Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 99 of 99 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 246)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
British Journal of Occupational Therapy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.323
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 255  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0308-0226 - ISSN (Online) 1477-6006
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • What is the occupational impact of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic
           fatigue syndrome for adults living in Australia'

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      Authors: Roshni Thomas, Julie Hughes, Cheryl Kotzur
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Occupational recovery for people living with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome requires better assessment and understanding of the occupational impact of this debilitating condition. This study explores the lived experience of Australian adults with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome using the Model of Human Occupation.Methods:The research design was a cross-sectional descriptive study, and participants were recruited via social media to complete an online survey. A Model of Human Occupation Tool, The Occupational Self-Assessment, captured an individual’s perceptions of occupational identity and competence.Results:Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric tests. The free-text responses were summarised. Twenty-nine participants completed the Occupational Self-Assessment. A decrease in occupational participation across all domains was evident. Qualitative themes of loneliness, feeling confined, feeling like a burden and loss of previous life/roles were collated, showing an adverse impact on occupational identity. A lack of independence and control showed a reduction in occupational competence.Conclusions:The study confirmed the impact of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome on occupational identity and competence. These individuals struggled with occupational adaptation and would benefit from occupational support. Occupational therapists could use the Occupational Self-Assessment to identify areas of need, set goals and facilitate better occupational adaptation.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-06-24T12:15:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241254720
       
  • Doing, being, becoming and belonging in forging professional identity:
           Lived experiences of occupational therapists’ professional identity
           currently working in physical health community roles in the UK

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      Authors: Emily Rosalyn French, Channine Clarke
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Professional identity is a multifaceted conceptual term combining behaviours, knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, contextual and socio-cultural factors with personal and group identity. The historical underpinning of occupational therapy is partly attributed to the difficulties occupational therapists face articulating their unique identity and the profession being misunderstood by others. Little is known about how occupational therapists working in community physical health settings experience their professional identity.Method:Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to understand how five occupational therapists interpreted and made sense of their experiences of professional identity working in community UK physical health settings. Interviews were carried out following social media recruitment and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis guidance.Findings:Participants identified that their professional identity was forged through experiences over time developing skills, confidence and their inner understanding of who they were as an occupational therapists. Maintaining a secure professional identity was attributed to building their community of practice and creating a sense of belonging.Conclusion:Professional identity was forged through time and experience of ‘doing’, ‘being’ and ‘becoming’ occupational therapists. Building a community of practice and creating a sense of ‘belonging’ were key components of how these occupational therapists working in community physical health roles sustained their professional identity.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-06-19T01:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241258714
       
  • Men’s experiences of the transition to fatherhood during the first
           postnatal year: A qualitative systematic review

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      Authors: Catherine White, Kathryn Jarvis
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Fatherhood is a significant transition in a man’s life, introducing new challenges. Yet men’s experiences of this period remain poorly understood. Occupational therapists possess skills and knowledge to support individuals during transition. This study explored the experiences of men during the transition to fatherhood over the first postnatal year.Method:Underpinned by an occupational therapy theoretical perspective, a systematic review was conducted. Following searches of databases: AMED, CINAHL, Medline and PsycINFO, qualitative studies meeting selection criteria were retrieved and quality assessed. Data was extracted and synthesised using an established meta-ethnographic approach.Findings:Seven articles were included in the review. Four interconnected themes: (1) A New Occupational Identity, (2) Relationship Changes, (3) Challenges and Impact, (4) Unmet Occupational Needs, and four subthemes: Roles and Responsibilities, and Adjusting Priorities (theme 1); An Emotional Journey and Exhaustion (theme 3) were identified.Discussion:Fathers’ postnatal transitional experiences were reflective of a journey of adjustment and growth. Experiences indicated the requirement for greater support of fathers throughout the antenatal and postnatal transition. Occupational therapists have the skills to work with fathers to balance occupations, manage fatigue and adjust to new roles. Further research should focus on understanding experiences of men in under-represented groups.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T04:22:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241258577
       
  • Activities of daily living interventions on activity performance of
           inpatients post-stroke: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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      Authors: Elyse Triantis, Karen PY Liu
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Inpatient rehabilitation is the best time window to improve patient performance post-stroke. Little is known about the type and effectiveness of activity interventions. This study aims to review activities of daily living interventions and evaluate their effectiveness on activity performance for stroke inpatients.Method:MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and Web of Science were searched. Randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of activities of daily living interventions for stroke inpatients were included. Two reviewers independently selected the studies and extracted data. Meta-analysis was conducted on relevant data with a random effect model with 95% CI.Results:Fourteen randomised controlled trials involving 602 stroke inpatients, were included. Both experimental and control groups offered activities of daily living interventions. Thirteen experimental groups offered added components, such as imagery and repetitive practice. Five studies reported significant improvement in activity performance within experimental and control groups. A meta-analysis of 12 randomised controlled trials with 512 participants revealed non-significant results for activity performance between the two groups.Conclusion:Both experimental and control groups in the included studies provided activities of daily living interventions. Added components were included in 13 out of 14 experimental groups. Meta-analysis revealed no significant difference between the two groups as they both offered activities of daily living interventions.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-06-18T04:15:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241255021
       
