Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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British Journal of Occupational Therapy
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.323
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 235  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0308-0226 - ISSN (Online) 1477-6006
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Concurrent validity of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment in children
           with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

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      Authors: Mahsa Sattari, Mina Ahmadi Kahjoogh
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background/aim:Occupational therapists use different models and measurements for assessing children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One of those measurements is the Child Occupational Self-Assessment. In this study, concurrent validity of the Child Occupational Self-Assessment with Pediatric Quality of Life was tested in children with ADHD.Methods:A correlational study was conducted. The Child Occupational Self-Assessment and Pediatric Quality of Life were filled by 128 children with ADHD aged between 8 and 11 years.Findings:The results indicated that in competency subscale the highest correlation coefficient was for the total score of Pediatric Quality of Life (r = 0.56, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-02-03T09:40:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221146460
       
  • Children with handwriting difficulties: Impact of cognitive strategy
           training for acquisition of accurate alphabet-letter-writing

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      Authors: Kathryn Mathwin, Christine Chapparo, Joanne Hinitt
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:An occupational therapy handwriting programme integrating cognitive strategy training with alphabet-letter-writing instruction was found more effective than in-class instruction alone for early writers. This study investigated the impact of cognitive strategy training for children struggling to correctly write alphabet-letters.Method:Participants were ten children in the first 2 years of formal schooling identified with challenges in alphabet-letter-writing. A nonconcurrent A1BA2 single system research design was used. The A Phases represented within-class handwriting instruction only and B Phase represented additional handwriting intervention which included cognitive strategy training. The Perceive, Recall, Plan and Perform (PRPP) System of Task Analysis (Stage 2) was the repeated outcome measure.Results:Results revealed all ten children demonstrated a similar pattern of change in cognitive strategy application which was concomitant with improvement and mastery in writing all 26-lowercase alphabet-letters from memory. Cognitive strategies which exhibited the greatest impact on acquiring and executing accurate alphabet-letter-writing skills were those related to planning, memory, attention and sensory perception. The least influential were those associated with generating and controlling motor actions.Conclusion:This study provides beginning support for including cognitive strategies training concurrently with alphabet-letter-writing instruction to assist children struggling to write alphabet-letters.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T10:03:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221148413
       
  • Evidence for 24-hour posture management: A scoping review

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      Authors: Lauren Julia Osborne, Rosemary Joan Gowran, Jackie Casey
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:People with complex physical disabilities unable to change their position independently are at risk of developing postural deformities and secondary complications. 24-hour posture management is needed to protect body structure. With inconsistencies in current service provision, this research aimed to scope the evidence for a 24-hour posture management approach.Method:A scoping review was conducted using four health and social science databases. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied; further papers were included through citation chaining.Results:The evidence for 24-hour posture management was often low quality due to the complications of completing robust research studies in this complex specialty. However, many professionals in the field agree that a 24-hour approach to postural care is essential.Conclusion:There is a need for clear national policy and guidance relating to postural care and scope for development of dedicated posture management services. Current NHS service provision is variable and inconsistent. Lack of postural care is a safeguarding and human rights issue. Specialist training and research in postural care within the Occupational Therapy profession is required to raise awareness of the role Occupational Therapists can play in preventing postural deformities and other secondary complications through providing good postural care.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T09:25:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221148414
       
  • Occupational therapists’ perspectives on an evidence-based,
           client-centered assistive technology intervention

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      Authors: Stina Meyer Larsen, Åse Brandt, Lise Hounsgaard, Hanne Kaae Kristensen
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Reviews within the field of assistive technology have shown that a client-centered approach is important for user satisfaction, and that assistive technology service delivery should be evidence-based, systematic, and structured. However, client-centered instruments and systematic, structured models are not used consistently. As part of a larger research project, an evidence-based, client-centered assistive technology service delivery process was developed and piloted. The purpose of this study was to investigate occupational therapists’ perspectives on this evidence-based, client-centered assistive technology intervention.Method:Ten occupational therapists, from two Danish municipalities, participated in focus groups. Data were analyzed based on a hermeneutic approach.Results:Three themes emerged from the analysis: a more refined collaboration with clients; advantages of using theoretical frameworks, structured models and instruments and challenges in using the intervention.Conclusion:By using the evidence-based, client-centered intervention, the occupational therapists found that the collaboration with the clients was refined—more emphasis was placed on shared responsibility. They found that the intervention was time-efficient in the long run; however, there seems to be a particular challenge in designing services that are inclusive of clients with cognitive limitations.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T09:20:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221148409
       
