Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 172)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 236)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 186)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Perspectives in Public Health
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.32
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1757-9139 - ISSN (Online) 1757-9147
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • What a year that was: some thoughts on health inequalities and publishing
           WEIRD articles

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Theo Stickley
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 2-3, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221147717
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Health professionals as activists: tackling threats to public health

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      Authors: K Burns
      Pages: 4 - 5
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 4-5, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221145607
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Diary

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 6 - 6
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 6-6, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221147736
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • RSPH Health and Wellbeing Awards 2022

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 7 - 10
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 7-10, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221144676
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • News

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 11-11, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221144674
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • First Dental Steps: a multistranded oral health improvement intervention
           embedded in the Healthy Child Programme

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      Authors: D Brown, R Patel, R Witton
      Pages: 12 - 13
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 12-13, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221122353
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Narrowing the gap between research and policy: using rapid evaluation
           during the COVID-19 crisis

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      Authors: K Anil, D Watson, J Alagil, R Dewar-Haggart, S Fearn, C McGrath, C Meagher, S Muir, M Barker
      Pages: 14 - 17
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 14-17, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221138449
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Role for Directors of Public Health in local gambling licensing

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      Authors: F Junaid, P Badrinath
      Pages: 18 - 19
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 18-19, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221094681
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Socioeconomic inequalities in health – debates on the persistence

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      Authors: A Molarius
      Pages: 20 - 21
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Volume 143, Issue 1, Page 20-21, January 2023.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-25T07:21:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221138447
      Issue No: Vol. 143, No. 1 (2023)
       
  • Perceived stigma among diabetic patients and their caregivers: a review

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      Authors: R Kaur, AK Sinha
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Considerable number of studies in the existing literature indicate the existence of stigma related to many diseases, disabilities, and disorders, but less attention has been given to diabetes-related stigma. This narrative review of literature aims to explore the existence of stigma surrounding type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM).Methods:Literature were searched using search engines, Google Scholar, PubMed, and Scopus electronic databases published from year 2000 to 2020. Both qualitative and quantitative studies focusing on the stigma associated with T1DM were included. A total of 21 articles met the inclusion criteria. Thematic analysis of collected research material was done.Results:Results provided substantial evidence that stigma associated with T1DM was experienced by T1DM patients and their caregivers at some point in their lives and it had affected their lives in different domains such as difficulty finding a spouse, discrimination at employment opportunities, educational institutions, management of disease, being misjudged as a druggie, poor quality of life of the patient and caregiver, depressive symptoms among parents of patients, constant worrying of their child’s disease management, and so on.Conclusion:Stigma related to T1DM is experienced by individuals suffering from it, and it is widespread. It not only affects the sufferers but their loved ones also. To reduce and cope-up with stigma, there is a need to increase public education and awareness at a mass level. Further research and awareness will serve to build our understanding of the experience of diabetes-related stigma.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T12:46:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221136725
       
  • The Middle-Out Perspective: an approach to formalise ‘normal practice’
           in public health advocacy

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      Authors: JS Mindell, Y Parag, SE Bartington, L Stoll, J Barlow, KB Janda
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:The middle-out perspective (MOP) provides a lens to examine how actors positioned between government (top) and individuals (bottom) act to promote broader societal changes from the middle-out (rather than the top-down or bottom-up). The MOP has been used in recent years in the fields of energy, climate change, and development studies. We argue that public health practitioners involved with advocacy activities and creating alliances to amplify health promotion actions will be familiar with the general MOP concept if not the formal name. The article aims to demonstrate this argument.Methods:This article introduces the MOP conceptual framework and customises it for a public health audience by positioning it among existing concepts and theories for actions within public health. Using two UK case studies (increasing signalised crossing times for pedestrians and the campaign for smoke-free legislation), we illustrate who middle actors are and what they can do to result in better public health outcomes.Results:These case studies show that involving a wider range of middle actors, including those not traditionally involved in improving the public’s health, can broaden the range and reach of organisations and individuals involving in advocating for public health measures. They also demonstrate that middle actors are not neutral. They can be recruited to improve public health outcomes, but they may also be exploited by commercial interests to block healthy policies or even promote a health-diminishing agenda.Conclusion:Using the MOP as a formal approach can help public health organisations and practitioners consider potential ‘allies’ from outside traditional health-related bodies or professions. Formal mapping can expand the range of who are considered potential middle actors for a particular public health issue. By applying the MOP, public health organisations and staff can enlist the additional leverage that is brought to bear by involving additional middle actors in improving the public’s health.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-12-30T12:46:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221138451
       
