Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
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Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.626
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 184  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0008-4174 - ISSN (Online) 1911-9828
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Losing Life's Sparkle: Experiences of Canadian Choral Musicians During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Authors: Mary Jo A. Lozano, Stephanie L. Churcher, Madison J. Kirchner, Teri M. Slade
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Singing in choirs, which previous research has identified as supporting wellbeing, has been restricted and altered during the COVID-19 pandemic. Purpose. The purpose of this study is to investigate and describe the experience of music-making for musicians in professional and semi-professional choirs in Canada 18–22 months into the COVID-19 pandemic. Method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 participants and analyzed using interpretive description. Findings. Four themes: (1) increased negative feelings associated with the music-making experience due to COVID-19 restrictions, (2) isolation and disconnection, (3) recognizing how music-making aids in their own mental health, the participants used music-making to help their communities cope with the pandemic, and (4) adapting in response to COVID-19 reinforced music-making's importance. Implications. Understanding how the COVID-19 pandemic has altered Canadian choral musicians’ experience of music-making can help occupational therapists in supporting choral musicians return to this meaningful occupation.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-23T07:49:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221145823
       
  • Profiling the Research Activities of Canadian Occupational Therapy and
           Occupational Science Faculty Members

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      Authors: Tal Jarus, Leanne L. Leclair, Setareh Ghahari, Shu-Ping Chen, Ada Leung, Lynn Shaw
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. There is a lack of knowledge on the scope and nature of the research by faculty members in occupational science (OS) and/or occupational therapy (OT) programs in Canada. Purpose. To describe the research activities of faculty members in these programs and directions. Method. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to 173 faculty members across all 14 Canadian OT that addressed: 1) research topics and methods, 2) populations, and 3) funding. Findings. Based on respondents (N  =  121), research is focused on a range of topics and populations with most conducting qualitative research. Many conduct research examining the effectiveness of interventions, with few respondents focused on OS research. Federal and provincial grants agencies were the largest source of funding. Implications. Research topics studied were not always proportional to practice although emerging areas were being investigated that can expand the evidence base and scope of practice. Despite limited occupation-specific funding options, respondents were accessing funding from varied sources. Collaborations among faculty members, clinicians, and individuals with lived experience can create priorities for future OS and/or OT research in Canada.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-20T05:46:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221145820
       
  • A Clinically Significant Difference on the COPM: A Review

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      Authors: Mary Ann McColl, Celine Boyer Denis, Kate-Lin Douglas, Justin Gilmour, Nicole Haveman, Meaghan Petersen, Brittany Presswell, Mary Law
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) assists occupational therapists to identify occupational performance problems using a client-centred approach. Since its first publication in 1991, there has been abundant evidence of the ability of the COPM to detect a statistically significant difference as an outcome measure. There has also been a tacit understanding that a difference of 2 points from pre-test to post-test on either Performance or Satisfaction COPM score represents a clinically significant difference. There is however, some confusion about the origins of this claim. Purpose. To ascertain empirical evidence for the claim that a clinically significant difference is a change score ≥2 points. Method. We conducted a scoping review of peer-reviewed literature (1991–2020) for intervention studies using the COPM as an outcome measure and examined intervention type and change scores. Findings. One hundred studies were identified. The COPM was used to assess effectiveness of eight types of occupational therapy interventions. The common belief, however, was not empirically supported that clinical significance can be asserted on the basis of a two-point change in COPM scores. Implications. Further research is needed to test alternative approaches to asserting clinical significance or a minimal clinically important difference.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T07:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221142177
       
  • Polysensoriality and Sensoriality and Aesthetics: The Lived Sensory
           Experiences of Adults with Mental Illness

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      Authors: Antoine Bailliard, Ben Lee, Jody Bennett
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Research in neuroscience shows that adults with schizophrenia or related psychotic disorders experience atypical sensory processing (e.g., deficits in sensory gating and mismatch negativity). Despite significant evidence proving these biomarkers are common among adults with serious mental illness, it is unclear how their sensory experiences impact their occupations in daily life (i.e., real-world implications of atypical sensory processing). Purpose. To explore how the lived sensory experiences of adults with psychotic disorders affect their occupations. Method. We used Walking with Video, photo-elicitation, and semi-structured interviews to study how the lived sensory experiences of adults with psychotic disorders (N  =  6) relate to their occupations. Informed by a phenomenological perspective, we analysed data from semistructured interviews, and undertook analyses through iterative rounds of coding to develop themes and two cycles of group reflective practices to identify researcher biases and assumptions. Findings. Analyses revealed the following themes: polysensoriality, embodied aesthetics of everyday life, habits of sensing and sensory anchors, and active sensory beings. Implications. In clinical contexts, occupational therapists should carefully consider the situatedness of sensory experiences while avoiding assumptions that sensory preferences and aversions mechanistically generalize across contexts and occupations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T06:06:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221145811
       