  • Selection and recruitment of pre-registration occupational therapy
           students in the United Kingdom: Exploring entry criteria across education
           providers

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      Authors: Sarah Louise McGinley, Sukhbinder Hamilton, Alexander Bradley
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Since widening access to higher education became a United Kingdom (UK) governmental priority in the 1990’s, occupational therapy has made little progress in diversifying student and workforce populations that mirror increasingly diverse service user populations. This research aims to, for the first time, map entry criteria across UK pre-registration programmes, while considering fair access and exploring who might be missing at the point of enquiry and entry.Method:A cross-sectional quantitative content analysis was conducted of all UK university websites, identifying programme type, academic, professional and alternative entry criteria for 2021/2022.Findings:Five entry routes via undergraduate and post-graduate programmes (n = 73) offer limited part-time opportunities (n = 11). Visible academic entry criteria appear weighted towards ‘traditional’ qualifications, while assessment of professional skills at application and selection is explicit for over 75% of programmes. 86% (n = 63) utilise interviews at selection, with 33% (n = 24) not publicly acknowledging alternative access routes into the profession.Conclusion:If the profession is to avoid continued stagnation in diversity amongst student populations and successfully reflect service user diversity in the workforce, it is essential UK universities increase parity across academic entry criteria, ensure the visibility of acceptable skills for alternative access and substantially improve flexibility for part-time study.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2023-01-11T09:06:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221148412
       
  • The effects of motor imagery on trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis in women
           during the post-surgical immobilisation period: A protocol for a
           randomised clinical trial

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      Authors: Eva Prado-Robles, Jose Ángel Delgado-Gil, Sonia Ruth Navarro-Prada, Bárbara Rodríguez-Martín, Miguel Gómez-Martínez, Jesús Seco-Calvo
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Trapeziometacarpal osteoarthritis is the second most frequent degenerative hand disease and is the most functionally debilitating. The condition presents in 66% of women over 55. Motor imagery (MI) training post-surgery could help reduce rehabilitation times.Method:It is an experimental, prospective, longitudinal, parallel arm randomised clinical trial. Participants were women over 50 years old on the surgical waiting list. The experimental group will undergo MI training during the 3-week post-surgical immobilisation period. The control group will receive standard rehabilitation treatment. Outcomes will be assessed four times throughout the study using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, the Cochin Hand Function Scale questionnaire, the Visual Analogue Scale, goniometry, baseline pinch gauge, circumferential measurement (cm), the Modified Kapandji Index and the Kinaesthetic and Visual Imagery questionnaire.Discussion:Early MI could improve hand function leading to improvements in recovery times.Trial registration:Clinical Trials registration: NCT03815734. Ethics Committee approval: 17155. Project funded in 2021.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T10:46:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221137771
       
  • Increasing occupational participation: A qualitative analysis within the
           “Occupational Self-Analysis” program

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      Authors: Ana Judit Fernández-Solano, María Rodríguez-Bailón, Maria Elena Del Baño-Aledo
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Occupational participation is a key element to increase the quality of life in the population. One of the effective interventions to increase occupational participation is the “Occupational Self-Analysis” program. The aim of this study was to analyze participant’s reported benefits about the “Occupational Self-Analysis” program.Method:This is a qualitative study with 26 participants (12 people with intellectual disability, 7 affected by acquired brain injury, and 7 students) who participated in weekly group sessions and one individual session. The outcomes were measured based on participant diaries and focus group transcriptions.Results:Two main themes emerged: (1) supports for occupational participation and (2) barriers for occupational participation. The thematic analysis of the categories was based on the Model of Human Occupation to increase applicability of the program in occupational therapy practice.Conclusions:The “Occupational Self-Analysis” program allowed participants to increase their knowledge of supports provided for and the barriers against occupational participation.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-29T06:29:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221145389
       
  • What can human rights law do for occupational therapy'

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      Authors: Fiona Maclean, Ken Dale-Risk
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-26T12:20:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221143878
       
