration of the expertise of bodybuilders we break the tunnel vision of medicine, and suggest ways we can move beyond our current under-developed understanding of MD. This paper examines MD from within its cultural context, and in so doing it lays the foundation for a sociocultural explanatory model of MD. If we are to significantly reduce the harms of this disorder we cannot rely solely on treating the few individuals who present to clinicians. Rather we must develop ways to help sufferers to manage their disorder, and to prevent the development of this disorder among those at risk in the first place. To do this we must understand the sociocultural dimensions of MD, and collaborate with bodybuilding communities.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-04-27T08:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221093494
       
  • Conceptual unclarity about COVID-19 ethnic disparities in Sweden:
           Implications for public health policy

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      Authors: Anna Bredström, Shai Mulinari
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on abundant racial and ethnic health disparities in many countries around the world. In Sweden, statistics on COVID-19 mortality and morbidity from both the first and the second wave of the pandemic show that foreign-born individuals have been disproportionately affected, compared to Swedish-born individuals. However, as demonstrated in this article, key stakeholders including politicians, public authorities, mainstream media, and medical researchers do not draw on the same explanatory framework when conceptualizing the health disparity. Probing the different discourses that were articulated through oral and written accounts during the first wave, the article identifies three different frameworks of how ethnic health disparities in relation to COVID-19 were understood in Sweden: the socioeconomic framework, the culturalist framework and the biological framework. We discuss the importance of our findings for health policy and argue for continued interrogation of epidemiological knowledge production from a critical vantage point in order to successfully combat health inequalities.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-02-14T05:26:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221074866
       
  • Spaces out of reach' Service user involvement in residents’ meetings
           at recovery-oriented social housing facilities for young people with
           mental health disorders

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      Authors: Anne Mia Steno, Alexandra Brandt Ryborg Jønsson
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Through anthropological fieldwork among people with severe mental health disorders, this article focuses on these service users’ interactions and relations with the professionals and with other service users at recovery-oriented housing facilities in Denmark. We discuss how recovery-oriented spaces designed for the service users may feel out of reach to them, hence making the service users feel awkward and reluctant to participate. The study shows how service users, initially recognized as “unengaged,” rather are to be understood as active actors involved in their recovery and forming social bonds. The research seeks to put forward new perspectives on recovery as a concept in psychosocial rehabilitation, arguing that recovery and healing may take up different forms in different spaces and that recognizing services users’ enactment of reluctancy and disengagements could serve as an important part of recovery work in rehabilitation.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-02-03T08:22:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221075950
       
  • Secondary emotional labor: How female nurses respond to the contradictions
           of caring

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      Authors: Beverly Hogan, Patricia Drentea
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Prior research suggests that caring is in tension with a financially incentivized, technologically-driven healthcare system. Nevertheless, employers, the public, and nurses expect nurses to be caring when providing care to patients and families. This article focuses on nurses’ emotional labor strategies when managing emotions related to organizationally imposed interference with caring. We analyzed 27 semi-structured interviews with nurses and found that the unsuccessful performance of emotional labor spills over into the women’s relationships at and outside of work. We apply Di-Cicco-Bloom and DiCicco-Bloom’s concept of secondary emotional labor to examine our findings and how secondary emotional labor further develops the alienation and exploitation concepts of Hochschild’s emotional labor theory. We suggest a structural change in nurses’ job design that remedies contradictory caring expectations and supports their emotional labor to prioritize a climate of caring for patients.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T07:19:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221075952
       
  • Accounting for complexity in healthcare innovation debates: Professional
           views on the use of new IVF treatments