  • Revisiting the Do-Live-Well Health Promotion Framework: A Citation Content
           Analysis

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      Authors: Kennedy A. Hamilton, Lori J. Letts, Nadine Larivière, Sandra E. Moll
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The Do-Live-Well (DLW) framework was first published in 2015 and aimed to fill a theoretical gap in the health promotion literature related to the links between occupational patterns and health. However, the extent of uptake and use of the framework since publication is unknown. Purpose. To explore and reflect on the adoption and application of DLW in the literature. Method. Citation content analysis of two seminal DLW publications was conducted from 2015 to November 2022 across six databases. Findings. Seventeen citations directly applied DLW to inform research (n = 10), practice (n = 5) and knowledge translation (n = 2). Implications. The findings highlight uptake of the framework in a range of settings, and how it can inform an occupation-based understanding of health and well-being. Ongoing knowledge dissemination, development of practice tools, and research to update evidence and examine relevance are needed to further advance the utility and application of the framework.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-10T05:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221149268
       
  • Thank You ! Merci !

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      Pages: 344 - 345
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Volume 89, Issue 4, Page 344-345, December 2022.

      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T09:51:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221129663
      Issue No: Vol. 89, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Occupational (Therapy's) Possibilities: A Queer Reflection on the Tangled
           Threads of Oppression and Our Collective Liberation

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      Authors: Barry Trentham
      Pages: 346 - 363
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Volume 89, Issue 4, Page 346-363, December 2022.
      AbstractThis presentation stems from the work of occupational therapy and science scholars who have critically described how systems of dominance perpetuate health inequities and limit the occupational possibilities of those we aim to support. Liberation is discussed as a communal process and outcome of untangling, undoing, and reconfiguring systems of dominance that negatively impact health and limit the occupational possibilities of individuals, groups, and communities. In critically reflecting on my personal, professional, and ongoing journey toward liberation as a gay, white, able-bodied, man, I draw parallels between the systemic and intersecting oppressive forces that limit the occupational possibilities of historically marginalized groups and the need for our profession to consider its own liberation. Informed by queer theory, I question the binary discourses that separate the “Us” from the “Them,” illustrating how our struggles to transform practice based on anti-oppressive principles and the liberation of our full potential as occupational therapists must be tied to the liberation of the communities we aim to support. Drawing on lessons from liberation movements, I argue for the necessity of a representative and compassionate professional community to support collective action and to position the celebration of communal achievements as resistance and acts of gratitude.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T09:51:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221129700
      Issue No: Vol. 89, No. 4 (2022)
       
  • Occupational therapy for improving occupational performance in COPD
           patients: A scoping review

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      Authors: Grégoire Goubeau, Stéphane Mandigout, Thierry Sombardier, Benoit Borel
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multisystemic chronic condition which may induce significant consequences in daily life activities. Preserving activities of daily living in COPD is therefore a common treatment goal among people living with COPD, which leaves ample opportunity for occupational therapy interventions to comprise part of their rehabilitation. However, the question of how exactly occupational therapists can and do contribute to pulmonary rehabilitation remains underexplored. Purpose. To reveal the contribution of occupational therapy intervention in the pulmonary rehabilitation on improving the occupational performance of patients with COPD. Method. A scoping review was performed by selecting articles focusing on occupational therapy in pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with COPD. A total of four databases were surveyed for article selection. Findings. Among nine studies selected, seven studies reported a significant improvement in the occupational performance of patients with occupational therapy. However, two studies did not observe differences between the groups regarding occupational performance. Implications. Occupational therapy in pulmonary rehabilitation seems to contribute to the improvement of occupational performances of patients with COPD. Nevertheless, research focused on this field needs to be further developed to support the positive impact of occupational therapy in COPD management.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-28T06:27:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221148037
       