  • Erratum to ‘Co-production to tackle vaccine uptake’

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      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-28T01:48:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221136786
       
  • Exploring the perceptions and acceptability of an integrated lifestyle
           database for public health research and service commissioning: a
           qualitative study

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      Authors: JNA Akanuwe, S Cooke, H Henderson, R Kane
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:Public health lifestyle databases at local authority level are currently poorly aligned across the UK. The integration of lifestyle databases at a regional level could provide a rich resource to support research and help inform public health leads and service commissioners in improving service delivery, facilitating decision-making and developing key public health policies. Prior to its implementation, the acceptability of an integrated lifestyle database should be explored. The aim of this study was to consult with public health stakeholders to explore the acceptability of developing and implementing a regional integrated lifestyle database across four key areas of public health: smoking cessation, diet, physical activity and alcohol consumption.Method:Qualitative interviews were conducted with public health stakeholders recruited from across the East Midlands region of England. All interviews were conducted using video conferencing software and recorded, transcribed, and analysed using the Framework approach. Sixteen public health stakeholders were purposively identified and invited to participate in interviews.Results:Stakeholders viewed the integrated database as having potential to support research, service development and commissioning decisions. Barriers such as providers’ reluctance to reveal their business strategies to rival organisations, cost of setting up and running the proposed database, complex information-sharing and governance were identified.Conclusion:An integrated lifestyle database has the potential to support research and service commissioning regionally. However, several barriers were identified that must be addressed prior to the development and implementation of an integrated database.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-11-15T01:57:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221136726
       
  • Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between cardiorespiratory
           fitness and health-related quality of life in primary school children in
           England: the mediating role of psychological correlates of physical
           activity

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      Authors: A Solera-Sanchez, DL Christian, MR Beltran-Valls, M Adelantado-Renau, R Martin-Smith, MJ MacDonald, R Tyler, SJ Fairclough
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:The aims were (1) to analyse the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between children’s cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and (2) to examine whether these associations were mediated by physical activity self-efficacy and physical activity enjoyment.Methods:This study involved 383 children (10.0 ± 0.5 years) recruited from 20 primary schools in northwest England. Data were collected on two occasions 12 weeks apart. The number of laps completed in the 20-m Shuttle Run Test was used as the CRF indicator. HRQoL was assessed using the KIDSCREEN-10 questionnaire. Physical activity self-efficacy and enjoyment were assessed with the social-cognitive and Physical Activity Enjoyment Scale questionnaires, respectively. Linear mixed models with random intercepts (schools) assessed associations between CRF and HRQoL cross-sectionally, and longitudinally. Boot-strapped mediation procedures were performed, and indirect effects (IE) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) not including zero considered as statistically significant. Analyses were adjusted for sex, time of the year, socioeconomic status, waist-to-height ratio, maturation, and physical activity.Results:CRF was cross-sectionally associated with HRQoL (β = 0.09, 95% CI = 0.02, 0.16; p = .015). In the longitudinal analysis, CRF at baseline was associated with HRQoL at 12 weeks after additionally controlling for baseline HRQoL (β = 0.08, 95% CI = 0.002; p = .15, p = .045). Cross-sectionally, physical activity self-efficacy and enjoyment acted individually as mediators in the relationship between CRF and HRQoL (IE = 0.069, 95% CI = 0.038; p = .105 and IE = 0.045, 95% CI = 0.016; p = .080, respectively). In the longitudinal analysis, physical activity self-efficacy showed a significant mediating effect (IE = 0.025, 95% CI = 0.004; p = .054).Conclusion:Our findings highlight the influence of CRF on children’s psychological correlates of physical activity and their overall HRQoL.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-10-13T01:09:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118771
       
  • How do we measure unmet need within sexual and reproductive health' A
           systematic review

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      Authors: D Solomon, M Cabecinha, J Gibbs, F Burns, CA Sabin
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Addressing health inequality with sexual and reproductive health requires an understanding of unmet need within a range of populations. This review examined the methods and definitions that have been used to measure unmet need, and the populations most frequently assessed.Methods:Five databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Health Management and Policy Database (HMIC)) were searched for studies that described quantitative measurement of unmet need within sexual and/or reproductive health between 2010 and 2021. A narrative synthesis was then undertaken to ascertain themes within the literature.Results:The database search yielded 19,747 papers; 216 papers were included after screening. 190 studies assessed unmet reproductive health need, of which 137 were analyses of trends among people living in low/lower-middle income countries; 181 used cross-sectional data, with only nine analyses being longitudinal. Eighteen studies analysed unmet sexual health need, of which 12 focused on high and upper-middle income populations. 16 papers used cross-sectional analyses. The remaining 10 studies examined unmet need for a combination of sexual and reproductive health services, eight among populations from upper-middle or high income countries. All were cross-sectional analyses. 165 studies used the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) definition of unmet need; no other standardised definition was used among the remaining papers.Discussion:There is a significant focus on unmet need for contraception among women in low income countries within the published literature, leaving considerable evidence gaps in relation to unmet need within sexual health generally and among men in particular, and unmet reproductive health need in high income settings. In addition, using an increased range of data collection methods, analyses and definitions of unmet need would enable better understanding of health inequality in this area.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T05:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118778
       