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      Authors: Alina Geampana, Manuela Perrotta
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Social scientists have long been interested in the forces and values driving healthcare innovation. The simultaneous rise of 20th century healthcare reforms, increased importance of evidence and upsurge in lay health activism have shaped modern medicine. On this backdrop, fertility care emerged in the 1970s. Recent developments reveal a contentious relationship between new fertility treatments and clinical evidence, with emerging technologies being used without conclusive evidence of effectiveness despite being sold to patients. Initial critiques of this phenomenon emphasise commercial interests as the culprit, suggesting that the problematic use of unproven treatments is mainly driven by the private sector. Here, we challenge this over-simplified view of IVF care. Drawing on a qualitative analysis of key documents and 43 in-depth professional interviews, this article identifies three main stakeholder approaches to new treatment adoption. We argue that viewpoints are anchored within three critical overarching ‘modes of coordination’ or core values in modern healthcare: efficiency, effectiveness and patient-centeredness. This analysis encourages a more contextualised overview of fertility care than previous literatures have afforded. The IVF case shows that an emphasis on private versus public clinic practices obscure similarities between the two along with the values motivating healthcare professionals’ approaches to new treatments.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-02-02T07:13:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221074874
       
  • Quality-of-life measurement in depression trials: A consumerist relic

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      Authors: Susan McPherson, Jeppe Oute, Ewen Speed
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Quality-of-life measurement in depression is advocated as a patient-centred indicator of recovery, but may instead enhance the mimetic authority of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which have been roundly critiqued in mental health. In this paper we draw on the social life of methods approach to extend the well-developed critique of RCTs into the field of quality-of-life measurement. We accomplish this through consideration and critique of the conceptual and epistemological development of quality-of-life measurement in depression, including the role of psychometrics in its development. Examining conceptual developments from the 1970s onwards, we consider how the scientific literature on quality-of-life in depression aligns with behavioural economics and consumerism but falls short of engaging with genuinely patient-centred approaches to recovery. We argue that quality-of-life measures in depression were developed within a consumerist model of healthcare in which the medical model was a central pillar and ‘choice’ a rhetorical device only. While quality-of-life instrument development was largely funded by industry, psychometrics provided no coherent solution to the ‘affective fallacy’ (high correlations between quality-of-life and depressive symptoms). Industry has largely abandoned the measures, while psychotherapy research has increasingly endorsed them. We argue that in their design and implementation, quality-of-life measures for depression remain based on a commercial model of healthcare, are conceptually flawed and do not support concepts of patient-centred healthcare.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-28T11:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221074887
       
  • A narrative exploration of identity in adults with de novo scoliosis

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      Authors: Lucy Tweedlie, Laura Simonds, Paul Hanna, Darren F Lui
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Adult de novo scoliosis is a chronic health condition characterised by a curvature in the ageing spine. It can cause debilitating back pain and significant visible differences. Yet there has been very limited research on the psychological effects of this condition, particularly around identity. Therefore, we undertook semi-structured interviews to explore the ways in which individuals with scoliosis understood their identity. Findings from narrative analysis highlight the ways in which individuals negotiate their identity in relation to their social roles, their ability to control their condition and things around them, the extent to which their condition is visible and the extent to which they experienced physical pain from their condition. This article concludes by highlighting the relationship between identity and scoliosis and offers practical implications and suggestions for future research.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-19T09:45:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593211067892
       
  • Taking care of oneself and others: The emotion work of women suffering
           from a rare skin disease

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      Authors: Yannick Le Henaff, Stéphane Héas, Pascal Joly
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In this article, we analyze the emotion work of women suffering from pemphigus, a rare skin disease. We suggest that this approach sheds new light on the upheavals caused by illness and more generally on the experience of illness itself. Our study draws on a series of 27 interviews with pemphigus patients whose average age was 57. We show that serious and chronic illness does not radically alter the feeling rules in place with close friends and family, despite the uncertainty and emotional upheaval confronting patients. The emotion work they carry out should be understood in light of roles and places established prior to the onset of the disease. Emotion work is embedded in the broader history of relationships with family and friends and prior episodes of illness help create particular configurations and expectations.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2022-01-07T06:34:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593211064127
       
 
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