  • Daily routine and habits during COVID-19 lockdown in Italy: An
           observational survey

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      Authors: Yuri Maritan, Diletta Maria Pisaniello, Annalisa Belvedere, Pier Carlo Battain
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Between March–May 2020, the Italian Government applied restrictive measures to reduce the risk of contagion, fostering a potential condition of occupational deprivation.Methods:A digital survey was administered in June 2020 including closed and open questions. The goal was to report how the first Italian lockdown affected daily routine.Results:648 surveys were valid. Most respondents were workers and spent lockdown at home. Before quarantine, the most representative occupations were working and housekeeping; the significant ones were working and meeting friends/relatives. Wellbeing meant meeting friends/relatives and hobbies/interests. During lockdown, respondents dedicated themselves to housekeeping and working; meaningful occupations were working and cooking. All data was stratified according to age and perceived wellbeing; open questions were categorized by the researchers.Discussion:A daily routine in compliance with lockdown restrictions required a change in habits. Time was used for occupations not strictly contentful; finance and work gained significance. It is to hypothesize that the idea of wellbeing was deeply altered.Conclusions:The study focuses on a slice of everyday life in times of emergency, it highlights people adaptability and their experiences according to age and future plans. Occupational justice emerges as a strong topic: the environment influences wellbeing, habits, and self-perception.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-24T01:37:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221113471
       
  • Implementation of a telerehabilitation program for children with
           neurodevelopmental disorders during the lockdown caused by COVID-19

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      Authors: Aníbal Báez-Suárez, Iraya Padrón-Rodriguez, Debora Santana-Cardeñosa, Lara Santana-Perez, Victoria Maria Lopez-Herrera, Romina Pestana-Miranda
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Telerehabilitation is a tool for patients who, for different reasons, cannot participate in person with their physical presence. We aimed to identify the factors associated with satisfaction with telerehabilitation in families with children with neurodevelopmental disorders through a program that included physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy.Methods:The program was developed during the COVID-19 lockdown period. Outcome measures: Child's age, the school stage to which they belonged, the person of reference in their daily care at home. The resources provided to the families, as well as the frequency of activities and difficulties detected, were evaluated through a survey.Findings:One hundred thirteen families responded to the survey. The general assessment resources were classified as very good. The average frequency of carrying out the activities was two times a week, with an average of 30 minutes per session. The ability to understand the information in the manual was not affected by the academic status of the caregivers (p = 0.286).Conclusions:This is the first study to quantify the multidisciplinary approach to children with neurodevelopmental disorders using telerehabilitation. The results show high levels of participation and satisfaction. The resources could be shared for their applicability in other countries whose families have similar needs conditioned by COVID-19.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-23T07:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221141322
       
  • Investigating the effect strength of positive risk-taking barriers on
           discharge decisions in occupational therapy intermediate care: A factorial
           survey

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      Authors: Craig Newman, Phillip Whitehead, Mary Thomson
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Positive risk-taking in occupational therapy intermediate care is a requirement, yet little is known about how positive risk-taking barriers influence discharge decisions at different experience levels.Method:A factorial survey was used to investigate positive risk-taking barriers (Limited Capacity, Risk Averse Family, Blame Culture and No Support). Participants self-categorised their experience level into Novice or Semi-expert or Expert before analysing four vignettes relating to recommending a home discharge for an older adult. Data were analysed using Multiple Regression and One-Way Analysis of Variance.Results:Seventy-four participants responded to two hundred eighty-one vignettes. The barriers that reduced the likelihood to recommend a home discharge for an older adult were ‘No Support’, Novices (β = −0.315, p = 0.002), Semi-experts (β = −0.313, p = 0.001) Experts (β = −0.254, p = 0.009); ‘Limited Capacity’, Novices (β = −0.305, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-13T09:13:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221141320
       
  • The life balance inventory in patients with multiple sclerosis:
           Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability and validity of the Turkish version
           