  • The Multiple Errands Test: A Guide for Site-Specific Version Development

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      Authors: Shannon M. Scarff, Emily J. Nalder, Hannah L. Gullo, Jennifer Fleming
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The complex and real-world nature of the Multiple Errands Test (MET) makes it a valuable and increasingly popular assessment of cognitive function. However, these same qualities make its local implementation challenging. Purpose. To produce an evidence-based guide for site-specific adaptation of the MET. Method. The CAN-IMPLEMENT© knowledge translation framework informed a structured approach to the creation of a guide to site-specific version development, informed by twenty-two published approaches to MET adaptation. Applicability of the guide was supported by a two-phase revision process, in which a site-specific hospital and community version produced from its recommendations were administered with forty-two neurologically intact participants and stakeholder feedback obtained. Findings. We offer an outline of core components which maintain the integrity of the MET, and adaptable peripheries which may be modified when required by the local setting. Implications. The proposed guide provides a systematic yet flexible guide for site-specific MET development.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-30T07:44:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221142184
       
  • “Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy” (MERIT) for the
           Occupational Therapy Practitioner

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      Authors: Sally Wasmuth, Caitlin Horsford, Lisa Mahaffey, Paul H. Lysaker
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Metacognitive Reflection and Insight Therapy (MERIT) is a manualized, evidence-based approach that supports occupational participation through its focus on the inter-related constructs of meaning making, positionality, and self-definition (Lysaker et al., 2020). MERIT's core tenets parallel the fundamentals of occupational therapy, making it an ideal guiding methodology for mental health occupational therapy practice. Purpose. We outline key constructs of MERIT and detail how occupational therapy practitioners can apply MERIT to support occupational engagement. Key Issues. Few manualized, evidence-based interventions exist to guide occupational therapy mental health practice (Kirsch et al., 2019). Detailing MERIT and its application in occupational therapy is an important first step in future studies of its feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness in this context. Implications. MERIT provides a clear methodology for delivering mental health occupational therapy services that is amenable to large-scale hybrid implementation and effectiveness studies, thereby supporting practice and rigour in research.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-25T08:52:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221142172
       
  • Effectiveness of Suicide Safety Planning Interventions: A Systematic
           Review Informing Occupational Therapy

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      Authors: Carrie Anne Marshall, Pavlina Crowley, Dave Carmichael, Rebecca Goldszmidt, Suliman Aryobi, Julia Holmes, Corinna Easton, Roxanne Isard, Susanne Murphy
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Suicide safety planning (SSP) is a suicide prevention approach that involves developing a collaborative plan between a service provider such as an occupational therapist and a person who is at risk of suicide. Purpose. To synthesize effectiveness studies on SSP. Method. Using the Joanna Briggs Institute methodology, we conducted a systematic review of effectiveness studies including a: (1) title and abstract screening; (2) full-text review; (3) critical appraisal; and (4) narrative synthesis. Findings. We included 22 studies. Critical appraisal scores ranged from 38.5 to 92.3 (m = 63.7). The types of interventions included were: standard and enhanced SSP (n = 11); electronically delivered SSP (n = 5); and SSP integrated with other approaches (n = 6). Only three studies identified meaningful activity as a component of SSP. Evidence across a range of studies indicates that SSP is effective for reducing suicide behavior (SB) and ideation (SI). While some studies have demonstrated effectiveness for reducing symptoms of mental illness, promoting resilience and service use, the number of studies exploring these outcomes is currently limited. Implications. Occupational therapists support individuals expressing SI, and SSP is a necessary skill for practice.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T05:30:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221132097
       
  • A Unique Clinical Tool for the Evaluation of Oral Feeding Skills in
           Infants

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      Authors: Sandra Fucile, Kimberly Dow
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background.Occupational therapy practice for oral feeding assessment is based on clinical observation of infants’ sucking, swallowing, and breathing ability, which is influenced by clinical experience and provides poor evidence on explanatory factors.Purpose.To test the clinical utility and safety of a nipple monitoring device for the quantitative evaluation of oral feeding skills.MethodSixteen infants, with no severe medical complications, participated in a pre-experimental pilot study. Oral feeding performances (duration, intake volume, and rate of transfer), and occurrence of adverse events (apnea, bradycardia, and oxygen desaturations) were recorded to ensure the tool does not interfere with infant's feeding ability or does not create any adverse effects.Findings.There was no significant difference in duration, intake volume, rate of transfer between the two monitored sessions, and no occurrence in adverse events.Implications.The findings suggest that the nipple monitoring device may be used for quantitative assessment and intervention planning of oral feeding difficulties in infants.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-31T06:15:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221134738
       
