Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 112 of 112 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 239)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 242)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 191)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 72)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 103)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal for Quality in Health Care
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.348
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 39  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1353-4505 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3677
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [425 journals]
  • Correction to: Is primary care a patient-safe setting' Prevalence,
           severity, nature, and causes of adverse events: numerous and mostly
           avoidable

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      First page: mzad033
      PubDate: Thu, 25 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad033
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • French Abstracts for Volume 34, Issue 2, 2022

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      First page: mzad029
      PubDate: Sat, 20 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad029
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • French Abstracts for Volume 34, Issue 1, 2022

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      First page: mzad028
      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad028
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Correction to: An invitation to join the IJQHC reviewer community—a
           call for peer-reviewers

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      First page: mzad031
      PubDate: Wed, 17 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad031
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • International approaches for implementing accreditation programmes in
           different healthcare facilities: a comparative case study in Australia,
           Botswana, Denmark, and Jordan

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      First page: mzad026
      Abstract: Healthcare accreditation programmes have been adopted internationally to maintain the quality and safety of services. Accreditation assesses the compliance of organizations to a series of standards. The evidence base supporting the benefits of accreditation is mixed, potentially influenced by differences in local implementation and operationalization of standards. Successful implementation is associated with optimizing regulation, funding, and government commitment. Implementation of accreditation is a complex intervention that needs to be tailored to meet contextual differences across settings. Comparing why and how accreditation is implemented across countries supports the effective implementation of new programmes and refinements to existing systems. This article presents four case studies from Australia, Botswana, Denmark, and Jordan to consider a geographic spread and mix of high- and upper-middle-income countries. The data were derived from a review of accreditation programme documents and follow-up discussions with directors of the accrediting bodies in the countries of interest. Each case study was summarized according to a standardized framework for comparison: (i) goals (why), (ii) programme implementation (how), (iii) outcomes based on pre-post measures (what), and (iv) lessons learned (enablers and barriers). The accreditation programmes were all introduced in the 2000s to improve quality and safety. Documents from each country outlined motivations for introducing an accreditation programme, which was predominantly initiated by the government. The programmes were adopted in demarcated healthcare sectors (e.g. primary care and hospital settings), with a mix of mandatory and voluntary approaches. Implementation support centred on the interpretation and operationalization of standards and follow-up on variation in compliance with standards, after announced surveys. Most standards focused on patient safety, patient centredness, and governance but differed between using standard sets on quality management or supportive processes for patient care. Methods for evaluation of programme success and outcomes measured varied. Frequently reported enablers of successful implementation included strong leadership and ownership of the process. A lack of awareness of quality and safety, insufficient training in quality improvement methods, and transfer of staff represented the most common challenges. This case analysis of accreditation programmes in a variety of countries highlights consistent strategies utilized, key enabling factors, barriers, and the influence of contextual differences. Our framework for describing why, how, what, and lessons learned demonstrates innovation and experimentation in approaches used across high- and upper-middle-income countries, hospital and primary care, and specialist clinics.
      PubDate: Tue, 02 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad026
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Clinical resilience: toward a unified definition

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      First page: mzad025
      Abstract: ANID- Millenium Science Initiative Program[NCS2021_081, ICS13_005 to ÁIL]
      PubDate: Tue, 02 May 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad025
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Changes in cervical dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and cervical cancer
           after expanding the National Cancer Screening Program to younger women in
           Korea

