Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 237)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.649
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1049-2089 - ISSN (Online) 1548-6869
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [305 journals]
  • Living History

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      Abstract: The Black History Month issue of the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved (JHCPU 34.1 Feb 2023) opens with a featured commentary by Louis W. Sullivan, MD and colleagues David Chanoff, PhD and Ronny Lancaster, JD, MBA. This is a case of hearing history from someone who was there. Dr. Sullivan, Secretary of Health and Human Services under George W. Bush and founding dean of Morehouse School of Medicine, and his colleagues retrace the vital work of the Association of Minority Health Professions Schools (AMHPS) in bringing health disparities to the fore, widening the focus of public policy to include all underserved populations (including but not limited to minority populations), and most importantly ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Association of Minority Health Professions Schools

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      Abstract: Disparities in health care between minority and mainstream Americans go back well beyond the beginning of formal record-keeping on race differences in morbidity and mortality. One reason that stands out historically for the still disconcerting state of Black health is the relative paucity of Black physicians and other health professionals. A hundred plus years ago there were shockingly few Black doctors attempting to care for a large, mostly rural Black population, and though the country's Black community today is far different from what it was at the turn of the 20th century, there is still a marked lack of African American physicians, dentists, and pharmacists and still alarming disparities. Another reason is ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Stress and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life Among a Sample of
           College-Educated Black Men

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      Abstract: The intersection of race and gender creates a social context that contributes to Black men's elevated health risks and underutilization of health care services.1–4 Black men have been subject to negative stereotypes, discrimination, and implicit biases in health care settings, which can contribute to them receiving poor quality health care.5,6 This effect can exacerbate Black men's historical mistrust of health care settings, resulting in underutilization or disparities in treatment planning and outcomes.7Studies have shown that even at higher levels of education, Black men may experience elevated risk for depression and chronic diseases due to stressful experiences with structural racism, discrimination, and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Correlations between Social Determinants of Health and Technology Access
           among Rural African American Alabamians

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      Abstract: With the COVID-19 pandemic, millions of Americans turned to internet technologies for health care, education, employment, and leisure.1 Approximately 79% of Americans reported using the internet in 2019.2 Additionally, from 2017 to 2019, a growing number of people were using the internet for health-related activity (48% to 51%), including insurance records (30% to 34%) and communicating with health professionals (23% to 25%).3 Despite the increasing use, a large swath of the U.S. population does not have access to broadband internet, with estimates ranging from 21.3 to 42 million residents lacking this capability.4 Public surveys and government reports regarding technology access demonstrate that individuals with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Discrimination, Sexual Violence, Depression, Post-traumatic Stress
           Disorder, and Social Support among Black Women

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      Abstract: Black Americans are the second largest racial group in the United States (U.S.), making up 14.5% of the population.1 Black Americans experience significant stigma (e.g., discrimination and victimization),2–4 contributing to symptoms of psychological distress.5,6 Discrimination refers to the act of treating a person differently because of their appearance, identities, or attributes. Perceived discrimination is a common measure of discrimination, and refers to one's self-rated, day-to-day experiences of discrimination (e.g., treated as inferior, called names, presumed of wrongdoing because of their attributes), whereas victimization refers to acts of physical, sexual, or psychological violence perpetrated by one ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Preexposure Prophylaxis in Latin America and the Caribbean—The
           Barbados Experience

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      Abstract: Overall, there has been a general decrease in the incidence of HIV in Latin America and the Caribbean, but that decrease has not been stable and may not be large enough to change the epidemic in the region.1 In 2008, 20,000 new HIV cases were recorded in the Caribbean (WHO, 2009),2 and new cases decreased to 12,000 in 2012.3 In 2018, 16,000 new HIV cases were reported in the Caribbean, and in 2019, 13,000 new HIV cases were reported.4,5 Gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (gbMSM) continue to be heavily affected by the HIV epidemic even though the prevalence of HIV infections is decreasing in that group.6 Globally in 2019, 23% of new HIV infections were among gbMSM; the risk of acquiring HIV was 26 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Recruitment and Feasibility of Hair Cortisol Collection in a Sample of
           Ethnically and Sexually Diverse, Low-Income Adults: A Qualitative
           Community-Partnered Participatory Research Study