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      Authors: Fatih Özden, Mehmet Özkeskin, Nur Yüceyar
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The aim of the study was to present the psychometric properties of the Turkish version of the life balance inventory in individuals with multiple sclerosis.Methods:Life balance inventory was translated and adapted considering common suggestions. Participants were cross-sectionally evaluated twice with life balance inventory, with a 1-week interval. Expanded Disability Status Scale, Beck Depression Scale, and Short Form-12 were used to assess the convergent validity.Results:A total of 113 individuals with multiple sclerosis were enrolled in the study. Test-retest reliability of the total score and all subscores of the life balance inventory were excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient > 0.80). The internal consistency of the life distress inventory was excellent (α = 0.73–0.95). The correlation of Expanded Disability Status Scale with life balance inventory and its subscores was low in the scope of divergent validity, as expected (r 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-05T05:04:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221136816
       
  • A qualitative investigation of influences on occupational therapists’
           research involvement in Ireland

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      Authors: Christopher P Dwyer, Alexandra Keane, Dympna Casey, Fionnuala M Rogers, Sinéad M Hynes
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:To fulfil the desire for evidence-based practice, there is impetus for occupational therapy (OT) to make research a priority and to encourage research engagement.Purpose:This study’s aim was to explore occupational therapists’ reasons for and for not getting involved in research and to determine potential barriers and enablers to engaging in research.Methods:Three focus groups were conducted with five participants each. Data were thematically analysed.Findings:Occupational therapists’ reasons for expressing interest in getting involved in research were having an interest in the condition and/or the symptoms being studied; promoting client support and service development; and ‘upskilling’. Three themes emerged from the thematic analysis: (1) motivation to get involved in research can be influenced; (2) ‘firefighting’: barriers and organisational culture; and (3) The nature of research needs consideration from an occupational therapist perspective.Implications:Findings suggest that though occupational therapists are able to get involved in research, it remains that there are difficulties in doing so (e.g., organisational culture); and such difficulties may outweigh both reasons and enablers to such involvement. Reasons for expressing interest, enablers, barriers and the relationships among them warrant further investigation and consideration with respect to involving occupational therapists in research.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-12-02T05:45:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221136812
       
  • The role of occupational therapists in mitigating the threats posed by
           monkeypox: A call to action

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      Authors: Benjamin E Canter
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-18T07:20:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221137769
       
  • Understanding the occupational role of dog ownership through the lens of
           attachment theory: A survey study

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      Authors: Pamela Meredith, Jenny Strong, Lara Condon, Danica Lindstrom, Jessica Hill
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Incorporation of animal-assisted services is an emerging field of occupational therapy practice. While the owner–dog relationship is an important component supporting positive outcomes, pets also represent an added responsibility, with pet care a little-understood role for occupational therapists. The present study drew on attachment theory to investigate associations between owner attachment pattern, care of the dog, relationship with and closeness to the dog and perceptions of the dog’s personality.Method:Participants (N = 97) completed an online survey using standardised measures.Results:Quality of the relationship with the pet dog was associated with the level of care provided to the dog, with stronger relationships associated with higher levels of care. While owner attachment pattern was not directly linked with the care provided to the dog, it was related to distress at being separated from the dog and perceptions of the dog’s personality.Conclusion:The present study supports existing findings that an attachment bond is present between owner and dog, and that this bond is linked with the care provided to the dog. Occupational therapists may facilitate the developing relationships between dog owners and their dogs, as well as supporting care of the dog, to optimise outcomes for both.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-08T09:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221133036
       
  • Experiences of occupational therapy clinicians on the assessment and
           evaluation of adult handgrip strength

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      Authors: Louise Myles, Nicola Massy-Westropp, Fiona Barnett
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Handgrip strength (HGS) is commonly measured to assess hand function, however, little is known about how and why occupational therapists assess and interpret HGS. This study aimed to explore the experiences of occupational therapists who work with HGS. Additionally, the study explored what biological and functional factors occupational therapists believe influence adult HGS.Method:A qualitative study design utilising purposive sampling identified occupational therapy clinicians within Queensland, Australia who assess HGS. Data were collected from 19 participants using a semi-structured interview process. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis.Results:Variations of the American Society of Hand Therapists HGS testing procedure were used by the participants based on experience. When evaluating HGS, comparison to normative data was not always completed or seen to be valuable. Biological and functional factors such as height, hand length, occupation and lifestyle factors were considered to influence HGS.Conclusion:The results of this study provide insight into the various ways occupational therapists assess and evaluate HGS according to experience and practice context. These variations in assessment and evaluation of HGS along with the influence of an individual’s biological and functional factors need to be considered when interpreting HGS results.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T08:21:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221135375
       
