Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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Evaluation & the Health Professions
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.701
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 11  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0163-2787 - ISSN (Online) 1552-3918
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Anxiety among College Students Who Self-Isolated During the Omicron
           Variant of SARS-CoV-2 in China

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      Authors: Zhiqiang Hao, Wanhong Zhang
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      We investigated the prevalence of anxiety and its associated risk factors among college students who self-isolated for 30 days during the emergence of the Omicron variant in China. We sampled college students specializing in four academic majors by cluster sampling and conducted questionnaires separately on days 1, 10, 20, and 30 after self-isolation. Anxiety was assessed using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD-7) and Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS). An odds ratio (OR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the strength of associations. A total of 10231 college students responded to the questionnaire 4 times. More students reported experiencing anxiety as the period of self-isolation approached 30 days. Among the students from four different major disciplines, medical students reported the highest rate of anxiety after 30 days of self-isolation, whereas humanities students exhibited the lowest rate of anxiety. Factor analysis indicated that the main reason for anxiety among all participating students was a delay in course completion. For engineering and medical students, there was an association between anxiety and research project delay. This study reveals the level of anxiety associated with COVID-19 pandemic-related self-isolation in college students and finds that it was aggravated by long-term isolation.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T08:05:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221147619
       
  • Development and Assessment of the Personal Emotional Capital Questionnaire
           for Adolescents

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      Authors: Morteza Khazaei, Mark D. Holder, Fuschia M. Sirois, Matthew W. Gallagher
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Higher emotional capital is associated with enhanced positive emotions, social relationships, social capital and human capital. The present study developed and evaluated a personal emotional capital questionnaire for adolescents (PECQ-A) that assessed 10 components of this capital. The PECQ-A was administrated to two samples of Iranian 15-year-olds from two Iranian cities (N1 = 600, N2 = 300, total N = 900) recruited using multistage random cluster sampling. A confirmatory factor analysis of the first sample confirmed the ten-factor structure of the PECQ-A. The reliability of PECQ-A was acceptable (Cronbach’s α = .90, McDonald’s ω = .88, AVE = .57, Composite reliability CR = .89). Analyses of the second sample revealed that the PECQ-A and its components exhibited convergent validity when compared to the Mental Health Continuum–Short Form (MHC–SF), the students’ GPAs, and the students’ mathematics and natural sciences scores. The PECQ-A demonstrated divergent validity when contrasted with the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS21). Test-retest reliability was acceptable. Invariance measurement was confirmed for the PECQ-A. A MANOVA identified several gender differences. PECQ-A scores were not sensitive to the order that the questionnaires were administered. The results suggest that the PECQ–A is a valid and reliable measure of personal emotional capital suitable for use with adolescents.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-15T03:30:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221146564
       
  • Psychometric Properties of the Turkish Version of the JHand for the
           Patient-Oriented Outcome Measure for Patients with Hand and Elbow
           Disorders

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      Authors: Hasan Atacan Tonak, Yener Aydin, Burc Ozcanyuz, Haluk Ozcanli, Kosuke Uehara, Yutaka Morizaki
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The JHand is an easy-to-understand questionnaire that includes questions that exclude hand dominance. It was developed to evaluate patients with hand and elbow disorders. However, JHand has not been translated and validated in the Turkish language. The aim of this study is to investigate the psychometric properties of the culturally adapted Turkish version of the JHand for Turkish patients. A total of 262 patients were included in the study. JHand, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand Questionnaire, and Hand20 were used to evaluate patients. Internal consistency and test-retest analyses were applied to determine the reliability of the Turkish version of the JHand. Confirmatory factor analysis and similar scale validity were used to determine its validity. The Turkish version of the JHand showed high levels of internal consistency and excellent test-retest reliability (Cronbach α = 0.907, ICC = 0.923). The model fit indices of the Turkish version of the JHand had good and acceptable fit with reference values. Statistically positive and very strong correlations were found between JHand and DASH (r = .825, p < .001) as well as the JHand and Hand20 (r = .846, p < .001). The Turkish version of the JHand had excellent internal consistency and test-retest reliability as well as a high level of validity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-12-13T03:38:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221146245
       