  • Assessing occupational participation among justice-involved people ‘with
           a personality disorder’: Quantitative assessments and their properties

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      Authors: Catriona Connell, Elizabeth Anne McKay
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:There is little evidence for what influences occupational participation for justice-involved people ‘with a personality disorder’ living in community contexts, and no validated occupational participation assessments specific to this group. We assessed a sample of justice-involved people ‘with a personality disorder’ to ascertain what influences occupational participation using commonly applied assessments and evaluated their construct validity.Method:As part of a mixed-methods study, a purposive sample of 18 justice-involved people ‘with a personality disorder’ were scored on the Model of Human Occupational Screening Tool and Occupational Performance History Interview–Version Two scales. Mean scores were calculated per Model of Human Occupational Screening Tool (MOHOST) item and Occupational Performance History Interview–Version Two (OPHI-II) items and scales and compared to published data. Mann–Whitney U Tests were used to identify within-sample differences based on demographic characteristics.Results:Participants had low scores on MOHOST items and OPHI-II items and scales. Differences were identified compared to published data. Within-sample differences were most apparent in comparisons by employment status and ethnicity. The OPHI-II scales did not operate as intended with this population and recommended adjustments impacted its construct validity.Conclusion:Replication is required with a larger random sample. Integrating these data with qualitative exploration would further elucidate factors influencing occupational participation in this population.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-06-04T04:49:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241254768
       
  • A meta-ethnography of identity formation among people with early-onset
           dementia

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      Authors: Jesper Larsen Maersk, Hanne Peoples, Hanne Kaae Kristensen, Jeanette Præstegaard
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Living with dementia can be challenging, even more so for people diagnosed before age 65. Loss of identity is one of the main subjective consequences dementia poses at this stage in life due to the loss of social relations and daily activities. While a growing body of research is reporting the experienced impact of early-onset dementia on identity for this group, studies synthesizing this knowledge are very limited. Therefore, we have conducted a meta-ethnographic review to explain how people with early-onset dementia form their sense of identity.Method:A systematic review of literature from five databases was conducted. Ten original studies published between 2004 and 2020 were included and analyzed using an interpretive approach.Findings:A conceptual interpretation emerged from the analysis, showing that social arenas and activities of daily life, as well as assumptions about dementia and natural aging made by the participants and society, influenced the participants’ sense of identity.Conclusion:Being in nonjudgmental environments can support people with early-onset dementia in creating continuity and positive connections in their personal history. Providing such environments can be a viable venue for healthcare professionals to support people with early-onset dementia in maintaining a positive sense of identity.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-31T06:05:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241253699
       
  • Acceptability and usability of assistive equipment and technology by
           individuals with multiple sclerosis: A qualitative study with occupational
           therapists

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      Authors: Courtney Barnett, Angela Murphy, Daniel Cezar da Cruz
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Assistive equipment and technology (AE&T) is often part of occupational therapy practice for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). We aim to explore the acceptability and usability of AE&T by people with MS from the perspective of occupational therapists.Methods:Our study applied a qualitative descriptive design, using semi-structured interviews conducted with five qualified occupational therapists with at least 6 months of experience in providing occupational therapy to adults with MS. Reflexive thematic analysis was used for data analysis.Findings:Three developed themes describe the occupational therapists’ experiences: ‘The cognitive impact of the illness rather than the physical’, ‘There’s a drive to not let the MS win’ and ‘They have to experience it by doing’. Therapists perceive cognitive changes, the meaning of technology and a person-centred approach as elements influencing the acceptability and usability of AE&T.Conclusion:Our findings highlight the importance of using core occupational therapy principles and approaches to best support people with MS in using AE&T effectively.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T04:58:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241253765
       
  • Life satisfaction and awareness of meaningful activities among middle-aged
           adults: A population-based study

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      Authors: Shoma Akaida, Daijo Shiratsuchi, Mana Tateishi, Ryota Kuratsu, Hyuma Makizako
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Meaningful activities have been suggested to contribute to life satisfaction. Investigating the association between the awareness of meaningful activities and life satisfaction will help us develop a population-based occupational therapy strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the proportion of people who were aware of meaningful activities among middle-aged adults, and the relationship between the awareness of meaningful activities and life satisfaction.Method:A cross-sectional analysis was conducted on 2698 middle-aged adults who participated in an online survey conducted in Japan by the Y-Cloud system. Participants responded to demographic questions, life satisfaction, and awareness of meaningful activities. We examined the association between the awareness of meaningful activities and life satisfaction using binomial logistic regression analysis.Results:Of the respondents, 77.4% were aware of meaningful activities. Binomial logistic regression analysis adjusted for covariates showed that the awareness of meaningful activities was significantly associated with higher life satisfaction (odds ratio, 2.97; 95% confidence interval: 2.45–3.61, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T04:56:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241253110
       
  • Embedding research within occupational therapy pre-registration training:
           A concept mapping study engaging staff and student voices

