Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.235
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 9  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1755-6228 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8707
Published by Emerald Homepage  [362 journals]
  • Capacity building in mental health: preparing Caribbean psychologists for
           the future

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      Authors: Donna-Maria Bradshaw Maynard
      Abstract: The English-speaking Caribbean is currently at a crossroads regarding the education and training of home-grown psychologists meeting the ever-increasing demands for mental health care in the region. This paper recommends an innovative approach to build capacity in mental health care in the English-speaking Caribbean that will require partnerships between the regional university, experienced registered practising psychologists, professional resources in the diaspora, public health and education institutions, which will produce trained clinical supervisors, PhD psychologists and improved mental health services in the region. Documents about the postgraduate programmes in psychology from the regional university were sourced. PubMed, Medline and Google Scholar were searched for the English language published articles using the key phrases psychology AND/OR psychologist AND/OR education AND training AND mental health. Searches of the reference lists of included articles were also undertaken. Postgraduate psychology programmes in the region have become stalled at the master’s level. Meanwhile, doctoral-level training is being sought outside the Caribbean largely due to the lack of availability of trained clinical supervisors. Moreover, training outside the region may lead to deficits regarding cultural relevance of practices, as well as impede the overall development of Caribbean psychology. This paper provides insights into the current practice of education and training for Caribbean postgraduate psychology students and the implications for the development of the practice of psychology in the region. Recommendations for educational and training strategies are provided. The proposed framework presented will help upgrade experienced master’s-level trained psychologists to PhDs with training in clinical supervision through Research Advancing Intensive Supervision Education (RAISE) doctoral programmes and can cultivate improved mental health services with a wider reach across the Caribbean. Raising the training standards of the psychologists, preparing clinical supervisors and increasing access to practicum sites will improve the trajectories of psychologists within the English-speaking Caribbean and the mental health of the population. Such changes will help to ensure the use of culturally appropriate therapies with Caribbean clientele. There are many social implications for capacity building within the practice and research domains of the preparation of psychologists. For example, increased access to psychological care, improved well-being of citizens, decreased prevalence of work absenteeism and improved management of citizens’ mental health and well-being. This paper provides insights into the current practice of education and training for Caribbean postgraduate psychology students and the implications for the development of the practice of psychology in the region. Recommendations for educational and training strategies are provided. The proposed organising framework presented offers a new conceptual model that can be used to guide the capacity building of psychologists within the English-speaking Caribbean. The proposed framework will help upgrade experienced master’s-level trained psychologists to PhDs with training in clinical supervision through RAISE doctoral programmes and can cultivate improved mental health services with a wider reach across the Caribbean.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-06
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-08-2022-0067
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Interprofessional learning through discussions of troubled sex/gender in
           mental health care: a case study

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      Authors: Tuija Viking, Maria Skyvell Nilsson, Inga Wernersson
      Abstract: This study aims to investigate how aspects of the sex/gender were scrutinized in a team’s production of clinical guidelines for psychiatric compulsory care and what the implications were for the final guidelines and for interprofessional learning. The study is a case study, where interviews were conducted and a narrative analysis was used. The results reflected how sex/gender arose in a discussion about gender differences when using restraining belts. Furthermore, discussions are presented where profession-specific experiences and knowledge about sex/gender appeared to stimulate interprofessional learning. However, the team’s learning about the complexity of sex/gender resulted in guidelines that emphasized aspects of power and focused on the individual patient. Thus, discussions leading to analysis and learning related to gender paradoxically produced guidelines that were gender-neutral. The study highlights the potential interprofessional learning in discussions of sex/gender and its complex relation in medicine.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2023-01-05
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-03-2021-0032
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2023)
       
  • Adult autism spectrum disorder: knowledge, attitude and practice of health
           system professionals

