Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

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Qualitative Health Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.946
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 33  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1049-7323 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7557
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • Clinician–Patient Relationships in Virtual Care: A Dimensional Analysis
           of the Symbolic World of Cancer Care

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      Authors: Jane Evered, Lucy Andersen, Anessa Foxwell, Christin Iroegbu, Clare Whitney
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Rapid uptake of telehealth technologies has shifted clinician–patient relationships, a well-studied topic of sociological inquiry. The purpose of this dimensional analysis study was to understand the symbolic interaction of clinicians and patients within virtual supportive cancer care. Seventeen clinicians, eighteen patients, and three care partners receiving or providing care at a multi-site cancer center in the United States participated in interviews. Our analysis of supportive cancer care experiences reveals a key tension: clinicians need to rely on patients in order to share clinical tasks in a virtual care setting but can be reluctant to do so. We posit that dimming the light on cancer is a process that enables clinicians to overcome their reluctance to engage in clinician–patient task sharing by strengthening the relationship. Taken together, these findings reconceptualize the symbolic interaction of the clinician–patient relationship and highlight opportunities to actualize models of relationship-centered virtual care. We discuss implications for clinical practice, ethical relational care, and the literature on clinician–patient relationships and trust.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-31T11:46:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231153793
       
  • Qualitative Story Completion: Opportunities and Considerations for Health
           Research

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      Authors: Kristi Urry, Sarah Hunter, Rebecca Feo, Brett Scholz
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Qualitative story completion (QSC) is an innovative research method that offers researchers a range of unique opportunities for generating and analysing data. Participants are asked to write a ‘story’ in response to a hypothetical ‘story stem’, often in the third-person and involving fictional characters, rather than reporting on their direct experiences. QSC is being developed and increasingly taken up by researchers working across a range of fields; but it has been little used in health research, especially in the fields of nursing, health services research, medicine, and allied health. This means that health researchers have few examples to draw on when considering what QSC can offer them and how to rigorously design, conduct, and report a QSC study within health-related fields. We aim to address this gap and contribute to existing QSC literature by promoting increased use of QSC by health researchers and supporting them to produce rigorous QSC research. We outline three case examples illustrating how we have used QSC to conduct multidisciplinary health research relevant to nursing, medicine and nutrition. Drawing on these case examples, we reflect on challenges that we encountered, describe decision-making processes, and offer recommendations for conducting rigorous health research using QSC.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-31T10:02:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221150130
       
  • “You Measure Us and You Depress Us”: Healthism and the Subjective
           Impact of Body Measurements on Secondary School Students

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      Authors: Vicente J. Beltrán-Carrillo, Alejandro Jiménez-Loaisa, David González-Cutre, Ana C. Sierra, Javier Valenciano-Valcárcel
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      This study explores adolescents’ subjective experiences when facing body measurements at school, performed to evaluate the effects of a school-based intervention to promote physical activity. Three semi-structured interviews (n = 3) and two focus groups (n = 7 and 3) were conducted with adolescents after measuring some variables related to their weight and adiposity. Observational data (n = 88) collected by the two researchers in charge of the measurements were also obtained. Findings derived from our thematic analysis question the suitability of body measurements as social contexts where the core ideas of healthism emerge. Some adolescents lived body measurements as negative social experiences, promoting body dissatisfaction, social comparison, embarrassment, and simplistic associations between health and body shape, which could hinder their adherence to healthy habits. We emphasize the role of qualitative research when evaluating pre/posttests of school-based intervention studies, not just the interventions themselves, to generate knowledge to improve research protocols and prevent unwanted psychological outcomes in participants.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-30T10:32:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231152155
       
  • “What I Would Do to Take Away Your Pain”: A Photovoice Project
           Conducted by Mothers of Children With Medical Complexity