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      Authors: Katie L Hackett, Helen Atkin, Sureshkumar Kamalakannan, Savannah Murray Mendes, Julie Anne Lowe, Phillip Whitehead, Gemma Bradley
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Occupational therapists require research and evaluation skills to deliver evidence-based care, making research education integral to their training. We aimed to develop a student and staff-informed strategy to further embed research into the occupational therapy programmes and enhance the research culture at a United Kingdom Higher Education Institution.Method:We used group concept mapping to gather ideas from students and staff on how to embed research and improve research culture within the occupational therapy programmes at a United Kingdom Higher Education Institution. Participants generated, sorted and rated ideas for importance and success. We analysed the data to create a concept map and identified rating values for the themed clusters and their ideas.Results:The concept map contained four themed clusters of ideas: Wider research community, Integration of research into the core programme, Advanced research support and capacity building and Research awareness. Successes and improvement targets were identified within each cluster.Conclusion:Group concept mapping provided a structured and comprehensive method to develop a strategy for embedding research and fostering a research culture in occupational therapy programmes at a higher education institution. The four-themed concept map and identified priority targets serve as a foundation for implementing the strategy and improving research integration in occupational therapy education.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T04:54:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241253102
       
  • Qualitative outcomes and impact of a robotic intervention on children with
           autism spectrum disorder: A multiple embedded case study

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      Authors: Eva Yin-Han Chung, Kenneth Kuen-Fung Sin, Daniel Hung-Kay Chow
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Most studies of social robot interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder have been laboratory experiments focusing on component skills. There is insufficient evidence documenting the qualitative impact of such programmes on social development and participation of children with autism spectrum disorder. This study aimed to identify the qualitative outcomes of a robot-mediated social skills training programme for children with autism spectrum disorder, examine the impact of such programmes on children’s social participation and identify the essential elements of robotic interventions that are conducive to children’s social development. A case study approach with a multiple case study design was adopted. Sixteen children with autism spectrum disorder, aged 5–11 years, were included. Participants received 12 weekly sessions of robot-mediated social skills training. The successful outcomes relating to social participation were identified as enhanced verbal expression, social awareness and emotional reciprocity. The impacts of the programme on personal development were identified as enhanced self-esteem, self-confidence and emotional expression. Robot friendship, the role of the robot as a facilitator and the presence of a human instructor capable of leading the programme were identified as essential elements of the positive changes. The encounter with a social robot was regarded as meaningful and important to the children with autism spectrum disorder.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-23T04:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241252272
       
  • Assistive technology: Occupational therapy assessment and services for
           people with dementia

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      Authors: Eleanor Curnow, Fiona Maclean, Brendan McCormack
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Research suggests that services are not effectively providing suitable assistive technology for people with dementia. There is a need to understand the challenges facing practitioners to identify where service changes should be focussed to improve this situation.Method:This study used an online survey to explore the experiences of 41 occupational therapists working with people with dementia, and/or assistive technology. Eight participants subsequently agreed to participate in online discussion groups. Group discussions were transcribed and checked. Data responses from group discussions and open questions in the survey were analysed thematically using the person-centred framework to identify domains supporting or obstructing effective assistive technology service delivery.Results:Forty-one occupational therapist participants described challenges to providing person-centred assistive technology services. These included restricted access to assistive technology interventions, limited knowledge regarding developments in the field, variable funding, unsupportive systems, limited relevant training and difficulties working across health and social care sectors.Conclusion:There is a need to revise the systems surrounding the provision of assistive technology for people with dementia. Occupational therapists need access to training relative to this field, and systems need to be adapted to support the provision of person-centred care by widening access to assistive technology.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-21T09:50:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241252280
       
  • Using time diaries to inform occupational therapy practice for people with
           Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: An exploratory study

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      Authors: Rachel Roxburgh, Julie Hughes, Wendy Milgate
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome affects an individual’s occupational participation. There is little understanding in Australia of occupational interventions for myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. This study explored how Australian adults with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome use their time and whether the National Institute of Health Activity Record can inform occupational interventions.Method:Using a convergent mixed method, nine participants completed the National Institute of Health Activity Record time diary and five survey questions exploring clinical utility and the impact of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Data analysis included descriptive statistics for time-use data and an inductive thematic analysis for survey responses.Results/Findings:Participants (aged 29–59 years) reported 58% of their time was spent awake and in recreation and leisure occupations. Quantitative data reflected no statistically significant change in participants’ symptoms, performance and motivation throughout the day. Six themes emerged from the qualitative data that highlighted participants’ experiences completing the National Institute of Health Activity Record and the impact of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome on their time-use.Conclusion and Relevance:The National Institute of Health Activity Record provided insights into a participant’s time-use, which could inform occupational interventions. Modifying the National Institute of Health Activity Record format would improve usability for participants and reduce time for completion. Discussing results and extending the data collection period may capture the impact and fluctuations of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome more accurately.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-05-20T05:33:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241249279
       
  • Assessing the quality of life priorities in the elderly: Application of
           the Turkish-Adapted Mayers’ Lifestyle Questionnaire (3)