  • ‘When the bedbugs come, that’s another problem’: exploring the lived
           experiences of bedbug infestations among low-income older adults and
           service providers who support them

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      Authors: CL Sheppard, B Roche, A Austen, SL Hitzig
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Older adults in low-income housing communities are more vulnerable to bedbug infestations. Prior research, however, has predominately focused on the effectiveness of integrated pest-management strategies, with little attention given to the lived experiences of tenants struggling with infestations. We used a qualitative approach to explore what it is like to live with and treat bedbug infestations from the perspectives of low-income older adults and service providers.Methods:Participants included low-income older adults (n = 58) and service providers (n = 58) who offer supports directly in the buildings. Semi-structured qualitative interviews and focus groups were used to explore the challenges of preparing and treating units for bedbugs, and examine how bedbugs impact access to support services.Results:Bedbugs were a widespread issue, and underlying physical, mental, social, and financial challenges made it difficult for older tenants to prepare their units and access treatment. Tenants also faced bedbug stigma from community services, as many were unwilling to provide services in infested units. Although some service providers utilized strategies to minimize exposure, many were concerned these strategies created additional stigma.Conclusion:Our findings highlight an urgent need to increase public health funding to support older adults with the costs of bedbug elimination and to enhance pest-management strategies through partnerships with health and social service agencies to improve outcomes for older adults.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-21T05:09:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118777
       
  • A process evaluation of Promotional Guides used by health visitors to
           support men’s transition to fatherhood: a qualitative study

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      Authors: S Baldwin, M Malone, J Sandall, D Bick
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Health visitors play an important role in supporting new parents in their transition to parenthood. A programme known as the Promotional Guide system is used by many health visitors in England with mothers and fathers to support this transition, but there is little known about health visitors’ views of the Promotional Guides, how they are used in practice or barriers to effective implementation with fathers.Aims:The aim of this study was to explore the following: (1) health visitors’ use of Promotional Guides with fathers, (2) health visitors’ assessment of father’s mental health and wellbeing and (3) facilitators and barriers to using Promotional Guides in practice.Methods:A prospective observational cohort study and a process evaluation informed by the Medical Research Council guidance were conducted. A purposive sample of 11 health visitors was interviewed, and an additional seven were observed using the Promotional Guides in practice. Data were analysed using framework analysis.Results:Five main themes were identified from interview and observational data as follows: (1) Enquiry into fathers’ mental health, (2) Promotional Guides in practice, (3) health visitors’ perceptions of the Promotional Guides system, (4) barriers to using Promotional Guides with fathers and (5) facilitators and recommendations for using Promotional Guides with fathers. This study identified a number of barriers and facilitators to the use of Promotional Guides with fathers. Recommendations were made for improving services for first-time fathers, implementing the Promotional Guide system with fathers and highlighting areas for future research.Conclusion:This study considered the acceptability, feasibility and fidelity of using the Promotional Guide programme with fathers from the health visitor’s perspective. The findings provided an insight into health visitors’ experiences of working with fathers, inquiring about men’s mental health needs and their use of the Promotional Guides with men during the perinatal period.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T08:55:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118243
       
  • Outbreaks of COVID-19 in indoor places of worship: a systematic review

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      Authors: F Bert, GL Moro, A Peano, C Previti, R Siliquini
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:This review aimed to describe what has been published on COVID-19 outbreaks originating from indoor places of worship.Methods:A systematic review was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) checklist by searching PubMed, Scopus and Embase from 1 January 2020 to 29 March 2021. Citation chasing was also performed. Studies with information about COVID-19 outbreaks originating in indoor places of worship of any religion were included.Results:A total of 9729 records were identified and 36 were selected. The articles reported 119 descriptions of outbreaks linked to churches, mosques, synagogues, and temples, referring to approximately 52–74 unique outbreaks. The outbreaks were mostly located in three major areas: East and Southeast Asia (46%), the USA (27%), Europe (22%). All the outbreaks began in 2020. Mainly, there were no restrictive measures, or such measures were not followed at the time of the outbreak. Choir practices presented the highest attack rate (up to 0.867).Conclusions:The lack of preventive measures and the role of singing practices were highlighted. Reports were often lacking contact tracing and sometimes did not report the date of outbreak extinction. Moreover, reports came from few geographical areas. Thus, the impact of transmission in places of worship may be largely underestimated.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-09-08T08:50:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118218
       