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      Abstract: A Major challenge for biomedical research in the United States is the effective translation of science to reduce racial/ethnic health disparities and improving the representation of historically understudied groups in research, which includes sexual and gender minority people of color (SGM-POC) and people from lower-income backgrounds.1–4 The National Institute of Health (NIH) and the Institute of Medicine have outlined that biospecimen research can help promote advances in basic science into new public health approaches through deeper understanding of the physiological mechanisms implicated with health disparities.2,5,6 However, people of color (POC), including Black and Latinx individuals, and sexual and gender ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Missed Opportunities for HIV Testing and PrEP Education in a High-risk
           Population at a Safety-net Health Care System

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      Abstract: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the Ending the HIV Epidemic in the U.S. (EHE) initiative in 2019. The goal of this initiative is to reduce new HIV infections in the U.S. by 90% by 2030.1 According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in 2019 there were over 36,000 new diagnoses of HIV in the U.S. and dependent areas.1 While this is a 9% decrease from 2015, it is still well above the goal. One of the core components of the EHE initiative is early diagnosis of HIV followed by engagement in care and treatment initiation.1 In addition to recommending one-time HIV screening for all adults ages 13–64 years, the CDC recommends screening for HIV in all patients seeking treatment for sexually ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Differences in Health Care Access and Use by Gender, Race, Income, Age and
           Employment among Residents of the Rural South

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      Abstract: Rural residents face a range of health disparities relative to those living in urban areas, from lower life expectancy and higher all-cause mortality to higher prevalence of many chronic diseases and differential rates of health-related behaviors.1–14 Reasons range from relatively high rates of poverty, an older population, fewer educational and job opportunities, and less investment in infrastructure, to greater distances to services and resources.10,15–20 Social determinants of health and health behaviors cause the majority of premature mortality, but access to health care is a significant contributor.21–23Access to health care is an especially well-documented disparity among rural populations relative to those ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Telehealth Use and Access to Care for Underserved Populations Before and
           During the COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Telehealth use rose steadily in the years prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, but Medicaid beneficiaries, low-income, and rural populations were among the least likely to use telehealth compared with wealthier, privately insured populations.1 Despite increasing telehealth visits, less than 2% of providers offered outpatient visits via telehealth before the pandemic, with the exception of mental health providers, of whom 4%–5% provided care via telehealth.2 Telehealth visits were often reimbursed at much lower rates than in-person, and the federal government and many states had restrictions on who could provide telehealth and under which circumstances, such as a requirement of a prior in-person visit. While states were ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Does Private Insurance Provide More Care'

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      Abstract: For decades, Medicaid has provided virtually no-cost coverage to millions of Americans priced out of the private insurance market.1,2 Still, state legislators, policy analysts, and the popular press continue to question its value, particularly in relation to private coverage. Twelve states have not expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) framework despite the offer of 90% federal funding to cover the costs associated with additional enrollees. Other states have experimented with reforms that make the Medicaid program function more similarly to private insurance, including requiring beneficiaries to pay premiums to enroll and cost-sharing to seek care.3,4 By contrast, some policymakers in ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Pediatric Primary Care Diagnoses Among Children with Intrauterine Opioid
           Exposure

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      Abstract: The prevalence of opioid use during pregnancy has increased at least four-fold in the past two decades, with one in 15 women self-reporting prescription opioid use during pregnancy in 2019.1,2 For affected infants, intrauterine opioid exposure (IOE) may or may not result in a subsequent diagnosis of neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome/neonatal abstinence syndrome (NOWS/NAS). Symptoms of NOWS/NAS can include newborn irritability and sleep disturbances, poor feeding, loose stools, and hypertonia, among others.3 While approaches to prevention and management of NOWS have been extensively developed and studied in the neonatal period, there has been recent growing interest in research and programmatic development to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Characteristics of Substance Use Screening at Intake in a Sample of U.S.
           Jails