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      Authors: Melanie Sonsteng-Person, Javier García-Pérez, Victoria Copeland, Laura Liévano-Karim, Darlene Abrams, Brittany Jarman, Rachel Marquardt, Sara Taitingfong, Jesse Van Leeuwen, Riahannon Valdez
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Research identifies that families of children with medical complexities in the United States have diverse and complex needs. Despite research emphasizing that families demonstrate higher needs that are not being met, limited research focuses solely on mothers of children with medical complexities. Specifically, how mothers understand and identify themselves, understand and define their role in coordinating care, and how they view their own mental and physical health. As such, this study provides a better understanding of how mothers in San Diego, CA, navigate the day-to-day psychological, social, and physical realities of having a child with medical complexities. Through the use of the participatory action research method photovoice, mothers conducted a critical analysis of their daily lives. Findings identify mothers’ main concerns about the conditions of their lives as well as the strengths they employ to care for themselves and their children successfully. Implications provide recommendations for hospitals working with mothers of children with medical complexities.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T08:57:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221146047
       
  • Ethical Consequences of Technological Mediation on Parental
           Decision-Making Experiences in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

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      Authors: Annie B. Friedrich
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is a morally charged space in which parents may be confronted with difficult decisions about the treatment of their newborns, decisions often complicated and created by the increasing use of technologies. This paper adopts a postphenomenological approach to explore the ethical consequences of technological mediation on parental treatment decision-making in the NICU. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with parents of children who received invasive technological support in the NICU to better understand how they made treatment decisions or decisions about specific interventions during their child’s hospitalization. The findings suggest that technological mediation—or the various ways in which humans can interact with their world via technologies—contributes to experiences of ambiguity, ambivalence, and alienation in parental decision-making. The ambiguity of invasive NICU technologies can create uncertainty in a decision, which can then lead to internal ambivalence about which decision to make. Ultimately, this ambiguity and ambivalence may lead to alienation from one’s child, as parents are disconnected physically and emotionally from the decision and thus their child. Articulating the effects of technological mediation on parental decision-making is a key step in addressing decisional conflict in neonatal intensive care settings and better supporting parents in their decision-making roles.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T08:40:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231151816
       
  • What are the Challenges and Resilience Resources Identified by Informal
           Carers During the First UK COVID-19 Lockdown' A Longitudinal
           Qualitative Study Using Naturalistic Data

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      Authors: Warren J. Donnellan, Lily Sepulveda Garcia, Sarah M. Gibson, Paige Butcher, Matthew J. Lariviere
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      COVID-19 has posed serious challenges for informal carers living in the UK. This article examines some of the specific challenges facing carers and the resources they used to manage them throughout the first UK lockdown. We used a framework approach to analyse naturalistic, longitudinal data from 30 carers taking part in 96 of Mobilise’s daily Virtual Cuppas between March and July 2020. We found that lack of information and social restrictions cumulatively impacted carers’ sense of certainty, control and motivation. This took an emotional toll on the carers, leading to exhaustion and burden. However, carers quickly established new routines and used humour and self-care to actively manage their wellbeing. Carers received support but also provided it to those in need, including fellow members of the caregiving community, supporting an ecological approach to carer resilience. Our findings may be used to anticipate challenges and promote protective resilience resources in future lockdowns.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T04:04:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221150131
       
  • Does Hope Reverberate Between Generations'

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      Authors: Dorit Redlich-Amirav, Denise Larsen, Elizabeth Taylor
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Intergenerational transmission refers to the transmission of stories, traits, abilities, ideas, behaviors, and various outcomes from parents to their children. To date, there has been little research on the intergenerational transmission of positive behavior, traits, and actions. To determine whether hope may be transmitted from one generation to the next, a qualitative study was performed, using narrative inquiry and thematic analysis. Over 4 months, four mothers of children with mental illness were engaged in repeated conversations about stories of hope related to their past and how they envisioned hope in their children. Findings indicated that hope could be transmitted to the next generation, either explicitly (verbally) or implicitly (i.e., expressed through actions involving one’s children). We conclude that also positive patterns may be transmitted both explicitly and implicitly from one generation to the next. Transmitting hope between generations played a significant role in the mothers’ experiences of hope.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-27T01:28:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231151614
       