  • Reflections on occupational science in 2022

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      Authors: Mandy Stanley, Juman Simaan
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T08:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221135374
       
  • Preliminary analysis of the clinical feasibility of a practice
           intervention derived from the occupational therapy intervention process
           model for patients with stroke in the convalescence stage

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      Authors: Yuki Choji, Ryuji Kobayashi
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:This study lays the groundwork for the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM) run by occupational therapy practitioners for patients with stroke. We explored the feasibility of a treatment approach based on the OTIPM for patients with stroke and the clinical feasibility of evaluating the degree of a collaborative relationship between patients and occupational therapists.Method:This pilot trial was conducted as a one-group pre-test–post-test study and two-group comparison on 16 patients with stroke in the convalescence stage. We used the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS), Functional Independence Measure, Japan Stroke Scale of Motor Function, and the Collaborative Relationship Scale between clients and occupational therapists to assess outcomes.Results:Patients demonstrated a significant improvement on the outcome measures after intervention. Moreover, the good collaborative relationship group demonstrated significantly higher process skills in AMPS and satisfaction in COPM than the poor collaborative relationship group.Conclusion:This preliminary study revealed that short-term OTIPM for patients with stroke may be a feasible clinical practice. In addition, evaluating the degree of the difference in the collaborative relationship between patients and occupational therapists would be a feasible clinical practice.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-11-03T08:12:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221135373
       
  • A protocol for removing environmental barriers to independent living
           (REBIL): An adapted evidence-based occupational therapy intervention to
           increase community participation for individuals aging with long-term
           physical disabilities

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      Authors: Szu-Wei Chen, Emily Somerville, Megen Devine, Susan Stark
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Background:People aging with long-term physical disabilities are living longer and experiencing the challenges of aging, including the onset of secondary and age-related health conditions. People aging with long-term physical disabilities are at high risk of falls, fall injuries, diminished functional abilities, and compromised participation. However, no available programs support people aging with long-term physical disabilities to participate safely at home and in the community. The proposed study is to examine the feasibility and efficacy of an adapted intervention: removing environmental barriers to independent living.Method/Design:A single-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. Participants who are 45–65 years old; self-report difficulty with ⩾2 daily activities; have had a physical disability for ⩾5 years; and live within 60 mi of the research lab are eligible. All participants will receive an initial in-home evaluation before randomization. The treatment group will receive removing environmental barriers to independent living (total five visits) intervention, which is tailored. The waitlist control group will be offered the same intervention after 6-month follow-up. Expected outcomes are high acceptability, fidelity, and adherence; low safety risk; improved community participation and daily activities performance; and fewer environmental barriers and fall hazards.Discussion:Findings will serve as preliminary evidence for occupational therapy community practice. Outcomes will also inform future large, pragmatic trials.Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT04589988
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-28T12:16:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221126901
       
  • Disabled Students’ perception of the sensory aspects of the learning and
           social environments within one Higher Education Institution

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      Authors: Clodagh Nolan, Jessica K Doyle, Kieran Lewis, Declan Treanor
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:The environment, both natural and man-made, can influence how we learn and socialise. For some, the environment can be a challenge to overcome. The purpose of this study was to establish a student’s perspective on the sensory aspects of the learning and social environments of a university.Methods:A survey design based upon Winnie Dunn’s Adult/Adolescent Sensory Profile was developed specifically for this study; 150 disabled students responded to the survey, which was analysed using descriptive statistics and template analysis.Results:The final template analysis identified 3 main themes with 10 sub-themes, with each sub-theme relating to the research question as well as to the level of explanation: (a) Theme one: Barriers in the environment described noise, poor lighting, crowding and lack of visual cues that created difficulties for the respondents to this survey. The sub-themes were obstacles to learning in the library, obstacles to learning in lectures, obstacles to learning in exams and ventilation in learning spaces. (b) Theme two: Reactions to barriers, included how respondents react to sensory overload and uncertainty in the environment. The sub-themes encompassed problems when schedules change regularly, and reactions when overwhelmed in college. (c) Theme three: Improving the environment refers to suggestions that respondents made to improving the environment for all students to enable engagement and participation within college. The sub-themes compromised of developing a safe space for managing sensory needs, seeking natural elements across campus, seeking awareness, as well as adaptions and strategies for transitions.Conclusion:Respondents identified how individuals have varied responses to sensory stimuli thereby increasing our understanding. They pointed to a way forward for institutes of higher education to design spaces that are more inclusive by putting forward suggestions for greater use of green space, better furnishings and minimisation of distractions, thereby increasing the health and welfare for all.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-17T06:32:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221126895
       