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      Abstract: Nearly two-thirds of individuals in jails have a substance use disorder (SUD), and 54% of sentenced people in jails reported drug use in the month prior to their incarceration, compared with 14% of the general population.1 After release from carceral facilities, the risk of overdose and death is increased.2–4 Due to a disproportionate burden of physical and mental health comorbidities among justice-involved populations,5 jails can be important public health venues for health screenings for a variety of conditions, including sexually transmitted diseases, HIV, hepatitis C virus, SUDs, and suicidality.6–8 Mass incarceration is a social determinant health with a multitude of adverse outcomes, and jails are often the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Medication Dosing Schedules, Medication Knowledge, and Dosing Errors of
           Adults Taking Complex Drug Regimens

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      Abstract: Complex medication regimens, specifically those consisting of three or more medications, are increasingly common. Data have shown that in the past 30 years the number of U.S. adults taking complex regimens has roughly doubled across most age groups.1,2 With greater regimen complexity, proper medication use becomes more challenging.3,4 The burden associated with treating conditions can make it difficult to remember to take medications or to find the most efficient daily dosing schedule to simplify medication-taking behaviors.5Studies have found half of adults possess an inadequate understanding of their prescribed medications.6 Patients with limited health literacy and limited English proficiency are at heightened ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Adults' Experiences with Type 2 Diabetes in Rural Guatemala: A Qualitative
           Study

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      Abstract: More than 80% of the global burden of diabetes occurs in low- and middle-income countries, where limited infrastructure and capacity for managing chronic illness lead to disproportionate morbidity and mortality.1,2 Guatemala is the largest country in Central America, and it is experiencing a rapidly increasing diabetes epidemic. It is estimated that the adult diabetes prevalence in Guatemala rose from 5% to 10% from 1980 to 2014.3An important feature of the demographic structure of Guatemala is that Indigenous Maya constitute most of the population in rural and agricultural areas of the country. Due to the legacies of a protracted civil war, structural racism, and minimal investment in rural community ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Use of Interpreters in Health Centers: A Mixed-Methods Analysis

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      Abstract: Health centers provide primary care to the nation's most vulnerable residents. Approximately 25% of the 30 million people who received care at health centers in 2019 have limited English proficiency (LEP) and need interpreters when clinicians and other staff are not fluent in their language.1 Health centers are accustomed to caring for non-English speaking patients and are required by statute to provide language services (LS).2 The commitment to LS is noteworthy from an equity perspective, since health centers serve nearly 30% of all people in the United States who are classified by the U.S. Census Bureau as LEP.3Despite a half century of legal requirements to ensure access to vitally important LS,4 health care ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Immigration-related Legal Collaboration in Primary Care: Evaluating Impact
           on Knowledge and Well-being

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      Abstract: Immigration status, immigration vulnerability, and understanding of immigration-related legal options are critical components of safety, access to public benefits, and wellness for many im/migrants. While immigration status is increasingly recognized as an independent social determinant of health,1 there is only a nascent understanding of best practices for health care systems that might mitigate the health disparities that result from unequal health care access dictated by immigration status.The relationship between immigration status and health outcomes is multifaceted and encompasses risk and resiliency factors related to pre-migration, peri-migration and post-migration experiences2,3 Im/migrants leave their ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • COVID-19-Related Emergency Department Visits Among Undocumented Patients
           in Los Angeles County

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      Abstract: Disparities in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outcomes have been well-documented. Throughout the course of the pandemic, immigrant, low-income, and racial/ethnic minority groups have had disproportionate COVID-19-related hospitalizations and death rates relative to their representation in the general population.1,2 One understudied group, however, is undocumented immigrants. There is indirect evidence that undocumented immigrants may be particularly vulnerable to infection and hospitalization from COVID-19 due to increased exposure risks to the virus and decreased access to health care.3 In the initial period of the COVID-19 pandemic, Hispanic/Latino individuals, who make up the majority of undocumented ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Prevalence and Determinants of Unmet Social Needs Among Rural and Urban
           Veterans

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      Abstract: Upwards of 70% of health outcomes result from social determinants of health, the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, work, and age that affect a wide range of health outcomes and risks.1,2 Unmet needs (e.g., lack of stable housing) resulting from adverse social and economic conditions are associated with the onset and progression of disease.3 These associations are especially well-documented for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States (U.S.).4 In recognition of these associations, numerous professional organizations, including the American Heart Association now encourage health care delivery systems to focus on unmet needs.4 This policy ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Engaging Stakeholders to Improve Care for Adults with Complex Health and
           Social Needs during a Public Health Emergency

