Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
AIDS and Behavior
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.792
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 16  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1573-3254 - ISSN (Online) 1090-7165
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2467 journals]
  • Strategies of Managing Repeated Measures: Using Synthetic Random Forest to
           Predict HIV Viral Suppression Status Among Hospitalized Persons with HIV

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      Abstract: Abstract The HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a major public health concern since the 1980s; untreated HIV infection has numerous consequences on quality of life. To optimize patients’ health outcomes and to reduce HIV transmission, this study focused on vulnerable populations of people living with HIV (PLWH) and compared different predictive strategies for viral suppression using longitudinal or repeated measures. The four methods of predicting viral suppression are (1) including the repeated measures of each feature as predictors, (2) utilizing only the initial (baseline) value of the feature as predictor, (3) using the last observed value as the predictors and (4) using a growth curve estimated from the features to create individual-specific prediction of growth curves as features. This study suggested the individual-specific prediction of the growth curve performed the best in terms of lowest error rate on an independent set of test data.
      PubDate: 2023-02-05
       
  • Willingness to Participate in and Preferences for Studies of mHealth HIV
           Prevention Interventions: Cross-Sectional Study Among Sexual and Gender
           Minority Groups in the Southern United States

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      Abstract: Abstract A number of mobile HIV prevention interventions have been developed to increase uptake of HIV prevention services such as HIV testing and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Most of these interventions have been tested among urban populations. However, sexual and gender minority (SGM) groups in rural areas might also benefit from mobile HIV prevention interventions. These groups have heightened experiences of stigma and discrimination and have limited access to culturally competent healthcare. We conducted a survey of SGM participants in the southern United States to assess willingness to use the common features of mobile HIV prevention interventions and to participate in research studies of these interventions and to compare the results between rural and non-rural respondents. We found few differences in willingness to use common features of mobile HIV prevention interventions based on rurality and high levels of cellular connectivity across participants. Based on these results, rural residence is not a barrier to using mobile HIV prevention interventions.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • Pre-exposure Prophylaxis Persistence at a Diverse Sexual Health Clinic:
           Comparison of the pre-COVID-19 era to the COVID-19 era

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      Abstract: Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic interrupted health care delivery and exacerbated disparities. Many sexual health clinics transitioned to telemedicine, including for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patients at an urban sexual health clinic to assess the likelihood and predictors of PrEP persistence in the year following PrEP initiation. We compared patients starting PrEP in the four months preceding the first COVID surge to those starting PrEP one year prior. We found lower PrEP persistence in the COVID cohort compared to the pre-COVID cohort (50.8% vs. 68.9%, respectively). In both cohorts, most care was provided through in-person visits and telemedicine was rare. In the pre-COVID cohort, older patients and those identifying as non-Hispanic White were more likely to persist on PrEP. In the COVID cohort, these disparities in PrEP persistence were not observed. Flexible models of care may facilitate equitable care engagement and re-engagement.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • Understanding COVID-19 Vaccine Confidence in People Living with HIV: A
           pan-Canadian Survey