  • Measuring the digital divide among people with severe mental ill health
           using the essential digital skills framework

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      Authors: P Spanakis, R Wadman, L Walker, P Heron, A Mathers, J Baker, G Johnston, S Gilbody, E Peckham
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Amid the vast digitalisation of health and other services during the pandemic, people with no digital skills are at risk of digital exclusion. This risk might not abate by the end of the pandemic. This article seeks to understand whether people with severe mental ill health (SMI) have the necessary digital skills to adapt to these changes and avoid digital exclusion.Methods:Two hundred and forty-nine adults with SMI across England completed a survey online or offline. They provided information on their digital skills based on the Essential Digital Skills (EDS) framework, sociodemographic information, and digital access. This is the first time that the EDS is benchmarked in people with SMI.Results:42.2% had no Foundation Skills, and 46.2% lacked skills for daily life (lacking Foundation or Life Skills). 23.0% of those working lacked skills for professional life (lacking Foundation or Work Skills). The most commonly missing skills were handling passwords and using the device settings (Foundation Skills) and online problem solving (Skills for Life). People were interested in learning more about approximately half of the skills they did not have. People were more likely to lack Foundation Skills if they were older, not in employment, had a psychosis-spectrum disorder, or had no Internet access at home.Conclusion:A significant portion of people with SMI lacked Foundation Skills in this objective and benchmarked survey. This points to a high risk for digital exclusion and the need for focused policy and tailored health sector support to ensure people retain access to key services and develop digital skills and confidence. To our knowledge, this is the first time this has been described using the EDS framework. Services, including the National Health Service (NHS), need to be aware of and mitigate the risks.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T11:37:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106399
       
  • The impact of COVID-19 on the hot food takeaway planning regulatory
           environment: perspectives of local authority professionals in the North
           East of England

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      Authors: HJ Moore, AA Lake, CL O’Malley, C Bradford, N Gray, M Chang, C Mathews, TG Townshend
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background & Aims:Planning regulations have been used to prevent the over-proliferation of hot food takeaways, minimising the impact of local obesogenic environments. To help mitigate the effects of lockdown, the UK government introduced temporary changes in March 2020 to Planning Regulations for England, allowing food retailers to open for takeaway services beyond ‘ancillary’ level without needing to apply for planning permission through permitted development rights (PDR). Businesses are required to notify their local authority (LA) when they implement PDRs. To better understand the impact of regulations on the policy and practice of key professional groups, Public Health England commissioned Teesside University to undertake scoping research in the North East of England.Methods:A focus group and interviews were conducted with 15 professionals from 7 of 12 North East LAs. Professions included Planners, Public Health Leads, Environmental Health Officers and Town Centre Managers. Data were analysed using a codebook thematic analysis approach. An interpretation meeting with some participants was conducted.Results:LAs were not aware of most businesses notifying them of new regulation adherence despite taking up PDRs, but were considered low-priority with many lacking formal recording procedures. There were concerns about health consequences of the changes, and consensus relating to ongoing issues with capacity across all professional groups, largely due to the continuing pandemic and absence of a strategy out of temporary measures. Concerns existed around ensuring cessation of restaurants trading as takeaways, and hygiene inspections backlog. Many (personally) saw new takeaways as a lifeline, offering broader menus and preserving local economies.Conclusion:Lack of information around the number of restaurants/pubs using PDR to trade as takeaway services, ongoing capacity issues of LAs and, at the time, the absence of a strategy post regulation changes, meant there were high levels of uncertainty regarding the impacts of these temporary measures.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-08-05T11:34:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106343
       
  • Erratum

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      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-29T09:45:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221118616
       