  • Occupational Performance Coaching for Adults with Heart Failure:
           Randomized Controlled Trial Protocol

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      Authors: Zahra Ahmadizadeh, Sanaz Shanbehzadeh, Dorothy Kessler, Sepideh Taghavi, Shiva Khaleghparast, Malahat Akbarfahimi
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) usually experience functional disabilities and face participation challenges. Self-care behavior is an essential component of long-term management of HF. Purpose: This study aims to investigate the effect of occupational performance coaching (OPC) on self-care behaviors and participation in people with HF. Method: This study is a parallel group, single-blind, randomized controlled trial of 44 adults with HF, to evaluate the efficacy of OPC. Patients will be randomly allocated (1:1) into two groups. Both groups will receive usual self-care education and the intervention group will receive eight weekly sessions of OPC as well. We will measure the primary and secondary outcomes at baseline, 8, and 12 weeks after the intervention initiation. Implications: If OPC is superior to usual self-care education on improving self-care behavior and participation, the finding will support the integration of OPC into practice to improve participation and self-care behaviors of HF patients.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-21T05:20:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221130167
       
  • Rapid Reviews to Support Practice: A Guide for Professional Organization
           Practice Networks

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      Authors: Megan M. MacPherson, Rosalie H. Wang, Emma M. Smith, Gobika Sithamparanathan, Cara A. Sadiq, Anna RH Braunizer
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Occupational Therapists, among other healthcare decision makers, often need to make decisions within limited timeframes and cannot wait for the completion of large rigorous systematic reviews and meta-analyses. Rapid reviews are one method to increase the integration of research evidence into clinical decision making. Rapid reviews streamline the systematic review process to allow for the timely synthesis of evidence; however, there does not exist a single agreed upon guide for the methodology and reporting of rapid reviews. Purpose. This paper proposes a rapid review methodology that is customized to a professional organization practice which can feasibly be used by practice networks such as those of the Canadian Association for Occupational Therapy to conduct reviews. Implications. Practice networks provide a sustainable mechanism to integrate research evidence and foster communication amongst practitioners. This guide for conducting and reporting rapid reviews can be used across Occupational Therapy practice networks and similar groups to support the consistent and timely synthesis of evidence necessary to improve evidence-informed clinical decision making.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T05:40:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221123721
       
  • Children's play–work occupation continuum: Play-based occupational
           therapy, play therapy and playwork

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      Authors: Ted Brown, Helen Lynch
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction: Occupational therapists often use play-based approaches to facilitate children's occupational development and promote participation, for example, play-based occupational therapy, play therapy and playwork. However, where does play occupation fit, within these adult-guided play-based approaches in occupational therapy' Purpose: To examine and discuss the play–work occupation continuum of children to inform occupational therapy practice. Key Issues: Children's play occupations are free-selected, unstructured, internally-controlled, spontaneous and intrinsically-motivated. Yet, occupational therapists often utilize play as a therapeutic modality to support occupational development for occupations other than play. This use of play represents play-based work occupations as they are structured, externally-controlled, adult-guided, goal-focused and extrinsically-motivated. Play occupations then move from being authentic free-play to adult-guided play-based work occupations for children. Implications: When working with children and families, occupational therapists need to balance the use of self-selected, unstructured play occupations with the application of adult-guided, structured, goal-focused play-based work occupations.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T06:30:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221130165
       
  • Review and Consultations of Canadian Financial Education Programs for
           Individuals with Disabilities

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      Authors: Lisa Engel, Taryn Rampling, Emma J. Brautigan, Tamika Bazin, Kelsey Dilts, Taylor Williams, Thalin M. Dyck, Ellie M. Jack, Heather Colquhoun
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Individuals or persons who live with a disability (PWD) can experience unique financial occupation challenges. Financial education programs can address some challenges. Purpose. The aim of this study was to describe and critically appraise current financial education programs for PWD in Canada. Method. This environmental scan framed by scoping review methods included a critical appraisal of Canadian programs’ online content and provider consultations. Researchers used four search methods to identify programs, interviewed service providers from four Canadian programs, and thematically analyzed interview transcripts. Findings. Researchers identified 134 programs; 50 (37.3%) included services. The online content of only 26 (19%) programs explicitly addressed accessibility; 106 (79%) programs’ content was at least college reading level. The qualitative results include three themes: (a) individualized approach, (b) “getting the word out”, and (c) service growth. Implications. There are financial education programs specific to PWD in Canada. Accessibility, individualization, advocacy, and development are needed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T06:28:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221129947
       