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      Authors: Javad Alaghband-rad, Maryam Ardeshir, Elham Hakki Kazazi, Mahtab Motamed
      Abstract: The prevalence of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is rising. As children with ASD become adults, the need for appropriate physical and mental health care becomes more evident. Lack of knowledge and inadequate training about adult ASD can lead to discomfort in management and service delivery to this population. This study aims to assess knowledge, attitude and practice of health-care providers for patients with adult ASD and to determine the needs of health-care staff to provide convenient care to adult patients with ASD. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2019–2020 among health-care professionals in Iran using an online questionnaire. In this study, 182 health-care professionals (67.6% mental health professionals) participated. A minority of participants mentioned having excellent or very good knowledge about autism (10%) or acceptable access to clinical tools and guidelines (27%). Around 67% of professionals believed that patients with ASD are not cooperative. The most preferred training was training on effective communication strategies with ASD patients (64.8%). The authors found a gap in knowledge and training of adult ASD diagnosis and management among health-care providers. This study highlights the significance of empowering professionals with better training to manage adult autism.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-12-16
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-07-2022-0066
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mental health, stigma and psychologists’ lived experience of caring

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      Authors: Angela Burrows, Claire Warner, Jennifer Heath, Saskia Keville
      Abstract: Mental health (MH) and caring can be demanding for those directly and indirectly impacted. An under-researched area is that of professionals’ personal experiences of caring for a loved one with MH difficulties. This study aims to provide an in-depth exploration of psychologists’ experiences of caring and its impact on clinical practice. A total of 11 psychologists with experiences of caring for a loved one with a diagnosed MH condition and/or MH distress participated in semi-structured interviews focused on caring experiences and its impact. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Themes identified were as follows: personal and professional roles; the emergence of a carer identity; carer stress and strain; impact on professional practice; and dual positioning. This study highlighted the knowledge and value of listening to professionals with lived experiences. Their ability to understand stigmatisation through personal caring experiences may facilitate the mitigation of this for vulnerable people attending clinical services.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-03-2022-0018
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • The effectiveness of happiness training on quality of life in women with
           premenstrual syndrome: a randomized, controlled, clinical trial

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      Authors: Azize Tanhayi, Mojgan Mirghafourvand, Jafar Kondori, Naiemeh Moheb, Jamileh Malakutie, Khadije Hajizadeh
      Abstract: Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) can disrupt women’s work process, social activities and interpersonal communication and lead to a lower quality of life (QOL). This study aims to determine the effectiveness of happiness training based on Fordyce’s theory on QOL and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) in women with PMS. This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 100 women (intervention = 50, control = 50). The intervention group participated in eight 120-min sessions of training counseling based on Fordyce happiness training. The participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, the PANAS and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). A general linear model was used to compare the mean scores of QOL and positive and negative affect after the intervention. After the intervention, the mean scores of negative affect [MD = −6.12; 95% confidence interval (CI) = −12.10 to −1.49] and body pain (MD = −26.19; 95% CI = −38.63 to −13.72) were significantly lower in the intervention compared to the control group. Also, the mean scores of physical functioning (MD = 42.0; 95% CI = 16.37 to 67.64) and vitality (MD = 10.40; 95% CI = 4.86 to 15.39) were significantly higher in the intervention group compared to the controls. Fordyce happiness training is recommended to be used in conjunction with other supportive and caregiving methods for women with PMS. Midwifes and nurses are the main source to give this training to women and can help them perform cognitive tasks, such as concentration, positive thinking and negative emotions. This randomized controlled trial suggests Fordyce happiness training as a feasible and acceptable training program that can be beneficial in reducing negative affect in women with PMS.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-10-2020-0072
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Risk factors affecting the mental health of first-year university students
           on a health sciences campus and related factors