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      Authors: Medine Nur Özata Değerli, Onur Altuntaş, Gonca Bumin
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The growing aging population requires the development of new policies and programs to meet the needs and expectations of the elderly. Identifying priorities for the elderly’s quality of life can be the foundation for rehabilitation services provided to the elderly. This study aims to assess the quality of life priorities in the elderly using the Turkish-adapted Mayers’ Lifestyle Questionnaire (3).Method:The study included 171 elderly with a mean age of 74.72 ± 4.36 years. Participants completed a sociodemographic information form and the Turkish-Adapted Mayers’ Lifestyle Questionnaire (3).Results:Quality of life priorities for elderly people were independence in reading and writing, participation in paid and/or voluntary work, spiritual, and satisfying activities, and the ability to make choices about their lives.Conclusion:The study results showed that Mayers’ Lifestyle Questionnaire (3) supports setting priorities by examining the quality of life of elderly people from a multidimensional perspective. The use of Mayers’ Lifestyle Questionnaire (3) can contribute to the development of effective strategies aimed at improving the quality of life for elderly individuals. A holistic approach to each factor affecting quality of life will enable occupational therapists and other professionals involved with elderly people to consider person-centered factors in their interventions.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-29T09:11:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241249283
       
  • Positive risk-taking within social care for adults with physical
           disabilities: A review of guidelines in practice in England

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      Authors: Leanne Field, Liana Nagy, Tarnya Knaggs, Johnny Collett
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Despite practice guidelines, professionals do not feel confident in implementing positive risk-taking. This may be due to the guidance provided.Method:A scoping review of current organisational guidance for the professional practice of positive risk-taking within Adult Social Care services for people with a physical disability. Guidelines were obtained from Local Authorities in England in October 2020. The data were extracted using TIDieR to describe positive risk-taking as an intervention. The quality of the guidelines was assessed using AGREE II.Findings:In all, 36 Local Authorities responded out of 106 contacted. A total of 21 documents were included for review. Substantial variability was found in terminology, definitions and risk grading between documents. The greatest consistency was found in how to implement a positive risk-taking intervention. Consistency was also found in the policy that documents cited. There was little reference to evidence to support intervention components. Overall, AGREE II quality scores were low and stakeholder involvement, specifically with regard to the views and preferences of service users, was largely absent.Conclusion:There is a need for a greater consensus to guide the professional practice of positive risk-taking. Determining the extent of current evidence and establishing an evidence base may facilitate more consistent guidelines and support professionals’ confidence in implementing positive risk-taking.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T06:28:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241246511
       
  • The relationship between occupational therapists’ organizational
           commitment, perceived organizational support, and entrepreneurial
           orientations

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      Authors: Ezginur Gündoğmuş, Medine Nur Özata Değerli, Hatice Abaoğlu
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Entrepreneurial orientation is a critical factor in the success of an organization and encourages higher performance. Individual entrepreneurial orientation can be influenced by organizational commitment and perceived organizational support. The study aimed to examine the relationship between occupational therapists’ organizational commitment, perceived organizational support levels, and their individual entrepreneurial orientation.Method:Using an online form, a cross-sectional survey study was conducted with 88 occupational therapists aged between 22 and 28. Occupational therapists completed a socio-demographic information form, the Organizational Commitment Scale, the Perceived Organizational Support Scale, and the Individual Entrepreneurial Orientation Scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation analysis.Results:Significant positive correlations were found between occupational therapists’ individual entrepreneurial orientations and organizational commitment (p = 0.015; r = 0.260) and perceived organizational support (p = 0.045; r = 0.214).Conclusion:This study indicates that occupational therapists’ individual entrepreneurial orientation increases when their levels of organizational commitment and perceived organizational support increase. Therefore, organizations should strive to maintain high levels of organizational commitment and the support provided by the organization to enhance the entrepreneurial orientation of occupational therapists, which is important for their creativity and innovation.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-16T06:26:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241245559
       
  • Using the PLUS Framework to support supervisors to make the most of
           practice education supervision: Experiences from Singapore

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      Authors: Karina M. Dancza, Corrine Hoo, Jacintha Goh Xin En, Jervyn Charity Tan, Lee Shu Hui, Rialyn Fae Lagui Masaoy, Ong Chooi Yin, Pay Pei Qi, Sharmaine Yong Mei Xing
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Practice education is a crucial component of occupational therapy education, providing students with hands-on experience in real-world settings. Supervisors play a vital role in shaping students’ learning experiences, and the Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework, developed in the United Kingdom, serves as a guide for supervisors. However, its applicability in different cultural contexts remains uncertain. This qualitative study explores the perspectives and experiences of supervisors in Singapore who used the Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework to guide their supervision of students.Method:Nine new and five experienced supervisors participated in semi-structured interviews, during a 7-week practice education period. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using template analysis.Findings:Three themes were developed: The Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework brought awareness to supervisors’ supervisory techniques and guided their actions; The Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework gave permission to use a range of supervisory strategies; and The Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework could be used as a catalyst for enhancing support for supervisors.Conclusion:The Professional Learning through Useful Support Framework positively influenced supervisor communication and encouraged a purposeful approach to student supervision. Challenges emerged in implementing the concept of ‘safe failure’ due to cultural attitudes towards success, necessitating cultural adaptation. The study suggests introducing educational opportunities and ongoing support to use the Framework to enhance supervisor skills.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T06:51:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241246139
       
  • Psychometric evaluation and feasibility of the Persian-Relative Mastery
           Scale in the caregivers