  • A scoping review of interventions using occupation to improve mental
           health or mental wellbeing in adolescent populations

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      Authors: Jackie Parsonage-Harrison, Mary Birken, David Harley, Helen Dawes, Mona Eklund
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionOccupation-based interventions could help to address a growing mental health crisis among young people and adolescents. To develop new interventions and avoid research waste, a review of the academic literature is needed that systematically identifies and describes interventions designed to improve the mental health and wellbeing of 11–25 year-olds.AimThe scoping review aims to systematically review the academic, literature to identify and describe key characteristics of intervention studies using occupation to improve adolescents’ and young people’s mental health and wellbeing, exploring the range of interventions, reviewing reporting quality and illuminating gaps for further research.MethodAn iteratively developed scoping review protocol informs a systematic database search and review of the literature. Core characteristics are extracted and described, using the TIDIER guidelines and the CASP assessment tool.ResultsFive occupational therapy-based interventions, and 69 other occupation-based studies representing a wide breadth of approaches, outcomes and settings were identified.ConclusionsRobust development, testing and reporting of occupation-based and occupation-focused intervention studies to promote and support mental health and wellbeing in adolescents and young people are needed. Interventions should be co-designed, developmentally appropriate and scaffold development. However, better agreement is needed about core outcomes measurement in this area.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T03:57:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221110391
       
  • Refining the psychometric properties of the Trinity Student Occupational
           Performance Profile – A self-report measure of occupational performance
           difficulties within the student role

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      Authors: Kim Lombard, Clodagh Nolan, Elizabeth Heron
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionNavigating the transition to university can pose occupational performance difficulties for students with mental health disabilities including those on the autism spectrum or with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This study aimed to refine the Trinity Student Occupational Performance Profile (TSOPP) – a self-report measure of occupational performance difficulties within the student role for students with mental health disabilities which is based on the Person-Environment-Occupation model.MethodData from 667 files were gathered from two Irish universities. Rasch analyses were conducted on the measure’s item-sets (i.e. Person N = 30; Environment N = 20; Occupation N = 24) and on an item-set which combined all 74 items. All item-sets were assessed for fit, rating scale functioning, dimensionality, reliability and separation indices.ResultsThe TSOPP demonstrated stronger psychometric properties as a combined item-set which measures the ultimate construct of occupational performance difficulties within the student role. The 6-point scale was collapsed into a 4-point scale and 20 redundant items were removed. The item difficulty hierarchy provided empirical evidence for occupational performance difficulties in the student role.ConclusionThe TSOPP is a valid and reliable self-report measure of occupational performance difficulties within the student role for students with mental health disabilities in higher education.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-06-21T05:37:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221107762
       
  • Occupational therapists and public contributors working together in the
           delivery of RCOT resources

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      Authors: Karen Day, Julia Roberts
      First page: 87
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-20T08:37:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221125074
       
  • Occupational therapy interventions for adult informal carers and
           implications for intervention design, delivery and evaluation: A
           systematic review

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      Authors: Kerry Micklewright, Morag Farquhar
      First page: 90
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      IntroductionInformal carers provide vital support for patients, reducing strain on health and social care services. However, caring can detrimentally affect carers’ health and wellbeing, thus policy advocates for improved carer support. Objective: to establish the published international evidence base regarding interventions for carers delivered by occupational therapists.MethodEnglish language studies published January 2010–January 2021 were identified against predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria via searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, OTSeeker, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Supplemental strategies: database alerts, hand-searching, searching of included papers’ reference lists and citations, and contacting key authors. Two reviewers completed critical appraisal and produced a textual narrative synthesis of data using a convergent integrated method.Results38 papers were included, reporting 21 interventions. Most were dyadic, home-based interventions for carers of people living with dementia. Common intervention components included: assessment and goal-setting, skill training, education, coping strategies, equipment provision, environmental adaptation and signposting. Interventions improved outcomes for carers, however, intervention design and evaluation require careful consideration to maximise carer benefits and capture intervention effects.ConclusionOccupational therapist delivered carer interventions enhance support and improve carer outcomes. Intervention and evaluation designs should include careful selection of outcome measures, avoidance of increased carer burden in dyadic interventions and acknowledgement of known barriers and facilitators to both carer and therapist intervention engagement.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-04-24T07:39:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221079240
       