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      First page: mzad024
      Abstract: The National Cancer Screening Program of South Korea for cervical cancer was expanded from women aged ≥30 years to women aged ≥20 years in 2016. This study investigated the effect of this policy on occurrence rates of cervical dysplasia, carcinoma in situ, and cervical cancer in women in their twenties. The National Health Information Database for the years 2012–19 was used. The outcome measures were monthly occurrence rates of cervical dysplasia, cervical carcinoma in situ, and cervical cancer. An interrupted time series analysis was performed to investigate whether the number of occurrences changed after policy implementation. For cervical dysplasia, a pre-intervention decreasing trend of 0.3243 per month (P-value < .0001) was found. The post-intervention trend did not differ significantly, although the slope increased at a rate of 0.4622 per month (P-value < .0001). For carcinoma in situ, a trend of increase at 0.0128 per month (P-value = .0099) was seen before policy implementation. The post-intervention trend did not escalate, but the slope showed an increasing trend of 0.0217 per month (P-value < .0001). For cervical cancer, no significant trend was present before intervention. Occurrences of cervical cancer escalated at a rate of 0.0406 per month (P-value < .0001) after policy implementation, and the slope also showed an increasing trend at a rate of 0.0394 per month (P-value < .0001). Expanding the target population for cervical cancer screening increased detection rates for cervical cancer in women aged between 20 and 29 years.
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad024
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Measuring health system responsiveness in a national community health
           worker primary care programme in rural Liberia

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      First page: mzad027
      Abstract: As many low- and middle-income countries scale up community health worker (CHW) programmes to achieve universal health coverage, ensuring quality as well as access is critical. Health system responsiveness (HSR) is a core domain of quality patient-centred care but has not been widely measured in CHW-delivered care. We report results from a household survey measuring HSR and health systems’ quality of CHW-delivered care in two Liberian counties where the national CHW programme of Community Health Assistants (CHAs) for communities ≥5 km from a health centre has been implemented. We conducted a cross-sectional population-based household survey in 2019 in Rivercess (RC) and Grand Gedeh (GG) counties, using a two-stage cross-sectional cluster sampling approach. We included validated HSR questions on six responsiveness domains and patient-reported health system outcomes, such as satisfaction and trust in the CHA’s skills and abilities. The HSR questions were administered to women aged 18–49 years who reported seeking care from a CHA in the 3 months prior to the survey. A composite responsiveness score was calculated and divided into tertiles. Multivariable analysis using Poisson regression with log link and adjusting for respondent characteristics was used to determine the association between responsiveness and patient-reported health system outcomes. The proportion of individuals rating responsiveness as very good or excellent was similar across all domains within a district, with ratings being lower in RC (23–29%) than in GG (52–59%). High ratings in both counties were seen for high trust in the CHA’s skills and abilities (GG 84%, RC 75%) and high confidence in the CHA (GG 58%, RC 60%). Compared with women in the lowest responsiveness tertile (score ≤3), women in the highest tertile (score $ \ge $4.25) were significantly more likely to report high quality of CHA-delivered care (prevalence ratio, PR = 14.1), very good/excellent at meeting health needs (PR = 8.0), high confidence in the CHA to provide future care (PR = 2.4), and a high level of trust in CHA’s skills and abilities (PR = 1.4). Controlling for respondent characteristics, the composite responsiveness score was significantly associated with all patient-reported health system outcomes (P < 0.001). We found that HSR was associated with important patient-reported health system quality outcomes, including satisfaction, trust, and confidence in the CHA. Measuring patients’ experience and outcomes of care is important to complement more common measures of technical quality for CHW-delivered care to ensure that this domain of quality is central to the community health programme design and delivery.
      PubDate: Tue, 25 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad027
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • COVID-19 pandemic and the quality of antibiotic use in primary care: an
           interrupted time-series study