  • Social capital, food insecurity, and health outcomes in the US during the
           COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Y Choi, HH Kim
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:The purpose of this study was first, to investigate the harmful effects of food insufficiency on health outcomes – self-rated health (SRH) and self-assessed depressive symptoms – during the COVID-19 pandemic and, second, to test whether these effects fluctuated across the US in terms of state-level social capital.Methods:Data were drawn from the Census Household Pulse Survey (fielded between April 2020 and February 2021) consisting of community-dwelling American adults (N = 1.5M+). Social capital measures were taken from the ‘Social Capital Project’ sponsored by the US Congress. We estimated three-level mixed effects models to analyze multiple waves of repeated cross-sectional surveys.Results:Post-COVID-19 food insufficiency was significantly negatively associated with SRH and positively associated depression, adjusting for controls including food insufficiency prior to the onset of the pandemic. These relationships were also more pronounced in areas with higher aggregate social capital.Conclusions:The health burdens of the new coronavirus disease have fallen disproportionately on the economically marginalized, as measured by food insufficiency. Contrary to the conventional literature, living in a state with a greater stock of social capital worsened its health effects.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-15T06:11:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106339
       
  • Loneliness prevention and the role of the Public Health system

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      Authors: CL Crowe, L Liu, N Bagnarol, LP Fried, N Bagnarol
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:To evaluate evidence on loneliness interventions that have been assessed and found effective, both for remediation and addressing fundamental causes of loneliness; to consider why population-level primary prevention strategies targeting fundamental causes are necessary, and determine areas for future research; and to outline an integrated approach to prevention considering roles for the Public Health system.Method:We conducted a review of systematic reviews to identify effective loneliness interventions and classified them in our Population-Prevention Matrix according to public health impact, amount of individual effort required, and level of prevention. We also highlighted emerging interventions that have yet to be formally evaluated.Results:We identified a range of preventive or therapeutic approaches, and a dearth of population-level primary prevention interventions targeting fundamental causes of loneliness. Filling this gap will be essential in addressing the loneliness epidemic, and we provided emerging examples of population-level primary prevention interventions that may inform future efforts.Conclusion:Based on evidence to date, we suggest an integrated approach to prevention with significant roles for the US Public Health system, including its function as Chief Health Strategist to lead and guide multisystem approaches to loneliness prevention, with a particular focus on population-level primary prevention strategies.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-11T11:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106579
       
  • How do local authority plans to tackle obesity reflect systems
           thinking'

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      Authors: R Taheem, K Woods-Townsend, W Lawrence, J Baird, KM Godfrey, M Hanson
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:A whole systems approach to tackling obesity has been recommended by Public Health England for several years. This qualitative study aimed to investigate whether systems thinking is reflected in local authority plans and strategies to tackle obesity, using the leverage points for intervention in a complex system, as a framework.Method:We sought to identify obesity strategies/plans for Southampton and 19 other local authority comparators (based on children’s services and Office for National Statistics data). A healthy weight strategy was available for 10 local authorities and a qualitative document analysis was undertaken. The policy actions proposed in the plans were coded against the leverage points for intervention in a complex system and themes were developed to characterise interventions in each category.Results:A majority of actions included in the plans were categorised as ‘Numbers, Constants and Parameters’ which reflect downstream measures. However, there were examples of actions that could act on higher leverage points. In addition, some local authority plans included interventions that could act on 10 of the 12 leverage points suggesting incorporation of systems thinking.Conclusions:Some local authority plans to tackle obesity do reflect systems thinking when viewed through the lens of the leverage points for intervention in a complex system. Interventions at higher leverage points should be prioritised by public health decision-makers, especially in a climate of competing agendas and limited resources.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-07T12:32:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106337
       
  • Exploring pregnant women’s experiences of stopping smoking with an
           incentive scheme with ‘enhanced’ support: a qualitative study

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      Authors: Fiona C McCormack, Rachel C Hopley, Elizabeth H Boath, Sian L Parry, Suzie M Roscoe, Antony Stewart, Victoria A Birch
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:This study aims to understand pregnant women’s experiences of smoking cessation with an incentive scheme in a deprived UK city. This is important because smoking cessation with pregnant women is one of the most crucial public health initiatives to promote, and is particularly challenging in deprived areas. While financial incentive schemes are controversial, there is a need to better understand pregnant women’s experiences. The scheme combined quasi-financial incentives (shopping vouchers) for validated quits (carbon monoxide (CO) validated at
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T11:40:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106842
       
  • Mental health and wellbeing among people with informal caring
           responsibilities across different time points during the COVID-19
           pandemic: a population-based propensity score matching analysis