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      Authors: Afsoon Hassani Mehraban, Fatemeh Motaharinezhad, Setareh Ghahari, Laleh Lajevardi, Mohammad Mohebbirad
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Purpose:This study aimed to evaluate the validity, reliability, and feasibility of the Persian version of the Relative Mastery Scale as a measure of the Occupational Adaptation Model in caregivers of people with multiple sclerosis.Method:In a cross-sectional study, after translation, face and content validity, the caregivers completed the Relative Mastery Scale and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Expanded Disability Status Scale for people with multiple sclerosis was reported by neurologist. Also, convergent validity, internal consistency, test–retest reliability, and exploratory factor analyses were evaluated.Results:A total of 150 caregivers completed both instruments. Cronbach’s α = 0.852 and ICC = 0.838 were good. The convergent validity of the total Relative Mastery Scale score was confirmed with a significant correlation with Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (r > 0.67, p  0.34, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-13T06:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241246137
       
  • Post-stroke depression, activities of daily living, and occupational
           therapy intervention: An observational survey

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      Authors: Anello Sara, Diletta Maria Pisaniello, Pier Carlo Battain
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Post-stroke depression is a frequent but under-diagnosed condition. Nevertheless, it impacts participation in activities of daily living (ADLs) and the rehabilitation process. The aim of this study is to analyze the influence of post-stroke depression on participation in ADLs and on occupational therapy (OT) intervention in adults.Methods:An observational study was conducted through a survey. The questionnaire covered OTs view about the influence of post-stroke depression on ADLs and occupational therapy treatment. Data collected by online questionnaire were analyzed through STATA®, using a mixed method. Quantitative data were analyzed through descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analyzed by thematic analysis.Results:Sixty-three surveys were valid. Stroke adults manifest hopelessness toward the future, crying and nervousness (“often” / “always”>50%). They have often worse occupational performance than patients with stable mood (55.56%), especially in self-care activities (35.92%). The performance limiting factors are low volition (41%), reduced motor skills (30%), and reduced cognitive skills (19%). OT intervention with these patients aims to increase volition (21.30%), recover roles (16.61%), and improve self-care activities (14.08%).Conclusion:Mood disorders negatively affect participation in ADLs and OT intervention. This study highlights the importance of volitional factors in promoting occupational engagement and provides guidance for OT treatment. Further investigation through specific studies appears necessary.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-12T10:42:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241246138
       
  • Every parent matters: The value of a parent-centric approach to supporting
           parenting occupations and roles

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      Authors: Margaret McGrath, Anne Honey, Yvonne Codd, John V Rider, Rodolfo Morrison, Carla Matta Abizeid, Hiba Zein, Hwei Lan Tan, So Sin Sim, Farahiyah Wan Yunus, Muhammad Hibatullah Romli, Evelina Pituch
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-09T04:48:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241241221
       
  • Development of a clinical hand rehabilitation guideline for second to
           fifth metacarpal fracture rehabilitation: A Delphi method

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      Authors: Monique M Keller, Roline Barnes, Corlia Brandt
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Metacarpal fractures are viewed as minor injuries, potentially leading to reduced hand function and productivity, especially in working-age people. The study aimed to develop and finalise a second to fifth metacarpal fractures clinical hand rehabilitation guideline.Methods:A three-round eDelphi method, employing REDCap questionnaires and informed by a previous clinical hand rehabilitation guideline, facilitated expert consensus. Experience and qualifications guided expert selection. Consensus was defined as 75% or more experts selecting four or five on a Likert scale or ‘yes’ in ‘yes/no’ questions. Open-ended responses were incorporated, following Conducting and Reporting of Delphi Studies recommendations.Results:Fifteen experts specialising in hand injury management, including orthopaedic surgeons, occupational therapists and physiotherapists, were invited to participate, with attrition of one expert in three rounds. In Round 1, 10 (28.5%), Round 2, 6 (18%) and Round 3, 16 (36%) guideline statements were accepted. Consensus was reached for including grasp types in rehabilitation; activities of daily living (ADLs) types under light, medium and heavy categories; time when early active mobilisation should commence and splint types after conservative management, K-wires and surgical fixation.Conclusion:The finalised clinical hand rehabilitation guideline based on the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) framework may benefit occupation return.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-04-03T11:18:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241241990
       
  • Youth mentoring: A new holistic intervention targeting the needs of young
           persons with acquired brain injury

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      Authors: Lene Odgaard, Mette Ryssel Bystrup, Jørgen Feldbæk Nielsen, Henriette Holm Stabel
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Holistic rehabilitation approaches addressing the numerous complex challenges in young persons with acquired brain injury are required. The purpose of this study was to describe and evaluate the holistic person-centered youth mentoring intervention program, which is based on occupational therapy.Methods:Prospectively collected data were extracted from a national clinical quality database (n = 59). Proportions of young persons receiving different aspects of support and proportions rating the intervention as meaningful were calculated. One-year changes in occupation, work ability, and social interactions were calculated.Results:The young persons most frequently received support for energy management (75%) and structuring of everyday life (61%). Seventy-three percent rated the intervention as meaningful. One year post-inclusion, occupation and work ability had increased by 35% and 58%, respectively, and it had declined by 10% and 26%, respectively. The 1-year increase and decrease in social interactions were less clear (15% and 25%, respectively). One-year changes did not differ between those who entered the program early or late after injury indicating the potential beneficial effect of the program.Conclusion:The findings could indicate that the program has a unique value in supporting young persons with acquired brain injury to create a meaningful everyday life through occupation, work ability, and social interaction.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T10:34:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241241991
       