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      Abstract: Abstract Understanding the roots of Covid-19 vaccine hesitancy in at-risk groups, such as persons living with HIV (PLWH), is of utmost importance. We developed a modified Vaccine Hesitancy Scale (VHS) questionnaire using items from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization Acceptability Matrix. To examine factors associated with receiving COVID-19 vaccine and the link between vaccine attitudes and beliefs with vaccine behavior, PLWH were recruited via social media and community-based organizations (February-May 2022). Descriptive statistics were used to summarize results. Total VHS score was generated by adding Likert scale scores and linear regression models used to compare results between participants who received or did not receive COVID-19 vaccines. Logistic regression models were used to identify factors associated with vaccine uptake. A total of 246 PLWH indicated whether they received a COVID-19 vaccine. 89% received ≥ 1 dose. Mean total VHS(SD) for persons having received ≥ 1 COVID-19 vaccine was 17.8(6.2) vs. 35.4(9.4) for participants not having received any COVID-19 vaccine. Persons who received ≥ 1 dose were significantly older than those who had not received any (48.4 ± 13.8 vs. 34.0 ± 7.7 years, p < 0.0001). The majority of participants considered COVID-19 vaccination important for their health(81.3%) and the health of others(84.4%). Multivariate logistic regression revealed the odds of taking ≥ 1dose were increased 2.4-fold [95% CI 1.6, 3.5] with each increase in age of 10 years (p < 0.0001). Sex and ethnicity were not different between groups. In conclusion, PLWH accept COVID-19 vaccines for both altruistic and individual reasons. With evolving recommendations and increasing numbers of booster vaccines, we must re-examine the needs of PLWH regularly.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • A Pilot Assessment of the Effects of HIV and Methamphetamine Dependence on
           Socially Dysregulated Behavior in the Human Behavioral Pattern Monitor

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      Abstract: Abstract Deficits in social cognition are seen in both people living with HIV (PWH) and people with a history of methamphetamine (METH) dependence. Dually affected individuals may experience additive negative effects on social cognition due to these conditions. We evaluated social cognition in 4 diagnostic groups (HIV−/METH−, HIV−/METH+, HIV+/METH−, HIV+/METH+). First, we used traditional social-emotional functioning assessments, the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale and the Faux Pas Task, to determine any significant effects of METH dependence and HIV on social cognition. Next, we quantified social cognition using the Human Behavioral Pattern Monitor by evaluating social behavior represented by interaction with novel objects. METH dependence significantly affected social-emotional functions and HIV significantly affected on object interactions, however no significant additive effects were observed using these methods. The nuanced relationship between HIV and METH dependence suggests that other factors (i.e., adaptive life skills) likely mediate social cognition-related behaviors.
      PubDate: 2023-02-04
       
  • Precarious Housing Associated with Unsuppressed Viral load, sub-optimal
           Access to HIV Treatment and Unmet Health care Needs, Among Women Living
           with HIV in Metro Vancouver, Canada

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      Abstract: Abstract We investigated associations between (1) housing status (four categories measuring housing stability) and outcomes along the HIV care continuum (not currently on antiretroviral therapy [ART]; sub-optimal ART adherence [< 95% in the last 3–4 weeks]; unsuppressed viral load [> 200 copies/ml], median CD4 < 200 in the last six months), and (2) housing status and unmet primary, dental and mental health care needs in the last six months among WLWH. Housing status was defined according to the Canadian Definition of Homelessness and had four categories: unsheltered (i.e., living in ≥ 1 unsheltered location [e.g., street, abandoned buildings]), unstable (i.e., living in ≥ 1 unstable location [e.g., shelter, couch surfing]), supportive housing (i.e., only living in supportive housing), and stable housing (i.e., only living in one’s own housing; reference). At baseline, in the last six months, 47.3% of participants reported unstable housing, followed by 24.4% unsheltered housing, 16.4% stable housing, and 11.9% supportive housing. Overall, 19.1% of the full sample (N = 336, 2010–2019) reported not currently on ART; among participants on ART, 28.0% reported sub-optimal ART adherence. Overall, 32.1% had recent unsuppressed viral load. Among a subsample (n = 318, 2014–2019), 15.7% reported unmet primary care needs, 26.1% unmet dental care needs, and 16.4% unmet mental health care needs. In adjusted models, being unsheltered (vs. stable housing) was associated with not currently on ART, unsuppressed viral load, and unmet primary and dental care needs. Housing and health services need to be developed with and for WLWH to address structural inequities and fulfill basic rights to housing and health.
      PubDate: 2023-02-02
       
  • Correction to: A Capacity-Strengthening Intervention to Support HIV
           Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Awareness-Building and Promotion by
           Frontline Harm Reduction Workers in Baltimore, Maryland: A Mixed Methods
           Evaluation