  • Engaging with nature and the outdoors: A scoping review of therapeutic
           applications in contemporary occupational therapy

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      Authors: Heather Firby, Rosi Raine
      First page: 101
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Engagement with the natural outdoors is recommended for public health and wellbeing. Occupational therapists are well-placed to promote these therapeutic benefits, yet limited evidence exists of the scope of such applications.Methods:A scoping review was conducted informed by the Joanna Briggs Institute framework. A systematic search was undertaken across five databases, and 64 sources were included following screening. Data were extracted using deductive content analysis, and themes identified through thematic analysis.Findings:Three themes were identified: occupation-based applications; occupation-focused applications; and occupational therapy’s contribution. Whilst current applications were evident, most literature explored potential or emerging practice. Outdoor engagement was found to be a complex, therapeutic occupation with the potential to promote mental health and restoration; quality of life and wellbeing; and healthy lifestyles through connection to nature; others; and self.Conclusion:Occupational therapists enable outdoor engagement through occupation-focused and occupation-based interventions across a range of practice contexts. Occupational science may offer a valuable contribution to the evidence base, through considering being in nature as a meaningful occupation and outdoor accessibility as a matter of occupational justice. However, evidence of current practice is limited. Further research is recommended to strengthen the evidence-base and inform routine consideration within practice.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T06:24:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221126893
       
  • The relationship between school-age children’s interoceptive awareness
           and executive functioning: An exploratory study

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      Authors: Caitlin Bishop, Ted Brown, Mong-Lin Yu
      First page: 116
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Independently, interoceptive awareness and executive functioning play major roles in children’s abilities to engage in their daily occupations. This study investigated the potential relationship between neurotypical school-age children’s interoceptive awareness and executive functioning.Method:A convenience sample of 30 children (8–12 years) completed the Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness–youth and one of their parents completed the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function® – Second Edition (BRIEF®2). Spearman rho correlations and linear regression analyses with bootstrapping were completed.Results:The Multidimensional Assessment of Interoceptive Awareness–youth Emotional Awareness aspect of interoceptive awareness was significantly correlated with and predictive of the following BRIEF®2 executive functioning components: Emotion Regulation Index (ρ = 0.402, R2 = 0.888, p 
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-27T11:42:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221128184
       
  • Emotional distress and quality of life among adults with developmental
           coordination disorder during COVID-19

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      Authors: Batya Engel-Yeger, Asi Engel
      First page: 130
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Individuals with developmental coordination disorder frequently report emotional and functional difficulties. A stressful era as COVID-19 pandemic may enhance emotional load. The present study aimed to (1) examine the emotional distress and quality of life among adults with developmental coordination disorder during COVID-19 as compared to typical controls, and (2) examine the relationships between these factors in adults with developmental coordination disorder.Method:Participants were 317 adults, aged 18–66, recruited during the first year of COVID-19: 227 were included in the developmental coordination disorder group, and 90 in the control group (normal motor performance) based on the Adult Developmental Co-ordination Disorders/Dyspraxia Checklist cutoff score. Participants completed a sociodemographic health status/daily life under COVID-19 questionnaire and self-reports about their emotional status (depression, anxiety, stress) and a quality of life.Results:The developmental coordination disorder group had significantly greater depression, anxiety, stress, and lower quality of life. Participants with developmental coordination disorder who were infected by COVID-19 or reported reduction of working hours due to COVID-19 had the lowest social and environmental quality of life. Depression significantly predicted reduced quality of life and mediated between developmental coordination disorder severity and quality of life.Conclusions:Prevention and intervention programs for adults with developmental coordination disorder should be elaborated, with reference to emotional load and to implications on daily life, especially in times of crisis, like COVID-19.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T07:17:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221126892
       