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      Authors: Hei Wan Mak, Feifei Bu, Daisy Fancourt
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Due to a prolonged period of national and regional lockdown measures during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, there has been an increase reliance on informal care for informal carers. In light of this, the current study compared the experiences of carers and non-carers on various mental health and wellbeing measures across six key time points during the pandemic.Methods:Data analysed were from the University College London (UCL) COVID -19 Social Study. Our study focused on six time points in England: (1) the first national lockdown (March–April 2020); (2) the beginning of first lockdown rules easing (May 2020); (3) the second national lockdown (November 2020); (4) the third national lockdown (January 2021); (5) the easing of the third lockdown (March 2021); and (6) the end of restrictions (July–August 2021). We considered five mental health and wellbeing measures: depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, loneliness, life satisfaction, and sense of being worthwhile. Propensity score matching was applied for the analyses.Results:We found that informal carers experienced higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms than non-carers across much of the pandemic. During the first national lockdown, carers also experienced a higher sense of life being worthwhile. No association was found between informal caring responsibilities and levels of loneliness and life satisfaction.Conclusion:Given that carers are an essential national healthcare support, especially during a pandemic, it is crucial to integrate carers’ needs into healthcare planning and delivery. These results highlight that there is a pressing need to provide adequate and targeted mental health support for carers during and following this pandemic.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-07-05T11:38:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221104973
       
  • Development of a multiagency protocol to support people with No Recourse
           to Public Funds in Wolverhampton (UK)

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      Authors: SM Reddy, H Mahmood
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background:No Recourse to Public Funds (NRPF) status is applied to individuals and families that are subject to immigration control, resulting in them having restricted access to state-funded benefits within England. NRPF is a public health risk as it increases the risk of destitution among vulnerable migrants.Aims:The aim of this study was to engage with public and voluntary sector staff within Wolverhampton working with people with a NRPF status to develop and create an easily accessible guide (‘protocol’) to help facilitate identification of appropriate cross-sector interventions and support.Methods:Data were collected via an online survey as well as face-to-face semi-structured interviews with local NRPF stakeholders.Results:Four themes emerged from the thematic analysis of participant responses: understanding NRPF statuses, varying support requirements, poor communication and awareness of vulnerabilities. Currently, in England, there does not appear to be a standardised localised protocol which can be used to reduce the complexities and confusion encountered by public and voluntary sectors who support people with NRPF status.Conclusion:The findings from this study have allowed the Wolverhampton NRPF to create an online information resource that includes training events to raise the awareness of NRPF, as well as the development of a localised multiagency protocol that has better equipped it to support and safeguard people with NRPF.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T11:06:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106574
       
  • Trends and projections in sexually transmitted infections in people aged
           45 years and older in England: analysis of national surveillance data

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      Authors: C Camacho, EM Camacho, DM Lee
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:We describe the epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV in people aged ⩾45 years in England and provide future projections about the burden of STIs in this age group.Methods:Analysis of national surveillance data in England from 2014 to 2019 for chlamydia, gonorrhoea, herpes, syphilis, anogenital warts and HIV was carried out. Time trends were assessed by the Poisson regression and reported using incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Two scenarios were modelled to predict the number of new STI diagnoses and associated costs in 2040.Results:In 2019, there were 37,692 new STI diagnoses in people ⩾45 years in England. Between 2014 and 2019, there was a significant increase in the rate of new STI diagnoses in men (IRR = 1.05, p = .05) and those aged 45–64 years (IRR = 1.04, p = .05). Absolute numbers of new STI diagnoses in men who have sex with men increased by 76% between 2014 and 2019 (IRR = 1.15, p 
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-29T10:53:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221106348
       
  • The consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on the refugee population: a
           rapid review

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      Authors: B Badanta, M González-Cano-Caballero, E Fernández-García, G Lucchetti, R de Diego-Cordero
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:This is a rapid review examining the available evidence about the repercussions of the COVID-19 pandemic on the refugee population.Methods:A search in the databases such as PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Web of Science was conducted and all relevant original articles, letters, and editorial and policy papers were included.Results:From 208 publications matching the search criteria, 36 were included. These publications were categorized into three distinct domains: Public Health, Policies and Financing, and Technology. Our findings revealed that the situation of the refugee population has worsened during the pandemic. Difficulty accessing healthcare, violation of human rights, lack of access to technology devices, unfavorable government policies, and economic crisis were the most important aspects impacted by COVID-19.Conclusion:Governments, health managers, health professionals, and policy makers should be aware of refugees’ problems during the pandemic to provide immediate solutions.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-06-01T09:27:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221093159
       
  • The changing vaccine landscape: rates of COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and
           hesitancy in young adults during vaccine rollout