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      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Characterization of HIV-Related Stigma in Myanmar

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      Abstract: Abstract Characterizing HIV-related stigma and its impacts are important for interventions toward their elimination. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 to evaluate enacted and internalized stigma among adult people living with HIV (PLWH) across four cities in Myanmar using the India Stigma Index questionnaire. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine differences in measured enacted and internalized stigma outcomes. Among 1,006 participants, 89% reported any stigma indicator, 47% enacted stigma, and 87% internalized stigma. In regression analysis, city and duration of illness were associated with higher enacted stigma, and younger age was associated with higher internalized stigma. Those with HIV duration > 7.4 years had mean enacted stigma nearly 2 units higher than the overall mean. Internalized stigma increased with duration of illness and leveled off at 5 years. PLWH from smaller cities experienced lower stigma. In Myanmar, nearly 90% of PLWH experience stigma, results that reflect a unique transition point.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Stigma and HIV Treatment Outcomes Among Transgender Women Sex Workers in
           the Dominican Republic

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      Abstract: Abstract Trans women experience multiple forms of intersecting stigma due to trans identity, HIV, and sex work, which can negatively affect their health. There is limited understanding of the relationships between stigma and HIV care and treatment outcomes. We assessed associations between multiple forms and types of stigma and HIV treatment outcomes among trans women who conduct sex work in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic using cross-sectional survey data. Most participants had received HIV care (91%) and were currently taking anti-retroviral therapy (ART) (84%). Only 64% were virally suppressed. Nearly one-third (32%) had interrupted ART at some point; those who had never interrupted ART were more likely to be suppressed. Drug use was associated with ART interruption. Higher enacted HIV stigma was associated with current ART use. Higher enacted HIV stigma and higher anticipated sex work stigma were associated with ART adherence. Higher trans stigma was associated with being virally suppressed. Findings highlight the importance of addressing multiple forms of stigma at the individual and clinic levels to improve and sustain viral suppression. Future research is needed to assess if unexpected associations between stigma and HIV outcomes reflect processes of resilience. Future research is also needed to assess the pathways between drug use, ART interruption, and viral suppression among trans women.
      PubDate: 2023-02-01
       
  • Psychosocial Protective and Risk Factors of Quality of Life Outcomes Among
           Older Adults Living With HIV

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      Abstract: Abstract HIV continues to be a public health issue for older adults. Previous studies have examined predictors of quality of life (QoL) among people living with HIV (PLWH), but the majority have been in international settings and have not focused on older adults living with HIV (OALH). The aim of this study was to examine the associations between psychosocial protective and risk factors (resilience, internalized HIV-related stigma, and depression), and overall and domains (physical, psychological, independence, social, environmental, and spiritual) of QoL among OALH. Data were obtained from 156 OALH living in South Carolina. Resilience was positively associated with all QoL domains except the spiritual domain. Internalized HIV-related stigma was associated with all QoL domains except the psychological and environmental domains. Depression was associated with the overall QoL measure and all domains. Interventions aimed at increasing resilience, attenuating internalized HIV-related stigma and depressive symptoms may be warranted for OALH, which may improve overall and varying domains of QoL.
      PubDate: 2023-01-31
       
  • The Impact of COVID-19 on HIV Care in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil 2019–2021:
           Disparities by Age and Gender