  • Reliability of the Gap–Kalamazoo communication skills assessment
           form in occupational therapy

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      Authors: Shih-Chen Fan, Shao-Tong Tsai, Yi-Ching Wang, Meng-Lin Lee, Sheau-Ling Huang, Ching-Lin Hsieh
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The Gap–Kalamazoo Communication Skills Assessment Form (GKCSAF) is widely used in medical education, yet its reliability in real occupational therapy clinical settings remains unexplored. This study aimed to assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability, as well as random measurement error, of the GKCSAF in occupational therapy.Method:Five independent raters evaluated audio-recordings and transcripts of conversations involving 30 patients treated by 22 assessors (7 therapists and 15 students). Both direct and coded ratings were used.Results:For direct ratings, intra-rater reliability was moderate for total score (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.76), but poor for inter-rater (ICC = 0.31). minimal detectable change (MDC%) was acceptable for the same rater (17.8%) but not for different raters (38.3%). Weighted kappa values indicated poor to fair reliability (−0.01 to 0.34) for each domain score. Coded ratings showed moderate intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.69) and poor inter-rater reliability (ICC = 0.22). MDC% was acceptable for the same rater (24.8%) but not for different raters (65.5%). Weighted kappa values indicated poor to fair reliability (−0.02 to 0.33) for each domain score.Conclusion:GKCSAF displays acceptable intra-rater but poor inter-rater reliability in occupational therapy clinical scenarios. Multiple raters are advised for enhanced reliability, while coding might not significantly enhance it. It is advisable to use the GKCSAF cautiously in occupational therapy education, ensuring adequate training, and possibly incorporating multiple raters for assessment consistency.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-29T05:03:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241239574
       
  • The role of Occupational Therapy in community development to combat social
           isolation and loneliness

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      Authors: Kate Cowen, Tracy Collins, Susan Carr, Gemma Wilson Menzfeld
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Social participation activities, an important area of occupation, have been effective in reducing social isolation and loneliness. However, most attendees are women, warranting the need to explore older men’s social participation needs.Methods:Qualitative methods, including interviews and a collaborative workshop, were used to explore the research aim. Public involvement included establishing partnerships with six staff from four community organisations and twelve older men. The project was informed by a steering committee. The steering group offered insight into all aspects of the research except analysis, which was performed thematically.Findings:Intergenerational engagements and the appropriate environment to establish connections with their communities were highlighted as beneficial to men. However, there is a lack of appropriate local spaces to connect communities through social participation. This suggests the need for occupational therapists to diversify their roles, moving beyond the individual and into community development.Conclusions:Occupational therapists’ unique and varied skill set, including the understanding of the profound impact of the environment on occupational engagement and, thus, well-being would offer valuable contributions to community development roles, including the built environment to ensure all communities have places for connection where individuals of all ages can thrive.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-28T04:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241239564
       
  • Enhancing occupational therapy education: Evaluating the impact of a
           STEAM-based assistive technology curriculum using Kirkpatrick’s
           four-level model

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      Authors: Chia-Hui Hung, Mei-Hsiang Chen, Shih-Chen Fan
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Integrating assistive technology (AT) into occupational therapy (OT) education is critical to educating students to utilize AT to enhance individual independence. This study aims to describe the development of a science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM)-based AT curriculum in OT and evaluate its effectiveness using the Kirkpatrick model.Methods:An 18-week STEAM-based AT curriculum was created with lectures, hands-on activities, and a simulation exam. A one-group pretest–posttest observational study was undertaken with 40 undergraduate students to gauge its effectiveness. Their professionalism was evaluated using a multidimensional checklist, whereas a satisfaction survey gathered their feedback on the curriculum experience.Results:Level 1: Participants reported high satisfaction (mean = 4.61, SD = 0.36), with a 97.5% agreement. Level 2: 95% (n = 38) passed the AT curriculum exam. Level 3: Therapists and patients expressed satisfaction with participants’ AT skills (therapists: t(39) = 12.22, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-21T11:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241239563
       
  • Parents’ and carers’ attitudes to the use of digital technology and
           its role in the care of children with complex needs

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      Authors: Joanna Apps, Stephen Webb, Eve Hutton
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Parent/carers of disabled children want timely and personalized support. Research suggests that technology may address some limitations associated with traditional methods of communication with therapists (e.g. letter, telephone). This exploratory study examined United Kingdom (UK) parents and carers views on the use of digital technology (i.e. computers/phones) in supporting their child and the potential for its greater use in the care of children with complex needs.Methods:An online survey was distributed via special schools and support forums/networks. Questions explored use of and attitudes to digital technology in the care of children with complex needs. Descriptive statistical analyses and content analyses were undertaken on the data.Results:Respondents were 43 parents/carers whose children used rehabilitation services prior to the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority used digital technology frequently to support their child and saw the potential for greater use in rehabilitation services – provided this was not at the expense of in-person therapist contact.Conclusion:Parents and carers held positive views of digital technology as a tool to support their child and enhance rehabilitation services. Recommendations include regular service consultation on parental/child attitudes to digital service delivery and longitudinal studies to assess related health outcomes.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-19T10:43:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241233112
       