  • Exploring the Complexity of Telehealth Privacy Through a Lens of
           Adolescent Development

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      Authors: Samantha Rea, Lisa Mikesell, Catherine Cuddihy, Martha Perry, Bianca Allison
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Many challenges exist related to ensuring adolescent privacy with health care providers (HCPs), and the rapid integration of telehealth visits has created additional complexities in organizing privacy for adolescents. Through interviews with adolescent patients and their parents (n = 34), this qualitative analysis aimed to explore the complicated relationship and balance of adolescent alone time with HCPs, parental presence and support, and organization of privacy in order to consider how privacy during telehealth visits may contribute to adolescents’ healthy development. A framework by Blum et al. (2014) proposed four central goals of adolescent development: emotional security, engagement with learning, self-efficacy, and decision-making skills. This conceptual framework was used to outline the ways in which adolescent privacy during telehealth impacts adolescent development. Some adolescents reported that having their parents present during their telehealth visit afforded reassurance and comfort, and many parents explained that they served as a role-model during their adolescent’s telehealth visit. However, other adolescents felt higher emotional security when they could establish an independent relationship with their HCP, with many describing how privacy during their telehealth visit enabled them to have more sensitive discussions with their HCP. Adolescents and parents also reported that telehealth allowed increased experiential learning for adolescents, given their proficiency with technology and ability to access their health care visits autonomously. Furthermore, the organization of privacy was complicated by a lack of understanding whose responsibility it was to facilitate alone time between the adolescent and HCP, as well as external factors such as location and quality of technology and the proximity of family members in the home. By ensuring opportunities for private healthcare encounters, both in telehealth and in-person visits, HCPs and parents can help support adolescents in achieving successful and healthy development.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T12:14:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231151596
       
  • A Tale of Childhood Loss, Conditional Acceptance and a Fear of
           Abandonment: A Qualitative Study Taking a Narrative Approach to Eating
           Disorders

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      Authors: Roma L. Watterson, Marie Crowe, Jennifer Jordan, Sarah Lovell, Janet D. Carter
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Eating disorders (EDs) are serious mental health illnesses, yet there is a need to better understand the illness experience to improve treatment outcomes. Qualitative research, and narrative approaches in particular, can elicit life stories that allow for the whole illness journey to be explored. This study aimed to explore the experiences of women with a history of an ED, identifying the life events they perceived were relevant to the onset of their ED through to recovery. Interviews were conducted with 18 women with lived experience of an ED. Through structural narrative analysis, an overarching storyline of childhood loss contributing to a belief of conditional acceptance, fear of abandonment and struggle to seek emotional support due to the fear of being a burden was identified. Negative experiences with the health sector were common. These findings have implications for the way medical professionals respond to help seeking and deliver treatment.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-19T07:30:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323231152142
       
  • The Help-Seeking Experiences of Family and Friends Who Support Young
           People With Mental Health Issues: A Qualitative Study

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      Authors: Christine Migliorini, Nicholas Barrington, Brendan O’Hanlon, Gretel O’Loughlin, Carol Harvey
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Little has been documented of the journey that family and friends (F&F) undertake when supporting a young person aged 12–25 years struggling with mental illness. The experiences of family and friends were explored using an online qualitative survey (N = 58) and semi-structured interviews (n = 15). Recruitment was through a national youth mental health service Facebook page and website. An experiential thematic analysis was conducted focusing on participants’ experiences and sense of their world.Strong feelings and challenging life circumstances made the context of help-seeking complicated. Despite following usual avenues for advice or support, F&F still came across professionals and a health/mental health system that compounded their distress. It was the simpler things that some professionals did that made their journey more bearable. Useful insights derived from the narratives allow service improvement recommendations such as reminding professionals of the multiplicity of stressors commonplace to families and the value of validation and acknowledgement.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-18T04:15:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221147130
       