  • ‘I left feeling different about myself’: What students learn on their
           first practice placement

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      Authors: Terri Grant, Peter Gossman, Yvonne Thomas, Liz Berragan, Helen Frank
      First page: 139
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:With the inclusion of 40 hours of simulated practice education for UK occupational therapy students and the subsequent impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, universities have been exploring simulated placement opportunities. However, the evidence available to guide the development of such placements is sparse. This article presents the first stage of a grounded theory study that seeks to understand what students learn during the course of their first practice placement, with the intention of informing simulated placement development.Method:Grounded theory methodology was used to guide semi-structured individual interviews with 15 participants – seven undergraduate students, three practice educators and five postgraduate pre-registration students. Interviews occurred close to the end of the first practice placement. Concurrent data collection and analysis led to the development of categories of learning.Findings:Four core categories of learning were identified: learning about oneself, learning about the occupational therapy profession, learning about practices and learning about service users.Conclusion:Understanding of these four categories of learning may enable educators to consider learning which occurs that may not be anticipated, particularly in regard to personal development. This can enable educators to consider how learning can be targeted within simulation for an authentic simulated placement.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-14T06:20:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221125394
       
  • Effectiveness of combining robotic therapy and modified constraint-induced
           movement therapy for moderate to severe upper limb paresis after stroke in
           subacute phase: Case–control study by propensity score analysis

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      Authors: Naoya Anmoto, Takashi Takebayashi, Yuho Okita, Masakazu Ishigaki, Shin Hibino, Keisuke Hanada
      First page: 149
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Robotic assisted therapy and modified constraint-induced movement therapy are used evidence-based approach in stroke rehabilitation. However, there is no study showing a combination of robotic assisted therapy and modified constraint-induced movement therapy (combined therapy) in the subacute phase. This study investigated the effectiveness of combined therapy in stroke patients with moderate to severe upper limb paresis compared with conventional occupational therapy at subacute setting.Methods:This research used a case–control study. The intervention group (n = 15) consisting of patients with moderate to severe upper limb paresis (Brunnstrom recovery stage upper extremity III or IV and above hand III) 4–8 weeks since stroke onset received a combined therapy for 3 weeks (total intervention time: 1440 minutes). The control group (n = 15) extracted by propensity score matching received a conventional occupational therapy for 4 weeks (total intervention time: 1680–2240 minutes). The primary outcome was the Fugl-Meyer assessment upper limb score change before and after the intervention.Results:The intervention group exhibited significantly greater improvement on Fugl-Meyer assessment upper lim change (p = 0.005).Conclusion:In the subacute phase, the combined therapy of robotic assisted therapy and modified constraint-induced movement therapy helped improve upper limb motor function more effectively and efficiently than conventional occupational therapy.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T07:10:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221121745
       
  • Perceptions of occupational therapists in the United Kingdom on the
           applicability of the reflective framework for community development in
           occupational therapy

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      Authors: Anna Melville, Sandra Schiller, Anne-Mie Engelen, Debbie Kramer-Roy
      First page: 158
      Abstract: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, Ahead of Print.
      Introduction:Community development approaches are increasingly used by occupational therapists in response to occupational justice theory, which posits that both individuals and community groups may be denied access to meaningful occupations through societal powers outside their control. Previous research has found that occupational therapists feel insufficiently prepared for a role in community development and tend to use their general skill set, sometimes in combination with generic community development approaches. This study explored whether the reflective framework for community development in occupational therapy is applicable and useful for occupational therapists in the United Kingdom.Methods:A mixed methods approach was used, combining an online questionnaire and focus groups with occupational therapists who already work in community development. Findings were compared with the framework.Findings:The participants recognised most aspects of the Framework in their own practice, but some key aspects such as collaboration with the community at every stage were less prominent. They found the framework applicable to the UK context, particularly for occupational therapists inexperienced in community development practice.Conclusion:This study has highlighted community development practice by occupational therapists in the United Kingdom and concluded that the framework would support them in fulfilling this role more effectively.
      Citation: British Journal of Occupational Therapy
      PubDate: 2022-10-12T07:05:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/03080226221121744
       
 
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