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      Abstract: Abstract We evaluated COVID-19’s impact on HIV care indicators among INI/FIOCRUZ’s HIV Clinical Cohort in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: (1) Adequate care visits: two visits ≥ 90 days apart; (2) Adequate viral load monitoring: ≥ 2 viral load results ≥ 90 days apart; (3) Consistent viral suppression: all viral loads < 40 copies/mL; and (4) ART medication possession ratio (MPR) ≥ 95%. Chi-square tests compared the fraction of participants meeting each indicator per period: pre-pandemic (3/1/2019–2/29/2020) and post-pandemic (3/1/2020–2/28/2021). Logistic regression models were used to assess disparities in adequate care visits. Among 906 participants, care visits and viral load monitoring decreased pre-pandemic to post-pandemic: 77.0–55.1% and 36.6–11.6% (both p < 0.001), respectively. The optimal MPR rate improved from 25.5 to 40.0% (p < 0.001). Post-pandemic period (aOR 0.33, CI 0.28–0.40), transgender women (aOR 0.34, CI 0.22–0.53), and those aged 18–24 years (aOR 0.67, CI 0.45–0.97) had lower odds of adequate care visits. COVID-19 disrupted care access disproportionately for transgender women and younger participants.
      PubDate: 2023-01-30
       
  • Cognitive Performance, as well as Depression, Alcohol Use, and Gender,
           predict Anti-Retroviral Therapy Adherence in a South African Cohort of
           People with HIV and Comorbid Major Depressive Disorder

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      Abstract: Abstract Depression and cognitive impairment, which commonly coexist in people with HIV (PWH), have been identified as potential barriers to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We investigated associations between cognitive performance, depression (as well as other sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric variables) and ART adherence in a South African cohort of PWH with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD). Cognitive performance and ART adherence were assessed at two time points 8 months apart (Nbaseline = 105, Nfollow-up = 81). Adherence was indicated by self-report, objective measures (Wisepill usage and plasma tenofovir-diphosphate levels), and HIV viral suppression. Mixed-effects regression models examined associations across both time points. Univariate models detected no significant associations between cognitive performance (globally and within-domain) and ART adherence. Multivariate modelling showed increased depression severity (β = − 0.54, p < 0.001) and problematic alcohol use (β = 0.73, p = 0.015) were associated with worse adherence as measured subjectively. Being female (OR 0.27, p = 0.048) and having better global cognitive performance (OR 1.83, p = 0.043) were associated with better adherence as indicated by viral suppression. This study identifies poor global cognitive performance, as well as depression and problematic alcohol use, as potential barriers to optimal ART adherence in PWH and comorbid MDD. Hence, clinicians could consider assessing for cognitive deficits, depression, and problematic alcohol use, and should endeavour to provide the appropriate support so as to improve adherence.
      PubDate: 2023-01-28
       
  • The Impact of Customized Short Message Service on High-Risk Behaviors
           Among MSM in China, a Randomized Controlled Trial Study

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      Abstract: Abstract An individual based randomized controlled trial (RCT) was designed to evaluate the impact of a customized short message service (SMS) intervention on HIV-related high-risk behaviors among Men who have sex with men (MSM). In total, 631 HIV-negative MSM were enrolled at baseline and divided into intervention and control groups randomly. Nine months later, the intervention group who received additional customized SMS intervention reported significantly lower rates of multiple partners, unclear partner infection status and condomless anal intercourse compared to the control group who received the routine intervention only. Six months post stopping the SMS intervention, the rates of unclear partner infection status and condomless anal intercourse still remained lower report in the intervention group. Our study shown that the customized SMS interventions can significantly reduce the HIV-related high-risk behaviors among MSM and with sustained effects over a period of time.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
       
  • Quantitative Methods Used to Evaluate Impact of Combination HIV Prevention
           Intervention: A Methodological Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Abstract Combination HIV prevention aims to provide the right mix of biomedical, behavioral and structural interventions, and is considered the best approach to curb the HIV pandemic. The impact evaluation of combined HIV prevention intervention (CHPI) provides critical information for decision making. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to map the designs and methods used in these studies. We searched original articles indexed in Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed. Fifty-eight studies assessing the impact of CHPI on HIV transmission were included. Most of the studies took place in Asia or sub-Saharan Africa and were published from 2000 onward. We identified 36 (62.1%) quasi-experimental studies (posttest, pretest–posttest and nonequivalent group designs) and 22 (37.9%) experimental studies (randomized designs). The findings suggest that diverse methods are already rooted in CHPI impact evaluation practices as recommended but should be better reported. CHPI impact evaluation would benefit from more comprehensive approaches.
      PubDate: 2023-01-27
       