  • Prevalence and Risk Factors for Dangerous Abbreviations in Malaysian
           Electronic Clinical Notes

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      Authors: Ismat Mohd Sulaiman, Awang Bulgiba, Sameem Abdul Kareem
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Medical abbreviations can be misinterpreted and endanger patients’ lives. This research is the first to investigate the prevalence of abbreviations in Malaysian electronic discharge summaries, where English is widely used, and elicit the risk factors associated with dangerous abbreviations. We randomly sampled and manually annotated 1102 electronic discharge summaries for abbreviations and their senses. Three medical doctors assigned a danger level to ambiguous abbreviations based on their potential to cause patient harm if misinterpreted. The predictors for dangerous abbreviations were determined using binary logistic regression. Abbreviations accounted for 19% (33,824) of total words; 22.6% (7640) of those abbreviations were ambiguous; and 52.3% (115) of the ambiguous abbreviations were labelled dangerous. Increased risk of danger occurs when abbreviations have more than two senses (OR = 2.991; 95% CI 1.586, 5.641), they are medication-related (OR = 6.240; 95% CI 2.674, 14.558), they are disorders (OR = 7.771; 95% CI 2.054, 29.409) and procedures (OR = 3.492; 95% CI 1.376, 8.860). Reduced risk of danger occurs when abbreviations are confined to a single discipline (OR = 0.519; 95% CI 0.278, 0.967). Managing abbreviations through awareness and implementing automated abbreviation detection and expansion would improve the quality of clinical documentation, patient safety, and the information extracted for secondary purposes.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T08:38:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221142623
       
  • Which Outreach Modes Improve Response Rates to Physician Surveys'
           Lessons from an Experiment at the American Board of Internal Medicine

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      Authors: Brendan J. Barnhart, Siddharta G. Reddy, Jonathan L. Vandergrift
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Physicians are a notoriously difficult group to survey due to a low propensity to respond. We investigate the relative effectiveness of reminder phone calls, pre-notification postcards, mailed paper surveys, and $1 upfront incentives for boosting survey response rate by embedding a randomized experiment into a mixed-mode operational survey at the American Board of Internal Medicine in 2019. Expected response rates and average marginal effects for each follow-up method were computed from a logistic regression model. The control group which only received email reminders achieved a response rate of 18.2%, 95% CI: (15.0%, 21.9%). The intervention group which included reminder emails, pre-notification postcards, and mailed paper surveys with $1 incentives achieved a response rate of 43.1%, 95% CI: (38.8%, 47.5%). Mailed paper surveys yielded the largest percentage point increase in response rate of 11.2%, 95% CI: (7.3%, 15.2%), while $1 upfront monetary incentives and phone call reminders increased survey response rate by 5.9%, 95% CI: (1.6%, 10.2%) and 5.5%, 95% CI: (2.6%, 8.3%) respectively. Pre-notification postcards are associated with a 2.0%, 95% CI: (−1.7%, 5.6%) increase in survey response rate. Cost-effectiveness for each method is discussed. This research supports optimal decision making for researchers when planning a physician survey study.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T06:41:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221143151
       
  • A Comparison of Caffeine Intake and Physical Activity According to Fatigue
           Severity in University Students

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      Authors: Musa Güneş, Büşra Demirer
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This study aims to compare caffeine intake and physical activity levels in university students with severe and ineffective fatigue and examine the relationship between them. A total of 647 (F:527; M:120) university students were included in this cross-sectional study. Individuals' socio-demographic information, severity of fatigue (Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS)), amount of caffeine intake and physical activity level (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short Form (IPAQ-SF)) were evaluated. It was determined that 56.5% of the university students (age: 21.21 ± 2.57) participating in the study had severe fatigue. Caffeine intake and physical activity level of students with severe fatigue were statistically significantly lower than those with ineffective fatigue (p < 0.05). In addition, there was a weak negative correlation between fatigue and caffeine intake (r = −0.157; p < 0.001) and physical activity level (r = −0.096; p < 0.017). There was a significant positive correlation between caffeine intake and physical activity (r = 0.143; p < 0.001). This study showed that a significant portion of university students have severe fatigue. In addition, individuals with severe fatigue have decreased caffeine intake and lower physical activity levels. To reduce fatigue, caffeine intake in safe doses should be encouraged in accordance with the individual’s metabolic and physiological parameters. In addition, physical activity counseling should be given to encourage physical activity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-22T08:03:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221141504
       