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      First page: mzad014
      Abstract: The coronavirus disease-19 pandemic and the related public health mitigation measures have impacted the transmission of infectious diseases; however, their impact on the use of antibacterials has not yet been extensively evaluated. This study evaluated the impact of the pandemic on the consumption patterns of antibacterials for systemic use in primary care in Portugal. An interrupted time-series analysis was performed using the autoregressive integrated moving average model of the antibacterials dispensed in the community pharmacies in Portugal from 1 January 2016 to 30 June 2022. Monthly rates of absolute consumption (all antibacterials for systemic use, and specifically penicillins; cephalosporins; macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins; and quinolones) and the relative consumption of antibacterials (penicillins sensitive to β-lactamase, penicillin combinations including β-lactamase inhibitors, third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones, and the ratio of broad- to narrow-spectrum antibacterials) were estimated. Antibiotic consumption was expressed in defined daily doses per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID). In Portugal, the consumption of antibacterials (J01) declined sharply immediately after the beginning of the pandemic, having a significant reduction of >5 DID (P < .0001). A similar, short-term impact was found for penicillins (−2.920 DID; P < .0001); cephalosporins (−0.428 DID; P < .0001); macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins (−0.681 DID; P = .0021); and quinolones (−0.320 DID; P < .0001). A long-term increase was found for cephalosporins (+0.019 DID per month; P < .0001). Relative consumption changes were only found for third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins (0.0734%). Our study suggests that the coronavirus disease-19 pandemic may have resulted in a decrease in antibiotic use, with no significant changes in the relative dispense. Uncertainties regarding the long-term effects of the pandemic and its impact on the rates of resistance remain.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad014
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Is primary care a patient-safe setting' Prevalence, severity, nature, and
           causes of adverse events: numerous and mostly avoidable

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      First page: mzad019
      Abstract: Knowing the frequency and characteristics of adverse events (AEs) is key to implementing actions that can prevent their occurrence. However, reporting systems are insufficient for this purpose and epidemiological studies are also required. Currently, the reviewing of clinical records is the gold standard method for knowing the frequency and characteristics of AEs. Research on AEs in a primary care setting has been limited and primarily focuses on specific types of events (medication errors, etc.) or patients. Large studies that search for any kind of AE in all patients are scarce. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of AEs in the primary care setting and their characteristics. Setting: all 262 primary health-care centres in the Madrid region (Spain) during the last quarter of 2018. Design: cross-sectional descriptive study. Eligible population: subjects over 18 years of age who attended medical consultation over the last year (N = 2 743 719); a randomized sample stratified by age. Main outcomes: age, sex, occurrence of an AE, number of consultations in the study period, avoidability, severity, place of occurrence, type of event, and contributory factors. The clinical records were reviewed by three teams, each composed of one doctor and one nurse trained and with expertise in patient safety. The SPSS software package (version 26) was used for the statistical analyses. The evaluators reviewed 1797 clinical records. The prevalence of AEs over the study period was 5.0% [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.0%‒6.0%], with higher values in women (5.7%; 95% CI: 4.6%‒6.8%;P = 0.10) and patients over 75 years of age (10.3%; 95% CI: 8.9%‒11.7%; P < 0.001). The overall occurrence per hundred consultations was estimated to be 1.58% (95% CI: 1.28%‒1.94%). Of the detected AEs, 71.3% (95% CI: 62.1%‒80.5%) were avoidable. Additionally, 60.6% (95% CI: 50.7%‒70.5%) were categorized as mild, 31.9% (95% CI: 22.4%‒41.4%) as moderate, and 7.4% (95% CI: 2.1%‒12.7%) as severe. Primary care was the occurrence setting in 76.6% (95% CI: 68.0%‒85.2%) of cases. The overall incidence of AEs related to medication was 53.2% (95% CI: 50.9%‒55.5%). The most frequent types of AEs were prescription errors (28.7%; 95% CI: 19.5%‒37.9%), followed by drug administration errors by patients (17.0%; 95% CI: 9.4%‒24.6%), and clinical assessment errors (11.7%; 95% CI: 5.2%‒18.2%). The most common contributory factors were those related to the patient (80.6%; 95% CI: 71.1%‒90.1%) and tasks (59.7%; 95% CI: 48.0%‒71.4%). A high prevalence of AEs (1 in 66 consultations) was observed, which was slightly higher than that reported in similar studies. About 3 out of 4 such events were considered to be avoidable and 1 out of 13 was severe. Prescription errors, drug administration errors by patients, and clinical assessment errors were the most frequent types of AEs.Graphical  
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad019
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Appropriateness of lumbar spine radiography and factors influencing
           imaging ordering patterns: paving the path toward value-driven health care
           