  • ‘Trials and Tribulations’: The Ambivalent Influence of Temporary
           Accommodation on Mental Health Recovery in Chronically Homeless Adults

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      Authors: Dimitar Karadzhov
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Relatively few studies have explicitly examined whether and how shelter-type, temporary or emergency accommodation shapes homeless clients’ personal (mental health) recovery. A transatlantic phenomenological qualitative study was conducted to examine the influence of those services on personal recovery. Eighteen chronically homeless adults with a history of serious mental illness were recruited from several temporary accommodation services in New York City (NYC), U.S., and Glasgow, Scotland. Participants completed repeat in-depth interviews and a novel one-week multimedia mobile phone diary. The interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) produced three overarching group experiential themes: ‘everything was just starting to fall into place’; ‘caught in a trap’; and ‘trials and tribulations’. Collectively, the findings underscore the duality of influence of temporary accommodation on recovery. Those ambiguous spaces confronted participants with existential uncertainty, volatility and chronic boredom, but also proffered opportunities for envisioning and enacting recovery. Embarking on recovery while residing in temporary accommodation is possible, even for those enduring chronic life adversity. However, it is contingent upon enabling socio-material, affective and relational resources. Implications are discussed for theorising recovery as a contextually embedded, relational phenomenon, and for providing recovery-oriented support across the housing continuum.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-16T09:38:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221147127
       
  • HIV Diagnosis as Both Biographical Disruption and Biographical
           Reinforcement: Experiences of HIV Diagnoses Among Recently Diagnosed
           People Living With HIV

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      Authors: Nathanael Wells, Dean Murphy, Jeanne Ellard, Steven P. Philpot, Garrett Prestage
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the potential for HIV treatments to transform the health needs of people living with HIV, receiving a positive HIV diagnosis can be a difficult experience and feelings of shock, distress and concerns for the future are commonly reported. Drawing on Michael Bury’s conceptualisation of ‘biographical disruption’, we utilised semi-structured interviews to explore experiences of HIV diagnoses among 34 people diagnosed with HIV between 2016 and 2020 and living in Australia. Interviews were conducted between January 2018 and August 2021. Despite significant advances in biomedical HIV treatments and prevention, participants commonly experienced HIV diagnosis as emotionally challenging. For those with limited HIV awareness, HIV was commonly understood as a likely fatal condition. For some participants, receiving a positive diagnosis also engendered a degree of uncertainty as to their anticipated life trajectory, particularly its impact on future sexual and romantic relationships, options for starting a family and migration opportunities. For some gay and bisexual male participants, receiving a positive diagnosis almost confirmed a life trajectory that they had worked to avoid and their own sometimes-negative attitudes toward people living with HIV were internalised, making adjusting to diagnosis more complex. While all participants reported challenges in adjusting to an HIV diagnosis, some ultimately came to experience living with HIV as bringing about unexpected and welcome changes to their lives. Our findings highlight the complex and intersecting medical, social and emotional needs of people living with HIV when receiving and adjusting to a positive HIV diagnosis.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2023-01-12T05:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221146467
       
  • The Adolescent Concept of Social Participation—A Qualitative Study on
           the Concept of Social Participation from Adolescents with and without
           Physical Disabilities

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      Authors: Tim Bärwalde, Laura Hoffmann, Astrid Fink, Carina Völlm, Olaf Martin, Marie Bernard, Britta Gebhard, Matthias Richter
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      PurposeThe construct of social participation is still not clearly defined. To reach a better understanding of social participation, the perspectives of adolescents must be taken into account. This study explores the adolescent concept of social participation and expands knowledge of the meaning of subjective components of the term.MethodsThirty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted with adolescents with and without physical disabilities or chronic diseases between the ages of 12 and 17 and analyzed according to grounded theory.ResultsAdolescents describe social participation as involving reflexive interaction with their social environment. Furthermore, forming a social environment plays an important role. All components of the concept are embedded in a context that influences the ways adolescents participate. Adolescents differentiate between active and passive forms of social participation. The concept of reflexive interaction is situated within an interdependent structure of components such as the “feeling of belonging” and the feeling of “well-being” among adolescents.ConclusionThe results expand the current state of knowledge regarding the theoretical differentiation of social participation by exploring subjective components of the term. This offers the possibility of supplementing the theoretical frameworks of social participation and supports the understanding of the critical importance of social participation for adolescents.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-17T07:30:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221146414
       