  • Development and Validation of a Measure to Assess Readiness to Advance
           Health and Equity: The Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation
           (AACT)

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      Authors: Brandon K. Attell, Kate Kingery, Tanisa Adimu, John Butts, Paul Howard, Somava Saha, Karen Minyard
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Multi-sector partnerships are core in efforts to improve population health but are often not as fully developed or positioned to advance health and equity in their communities as believed to be. Therefore, measuring the collaborations multi-sector partnerships undertake is important to document the inputs, processes, and outcomes that evolve as they work together towards achieving their goals, which ultimately creates a greater sense of shared accountability. In this study we present the development and validation of the Assessment for Advancing Community Transformation (AACT), a new tool designed to measure readiness to advance health and health equity. Development of the AACT included initial item pool creation, external evaluation from five subject matter experts, and pilot testing (including user feedback surveys) among 103 individuals. Validation of the AACT was performed using a series of confirmatory factor analyses on an expanded dataset representing 352 individuals from 49 multi-sector collaboratives across the United States. The results of our study indicate the items in the AACT align to six domains created during the scale development process, and that the tool demonstrates desirable measurement characteristics for use in research, evaluation, and practice.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-11-14T01:13:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221139244
       
  • Validity and Reliability of Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Chronic
           Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Inventory and Caregiver Self-Efficacy in
           Contributing to Self-Care Scale

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      Authors: Maria Matarese, Roberta Pendoni, Davide Ausili, Ercole Vellone, Maddalena De Maria
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The study tested the construct validity and reliability of the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Inventory and the Caregiver Self-Efficacy in Contributing to Self-Care of COPD Scale. The two instruments were developed by modifying the Self-Care of COPD Inventory and Self-Care Self-Efficacy Scale in COPD into caregiver versions. The psychometric properties were tested in a convenience sample of 261 informal caregivers of COPD patients recruited in Italy in two cross-sectional studies. Structural validity was tested by confirmatory factor analysis, construct validity by posing several hypotheses, and internal consistency through factor score determinacy and global reliability index for multidimensional scales. In confirmatory factor analysis, the caregiver contribution to self-care maintenance, monitoring and management scales, composing the Caregiver Contribution to Self-Care of COPD Inventory, presented good fit indices. Global reliability indices ranged 0.75–0.88. The caregiver self-efficacy scale presented a comparative fit index of 0.96 and a global reliability index of 0.82. The caregiver contribution to self-care and the caregiver self-efficacy scales correlated moderately among themselves and with the patient versions of the scales, and scores were higher with caregiver-oriented dyadic care types and female caregivers. Our study provides evidence of the two instruments’ construct validity and internal consistency.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T01:34:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221134712
       
  • Systematic Review of the Content Validity of Patient Reported Outcome
           Measures of Transition to Parenthood

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      Authors: Elise van Beeck, Laura Van den Branden, Wichor M Bramer, Yvonne Kuipers
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      This review aims to identify self-report instruments examining aspects of transition to parenthood for use in practice and research. After performing a literature search in Embase, Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane, PsycINFO and Google Scholar, the Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) measuring (aspects of) transition to parenthood during pregnancy or up to 1-year postpartum were identified. Following COSMIN guidelines for systematic reviews on PROMs, the quality of the PROM development and PROM content validity was evaluated. From the 129 included studies, 39 PROMs assessed aspects of transition to parenthood. A total of 32 PROMs were included in the evaluation. The development quality of 30/32 PROMS was mostly rated as inadequate and the quality of 15 content validity studies was mostly rated as doubtful. All PROMs received inadequate or doubtful ratings on content validity. Most of the PROMs measuring aspects of the transition to parenthood didn’t include parents’ points of view when developing them. Many PROMs are being used for a long time without reassessing relevance, comprehensiveness, and comprehensibility among parents and/or practitioners. It is recommended that researchers and healthcare professionals assess content validity of the PROM before use with the target population.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-11T04:28:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221127382
       