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      First page: mzad021
      Abstract: The demand for diagnostic imaging continues to rise. Against the backdrop of rising health care costs and finite resources, this has prompted a paradigm shift toward value-driven patient care. Inappropriate imaging is a barrier toward achieving this goal, which runs counter to prevailing evidence-based guidelines and contributes to rising healthcare costs. Our objective was to evaluate the appropriateness of lumbar spine X-rays in a tertiary referral Emergency Department (ED) and assess whether physicians’ specialization and years of experience influence appropriateness. A total of 1030 lumbar spine radiographs performed in the ED of an academic medical center over a consecutive 3-month period were reviewed retrospectively. Referral indications were reviewed for adherence to 2021 American College of Radiology appropriateness guidelines for lower back pain, and referral patterns were evaluated among physician groups based on specialists’ training and years in practice. 63.8% of lumbar spine radiographs were appropriate, with trauma being the most common indication. 36.2% of orders were inappropriate, with lower back pain of <6 weeks duration being the most common indication. Significant differences in inappropriate orders were found (P < .001) across physician groups: qualified Emergency Medicine specialists (20.9% inappropriate orders), specialists in training (27.8%), and non-specialists with ≥3 (60.0%) and <3 (36.9%) years in practice, respectively. Approximately one-third of lumbar spine radiographs performed in the ED were inappropriately ordered by American College of Radiology guidelines; specialists training and years in practice affected referral patterns. Integrating evidence-based appropriateness guidelines into the physician order workflow and targeting older non-specialists may promote more judicious imaging and reduce health care costs.
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad021
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Patient-reported outcomes for quality of care among pediatric patients

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      First page: mzad020
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad020
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Portuguese Abstracts for Volume 34, Issue 2, 2022

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      First page: mzad013
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad013
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Leaving the hospital on time: hospital bed utilization and reasons for
           discharge delay in the Netherlands

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      First page: mzad022
      Abstract: Inappropriate bed occupancy due to delayed hospital discharge affects both physical and psychological well-being in patients and can disrupt patient flow. The Dutch healthcare system is facing ongoing pressure, especially during the current coronavirus disease pandemic, intensifying the need for optimal use of hospital beds. The aim of this study was to quantify inappropriate patient stays and describe the underlying reasons for the delays in discharge. The Day of Care Survey (DoCS) is a validated tool used to gain information about appropriate and inappropriate bed occupancy in hospitals. Between February 2019 and January 2021, the DoCS was performed five times in three different hospitals within the region of Amsterdam, the Netherlands. All inpatients were screened, using standardized criteria, for their need for in-hospital care at the time of survey and reasons for discharge delay. A total of 782 inpatients were surveyed. Of these patients, 94 (12%) were planned for definite discharge that day. Of all other patients, 145 (21%, ranging from 14% to 35%) were without the need for acute in-hospital care. In 74% (107/145) of patients, the reason for discharge delay was due to issues outside the hospital; most frequently due to a shortage of available places in care homes (26%, 37/145). The most frequent reason for discharge delay inside the hospital was patients awaiting a decision or review by the treating physician (14%, 20/145). Patients who did not meet the criteria for hospital stay were, in general, older [median 75, interquartile range (IQR) 65–84 years, and 67, IQR 55–75 years, respectively, P < .001] and had spent more days in hospital (7, IQR 5–14 days, and 3, IQR 1–8 days respectively, P < .001). Approximately one in five admitted patients occupying hospital beds did not meet the criteria for acute in-hospital stay or care at the time of the survey. Most delays were related to issues outside the immediate control of the hospital. Improvement programmes working with stakeholders focusing on the transfer from hospital to outside areas of care need to be further developed and may offer potential for the greatest gain. The DoCS can be a tool to periodically monitor changes and improvements in patient flow.
      PubDate: Fri, 07 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad022
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • A prospective randomized controlled study of the effect of standardized
           nursing intervention for cancer pain on the quality of life of patients