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      Authors: Saime Erol, Kamer Gur, Semra Karaca, K. Burcu Çalık, Arzu Uzuner, Çiğdem Apaydın Kaya
      Abstract: The purpose of this study is to determine the mental health status and risk factors for the mental health of first-year university students on a health sciences campus. This is a descriptive study. The research was conducted with first-year students in the health sciences, dentistry and medical faculties of a state university (n = 770). The data were collected with a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Risk Behavior of Young Adults Survey, the Bergen Insomnia Scale, General Health Questionnaire-28 and the Mental Health Improvement Scale. Body mass ındex was calculated. Among the students, 53.7% experienced feelings of hopelessness in the last year and 1% had attempted suicide. The percentage of students found to be at risk in terms of mental health was 41.9%; 39.4% reported that they suffered from insomnia. It was found that those who had been subjected to bullying, felt hopelessness, had suicidal thoughts, planned to commit suicide and students who experienced sleeping problems were more at risk in terms of psychological issues (p < 0.01). Insomnia (β: 3.341) and smoking (β: 2.226) were identified as the strongest risk factors for mental health in first-year health sciences students (p < 0.005). The results of the research offer an opportunity to get to know the characteristics of first-year university students who are at risk for mental health. It offers the opportunity to closely monitor and protect the mental health of students starting from the first grade. In this study, it was determined that approximately half of the first-year university students were in the risk group in terms of mental health. Female gender, having a chronic illness, smoking a day or more in the past 30 days, not doing any physical activity, having a weak BMI, being bullied in the past 12 months, being cyberbullied in the past 12 months and having insomnia have been identified as risk factors that negatively affect mental health.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-03-2022-0015
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Links between reading acquisition level, emotional difficulties and
           academic performance in school-aged children

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      Authors: Said Ihbour, Oumaima Essaidi, Meriem Laaroussi, Mohamed Najimi, Fatiha Chigr
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the associations between reading difficulties, anxiety and depressive symptoms, self-esteem status and academic achievement among children of school age in the Moroccan context. This cross-sectional study was carried out on 302 Moroccan students aged 9 to 16 years, the latter having voluntarily participated in the different stages of the proposed assessments. Standardized reading tests administered individually allowed us to classify participants into three groups (good readers, intermediate level and weak readers). The subjects completed the measurements of three self-evaluative scales: the Beck depression inventory, the Coopersmith scale of self-esteem and the Taylor questionnaire of manifest anxiety. The variable of academic achievement is constituted by calculating the grade point averages of the last three semesters. Emotional disturbances are more frequent in the “weak readers” and the “intermediate level” group when compared to the good readers. Academic achievement and reading level are negatively correlated with anxious-depressive symptoms and positively with self-esteem at each reading level; the analysis of the results does not show any relevant difference in terms of the psychopathological disorder intensity between girls and boys. This study emphasizes improving education and psychological support for learners. It also encourages the strengthening of strategies for dealing with learning disabilities and the emotional distress associated with them. The trend toward an inclusive school and the recruitment of school psychologists is advantages to be considered in the Moroccan educational system. In addition to psychopathological vulnerability and academic failure, the social and family dimensions of self-esteem are impaired in weak readers.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-11-09
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-05-2021-0040
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Reflective monitoring as an iterative process in clinical teaching:
           lessons from online undergraduate psychiatry teaching during COVID-19

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      Authors: Irene Mateos Rodriguez, Saba Syed, Paul Wilkinson, Charlotte Tulinius
      Abstract: During the COVID-19 outbreak, clinical schools across the UK were forced to switch their learning from face-to-face to online platforms. This paper aims to describe the experiences of psychiatry teachers and medical students at Cambridge University of the online psychiatry case-based tutorials during the COVID-19 outbreak and the lessons learned from this implementation. The authors conducted qualitative focus groups with students followed by in-depth individual interviews with students and teachers. In a data-led systematic text condensation analysis, this study found seven themes: the COVID-19 context, the structure of the course, teachers’ educational ethos, beyond the (teaching) script, possibilities for learning or teaching reflective practice, attitudes to online learning and suggestions for future development. The authors then applied the normalisation process theory (NPT) as the theoretical frame of reference. This model has previously been applied to the implementation of telemedicine in psychiatry, to understand how new technology can become embedded in clinical care. This study’s results show how the NPT model can be modified to support the delivery of medical education online, including reflective learning and practice as an iterative process at every stage of the implementation and delivery of the teaching.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-10-11
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-10-2021-0122
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Health-care undergraduate student’s attitudes towards mental illness
           following anti-stigma education: a critical review of the literature