  • Integrated Occupational Therapy Camp for Children with Regulation/Sensory
           Processing Differences: Preliminary Evaluation

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      Authors: Tracy M. Stackhouse, Hannah K. Burke, Colleen G. Hacker, Lynette M. Burke, Caroline E. Hui, Beth Osten, Shelly J. Lane
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Integration of occupational therapy into a camp environment may support participation for children with neurodevelopmental differences, but evidence is limited. Purpose. This study examines the effects of participation of children with regulation/sensory processing differences at one such integrated camp on parent-established functional goals. Method. We used a pre-test/post-test repeated measures cohort design. Individualized goals were established with parents three months before camp using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 82, child ages 4–13). Parents re-rated goals immediately before, one month after, and three months after camp. Findings. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed improvement in occupational performance over the week of camp significantly exceeded change within the three months prior. Improvements remained stable three months post-camp. Implications. Integrating occupational therapy within a camp setting is beneficial for children with neurodevelopmental differences. The COPM can be integrated into a camp setting to document meaningful change in individualized parent-established goals.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-06T03:01:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221129941
       
  • Description of a Pilot Project for Pediatric Occupational Therapy in
           Daycare and Community Settings

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      Authors: Audrée Jeanne Beaudoin, Marilyn Gagnon, Julie Ouellette, Véronique Foley, Mélanie Couture, Chantal Camden
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Occupational therapy interventions that promote and prevent children's health and well-being aim to reduce health inequalities and foster protective factors. The purpose of this study is to describe a pilot community-based occupational therapy project for preschoolers in partnership with community organizations and childcare services. Method. A participatory action research approach was implemented with support from an advisory committee. An occupational therapist provided community-based occupational therapy services in a tiered organization model over one year. Findings. Services were offered in three tiers: 7 awareness workshops for parents and caregivers (Tier 1), 57 visits and 27 consultations in 8 community agencies (Tier 2), and 23 individual follow-ups (Tier 3). Implications. There is an opportunity to implement with community agencies and daycare settings an occupational therapy service based on community-based rehabilitation for children under 5 years of age.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-09-07T07:03:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221121421
       
  • Clinical Tests Predicting On-Road Performance in Older Drivers with
           Cognitive Impairment

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      Authors: Sarah Krasniuk, Alexander M. Crizzle, Ryan Toxopeus, Diane Mychael, Natasha Prince
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The Trail Making Test Part B (Trails B) and Useful Field of View® (UFOV) can predict on-road outcomes in drivers with cognitive impairment (CI); however, studies have not included drivers referred for comprehensive driving evaluations (CDEs), who typically have more severe CI. Purpose. We determined the predictive ability of Trails B and UFOV on pass/fail on-road outcomes in drivers with CI (Montreal Cognitive Assessment
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-08-11T06:27:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221117708
       
  • Knowledge Gaps Regarding Indigenous Health in Occupational Therapy: A
           Delphi Process

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      Authors: Claire C. Jacek, Kassandra M. Fritz, Monique E. Lizon, Tara L. Packham
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The occupational therapy profession needs to respond to the calls to action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) to engage in the process of reconciliation with Indigenous populations. Purpose. To inform development of a survey intended to determine the knowledge gaps of occupational therapists in relation to Indigenous health. Method. A Delphi process engaging 18 occupational therapists with membership in an Indigenous health network was used to prioritize and refine potential themes identified via literature review. Findings. Results of three consensus rounds and Dunn-Bonferroni post-hoc testing demonstrated three statistically distinct hierarchical tiers of 10 priority themes to inform survey development. Implications. The consensus prioritized themes from the literature to underpin further research on occupational therapists’ knowledge in relation to Indigenous health and can provide a learning scaffold for occupational therapists to support a continued response to the TRC calls to action.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-08-10T05:19:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221116638
       
  • Occupational Therapist Led Cognitive Stimulation Therapy: Feasibility of
           Implementation