  • Web-based Evidence on the Treatment of Behavioral Addictions in United
           States Model Treatment Centers

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      Authors: Steve Sussman, Artur Galimov, Nayeli Ayala, Deborah Louise Sinclair
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Behavioral addictions are highly comorbid with substance use disorders, presenting in as many as 54% of service users receiving substance use treatment. Few studies have examined whether treatment centers are attentive to such other addictions, which may undermine treatment. This study examined the mention and treatment of behavioral addictions on United States treatment center websites. The 2021 Newsweek America’s Best Addiction Treatment Centers website was utilized to examine the mention and treatment of behavioral addictions in 300 leading treatment centers across 25 states in the United States. Of 289 active websites, only 61 (21.1%) treatment centers mentioned anything about behavioral addictions. The highest prevalence was for gambling (n = 38), sex (n = 22), food/eating (n = 21), and internet gaming (n = 12). A total of 49 treatment centers reported treating those addictions. The most prevalent treatments involved 12-step programming (n = 18), CBT (n = 16), individual counseling (n = 16), and group therapy (n = 15). Little formalized importance via websites was provided regarding the mention or treatment of behavioral addictions at treatment centers. A greater emphasis on concurrent and substitute behavioral addictions is needed to improve the quality of life and lower the possibility of relapse among those persons in addictions treatment.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-10-03T10:19:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221130543
       
  • Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Validation of the Turkish
           Version of Pain Resilience Scale

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      Authors: Muge Dereli, Turhan Kahraman, Christopher R. France
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Pain Resilience Scale (PRS) is a useful tool that evaluates behavioral engagement and adaptively regulates cognitions and emotions despite the pain. This study aimed to translate the PRS to Turkish and investigate its psychometric properties. The Turkish version of PRS was completed online by 332 healthy adults, and a subset of 105 respondents was re-assessed after 7–14 days. The reliability of the adapted measure was evaluated in terms of internal consistency, relative, and absolute test-retest reliability. Validity was evaluated in terms of structural, construct, and known-group validity using positive and negative psychological scales. The Turkish version of PRS has a three-factor structure and its cumulative variance is 78.06%. The total PRS score and its subscales correlated positively with pain self-efficacy, general resilience, and quality of life, and negatively with pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, anxiety, depression, and disability. The PRS scores were significantly higher in those with high general resilience (p < 0.001). The PRS had high internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Standard Error of Measurement (SEM) and Minimum Detectable Difference (MDD) were calculated as 2.9 and 8.0, respectively. The Turkish version of PRS is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring pain resilience in terms of behavioral perseverance and cognitive positivity.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-09-23T10:17:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221127377
       
  • Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of the Modified Dynamic
           Gait Index in the Elderly

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      Authors: Emrah Zirek, Rustem Mustafaoglu, Aynur Cicek, Ishtiaq Ahmed, Savvas Mavromoustakos
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The modified Dynamic Gait Index (mDGI) is one of the valid instruments used in the evaluation of gait disorders. This study aimed to translate the mDGI into Turkish and evaluate the evidence for its reliability and validity for use in an elderly population. For test-retest reliability, the mDGI was administered twice, and for inter-rater reliability, the mDGI was administered alone on the same day by two raters. Concurrent validity of the mDGI was assessed using Pearson’s correlation analysis between the Turkish version of the mDGI score and the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), and 10-m Walk Test (10-MWT), respectively. The internal consistency of the mDGI was found to be excellent (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.97) and test-retest (ICC = 0.95; 95% Cl (0.84–0.95)) and inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.95; 95% Cl (0.85–0.95)) were excellent. A negative, moderate correlation was found between mDGI and TUG (r = −0.73, p < .0001), and a positive, moderate correlation with BBS (r = 0.71, p < .0001) and 10-MWT (r = 0.72, p < .0001). The Turkish version of the mDGI was found to be a valid and reliable assessment instrument for gait and balance in the elderly.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-09-17T10:58:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221128311
       
  • An Investigation of Surgical Nurses' Professional Values, Ethical
           Sensitivity and Quality of Care: A Cross-Sectional Study From Northwest
           Turkey