  • The Gendered Work/Role of Program Directors in International Graduate
           Medical Education

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      Authors: Debalina Dutta, Halah Ibrahim, Joseph Cofrancesco, Sophia Archuleta, Dora J. Stadler
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Healthcare organizations offer numerous clinical and academic leadership pathways for physicians, among which the position of program director (PD) is considered to be a prominent educational leadership role. As PDs are instrumental in the recruitment and training of the next generations of physicians, PD gender distribution can affect the present and future of a medical specialty. This study offers a dialectical perspective in understanding how international PDs negotiate gendered understanding of their work/role by using the framework of Relational Dialectics Theory 2.0. Thirty-three interviews of PDs from Qatar, Singapore, and the United Arab Emirates were conducted and, using contrapuntal analysis, the competing discourses of meanings of gender in the PD work/role were examined. Competing discourses where structural, cultural, and professional meanings of gender were interrogated revealed inherent multiple meanings of how gender is understood in PD work/roles. In making sense of these meanings of gender, PDs express dilemmas of traditional gender binaries of masculine/feminine work/role meanings to explain the term in different ways in their everyday organizational and cultural struggles. The findings have implications for PD recruitment and retention in teaching hospitals.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-17T05:23:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221145832
       
  • The Unspoken Voice: Applying John Shotter’s Dialogic Lens to Qualitative
           Data from People Who have Communication Difficulties

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      Authors: Katherine Broomfield, Karen Sage, Georgina L. Jones, Simon Judge, Deborah James
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      As speech and language therapists, we explored theories of communication and voice that are familiar to our profession and found them an inadequate basis on which to generate deep and rich analysis of the qualitative data from people who have communication difficulties and who use augmentative and alternative communication. Expanding our conceptual toolkit to include the work of John Shotter allowed us to reconceptualise voice and where it is emergent in dialogue. Reimaging voice will inform clinical and research praxis with people who have communication difficulties as it allows practitioners to attend more closely to the complexity and nuance inherent in interactions with this population. Our proposition is exemplified with excerpts from a single participant who has communication difficulties to illustrate the value of dialogic theory in praxis. This article presents a provocation for the wider academy of qualitative health research; do we have the concepts and tools to develop meaning with people whose lived experiences may also be hard to voice in monologues'
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-16T01:08:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221139803
       
  • Keeping the Connection Alive With Tender Care and Common Sense: A
           Phenomenological Study on Daughters’ Experiences of Having a Mother in a
           Nursing Home

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      Authors: Maria Finster Úlfarsson, Margrét Hrönn Svavarsdóttir, Kristín Thórarinsdóttir
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      The relationship between mother and daughter is exceptional when it comes to closeness and its impact on their whole life. Thus, a mother’s move to a nursing home is pivotal for both of them. The aim of this interpretative phenomenological study, using the Vancouver School of Doing Phenomenology, was to explore daughters’ experience of having a mother in a nursing home, its impact on the maternal relationship, and the daughters' need for education and support. Data were collected by 21 semi-structured interviews with 12 women who had mothers living in a nursing home. Keeping the connection alive with tender care and common sense encapsulates the interrelation between the daughters’ urge to hold on to the mother–daughter relationship and the rare consideration of education and support from health professionals. Responsibility and sense of duty paired with relief because the mother is in a safe place were accompanied by the daughters’ need for confirmation that the mother is well taken care of.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T10:26:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221137211
       