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      Authors: Kristin Collins, Madona Hanna, Julie Makarski, Monika Kastner
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Despite local training opportunities for Cognitive Stimulation Therapy (CST) for occupational therapists, there has been limited evaluation of the feasibility of implementation in Canada. Purpose. This study explored the feasibility of CST delivery by an occupational therapist in an Ontario health care setting and the impact it may have on self-efficacy and hope measures of individuals with dementia. Methods. A mixed-methods experimental pre/post design was used. Survey measures included hope, self-efficacy, feasibility, satisfaction, and individual session evaluation. Semistructured focus groups were held for participants and facilitators. Findings. Quantitative findings are summarized descriptively for the 10 participants. Qualitative findings were grouped into themes: social connectedness, knowledge gained and shared, tailored implementation adjustments, and need for long-term programing. Implications. Occupational therapists are well-positioned to implement CST and should be a part of further research to test the intervention rigorously for applicability within a range of Canadian health care settings.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T07:28:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221115284
       
  • Participatory Methods to Develop Health Education for PW-SCI: Perspectives
           on Occupational Justice

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      Authors: Moussa K. Abu Mostafa, Nicola A. Plastow, Maggi Savin-Baden
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background.Many people with spinal cord injury (PW-SCI) in the Gaza Strip in Palestine are discharged from inpatient rehabilitation with limitations in their ability to meet basic needs, and reach their full potential. There is limited evidence of how clinicians can promote occupational justice for PW-SCI.Purpose.To describe participants’ perspectives revealed during a participatory action research (PAR) process used to develop an education manual for PW-SCI in Gaza, using Participatory Occupational Justice as a lens.Methods.Following ethical approval, a four-step PAR design was utilized by eight researchers to co-construct the Spinal Cord Injury Activities of Daily Living—education Manual with 54 participants from SCI rehabilitation settings in Gaza. Qualitative data from eight focus groups were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis.Findings.Two main themes were evident in the participants’ viewpoints: Enabling occupational justice and Removing barriers to occupational justice.Implications.Occupational justice is a central value that needs to be considered when developing occupational therapy educational interventions for this client group. PW-SCI health education may facilitate occupational justice in practical and culturally relevant ways when participatory methods are used to develop educational resources.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-07-27T06:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221116250
       
  • The Relationship Between Sensory Processing and Attachment Patterns: A
           Scoping Review

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      Authors: Lachlan J. Kerley, Pamela J. Meredith, Paul H. Harnett
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Clinicians and researchers have observed that sensory processing and attachment difficulties frequently co-occur; however, little is known about which sensory processing and attachment patterns are interrelated across populations. Purpose. To review evidence of empirical relationships between sensory processing and attachment patterns across the life span. Method. Using the Arksey and O’Malley framework, four databases were searched up to June 2021 for studies that investigated relationships between sensory processing and attachment patterns. Findings. Twenty-two studies met inclusion criteria: nine considered sensory and attachment patterns in children/adolescents and thirteen in adults. In children, sensory modulation was positively associated with attachment security. In adults, more extreme patterns of sensory modulation (e.g., higher sensory sensitivity) were generally associated with attachment insecurity. Implications. Findings indicate empirical relationships between sensory processing and attachment constructs in children and adults that warrant further investigation. Occupational therapists should consider both sensory processing and attachment patterns when planning interventions.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-05-25T06:22:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221102726
       
  • Parents’ and Therapists’ Satisfaction with Four Early
           Childhood Power Mobility Devices

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      Authors: Debra A Field, Roslyn W Livingstone
      First page: 364
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Little is known about satisfaction with power mobility devices used by young children. Purpose. Parents’ and therapists’ satisfaction with four early childhood power mobility devices were examined. Method. A two-phased study, comprising Trial Phase cross-sectional design and Loan Phase one-group pretest-posttest design. Parents and therapists of children 9 months to 6 years with mobility limitations completed the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction of Assistive Technology 2.0 Device Subscale (QUEST8) plus an additional device Aesthetics rating. Findings. Seventy-four parents and 42 therapists from 18 child development and rehabilitation centres participated. Parent and therapist median QUEST8 and Aesthetics scores varied across devices when trialled and over the six-month loan. Favourable median ratings had no statistically significant differences between parents and therapists. Parent ratings decreased statistically over loan period although therapists’ ratings did not. Device dimensions, safety, and aesthetics were highly rated. Implications. Similarities and differences exist among parent and therapist ratings.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-06-03T07:50:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221098879
       
  • Psychotherapy Within Occupational Therapy Literature: A Scoping Review: La
           psychothérapie dans littérature ergothérapique: une revue de portée