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      Authors: Selda Mert, Özlem Kersu, Aylin Aydin Sayilan, Neriman Akyolcu
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Nurses’ professional values are closely associated with their ethical sensitivity and the quality of nursing care. The aim of this study was to determine surgical nurses’ perceptions of their professional values, ethical sensitivities and quality of care, the relationship between these variables, and the factors influencing these. The sample of this cross-sectional, descriptive and relational study consisted of 231 nurses working in the surgical units of two university hospitals and a training and research hospital. The study revealed a statistically significant negative relationship between the nurses’ professional values scale median score and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire median score, and a positive significant relationship between the Nurses' Professional Values Scale median score and the Care Behaviors Scale median score. Having ethical problems in their professional lives increased the ethical sensitivity of nurses, while having a medical-vocational high school and vocational school of health services degree and participation in training/meetings about professional values and ethics increased the perception of the quality of nursing care. Awareness of professional values is crucial in providing quality nursing care that is in line with ethical principles; therefore, it is recommended that the continuity of surgical nurses’ participation in training/meetings on professional values and ethics be ensured, that they be supported to become members of professional associations, and that supportive working environments be provided to improve the quality of nursing care.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-22T07:52:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221109968
       
  • Examining the Factor Structure of an Adapted Posttraumatic Growth
           Inventory in a Sample of Childhood Cancer Survivors: A Brief Report

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      Authors: Julia Stal, Cynthia N. Ramirez, Jimi Huh, Jessica Tobin, Yoonji Kim, Kimberly A. Miller, Joel E. Milam
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Posttraumatic growth (PTG) represents positive changes following a trauma, crisis, and/or psychologically distressing event. Experiencing cancer can serve as a traumatic event for patients, resulting in life changes among survivors. Various PTG measures have been used to assess post-cancer change among childhood cancer survivors (CCS), but few have been evaluated for use in this population. This study examined the factor structure of an adapted, 11-item version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) among CCS. A randomly selected subgroup of participants (N = 332) was selected from the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program (mean age of 26.5 years at time of survey, mean age at diagnosis of 12 years, primarily male [53.6%], and Hispanic [51.5%]). Participants indicated the degree to which they experienced positive, negative, or no change in their life because of their cancer experience. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) identified two factors: Appreciation of New Possibilities and Spiritual Change. The adapted, 11-item PTGI was deemed appropriate for use among CCS. Additional research is needed to confirm the use of the two-factor model with confirmatory factor analysis in an independent sample. Future research on PTG among CCS can consider spiritual change as a potential independent factor.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T02:04:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221109309
       
  • Evaluation of the Psychometric Properties of a Newly Developed Chinese
           Screening Tool for Speech Disorders in Patients With Parkinson’s Disease
           

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      Authors: Chi-Lin Chen, Ching-Huang Lin, Chen-San Su, Hsiang-Chun Cheng, Li-Mei Chen, Rong-Ju Cherng
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The study aimed to analyze the psychometric properties of a newly developed Chinese screening tool, the Chinese Version of the Speech Disorders in Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (SDPD-C). The SDPD-C contains a 24-item questionnaire with four assessment domains. Overall, 93 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) (age 70.1 ± 8.9 years) and 76 healthy older adults (age 67.2 ± 8.1 years) participated in the psychometric analysis study. The internal consistency of the SDPD-C was .91 (four dimensions: .69–.85), and test-retest reliability was .91 (four dimensions: .85–.88). The SDPD-C was highly correlated with the Voice Handicap Index-10 and Movement Disorder Society-Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale II 2.1 (r = .83 and .78, respectively). The SDPD-C scores also differed significantly between stages 1 and 4 of the Hoehn and Yahr Scale (p < .05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was .955 (95% confidence interval, .927–.983; asymptotic significance p < .001), and the optimal cut-off score of this study was 36, with a sensitivity of .849 and specificity of .947. The results indicate that SDPD-C showed good reliability, validity, accuracy, and discrimination. It can be used as a screening tool for speech disorders in patients with PD.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-06-18T07:21:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221108458
       
  • Active Ingredients of Interventions Improving Smoking Cessation Support by
           Dutch Primary Care Providers: A Systematic Review