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      First page: mzad017
      Abstract: Cancer pain refers to pain caused by cancer itself or cancer-related factors and can seriously affect cancer patients’ quality of life. Cancer pain can also cause a decline in patient compliance with cancer treatment and care. It has been suggested that nursing should be oriented to meet the patients’ needs, improve the capacity and quality of its specialized services, and provide a continuum of good quality care for different types of cancer patients with varying degrees of pain. This study used a convenience sampling of 236 cancer patients. According to the random number table method, these patients were randomly divided into an observation group and a control group, with 118 cases in each group. The control group was given routine nursing and pain management care. The observation group was given standardized nursing intervention for cancer pain alongside routine nursing and pain management care. After 2 weeks of different nursing interventions, the results of the Numeric Rating Scale and the World Health Organization Quality of Life brief version questionnaire from the two groups were compared. After 2 weeks of standardized nursing intervention for cancer pain, the results of the Numeric Rating Scale and World Health Organization Quality of Life brief version in the observation group were significantly better than those in the control group (P < .05), and the difference was statistically significant. The standardized nursing intervention can effectively relieve cancer pain, improve cancer patients’ quality of life, and play a significant role in cancer treatment, which is worthy of clinical reference and promotion.
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Apr 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad017
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Adjuvant zoledronic acid therapy for postmenopausal women with early
           breast cancer in China: a cost-effectiveness analysis

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      First page: mzad016
      Abstract: Combination therapy of zoledronic acid (ZOL) plus aromatase inhibitor (AI) was found to reduce bone metastasis risk and improve overall survival for treatment-naïve postmenopausal women (PMW) with hormone receptor–positive (HR+) early breast cancer (EBC), when compared with AI alone. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding ZOL to AI in treating PMW with HR+ EBC in China. A 5-state Markov model was constructed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding ZOL to AI for PMW-EBC (HR+) over a lifetime horizon from the perspective of Chinese healthcare provider. Data used were obtained from previous reports and public data. The primary outcomes of this study were direct medical cost, life years (LYs), quality-adjusted LYs (QALYs), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). One-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed to examine the robustness of the presented model. Over a lifetime horizon, adding ZOL to AI was projected to yield a gain of 1.286 LYs and 1.099 QALYs compared with AI monotherapy, which yielded ICER $11 140.75 per QALY with an incremental cost of $12 247.36. The one-way sensitivity analysis indicated that the cost of ZOL was the most influential factor in our study. The probability that adding ZOL to AI was cost-effective at a threshold of $30 425 per QALY in China was 91.1%. ZOL is likely to be cost-effective in reducing bone metastasis risk and improving overall survival for PMW-EBC (HR+) in China.
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad016
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • COVID-19 response: a perspective from Pakistan

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      First page: mzad015
      Abstract: PakistanCovid-19 response
      PubDate: Mon, 27 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad015
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
  • Associations between clinical pathway concordance, cost, and survival
           outcomes for stage II colon cancer: a population-based study

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      First page: mzad012
      Abstract: This study measures patient’s concordance between clinical reference pathways with survival or cost among a population-based cohort of colon cancer patients applying a continuous measure of concordance. The primary hypothesis is that a higher concordance score with the clinical pathway is significantly associated with longer survival or lower cost. The study informs whether patient’s adherence to a defined clinical pathway is beneficial to patients’ outcomes or health system. An externally determined clinical pathway for colon cancer was used to identify treatment nodes in colon cancer care. Using observational data up to 2019, the study generated a continuous measure of pathway concordance. The study measured whether incremental improvements in pathway concordance were associated with survival and treatment costs. Concordance between patients’ reference pathways and their observed trajectories of care was highly statistically associated with survivorship [hazard ratio: 0.95 (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.95–0.96)], showing that adherence to the clinical pathway was associated with a lower mortality rate. An increase in concordance was statistically significantly associated with a decrease in health system cost. When patients’ care followed the clinical pathway, survival outcomes were better and total health system costs were lower in this cohort. This finding creates a compelling case for further research into understanding the barriers to pathway concordance and developing interventions to improve outcomes and help providers implement best practice care where appropriate.
      PubDate: Fri, 24 Mar 2023 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzad012
      Issue No: Vol. 35, No. 2 (2023)
       
 
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