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      Authors: Carrie Anne Marshall, Michelle Murphy, Kristina Marchiori, Suliman Aryobi, Pam Wener, Catherine White, Nadine Lariviere, Roxanne Isard, Avneet Chohan, Mary Forhan, Niki Kiepek, Skye Barbic, Victoria Sarunsky, Sandra Moll
      First page: 376
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Recent changes in the Canadian regulatory landscape have prompted reflections on the role and scope of occupational therapy in the provision of psychotherapy. Purpose. To document how psychotherapy has been explored in occupational therapy literature. Method. We conducted a scoping review following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Scoping Review (PRISMA-ScR) guidelines by searching eight databases (e.g., Medline, AMED, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Sociological Abstracts, and ProQuest Dissertations & Theses). Articles included at the full-text stage were subjected to a narrative synthesis. Findings. A total of 207 articles met the criteria for inclusion, spanning 93 years. 47.3% of these articles represented non-empirical literature, with only 14% representing effectiveness studies, suggesting that this body of literature remains in an early stage of development. Implications. Occupational therapists have been writing about and practicing psychotherapy for nearly a century, yet there remains an important opportunity to develop and evaluate occupation-based psychotherapy approaches. Effectiveness studies are needed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-07-26T04:37:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221102732
       
  • New Graduates’ Experiences in Paediatric Private Practice: Learning to
           Make Intervention Decisions

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      Authors: Elizabeth M A Moir, Merrill J Turpin, Jodie A Copley
      First page: 395
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. Challenges with clinical decision-making are common among new graduate occupational therapists. There is limited research exploring their experiences of learning to make intervention decisions. Purpose. To explore new graduates’ experiences of learning to make intervention decisions in pediatric private practice. Method. A case study approach, involving a range of data sources, explored the experiences of 11 new graduates and three experienced occupational therapists working in Australian private practices. Data were analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. Findings. Themes pervading new graduates’ decision-making experiences were: “being seen as capable and competent,” “similar and familiar,” and “specialist versus generalist positions.” Contextual influences contributed to new graduates utilizing their support networks and personal experiences in addition to workplace supports. Implications. It is vital to balance private practice business demands with opportunities for new graduates to engage with experienced occupational therapists and professional communities of practice to assist their learning to make intervention decisions.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-05-20T08:35:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221102716
       
  • Rethinking Driving Against Medical Advice: The Situated Nature of Driving
           After Stroke

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      Authors: April Vander Veen, Debbie Laliberte Rudman
      First page: 406
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background: As stroke can result in functional impairments that impact driving ability, many jurisdictions mandate a 30-day period of driving restriction post-stroke. However, between 26% and 38% of clients drive against medical advice during this period. Purpose: Informed by critical reflexivity of the literature and the first author's practice, this critical analysis paper (1) explicates and critiques how adherence to guidelines regarding driving after stroke in the first 30 days is conceptualized in individualistic, biomedically centred research and (2) argues for expanded understandings of driving based on a transactional occupational perspective. Key Issues: Individualistic, biomedical perspectives view driving against medical advice as an individually located phenomenon, generating partial understandings and individually focused solutions. Re-conceptualizing driving after stroke as a transactional occupational choice provides a productive basis for understanding and addressing driving within practice and research. Implications: Concepts from occupational science can generate new insights for research and client-centred practice regarding driving following stroke.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-07-20T03:52:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221114670
       
  • Occupational therapists’ application of the Do-Live-Well framework: A
           Canadian health promotion approach

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      Authors: Sungha Kim, Nadine Larivière, Ilana Bayer, Rebecca Gewurtz, Lori Letts
      First page: 417
      Abstract: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background. The Do-Live-Well (DLW) framework is an occupation-focused health promotion approach. Online and in-person DLW educational workshops were offered to encourage occupational therapists to apply the DLW concepts. Purpose. The purpose of this study was to understand workshop participants’ experiences of and perspectives on using the DLW framework to support its application in the future. Method. Interpretative description was used to understand workshop participants’ perspectives on benefits, facilitators, and challenges of using DLW. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a thematic analysis. Findings. Eight themes were identified as follows: (a) environmental factors of practice settings, (b) co-workers’ support, (c) DLW enhanced occupational therapy practice, (d) confidence in using DLW, (e) nature of the DLW framework, (f) DLW promoted healthy occupational engagement, (g) DLW was not suitable for everyone, and (h) pandemic effects. Implications. The DLW framework supports occupationally focused practices, and continuous learning support will be needed.
      Citation: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-08-22T07:11:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/00084174221117717
       
 
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