  • Identifying characteristics of stroke patients benefiting from
           interprofessional collaboration

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      Authors: Kohei Ikeda, Satoshi Sasada
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:This study identifies the patient population that may benefit from interprofessional collaboration in the support of patients with cerebrovascular diseases.Method:This study involved 170 patients who received treatment in Japan’s recovery rehabilitation wards in December 2019–June 2020. Participants were categorized into three groups based on their functional independence measure (FIM) scores at admission, distinguishing between complete dependence, modified dependence, and independence groups. They were classified into the group with higher collaborative practice (HCP) and the group with lower collaborative practice (LCP) based on the median value of the therapist collaborative practice scale (TCPS). The primary outcomes measured were FIM efficiency and FIM effectiveness. The main effects and interactions of the level of independence with activities of daily living (ADL) and collaboration were examined using a two-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni multiple comparison tests.Results:The level of independence with ADL and collaboration had an interaction effect related to FIM effectiveness (F(2, 164) = 3.191, p = 0.044). Within the independence group, HCP and LCP differed significantly (F(1, 164) = 15.562, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-18T12:11:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241233127
       
  • The problems and potential for emotional labour in occupational therapy

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      Authors: Rebecca F Hings, Katarzyna Furmaniak, Carolyn Dunford, Christopher RD Wagstaff
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-14T05:20:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241233185
       
  • Adopting new habits and routines in response to COVID-19 lockdown
           disruptions: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Dorothy Kessler, Emma Boudreau, Jennifer Maitland, Rosemary Lysaght, Mary Ann McColl, Libby Alexander, Clarke Wilson, Beata Batorowicz, Vincent DePaul, Catherine Donnelly
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:COVID-19-related restrictions resulted in changes to time use and occupational participation, impacting individual and collective well-being. This study addressed a knowledge gap concerning the adaptive process during periods of occupational disruption. We explored the experience of occupational disruption and how people managed disruption during the COVID-19 pandemic.Methods:We used a qualitative descriptive approach and interviewed 18 participants of a larger survey study of time use during the COVID-19 pandemic undertaken around a medium-sized city in Canada. Transcript analysis was conducted inductively using conventional content analysis.Findings:Two overarching themes were constructed during data analysis: The Disruption Experience and Adopting New Habits and Routines. In the face of disruption, participants described a sense of loss and disconnection, and challenges with time management. Establishing new habits and routines required new learning associated with increased time and flexibility, connecting with others and health and wellness.Conclusion:During changing pandemic restrictions, participants expressed a sense of loss, disconnection and time management challenges associated with occupational disruptions, but also described ways they adapted, improving their health and well-being. Strategies identified through this work may be used to enhance adaptation during disruptions. Future research should explore differences in adaptation, among more diverse populations.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-03-13T05:13:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241232815
       
  • Feasibility of OT-Parentship: An intervention for parents of adolescents
           with autism

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      Authors: Batel Wachspress, Itai Berger, Adina Maeir, Tal Mazor-Karsenty
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Parents of individuals with autism face various difficulties, among which are decreased resilience and heightened stress. OT-Parentship is an intervention for parents of adolescents with autism that aims to promote parental resilience and enhance adolescents’ participation in daily life. This study examines OT-Parentship’s feasibility and explores the improvement of parental resilience and child and parent occupational performance following intervention.Methods:A mixed methods pre-post and follow up study. Fourteen parents (six mothers and four couples) of adolescents with autism participated in a series of 13 individual weekly sessions of 90 minutes each. Study results were analyzed before, after, and 3 months post intervention.Results:All parents completed treatment, with 100% adherence to sessions. Therapist’s treatment fidelity was estimated at 95–97% and parent homework completion was 85%. Preliminary efficacy findings show significant improvement in mothers’ and adolescents’ occupational performance and improvement in maternal resiliency.Conclusion:Research results support the feasibility of the OT-Parentship as a family centered, strength-based, intervention program that leads to improvements in adolescent participation and parental resilience.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-02-17T10:15:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241229298
       
  • Strategies used by Occupational Therapists to overcome return-to-work
           obstacles perceived by workers with common mental disorders