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      Authors: H Knight, R Jia, K Ayling, H Blake, JR Morling, AM Villalon, J Corner, C Denning, J Ball, K Bolton, G Figueredo, D Morris, P Tighe, K Vedhara
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Development and rollout of vaccines offers the best opportunity for population protection against the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus. However, hesitancy towards the vaccines might impede successful uptake in the United Kingdom, particularly in young adults who demonstrate the highest rates of hesitancy. This prospective study explored COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in young adults and whether the reasons behind these attitudes changed during the initial stages of the United Kingdom’s vaccine rollout.Method:Data on vaccination intention were collected from a British university student cohort at three time points: October 2020, February 2021, and March 2021. This online survey included items on intention to receive a vaccine and a free-text response for the reasons behind this intention. Cochran’s Q tests examined changes in rates of hesitancy and acceptance over time and free-text responses were analysed thematically.Results:At baseline, 893 students provided data, with 476 participants completing all three time points. Hesitancy declined over time, with 29.4% of participants expressing hesitancy at baseline, reducing to 9.1% at wave 2 and 5.9% at wave 3. The most commonly endorsed themes for those willing to accept a vaccine were self-protection against COVID-19 and pro-social reasons, including protecting the population or unspecific others, and ending the pandemic/returning to normal life. The most commonly endorsed hesitancy themes related to ‘confidence’ in the vaccines and potential personal risk, including insufficient testing/scientific evidence, concern about side effects, and long-term effects. These reasons remained the most commonly endorsed at both waves 2 and 3.Conclusions:While a decline in hesitancy was observed over time, the key reasons behind both vaccine acceptance and hesitancy remained consistent. Reasons behind hesitancy aligned with those of the general public, providing support for the use of generalist interventions. Pro-social reasons frequently underpinned vaccine acceptance, so cohort-specific interventions targeting those factors may be of benefit.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-16T06:44:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221094750
       
  • Outcomes of a residential respite service for homeless people with
           tuberculosis in London, UK: a cross-sectional study

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      Authors: L Crosby, D Lewer, Y Appleby, C Anderson, A Hayward, A Story
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background:Many countries are seeking to eliminate tuberculosis (TB), but incidence remains high in socially excluded groups such as people experiencing homelessness. There is limited research into the effectiveness of residential respite services (RRS), which provide accomodation and social and clinical support for homeless people with active TB.Methods:We used a register of all cases of TB diagnosed in London between 1 January 2010 and 3 October 2019 to compare characteristics and outcomes of patients treated in an RRS with patients receiving standard care. The primary outcome was successful treatment completion. We used logistic regression to compare likelihood of completing treatment, and simulation to estimate the absolute change in treatment completion resulting from this service.Results:A total of 78 homeless patients finished an episode of TB treatment at the RRS. Patients treated in the RRS were more likely than patients treated in standard care to have clinical and social risk factors including drug resistance, history of homelessness, drug or alcohol use, and need for directly observed therapy. After adjusting for these factors, patients treated in the RRS had 2.97 times the odds of completing treatment (95% CI = 1.44–6.96). Treatment ended in failure for 8/78 patients treated in the RRS (10%, 95% CI = 5%–20%). We estimated that in the absence of the RRS, treatment would have ended in failure for 17/78 patients (95% CI = 11–25).Conclusion:The residential respite service for homeless TB patients with complex social needs was associated with better treatment outcomes.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T12:56:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221093544
       
  • A systematic review of ethnic disparities in the uptake of colorectal
           cancer screening

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      Authors: HK Sekhon Inderjit Singh, N Lal, A Majeed, N Pawa
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aims:Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening reduces mortality, but variation exists in uptake. Ethnicity is suggested to play a role; however, there is no high-level evidence to support this. We aim to clarify the impact of Ethnicity on CRC screening uptake and our barriers to its understanding.Methods:A systematic review to identify studies reporting on the participation of ethnic minorities in CRC screening worldwide was performed. MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and Google Scholar databases up until 31 May 2019 were searched. Compliance with screening according to ethnic groups and screening modality was evaluated compared to the ‘White’ control group.Results:Twenty-two studies were included in the review reporting on 2,084,213 patients. Substantial variation in categorisation of ethnicities (40 sub-categories), screening modality studied and confounding factors accounted for was observed. 8/15 studies for ‘Blacks’, 10/13 for ‘Hispanics’, 2/2 for ‘Asians’ and 1/1 for ‘South East Asians’ suggest a less likely or significantly decreased compliance with screening for all screening modalities (p 
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T12:51:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221093153
       
  • Corporate social and community-oriented support by UK food retailers: a
           documentary review and typology of actions towards community wellbeing