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      Abstract: In the U.S. health care system, high-need adults represent 37% of adults in the top 10% of health care spending, and 47% of those adults are in the top 5% of health care spending.1 This population has been characterized with a variety of titles and segmentation definitions, including high-cost, high-needs patients (HCHN),2,3 superutilizers,4–6 and medically and socially complex patients (MSCP).7,8 They are hereafter referred to as adults with complex health and social needs (ACHSN).9 ACHSN have average annual per-person health care expenditure of $21,000—three-fold higher than adults only characterized by multiple chronic diseases.10 Furthermore, ACHSN have needs extending beyond chronic conditions to include ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Development of a Conceptual Framework for Providing Tailored Diabetes
           Care for Individuals Experiencing Homelessness: A Qualitative Study

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      Abstract: Cardiovascular disease is a significant contributor to mortality among those who experience homelessness.1–3 The prevalence of chronic diseases that lead to cardiovascular disease, such as diabetes, is comparable between housed and homeless individuals.1,3 However, people who experience homelessness are more likely to have higher glycemia and rates of diabetic ketoacidosis.4–7 Further, those experiencing homelessness have poorer overall health, higher rates of health care utilization, and higher rates of age-standardized mortality than the housed population.2,8,9The reasons behind these disparities are complex. Those experiencing homelessness have numerous competing priorities that may interfere with their ability ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Effect of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Use of Select Child Health Services
           in Kenyan Hospitals

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      Abstract: Kenya reported its first coronavirus disease (COVID-19) case on March 13, 2020.1 The government immediately implemented containment measures. These included the regular hand-washing with water and soap or using alcohol-based sanitizers, maintaining social distance, encouraging people to stay at home if they felt unwell with respiratory symptoms, suspension of public gatherings, mandatory wearing of face masks in public, closure of all educational institutions, and travel restrictions. More measures were implemented later. These included a nationwide dusk-to-dawn curfew and lockdown in counties with the highest cases.1 By mid May 2022, a total of 324,026 COVID-19 cases had been reported as well as 5649 fatalities.2 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rural-Urban Differences in Workers' Access to Paid Sick Leave

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      Abstract: The COVID-19 public health emergency has amplified the importance of paid sick leave (PSL). Prior evidence indicates that access to PSL is associated with reduced spread of infectious illness such as influenza1 and reductions in employees working while sick.2 Yet workers' access to PSL varies in the United States (U.S.), where there is no national paid leave policy. The U.S. is one of only two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries that does not guarantee PSL to workers; a majority of OECD countries (28 of 34) provide at least six months of paid leave for personal illness.3 Recognizing the role of PSL in disease mitigation, federal lawmakers added PSL provisions to the 2020 Families ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • State-Specific Medicaid/CHIP Eligibility Criteria and Their Impact on
           Health Care Access for Foreign-born Children Living in the United States

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      Abstract: Nativity is an important social determinant of health that can affect children's access to health care.1 Non-citizen children are more likely than citizen children to lack coverage.1,2 In 2019, 21% of lawfully residing and 35% of undocumented immigrant children were uninsured, compared with an uninsured rate of 5% in citizen children with U.S.-born parents.2 It is known that uninsured children are less likely than insured children to see a physician or receive necessary medical care, and the additional socioeconomic, linguistic, and cultural barriers immigrant families face have been shownFigure 1Descriptive graph of state Medicaid/CHIP eligibility for foreign-born children.to create a cumulative disadvantage ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Trials Informing Back Pain Guidelines Underreport Key Sociodemographic
           Data

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      Abstract: Low back pain (LBP) is the single greatest cause of years lived with disability in many countries, and has increased in prevalence by 17.5% in the past decade.1 Adverse LBP outcomes, including the transition from acute to chronic, disabling pain, are linked to social and economic factors including class, educational attainment, income inequality and poverty, and deprivation of essential resources.2,3 There is increased risk of opioid prescriptions for people with self-reported LBP having only a primary school education, having difficulty meeting financial needs, and being widowed.4 Race appears to be a key moderating variable between social status and pain in patients with chronic LBP in the United States, where ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Facilitators and Challenges to Maintaining Oral Health for Indigenous
           Communities Globally: A Qualitative Systematic Review