  • More Than Just an Entertainment Show: Identification of Medical Clowns’
           Communication Skills and Therapeutic Goals

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      Authors: Orit Karnieli-Miller, Orna Divon-Ophir, Doron Sagi, Liat Pessach-Gelblum, Amitai Ziv, Lior Rozental
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Medical clowns (MCs) are trained professionals who aim to change the hospital environment through humor. Previous studies focused on their positive impact and began identifying their various skills in specific situations. When placed in pediatrics, MCs face various challenges, including approaching frustrated adolescents who are unwilling to cooperate with their care, dealing with their anxious parents, and communicating in a team in the presence of other health professionals. Research that systematically describes MCs’ skills and therapeutic goals in meeting these challenges is limited. This article describes a qualitative, immersion/crystallization study, triangulating between 26 video-recorded simulations and 12 in-depth-semi-structured interviews with MCs. Through an iterative consensus-building process we identified 40 different skills, not limited to humor and entertainment. Four main therapeutic goals emerged: building a relationship, dealing with emotions, enhancing a sense of control, caring, and encouragement, and motivating treatment adherence. Mapping MCs’ skills and goals enhances the understanding of MCs’ role and actions to illustrate their unique caring practices. This clarification may help other healthcare professionals to recognize their practices and the benefits in involving them in care. Furthermore, other health professionals may apply some of the identified skills when faced with these challenges themselves.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-17T12:21:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221139781
       
  • Exploring the Knowledge, Attitude, and Practices of Healthy Pregnant Women
           Towards Gestational Diabetes Mellitus in Nigeria

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      Authors: Feyisayo Adeola Offomiyor, Satwinder Rehal
      First page: 39
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) is a major public health issue and a threat to the well-being of a mother and her offspring. As a growing concern in sub-Saharan Africa, this paper explores the knowledge, attitude, and practices of healthy expectant mothers towards GDM, and the content of GDM information delivered by prenatal nurses during Antenatal Clinic (ANC) in Warri, Delta State, Nigeria. Semi-structured telephone interviews were employed with 22 participants comprising 20 pregnant women and 2 antenatal nurses. The results reveal that majority of the pregnant women were unaware of GDM as a particular health condition during pregnancy that poses a risk to both maternal and infant health and could lead to a long-term risk of developing the chronic condition of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). This low level of awareness was attributed to a lack of adequate information during prenatal clinic sessions. The findings from this study emphasize the need to enhance the quality of public health education offered to pregnant women during pre and antenatal clinical services emphasizing GDM as part of the overall global agenda on promoting maternal and infant health.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-21T01:57:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221139105
       
  • Continuity of Care Advocate Model (CCAM): Healthcare Workers’
           Perspectives on Quality Stroke Care at an Acute Unit, Rehabilitation
           Center and Community Rehabilitation Program in Singapore

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      Authors: HL Michelle Chiang, Audrey Yoke Poh Wong, Serene Leong Hwee Tan, Litali Mohapatra, Olivia Harmony Chan, Andy Hau Yan Ho
      First page: 53
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Physicians, nurses, social workers, and allied health professionals including physiotherapists and occupational therapists play important roles as they work closely with stroke survivors to improve functional independence in daily activities and quality of life. Yet, in Singapore little is known about their perspectives on what constitute quality stroke care based on their clinical experiences. In this project, our qualitative interviews with 15 healthcare workers at a major stroke center in the country yielded a Continuity of Care Advocate Model (CCAM) to help us better understand our participants’ experience-based perspectives on quality stroke care. We found that CCAM, constructed based on the perspectives of HCWs across a stroke care continuum, is a holistic model of quality stroke care which prioritizes support for patients and their families throughout the patient’s health trajectory. We conclude by discussing how this model is aligned with and differs from current research on definitions of care continuity.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-24T12:47:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221139392
       