  • Zambian Parents’ Perspectives on Early-Infant Versus
           Early-Adolescent Male Circumcision

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      Abstract: Abstract Despite increasing interest in Early-Infant and Early-Adolescent Medical Circumcision (EIMC and EAMC, respectively) in Zambia, parental willingness to have their sons undergo the procedure has not been explored. This study describes Zambian parents’ perspectives on EIMC and EAMC. A total of N = 600 men and women (n = 300 couples) were recruited. Most parents, 89% and 83%, planned to have their newborn or adolescent sons circumcised, respectively, and 70% and 57% had plans for EIMC and EAMC, respectively. Most (91% for infants and 86% for adolescents) reported they were considering the pros and cons of circumcision. Parents’ age (OR 1.05), having children living in one’s home (OR 3.58), and lower education (OR 0.63) were associated with sons’ circumcision. The minimal risks associated with circumcision and the lifetime benefits conferred underscore its contribution to public health in high HIV prevalence areas.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Confronting AIDS in the Early 1980s: Biomedicine, Public Health, and the
           Fourth Estate

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      Abstract: Abstract Detection of a mysterious and fatal disease among young, previously healthy, homosexual men in spring 1981 warranted a rapid and effective response. An adequate response failed to materialize during the first 5 years of the AIDS pandemic. The failure of biomedicine, public health, and The Press to stop the outbreak was attributed by Randy Shilts to institutional failures. This commentary considers the possibility that organizations, agencies, and authorities failed to safeguard the public’s health because they succeeded in carrying out their appropriate tasks of (1) meticulously conducting systematic, scientific, research, (2) cautiously reporting evidence-based observations and alternative interpretations, and (3) carefully exercising rigorous controls over unauthorized and potentially wasteful spending. As practiced in the early 1980s by the National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and major newspapers and other media outlets, essential features of biomedicine, public health, and The Press inhibited a rapid and effective response.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Missed Opportunities When We Focus only on Risk: Using the Concerns Based
           Conversation Starter to Identify Potential PrEP Candidates

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      Abstract: Abstract Collection and use of self-reported HIV sexual risk-behaviors to identify pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) candidates is common practice in PrEP providing and referral services. Critiques of this strategy highlight overreliance on self-report and contribution to ongoing PrEP stigma. As an alternative (or complimentary) approach, we evaluated a 5-item Concerns Based Conversation Starter (CBCS) that could be used to identify individuals who could benefit from PrEP. The CBCS was included in the 2019 cycle of the American Men’s Internet Survey. Item responses were characterized overall and in relation to CDC risk-based PrEP indication and reported willingness to use PrEP. In total, 1606 HIV-negative men who have sex with men not on PrEP were evaluated. Of these, 50% were below the age of 25, 11% Black, 16% Latino, and 64% White. Across the sample, 61% (986) met risk-based criteria for PrEP indication, 80% (1278) were identified by the CBCS, and 52% (835) were flagged by both. The CBCS uniquely identified 28% (443) for follow-up PrEP discussions that would have been missed by a risk-based only approach. Only 9% (151) of the sample had risk-based indication but did not report concerns. Over half of those flagged by the CBCS expressed willingness to use PrEP. The CBCS identified more people than a risk-based indication approach, with most also reporting an interest in using PrEP. A small percentage of risk-indicated participants were ‘missed’ by the CBCS. As PrEP options and access points expand, implementation tools like the CBCS can facilitate more wide-scale, values-focused PrEP implementation.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Risks of Intimate Partner Violence for Women Living with HIV Receiving
           Cash Transfers: A Qualitative Study in Shinyanga, Tanzania