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      Abstract: Indigenous Peoples* is a global term used to refer to a vast range of groups with unique social, cultural, and historic characteristics whose societies developed on their traditional lands prior to colonisation.1 Despite such rich sociocultural diversity, robust evidence has demonstrated a clear pattern of poorer health and social outcomes for Indigenous populations compared with their non-Indigenous counterparts, irrespective of the level of development of the region where they live.2,3 For instance, Canada and Australia, two high-income countries, present some of the highest gaps in life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups globally.2 These pervasive health inequities have been attributed to a ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Understanding Hispanic/Latino Participation in Clinical Trials and
           Observational Studies, and Strategies to Increase Participation: A
           Targeted Literature Review

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      Abstract: The underrepresentation of ethnic and racial minorities in clinical trials is a persistent issue in the United States (U.S.), despite the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Revitalization Act of 1993 stipulating the mandatory recruitment of women and minorities in all NIH research.1,2 A recent report from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on its 2020 Drug Trial Snapshots showed a notable disparity between the representation of minorities and the representation of non-Hispanic Whites in clinical research, with the latter making up only 62% of the U.S. population, but 76.3% of research participants within clinical trials for new molecular entities and therapeutic biologics.3 Additionally ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Digital Technology in Community Engagement: Impacts and Implications

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      Abstract: Digital technology is the application of data and communication technology to collect, store, synthesize, and disseminate information at each step of planning, implementation, and evaluation; it acts as a crucial tool across various disciplines.1 Some examples are mobile apps, smartphones, websites, digital recruitment tools, artificial intelligence, e-books, and social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and others.2 Despite mainstreaming digital technologies, the digital divide continues to widen, leaving underserved communities behind, especially as the most basic modes of health communication and community engagement shift online.3 This commentary discusses the impacts and implications of the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Redlining and Lead Poisoning: Causes and Consequences

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      Abstract: In 1962 Harold Jacobziner and Harry Raybin, epidemiologists with the New York City Department of Health provided a map showing neighborhoods where children had blood lead levels greater than 60µg/dl, the upper limit of normality at that time.1,2 Jacobziner and Raybin countered a false assumption that differences in lead poisoning by race were a result of biologic factors. As they wrote,The majority of cases occur in the Puerto Rican and non-white, not because of any genetic predetermined factors but chiefly because the above ethnic groups live in areas where substandard housing prevail, i.e., the "lead belt."1A second false assumption, that poisoning was due to negligent parenting and characteristics of poisoned ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Assessment and Prevention of Lead Poisoning in Refugee Populations

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      Abstract: Lead is an environmental hazard and elevated levels can damage the developing brains of children and lead to long-term, irreversible, negative health consequences including learning difficulties, behavioral changes, abdominal pain, impaired motor skills, and even death.1 The prevalence of elevated blood lead levels (EBLL), in refugee children is double that of children born in the United States (U.S.)2 and as high as 13% to 22% in various studies.3,4 Refugee children may arrive from countries where there is a high risk for lead exposure from cultural practices, housing, and/or personal care products, as well as limited primary care services for lead screening. A large-scale study of newly arrived refugees in the ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Oral Health in America and Subsequent Policy Challenges for Oral Health
           Equity

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      Abstract: The National Institutes of Health recently released only the second nationwide account of oral health in American history, Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges, after a 20-year follow-up to the seminal report of 2000, Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. The original report was a groundbreaking and comprehensive examination of oral health across the United States, and the first to systematically characterize the state of U.S. oral health, detail its numerous challenges, and establish a framework of action for the public, policymakers, and health care providers to improve population oral health. Although the resulting strategies and approaches led to important national progress, many ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Power of Relationships During the Pandemic: A Community Health
           Center's Response to COVID-19

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      Abstract: Pacific Island (PI) cultures have long valued the intricate balance between human and environmental health.1 Colonial medical perspectives can often disrupt this ancestral relationship to time and place, leading to inappropriate and ineffective treatment of Pacific Islanders by mainstream health care.2,3 Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services (KKV), a federally qualified health center (FQHC) in Hawaii, believes engagement in the health care system can become healing for a wider group of people when we foster community health experiences that prioritize Pacific values, including deep relationships, dignity, agency, and ancestral philosophies.For the past 50 years, KKV has been a hub of cultural ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Integrating Community Health Workers into Hospital Systems Through a
           Social Work Partnership: A Report from the Field