  • “If not me, who'”: Awareness- and Self-Advocacy-Related
           Experiences of Adults With Diverse Rare Disorders

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      Authors: Emily F. Plackowski, Kathleen R. Bogart
      First page: 63
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      In a two-study project, researchers used qualitative methods and inductive thematic analyses to investigate the lived awareness- and advocacy-related experiences of 27 adults with over 35 different rare diseases, disorders, or disabilities (RDs). In Study 1, participants in two focus groups described how a lack of RD awareness led to experiences with several types of stigma, complicated their expressions and disclosures of disability, and spurred them to work towards awareness. Participant priorities identified in Study 1 motivated researchers to design and conduct Study 2. In Study 2, researchers interviewed 18 RD self-advocates about their lived experiences with and ideas regarding advocacy. Their recommendations included increasing social and systemic support, education, and media and professional representation. Advocates in Study 2 also warned of potential roadblocks to self-advocacy and change, including systemic invalidation and bias, lack of access to activist spaces, and limited time and energy for advocacy. Overall, analyses exposed the complex and interwoven influences of RD awareness and advocacy.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-11-29T12:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221135974
       
  • I’m Skinny, I’m Worth More: Fashion Models’ Experiences of Aesthetic
           Labor and Its Impact on Body Image and Eating Behaviors

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      Authors: Alison Fixsen, Magdalena Kossewska, Aurore Bardey
      First page: 81
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      The fashion industry has been critiqued for promoting ultra-thin bodies, yet the relationship between models’ aesthetic labor and eating disorder (ED) development is unclear. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis, we explored the lived experiences of nine female fashion models including metaphors they used to describe body perceptions and eating behaviors. Four superordinate themes emerged: Shaped for the industry; The body as a market product; Food restriction (“it’s almost glamorized”); Toward a healthier modelhood. Models’ career trajectories were those of lost childhoods, punitive body rules, inadequate dietary advice, and self-regulated food restriction. Models were “shaped” by agents from an early age to conform to the industry’s body rules irrespective of the physiological and psychological consequences. A “toxic” side to this aesthetic industry was depicted; agents were judged callous and money-focused, while idioms like, “feeling like a piece of meat” and “being a hanger of clothes” conveyed a deep sense of degradation and objectification. Ideas instilled at a formative age continued to influence self-image and eating patterns into maturity, pointing to an industrial element to the construction of eating disorders. Our study highlights how infantilization, sexism, and other unethical elements become normalized in poorly regulated industries such as fashion, with dire consequences for the health and wellbeing of employees. Model agencies should recognize the impact of occupational edicts and poor communication on young recruits in a sensitive phase of personality development. Finally, we advocate for more acknowledgment and further investigation into eating disorder construction commercial/industrial side.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-07T08:29:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221141629
       
  • Nigerian Health Care Providers and Diabetes Self-Management Support: Their
           Perspectives and Practices

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      Authors: Sandra Iregbu, Jude Spiers, Wendy Duggleby, Bukola Salami, Kara Schick-Makaroff
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Nigeria struggles to reframe its traditional acute-care disease approach to health care to accommodate rising needs for chronic disease care. This interpretive descriptive study explored Nigerian healthcare providers’ (HCPs) perspectives, experiences, and practices related to self-management support (SMS). Observational and experiential data were gathered from 19 HCPs at two urban hospitals in Southeastern Nigeria (seven physicians, four nurses, five dietitians/nutritionists, and three health educators). There were four themes: (a) compliance-oriented medical model, (b) SMS as advice, informal counseling, and education, (c) navigating the sociocultural terrain, and (d) workarounds. Nigerian HCPs perspectives and SMS practices were characterized by attempts to foster compliance with healthcare instructions within a traditional biomedical model. Participants enhanced patient support using specific strategies to bypass structural system obstacles. These findings demonstrate the need to reevaluate the current understanding of SMS in Nigeria and its practice.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-15T01:37:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221143889
       