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      Authors: C Lee, C Hammant
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:This article provides a comprehensive exploration of the varied Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) actions in relation to supporting communities reported by the UK’s leading food retailers. Findings are discussed against a backdrop of enduring inequalities, exacerbated by the on-going global Coronavirus pandemic, with actions considered for their potential contribution to community-based approaches to addressing local wellbeing and inequalities.Method:This article presents the structure and key characteristics of community-oriented CSR in food retailing in the UK. A thematic analysis of comprehensive documentary evidence from the 11 principle UK food retailers was conducted, drawing on asset-based frameworks of community-centred actions towards wellbeing.Findings:The findings suggest an increasing acknowledgement in food retail that local community is of key importance. Initiatives were categorised according to a typology, comprising national partnerships, local store-based funding and support actions, targeted programmes on healthy lifestyles or employability, and changes to store operations, in the favour of priority groups, prompted by the pandemic.Conclusion:The article combines an up to date overview of community-focused CSR agendas and support by food retailers at a time of significant economic and social challenge for the UK. It highlights the potential of the sector to contribute more strategically to reducing inequalities and supporting community wellbeing, alongside statutory and voluntary sector partners.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-05-04T01:03:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221095326
       
  • The reach and benefits of a digital intervention to improve physical
           activity in people with a musculoskeletal condition delivered during the
           COVID-19 pandemic in the UK

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      Authors: J Webb, R Horlock, A Ahlquist, A Hall, K Brisby, S Hills, D Stewart
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Aim:To evaluate a digital intervention to improve physical activity in people in the UK with a musculoskeletal condition delivered during movement restrictions brought about because of the COVID-19 pandemic.Method:Service evaluation data collected from 26,041 participants over 5 months was assessed against national datasets to understand the reach and representativeness of the digital physical activity intervention. Measures to restrict the movement and interaction of people were in place during these 5 months. Cross-sectional data from 2752 participants across different stages of the 12-week programme assessed levels of physical activity and the components of behaviour as defined by the COM-B model (Capability, Opportunity, Motivation = Behaviour). Regression analysis investigated the relationship between programme stage and physical activity and the components of behaviour.Results:In comparison to the UK population of people with a musculoskeletal condition, the intervention participants were over-represented by females, White, and inactive people. A cross-sectional analysis suggested that the number of participants regularly active increased by programme stage. Scores for the behavioural components of automatic and reflective motivation, physical and psychological capability, and physical opportunity were also improved by programme stage.Conclusion:The service evaluation suggests that the digital intervention, designed to improve physical activity in people with a musculoskeletal condition, could be beneficial during measures to restrict movement to slow the spread of infectious disease in those who are already motivated to become or stay active.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-04-03T07:12:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139221085098
       
  • Barriers and facilitators to delivering bystander cardiopulmonary
           resuscitation in deprived communities: a systematic review

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      Authors: I Uny, K Angus, E Duncan, F Dobbie
      First page: 43
      Abstract: Perspectives in Public Health, Ahead of Print.
      Background:There is a higher incidence of cardiac arrest in economically deprived areas; however, data show that bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in those areas is lower. This results in lower survival rates, placing those communities at a double disadvantage. This systematic review explored the barriers and facilitators to engaging with bystander CPR in deprived communities.Methods:Studies were eligible for inclusion if they addressed any barrier or facilitator to performing bystander CPR or being trained in CPR or training others. Studies had to either be set in a deprived area or examine a deprived population. Selected studies were published between January 2000 and December 2017 and reported on primary research. No language limitations were applied. Searches were conducted in the following databases: Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and Web of Science Core Collection. Unpublished ‘grey’ literature was also searched as well as the reference lists of any relevant studies.Results:The systematic review highlighted several main factors acting as barriers or facilitators to engaging with bystander CPR in deprived communities: (1) the willingness to learn or perform CPR, (2) the confidence to perform CPR, and (3) self-reported likelihood of performing CPR. The review also revealed additional barriers to engaging with CPR which are specific to – or more acute for – individuals from socioeconomically deprived backgrounds or areas.Discussion:We found little evidence suggesting that the willingness to perform or learn bystander CPR is lower in deprived communities compared to the general population. However, the confidence to perform CPR in deprived communities was affected by some measures of socioeconomic status. The results also crucially highlighted other barriers more acute in deprived communities: the risk to personal safety in administering CPR; the fear of legal consequences; and the lack of community cohesion and other cultural barriers.
      Citation: Perspectives in Public Health
      PubDate: 2022-02-01T05:06:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/17579139211055497
       
 
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