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      Authors: Enrique L. P. Mergelsberg, Dennis de Ruijter, Mathilde R. Crone, Eline S. Smit, Ciska Hoving
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The objective was to assess active ingredients, change mechanisms, and fidelity in interventions aiming to increase the quality of smoking cessation care in the Dutch primary healthcare setting. We conducted a systematic review searching five scientific databases on August 2nd, 2019, updated on October 28th, 2021. We included effect data of behavioural interventions aiming at improving the provision of smoking cessation support by Dutch primary care providers to their patients. We excluded studies published before 2000 and those without a behavioural support intervention for primary care providers targeting smoking cessation in their patients. We found 1939 articles and included 15 distinct interventions in the review. We provided an overview of study characteristics, intervention effects, fidelity, active ingredients and change mechanisms using the Behaviour Change Techniques (BCT) Taxonomy and Mechanisms of Action (MoAs) protocols. Interventions seemed more effective when including a face-to-face component, using active learning strategies and providing a tool to help follow the guidelines in practice (e.g., physical cards with information). BCTs, MoAs, and fidelity were overall poorly reported on. To support the application of smoking cessation practices in Dutch primary care, we recommend implementation of face-to-face training programs incorporating active skill training elements combined with practical tools.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T06:01:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221099941
       
  • The Reliability and Validity of the Turkish Version of Smartphone Impact
           Scale

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      Authors: Tansu Birinci, Pınar Van Der Veer, Caner Mutlu, Ebru Kaya Mutlu
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Smartphone Impact Scale (SIS) was originally developed in English to determine the cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral impacts of smartphones. This study aimed to translate and cross-culturally adapt the SIS instrument into Turkish and investigate its psychometric properties. Two hundred and sixty-four young and middle-aged adults (186 females) with a mean age of 36.24 years (SD = 14.93; range, 18–65 years) were included. For cross-cultural adaptation, two bi-lingual translators used the back-translation procedure. Within a 5-to-7-day period after the first assessment, the participants completed the Turkish version of SIS (SIS-T) to evaluate test-retest reliability. Cronbach’s alpha (α) was used to assess internal consistency. The correlation between the Turkish version of the Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS-T) and the Nottingham Health Profile was determined to check the validity. The SIS-T had a high-level internal consistency (α = 0.86) and test-retest reliability (ICC2,1 = 0.56 to 0.89 for subscales). The SIS-T subscales were correlated with the SAS-T (r = 0.31 to 0.66, p < 0.01), indicating a good concurrent validity. The results show that the SIS-T is semantically and linguistically adequate to determine smartphones' cognitive, affective, social, and behavioral impacts on young and middle-aged adults. Good internal validity and test-retest reliability of the SIS-T were defined to evaluate the impacts of smartphones among Turkish-speaking young and middle-aged adults.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T12:32:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221097703
       
  • Psychometric Evaluation of Chronic Patients Using the Persian Version of
           Patient Activation Measure (PAM)

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      Authors: Mohammad Ali Zakeri, Ali Esmaeili Nadimi, Golamreza Bazmandegan, Maryam Zakeri, Mahlagha Dehghan
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The Patient Activation Measure (PAM) is a 13-item questionnaire that assesses patients’ knowledge, skills, and confidence in self-management. The current study aimed to translate the American version of the PAM-13 into Persian and test the psychometric properties of the Persian version among chronic patients. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 438 chronically ill patients in Rafsanjan, Iran from May to November 2019. The American version of the PAM-13 was translated into Persian using a standardized forward–backward translation method. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, face and content validity, as well as construct validity (structural and convergent validity) were all assessed. The content validity index of the Patient Activation Measure-13 Persian (PAM-13-P) was 0.91. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed that the PAM-13-P had a meaningful structural validity. The PAM-13-P scores were negatively correlated with the Partner in Health Measure (PIH) (r = −0.29, p < 0.001). In addition, the PAM13-P scores were positively correlated with the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) (r = 0.31, p < 0.001). The internal consistency was 0.88, and the repeatability was excellent [Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC):0.96 and confidence interval (CI): 0.94–0.98]. This study demonstrates that the PAM-13-P is a reliable and valid measure for assessing activation among chronically ill patients. The PAM-13-P scale assesses the level of self-management of chronic patients and identifies appropriate care strategies to meet their needs.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T11:50:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221096904
       