  • The Surgical Sisterhood – The Experiences of wāhine Māori and Pasifika
           Aspiring Surgeons

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      Authors: Senitila Tutone, Atua Fuimaono-Asafo, Ailsa Wilson, Matire Harwood, Rachelle Love, Jamie-Lee Rahiri
      First page: 106
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      The establishment of a culturally diverse surgical workforce, largely on the basis of gender, has been highly promoted in Australasia in the last decade. Despite this, discussions of gender diversity in surgery have largely excluded Indigenous women. This study presents the experiences of wāhine Māori and Pasifika doctors in Aotearoa, who formed a surgical sisterhood to support them towards applying for advanced surgical training. Utilising mana wāhine and Masi methodologies, semi-structured interpersonal interviews were undertaken with five wāhine who formed the surgical sisterhood. Following transcription and analysis of all interviews, four key themes were identified. These were mana wāhine, unity, our why and change on the horizon. These themes illustrate the complex and varied experiences of wāhine Māori and Pasifika and how they have navigated their surgical pathways amidst multiple layers of discrimination towards being in a position to apply for advanced surgical training.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T03:37:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221144929
       
  • Child Sexual Abuse, Alcohol and Other Drug use and the Criminal Justice
           System: The Meanings of Trauma in Survivor Narratives for a National Royal
           Commission

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      Authors: Carla Treloar, Jan Idle, kylie valentine
      First page: 117
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      Adverse childhood experiences, including childhood sexual abuse, have significant immediate and lifelong effects including higher risks of alcohol and other drug use and contact with the criminal justice system. The concept of trauma to describe adverse experiences and later behaviours provides potential to reshape prevention and responses for victims. We draw on survivor accounts to a national enquiry, the Australian Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse, to examine the ways in which trauma is narrated in adverse childhood experiences, alcohol and other drug use and contact with the criminal justice system, and how trauma is interpreted by others in the context of policy and legal findings. These accounts showed damaging and unjust experiences of childhood, which were compounded by subsequent contact with the criminal justice system. Trauma seems to be important to both the experienced narrated by survivors and the synthesising of these experiences into narratives. National enquiries play important roles in listening to survivors and advocating for reform. There is a risk, however, that they will fail to result in substantive change, and function primarily as a forum for bearing witness to trauma, but not preventing it.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-08T07:07:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221144923
       
  • Coalescing, Cross-Pollinating, Crystalising: Developing and Evaluating an
           Art Installation About Health Knowledge

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      Authors: Chloe Watfern, Zoi Triandafilidis, Priya Vaughan, Barbara Doran, Ann Dadich, Kate Disher-Quill, Peter Maple, Louise Hickman, Michele Elliot, Katherine M. Boydell
      First page: 127
      Abstract: Qualitative Health Research, Ahead of Print.
      The HIVE is an arts-based knowledge translation (ABKT) project that showcases work undertaken across Maridulu Budyari Gumal: the Sydney Partnership for Health, Education, Research and Enterprise (SPHERE). Here, we present two distinct forms of data (reflective and evaluative) to tell the story of The HIVE and outline the project’s achievements and shortcomings. Reflective data are used to describe the process of establishing a creative, cross-disciplinary collaboration, in order to devise and produce The HIVE. Evaluative data are used to assess the impact of The HIVE on audiences. By presenting reflective and evaluative data together, we highlight that impact in ABKT cannot be reduced to an assessment of audience engagement with an ABKT end-product. Although audience impact is vital, in our experience, The HIVE also had a powerful impact on the researchers, health service users, artists and others who worked together to create it. The process of creating The HIVE informed research- and art-practice change, forged interdisciplinary networks, and enabled the growth of new patterns of knowledge sharing and collaboration. The reflective and evaluative data we present attest to different forms of impact resulting from the creation and exhibition of an ABKT project.
      Citation: Qualitative Health Research
      PubDate: 2022-12-20T09:15:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/10497323221145120
       
 
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