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      Abstract: Abstract Cash transfers are increasingly used to motivate adherence to HIV care. However, evidence on cash transfers and intimate partner violence (IPV) is mixed and little is known about their safety for women living with HIV. We conducted in-depth interviews with women living with HIV who participated in a randomized trial providing 6 months of cash transfers (~$4.5 or $11 USD) conditional on HIV clinic attendance in Shinyanga, Tanzania to assess how receiving cash affects IPV and relationship dynamics. Eligible participants were 18–49 years, received cash transfers, and in a partnership at baseline. Data were analyzed in Dedoose using a combined inductive-deductive coding approach. 25 interviews were conducted between November 2019-February 2020. Women’s employment was found to be a source of household tension and violence. None of the participants reported physical or sexual IPV in relation to cash transfers, however, some women experienced controlling behaviors or emotional violence including accusations and withholding of money, particularly those who were unemployed. Cash transfers were predominantly used for small household expenses and were not viewed as being substantial enough to shift the financial dynamic or balance of power within relationships. Our findings suggest that small, short-term cash transfers do not increase physical or sexual IPV for women living with HIV however can exacerbate controlling behaviors or emotional violence. Modest incentives used as a behavioral nudge to improve health outcomes may affect women differently than employment or larger cash transfers. Nonetheless, consultations with beneficiaries should be prioritized to protect women from potential IPV risks.
      PubDate: 2023-01-24
       
  • Socio-ecological Barriers to Viral Suppression Among Transgender Women
           Living with HIV in San Francisco and Los Angeles, California

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      Abstract: Abstract Troubling disparities in viral suppression persist among transgender (trans) women living with HIV in the US. We utilized baseline data from a randomized controlled trial of a behavioral intervention among trans women living with HIV in San Francisco and Los Angeles, to identify the socio-ecological correlates of biologically confirmed viral suppression (< 200 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL). Among 253 participants, the mean age was 43 (SD = 11), 46% identified as Black or African American and 35% were virally non-suppressed. In adjusted Poisson regression models, the following barriers to viral suppression were identified: injection drug use [adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 0.78, 95% CI 0.65–0.93, Z = − 2.64, p = 0.008], methamphetamine use (aRR 0.65, 95% CI 0.51–0.83, Z = − 3.45, p = 0.001), amphetamine use (aRR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.87, Z = − 2.75, p = 0.006), homelessness (aRR 0.79, 95% CI 0.63–0.98, Z = − 2.06, p = 0.039), and sex work (aRR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41–0.86, Z = − 2.77, p = 0.009). These findings underscore the importance of interventions that address the socio-ecological barriers to viral suppression among trans women in urban settings.
      PubDate: 2023-01-22
       
  • Optimizing Uptake of Long-Acting Injectable Pre-exposure Prophylaxis for
           HIV Prevention for Men Who Have Sex with Men

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      Abstract: Abstract Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a highly effective HIV prevention tool. Long-acting injectable PrEP (LAI-PrEP) offers another opportunity to reduce HIV. However, how at-risk individuals will consider LAI-PrEP over other modes of administration is unclear. We conducted a discrete choice experiment on preferences for PrEP among a sample of N = 688 gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBMSM). We analyzed preferences for mode of administration, side-effects, monetary cost, and time cost using a conditional logit model and predicted preference for PrEP options. LAI-PrEP was preferred, despite mode of administration being the least important PrEP attribute. Side-effects were the most important attribute influencing preferences for PrEP (44% of decision); costs were second-most-important (35% of decision). PrEP with no side-effects was the most important preference, followed by monthly out-of-pocket costs of $0. Practitioners and policymakers looking to increase PrEP uptake should keep costs low, communicate clearly about PrEP side-effects, and allow the use of patient-preferred modes of PrEP administration, including LAI-PrEP.
      PubDate: 2023-01-21
       
 
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