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      Authors: Eve-Lyne Robitaille-Beaumier, Jean-Philippe Lachance, Nadine Larivière, Marc Corbière
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Few studies have focused on identifying distinctive strategies implemented for overcoming return-to-work (RTW) barriers perceived by people with common mental disorders (CMDs), and their impact on RTW. The study aimed to document the strategies used by occupational therapists to overcome RTW obstacles identified by people with CMDs, and to explore the impact of these strategies on employees’ self-efficacy.Method:Ten workers followed by three occupational therapists were recruited for this study. Based on the participants’ ROSES scores, the occupational therapists identified in a logbook the dimensions to be worked on and the strategies they implemented for each dimension. Data was analyzed with the use of thematic analysis and descriptive statistics.Results:Three dimensions of the ROSES were most frequently targeted by the occupational therapists: job demands, fear of relapse and difficult relation with the immediate supervisor. The main strategies used to overcome these obstacles were work-oriented and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-based interventions. Most of the participants have increased their self-efficacy for RTW after using these strategies. Eighty percent of the participants returned to work at the end of the study.Conclusion:The use of work-oriented and CBT-based interventions by occupational therapists appears to be useful in improving participants’ self-efficacy and promoting their return to work.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T06:41:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241229911
       
  • Proceed with care and intention: Factors to consider when introducing a
           doctoral-level route to occupational therapy registration in the UK

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      Authors: Jo Watson, Stephanie Tempest, Carolyn Hay
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Several United Kingdom Higher Education Institutions are seeking accreditation of new, doctoral entry routes to occupational therapy. This research explored stakeholder perspectives regarding the implications of introducing this additional pre-registration pathway.Method:A mixed-method design gathered data via four virtual events (n = 42). Descriptive statistics summarise the levels of agreement with prepared belief statements. Qualitative data from online functions were subject to reflexive thematic analysis.Findings:Participants agreed that introducing pre-registration doctorates was beneficial (68%) and an exciting opportunity with the potential to expedite evidence-base expansion (68%). Recognising the challenges, eight emergent themes coalesced into a statement guiding future work: ‘It will take an ongoing commitment from all of us to influence, shape and take positive actions to make structural changes to enhance equity and justice into and within the profession encompassing the themes of value, visibility, viability, expectations, perceptions, equity and diversity, accessibility and clarity of vision. Continued dialogue and communication, with compassionate listening, is required for this’.Conclusion:An additional pre-registration doctoral route into United Kingdom occupational therapy is broadly welcomed, acknowledging the need for ongoing dialogue. The emergent themes provide a framework for proceeding with care and intention as discussions move towards implementation and may assist other nations having similar debates.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-02-07T05:14:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226231225391
       
  • Occupation- and lifestyle-based mental health interventions – A hallmark
           for the occupational therapy profession'

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      Authors: Mona Eklund, Jackie Parsonage-Harrison, Elisabeth Argentzell
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-01-31T05:08:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226241228750
       
  • Participant and caregiver experiences of an activities of daily
           living-focused cognitive stimulation program for individuals with
           mild-to-moderate dementia (CS-ADL)

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      Authors: Simone Ryan, Manigandan Chockalingam, Orla Brady
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Individuals with dementia experience a progressive deterioration in their cognitive and functional abilities, and as a result, require support from informal family caregivers. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as cognitive stimulation, are increasingly being used to address this deterioration. This study explored the participant and caregiver experiences of CS-ADL (Cognitive Stimulation in Activities of Daily Living), an activities of daily living-focused group cognitive stimulation program for individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia.Methods:A descriptive qualitative design was implemented. CS-ADL participants and caregivers were recruited in dyads through a Psychiatry of Later Life service where CS-ADL was delivered. Semi-structured interviews were completed with each dyad either in-person or via the telephone. Data retrieved were analyzed through reflexive thematic analysis.Results:CS-ADL was experienced as an acceptable intervention that positively influenced the everyday life of both dyad members, with benefits reported in the memory, mood, daily routine, and social interaction of participants. Furthermore, the facilitation style of group facilitators positively influenced participants’ engagement in CS-ADL. Limited data was gathered regarding the experience of activities of daily living.Conclusion:This is the first study to explore experiences of CS-ADL, producing a preliminary addition to the evidence-base for CS-ADL. However, further research is required to confirm study findings and explore the experiences of activities of daily living in greater depth.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-01-17T09:05:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226231225358
       
  • An exploration into the occupational identity of women following breast
           cancer and treatment: A qualitative study

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      Authors: Courtney Hopkins, Angela Murphy, Rebecca Haythorne, Daniel Cezar da Cruz
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The number of women surviving after breast cancer is increasing, along with the length of time they are living with the after-effects of treatment. Although the treatment’s effects are known to impact occupational participation, little is known about how breast cancer could affect occupational identity. This study aims to illuminate the lived experience of women long-term after breast cancer treatment through an occupational perspective in order to explore how they perceive their occupational identity.Methods:A qualitative study with semi-structured interviews was conducted with six women, who had all received a diagnosis of breast cancer and treatment for longer than a year. Reflexive Thematic Analysis was used to analyse the data.Findings:Three intertwined themes describe the participants’ experience. (1) ‘Disruptions in daily life and Environmental support’, (2) ‘Be able to do’ and identity, and (3) ‘Doing what matters and is possible’. Findings revealed that the occupational identities of the participants were maintained. Cancer treatment effects appear to impact occupational competence that corresponded to participants’ occupational identities, suggesting difficulties in the order of occupational adaptation.Conclusion:Our findings contribute to understanding the challenges to occupational participation related to the occupational identity of women following breast cancer and treatment.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2024-01-10T05:16:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226231225103
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 99 of 99 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 246)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 197)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 255)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 205)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 63)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 75)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 81)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 82)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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