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      Authors: Lucy Pursehouse
      Abstract: There has been growing awareness underpinned with legislative recognition of the need to reduce the stigma attached to mental health. Education is seen as an integral factor for this endeavour. The purpose of this paper is to review existing literature to determine both positive and negative attitudinal changes of health-care-related undergraduate students towards mental illness after a training intervention within higher education. A search of papers written in the English Language was conducted between 2004 and 2021, using CINAHL, Eric, Educational Research Complete, Medline, psychINFO and SocIndex. Search terms used were undergraduate, attitudes or perceptions, mental illness/mental ill health, education, stigma and students. In total, 24 studies were critically reviewed, which included experimental, descriptive and exploratory designs. The appraisal of papers used recognised evaluation tools to review the methodological quality. Findings suggest that overall, anti-stigma education has a significant positive effect for student attitudinal change. Mental health anti-stigma education is beneficial for changing attitudes, however, more bio-medically framed training is less powerful for initiating change. Learning from those with the lived experience appears to have a more sustainable impact as indicated in some of the studies. There is a need for more exploratory research to gain further knowledge on the critical educational mechanisms that may foster more long-term reframing of positive attitudes towards mental health. Training providers need to consider the compelling evidence base surrounding anti-stigma pedagogy that supports the use of individuals with experience of mental ill health within the educational processes. Mental health stigma has potential for profound negative impact on individuals and at a wider societal level. Education is central to enable learners to consider their attitudes to mental illness to reduce stigmatising attitudes. Students on health-care-related courses are influential in becoming catalysts for change. This paper has critically reviewed the literature examining the attitudes of health-care-related undergraduate students following anti-stigma education, offering insights into some of positive and negative attitudinal changes and opinions of the event. In particular contributing to an understanding on the important components for eradicating the stigma surrounding mental health.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-09-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-09-2021-0112
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Facilitator reflections on online delivery of simulation-based mental
           health education during COVID-19

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      Authors: Owen P. O'Sullivan, Anita Bignell, Jennifer Powell, Sandra Parish, Lloyd Campbell, Hannah Iannelli, Chris Attoe, Grégoire Billon
      Abstract: During COVID-19, Maudsley Simulation successfully pivoted to fully online delivery of simulation-based education (SBE) in mental health. In migrating digitally, the simulation faculty experienced a range of new phenomena and challenges. The authors’ experiences may be transferable to other specialities and for other educator groups. By sharing the authors’ experiences, this study aims to support others adapt to online SBE. This piece represents the authors’ collective reflections on the challenges of adapting their facilitation skills to the online environment. It also offers various suggestions on how to improve the learner experience in view of these challenges. Beyond merely platform orientation and operating procedure familiarisation, the team gained insights into ensuring optimal learning, engagement and participant experience during online deliveries. Delivery of online SBE brings several potential barriers to psychological safety and these warrant careful consideration by experienced simulationists. Optimising participant engagement and psychological safety remain key considerations despite this novel medium. Facilitators must be willing to adapt accordingly to begin delivering high-quality online SBE. From their experience, facilitators must reframe their debriefing expectations and adjust how they engage participants and manage group dynamics given the inherently different nature of this new learning environment.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-02-2021-0009
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Culturally tailored substance use interventions for Indigenous people of
           North America: a systematic review

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      Authors: Ariel M.S. Richer, Ariel L. Roddy
      Abstract: The purpose of the current study is to conduct a systematic review of peer-reviewed work on culturally tailored interventions for alcohol and drug use in Indigenous adults in North America. Substance use has been reported as a health concern for many Indigenous communities. Indigenous groups experienced the highest drug overdose death rates in 2015, the largest percentage increase in the number of deaths over time from 1999 to 2015 compared to any other racial group. However, few Indigenous individuals report participating in treatment for alcohol or drug use, which may reflect the limited engagement that Indigenous groups have with treatment options that are accessible, effective and culturally integrative. Electronic searches were conducted from 2000 to April 21, 2021, using PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, MEDLINE and PubMed. Two reviewers classified abstracts for study inclusion, resulting in 18 studies. Most studies were conducted in the USA (89%). Interventions were largely implemented in Tribal/rural settings (61%), with a minority implemented in both Tribal and urban contexts (11%). Study samples ranged from 4 to 742 clients. Interventions were most often conducted in residential treatment settings (39%). Only one (6%) intervention focused on opioid use among Indigenous people. Most interventions addressed the use of both drugs and alcohol (72%), with only three (17%) interventions specifically intended to reduce alcohol use. The results of this research lend insight into the characteristics of culturally integrative treatment options for Indigenous groups and highlight the need for increased investment in research related to culturally tailored treatment across the diverse landscape of Indigenous populations.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-07-2021-0088
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Clinical psychologists’ well-being and experiences of home working
           during COVID-19