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      Abstract: Community health workers (CHWs) are frontline public health professionals who are well positioned to address some of the U.S.'s extensive and growing health inequities1 through a focus on social determinants of health (SDoH) and marginalized populations.2 Community health workers come from or have a close understanding of the communities they serve.3 Their shared experiences with patients and firsthand knowledge of patients' neighborhoods and cultures often differentiate them from other providers who care for patients with complex needs, including many social workers (SWs) and nurse case managers.4 Community health workers are increasingly recognized as valuable members of the health care workforce and agents to ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Implementing a State-Funded Peer-Run Mental Health Warmline During the
           COVID-19 Pandemic

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      Abstract: Despite the formidable challenges that COVID-19 has posed to the health and health care care access of people living with serious mental illness (SMI),1 the health care systems serving this population at times responded with creativity to these new challenges, resulting in changes worth sustaining. Among these changes were an increase in the prevalence of warmlines.2 Warmlines are telephone lines that operate outside traditional business hours, designed for callers who seek support but who are not in an immediate mental health crisis, and are typically staffed by non-clinicians.3,4 In a recent survey, 70% of warmlines nationwide reported experiencing a significant increase in calls since the start of the pandemic.5 ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Integrated Care for Kids Model: Addressing Fragmented Care for
           Pediatric Medicaid Enrollees in Seven Communities

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      Abstract: Children from birth up to age 21 with complex health and behavioral health conditions face challenges in accessing coordinated health and community-based services, particularly if they also face increased risk for health and behavioral health complexity due to the social determinants of health and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), which can affect health status in later childhood and into adulthood.1 Coordination between the health care sector, child welfare, the school system, and other programs is difficult due to lack of data exchange, the absence of incentives to coordinate, and differing funding streams. As a result, complex health and behavioral health needs in children are often not detected and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Incorrectly Labeled Randomized Study and Inappropriate Within-Group
           Comparisons in: "Effectiveness of Home Gardening in Improving Food
           Security and Health in Chacraseca, Nicaragua: A Pilot Study"

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      Abstract: We read with interest the article by Tumwebaze et al. on the impact of home gardening on household food security, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and blood pressure.1 However, we have concerns about the description of the study as randomized, the use of within-group comparisons to draw conclusions, and numerical inconsistencies.First, it does not appear that participants were randomized to the intervention, contrary to a description as such in the abstract. Randomization is considered the gold standard to provide unbiased estimates of causal effects, as it controls for known and unknown confounding.2 Tumwebaze et al. describe their design in the abstract as: "One hundred participants were randomized into the control and ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • We'll Fight It Out Here: A History of the Ongoing Struggle for Health
           Equity: How a coalition of Black health professions schools made health
           equity a national issue by David Chanoff and Louis W. Sullivan (review)

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      Abstract: We'll Fight It Out Here: A History of the Ongoing Struggle for Health Equity by David Chanoff and Louis W. Sullivan, MD is an extraordinary story of women and men who worked to improve the health and human condition of Black and other underserved or unserved populations. They established and sustained academic health professions institutions and provided health care, including health services and health education, to targeted populations. The Association of Minority Health Professions Schools has served all segments of society dating back to the 1800. The book chronicles instances where member schools engaged in human subjects research and educated a diverse population including racial/ethnic minority, sex/gender ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Effectiveness of Home Gardening in Improving Food Security and Health in
           Chacraseca, Nicaragua: A Pilot Study

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      Abstract: Nicaragua is a low-income country that presents with high levels of low nutrient intake along with increasing levels of excessive calorie intake.1 Excessive calorie intake usually results in overweight and/or obesity. Overweight is defined as having a body mass index (BMI) 25.0 to < 30 and obesity BMI >= 30 and in Nicaragua, the incidence of overweight and obesity in the general population have been found to be 46% and 15%, respectively.2 On the other hand, the level of low nutrient intake was reported to be 17% in 2015.3 Although the level of undernourishment in Nicaragua has been declining over the years, it is now accompanied by rising levels of over nutrition.4 The existence of low nutrient intake together with ... Read More
      PubDate: 2023-02-20T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
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