  • Prevalence of Workplace Bullying Among Healthcare Professionals in
           Tertiary Care Hospitals in Pakistan

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      Authors: Usha Kumari, Muhammad Z. Muneer, Muhammad A. Murtaza, Fakhar Abbas, Abdul M. Sahito, Zair Hassan, Keerathana Manjunath
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace bullying (WPB) in the healthcare system (HCS), whether perpetrated by healthcare professionals (HCPs) or patients, is a serious problem. The goal of this research study was to find out how common WPB is among HCPs. We conducted a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study in the three public tertiary care hospitals of Karachi, Pakistan from May to October 2020. A validated Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised (NAQ-R) was used to measure WPB prevalence. The final sample size was 449, out of which 72.4% were females and 27.6% were males. The majority of respondents were house officers or 1st-year trainees who had completed their MBBS (n = 252, 56.1%). Residents (n = 197, 43.9%) who were pursuing specialty training made up the remainder of the respondents. As per NAQ-R cut-offs, the prevalence of bullied, being bullied, and not bullied was 41, 29, and 30%, respectively. WPB prevalence was higher in males (53%) than females (38%), whereas it occurred more often in residents (48%) than house officers (36%). We found similar findings while using the self-reported definition for WPB. Based on our findings, we conclude that WPB is pervasive among HCPs, particularly for males and residents in tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-04-30T08:35:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221098119
       
  • Psychosocial Indicators of Adolescent Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana
           Use: An Analysis of Normalized, Harmonized, and Pooled Data

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      Authors: William B. Hansen, Santiago Saldana, Edward Hak-Sing Ip
      First page: 341
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      We normalized, harmonized, and pooled 344,429 surveys collected from 106,470 research participants from 25 research studies that assessed past 30-day alcohol use, drunkenness, smoking cigarettes, using marijuana, and a host of psychosocial variables. After normalizing and harmonizing psychosocial measures, we completed analyses to examine the ability of psychosocial variables to serve as proxy indicators of use. Intentionality, peer descriptive normative beliefs, and age emerged as being of primary importance in indicating use. Additional variables – peer injunctive norms, beliefs about the positive and negative consequences of use, and attitudes – were also demonstrated to have the potential to serve as proxies in the assessment of substance use risk. There were developmental patterns in how intentionality and descriptive normative beliefs changed with age. Young adolescents had scores that are protective; they have positive intentionality and do not see the prevalence of alcohol and other drug use as widespread. These and other psychosocial variable’s mean scores generally erode with age while the distribution of scores widens as youth grow older. The goal of analyses was to define age-related psychosocial profiles that can be used prospectively to estimate substance use risk. These profiles are useful in creating virtual control cases for evaluating disseminated prevention programs.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-05-07T10:07:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221097145
       
  • Least Squares and Robust Rank-Based Double Bootstrap Analyses for
           Time-Series Intervention Designs

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      Authors: Shaofeng Zhang, Joseph W. McKean, Bradley E. Huitema
      First page: 362
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Time-series intervention designs that include two or more phases have been widely discussed in the healthcare literature for many years. A convenient model for the analysis of these designs has a linear model part (to measure changes in level and trend) plus a second part that measures the random error structure; the error structure is assumed to follow an autoregressive time-series process. Traditional generalized linear model approaches widely used to estimate this model are less than satisfactory because they tend to provide substantially biased intervention tests and confidence intervals. We describe an updated version of the original double bootstrap approach that was developed by McKnight et al. (2000) to correct for this problem. This updated analysis and a new robust version were recently implemented in an R package (McKean & Zhang, 2018). The robust method is insensitive to outliers and problems associated with common departures from normality in the error distribution. Monte Carlo studies as well as published data are used to demonstrate the properties of both versions. The R code required to perform the analyses is provided and illustrated.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T02:47:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221119534
       
  • State Department and Provider Agency Utilization of Evidence-Based Program
           Registries in Behavioral Healthcare and Child Welfare