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      Authors: Heather Tolland, Emma Drysdale
      Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to explore the well-being and experiences of working from home (WFH) for psychology staff across a range of specialties working within one health board in Scotland during the COVID-19 pandemic. In total, 161 clinical psychology professionals took part in an online survey that explored experiences of WFH during the COVID-19 pandemic and assessed well-being during this period. A number of challenges with WFH were identified, including challenges with carrying out clinical work (e.g. communication difficulties, risk assessment) and fewer opportunities for collaborative working and technical/equipment issues. During the WFH period, 46% experienced fatigue, 45% felt stressed and anxious and 30% felt lonely and isolated, compared to normal. Physical health complaints were also common with 37% experiencing aches/pains in back compared to normal and 40% experiencing headaches or migraines. Remote therapy should be directed to those with less complex needs or who require straightforward assessments. There should be increased access to occupational health assessments and provision of ergonomic furniture when WFH, and all staff should be supported to access well-being resources available within the health board. Further evaluation should be carried out to support evidence-based practice of remote clinical work. Few studies have explored the experiences of WFH and/or remotely from the perspectives of clinical psychologists in a Scottish health board. It is expected that this way of working will continue, albeit to a smaller extent; therefore, WFH policy will be informed by the findings.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-18
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-08-2021-0098
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Staff perspectives on obesity within a Welsh secure psychiatric inpatient
           setting

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      Authors: Joseph Lloyd Davies, Ruth Bagshaw, Andrew Watt, Paul Hewlett, Heidi Seage
      Abstract: This study aims to understand the perceived causes and consequences of weight gain within a secure psychiatric inpatient service in South Wales. A purposive sample of 12 staff members were interviewed. These interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified, these were increasing demand for integrated physical health care, unhealthy lifestyles and weight gain viewed as a symptom of poor mental health. It is a unique insight into the factors that contribute to obesity in a Welsh secure unit and adds to current understanding of the challenges of improving weight management services within this sector.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-08-08
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-06-2022-0050
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Attitudes of nursing students towards mental health and the influence of
           social desirability: a cross-sectional study

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      Authors: Rosa Giralt Palou, Gemma Prat Vigué, Maria Romeu-Labayen, Glòria Tort-Nasarre
      Abstract: Identifying negative attitudes toward mental illness among students on nursing undergraduate degrees can help to design teaching strategies able to reduce the stigma attached to this condition. This study aims to assess attitudes toward mental health and intentions regarding future behavior in university nursing students initiating their training in the treatment of mental health problems (MHPs). A descriptive, observational and cross-sectional study was designed. A sample of 162 nursing students completed scales to assess their attitudes toward mental health, stigma, predicted behavior and social desirability. Simple and a multiple linear regression was performed adjusted for the social desirability scale result. Nursing students with previous experience of MHPs presented positive attitudes and behavioral intentions toward mental illness. Those who had no such experience before their training in mental health nursing presented certain stigmatizing attitudes. Attitudes toward MHPs may be affected by stigma and also by social desirability bias. The training in mental health care given to nursing students should aim to reduce its influence to help them carry out their future duties efficiently and compassionately. This study demonstrates the relevance of university teaching plans, which should place special emphasis on promoting knowledge and developing skills and attitudes in nursing students undergoing training in mental health care to ensure optimal levels of performance in their future careers.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-29
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-12-2020-0089
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Mental health professionals’ views of the borderline personality
           disorder diagnosis for children and young people: a Q-methodological study
           