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      Authors: Stephen Magura, Miranda J. Lee, Ruqayyah N. Abu-Obaid, John Landsverk, Whitney DeCamp, Jennifer Rolls-Reutz, Brandn Green, Charles Ingoglia, Vera Hollen, Anne Flagg
      First page: 397
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Evidence-based program registries (EBPRs) are web-based compilations of behavioral healthcare programs/interventions that rely on research-based criteria to rate program efficacy or effectiveness for support of programmatic decision-making. The objective was to determine the extent to which behavioral health decision-makers access EBPRs and to understand whether and exactly how they use the information obtained from EPBRs. Single State Authorities (SSAs) and service provider agencies in the areas of behavioral health and child welfare were recruited nationally. Senior staff (n = 375) responsible for the selection and implementation of programs and/or policies were interviewed by telephone concerning their visits (if any) to 28 relevant EBPRs, the types of information they were seeking, whether they found it, and how they may have used that information to effect changes in their organizations. At least one EBPR was visited by 80% of the respondents, with a median of three different registers being visited. Most visitors (55%) found all the information they were seeking; those who did not desired more guidance or tools for individual program implementation or were unable to locate the program or practice that they were seeking. Most visitors (65%) related using the information obtained to make changes in their organizations, in particular to select, start or change a program, or to support the adoption or improvement of evidence-based clinical practices. EBPRs were shown to be important resources for dissemination of research-based program effectiveness data, leading to increased use of evidence-based practices in the field, but the study also identified needs for greater awareness of EBPRs generally and for more attention to implementation of specific recommended programs and practices.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-04-21T05:05:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221085754
       
  • Challenges and Learning Needs of Nurse-Patients’ Family Communication:
           Focus Group Interviews With Intensive Care Unit Nurses in South Korea

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      Authors: Juhye Jin, Youn-Jung Son, Judith A. Tate, JiYeon Choi
      First page: 411
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are expected to facilitate effective day-to-day communication with patients and family members at the bedside. To date, communication training for ICU health care professionals has targeted mainly intensivists-in-training, but there is limited data on communication experience and needs to be evaluated among ICU nurses. This qualitative study used focus group interviews to explore daily communication experiences with patients’ families and communication training needs and preferences among ICU nurses in South Korea. Five focus group interviews were conducted with 27 ICU nurses (4–6 nurses per group). The results of inductive qualitative content analysis highlighted four main categories: “Perceived difficulties during communication,” “burden from working conditions,” “endeavors to promote communication skills,” and “strategies for cultivating effective communication.” Regarding suggestions for future communication training, nurses preferred interactive learning with peer-support over traditional methods (e.g., lectures). Nurses also suggested that communication training for ICU nurses should include learning skills appropriate for difficult situations (e.g., angry family members). Findings from this study can serve as a framework for stakeholders in ICU care and healthcare education (e.g., hospital and nursing administrators, nurse educators) when designing communication training to support ICU nurses with their practical knowledge and communication skills.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-03-26T03:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221076911
       
  • Evaluation of pharmacists’ Preferences and Barriers to Access Continuing
           Education: A Cross-Sectional Study in Lebanon

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      Authors: Georges Hatem, Lina Ismaiil, Sanaa Awada, Diana Ghanem, Roula Bou Assi, Mathijs Goossens
      First page: 420
      Abstract: Evaluation & the Health Professions, Ahead of Print.
      The implementation of continuing education programs for pharmacists in Lebanon is emerging and needs to be further developed and strengthened to fill the gaps between knowledge acquisition and its application in the workplace. This study examined the perceptions of pharmacist preferences for and barriers to access programs. A crosssectional descriptive study was undertaken with a convenience sample of 142 pharmacists who were surveyed in their workplace. Almost 83.1% of pharmacists reported their day-to-day workplace experiences were the best way to learn. The high cost (50%) and time away from work (37.8%) were the main barriers to continuing education. Pharmacists reported a mean satisfaction of 5.8 (sd = 2.2)/10 with programs suggesting a need for routine needs assessments and adaptation of programs to better meet their learning needs.
      Citation: Evaluation & the Health Professions
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T05:45:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/01632787221126500
       
 
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