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      Authors: Gemma Vickers, Helen Combes, Jennie Lonsdale
      Abstract: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a controversial psychiatric diagnosis. Despite an increasing amount of research looking at the BPD diagnosis when applied to young people, there is limited understanding of the key viewpoints of mental health professionals working with young people in the UK. This research aims to use Q-methodology to contribute to understanding the multiple views of the diagnosis. Q-statements about views of the BPD diagnosis were selected from relevant journals, internet sites and social media platforms and were validated by a Q-methodology research group, the research supervisors and an online group of individuals with BPD. Q-sorts were then used to explore the viewpoints of 27 mental health professionals in the UK working with children and adolescents. Analysis of the data was completed using Q-methodology analysis software. Three main factors emerged from the data, explaining 66% of the variance. Of the 27 participants, 24 loaded onto these three factors, defined as: harmful not helpful; language and optimism; and caution and specialist services. Three Q-sorts did not load significantly onto any one factor. There appears to be at least three ways of understanding the BPD diagnosis for young people. It may be useful for clinicians to consider and share their own viewpoint, be open to difference and formulate difficulties from an individual perspective.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-28
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-09-2021-0104
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • A qualitative exploration of the experience and attitudes of exercise
           professionals using telehealth for people with mental illness

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      Authors: Grace McKeon, Caroline Fitzgerald, Bonnie Furzer, Simon Rosenbaum, Robert Stanton, Oscar Lederman, Samuel B. Harvey, Kemi Wright
      Abstract: Physical activity is an important component of treatment for people living with mental illness, and exercise practitioners are well placed to deliver these interventions. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lock-down regulations, exercise professionals have rapidly adapted to the online delivery of services to continue care for their clients. To date, the research surrounding the delivery of exercise sessions via telehealth for this population has been scarce. Therefore, this study aims to explore how exercise professionals working in mental health have adapted to telehealth, the barriers and facilitators they have experienced and the implications for the future. A qualitative study using semi-structure interviews was conducted. Interviews were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed using reflexive thematic analysis. Nine exercise physiologists working in mental health settings in Australia participated in the interviews. Two main themes were explored. The first related to the implementation of telehealth and was divided into four sub-themes: service delivery, accessibility and suitability, technology barriers and facilitators, adaptations to exercise prescription. The second theme related to attitudes and was categorised into two sub-themes: attitudes towards telehealth and future recommendations. Telehealth appears to be a feasible and well accepted platform to deliver exercise sessions for people with mental illness, and this study provides guidance for clinicians including service and training recommendations. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to examine the experiences of exercise physiologists working in mental health and using telehealth.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-07-25
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-07-2021-0084
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
  • Examining clinical skills and abilities in psychology – implementation
           and evaluation of an objective structured clinical examination in
           psychology

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

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      Authors: Anna E. Sundström, Camilla Hakelind
      Abstract: Assessment of complex clinical skills and abilities is a challenge in mental health education. In the present study, an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) was adapted to psychology and implemented in a Master in Psychology program. The purpose of the present study was to examine aspects of validity of this OSCE. A total of 55 students enrolled in the Master in the Psychology program at Umeå University, Sweden, participated in two OSCE occasions. In addition to OSCE data, questionnaires were administered immediately after the OSCE to students (n = 18) and examiners (n = 13) to examine their perceptions of the OSCE. The results provided support for different aspects of validity. The level of internal consistency was close to acceptable, and there was a good correspondence between global ratings and checklist scores for many stations. However, adding an additional category to the global rating scale and reviewing some of the station checklists might improve the assessment further. The present cut-score of the OSCE was comparable to a cut-score set by the borderline regression model. In general, students and examiners perceived the OSCE as a high-quality examination, although examiners raised some issues that could improve the OSCE further. In conclusion, OSCE is a promising assessment in psychology, both from a psychometric perspective and from a test-taker and examiner perspective. The present study is an important contribution to the field as there are only a few examples where OSCE has been used in clinical psychology, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper is the first to evaluate the validity of such an assessment.
      Citation: The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice
      PubDate: 2022-04-12
      DOI: 10.1108/JMHTEP-10-2021-0124
      Issue No: Vol. ahead-of-print, No. ahead-of-print (2022)
       
 
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