Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 111 of 111 Journals sorted alphabetically
AIDS and Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Occupational Therapy     Partially Free   (Followers: 236)
Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Research in Quality of Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Australian Occupational Therapy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 173)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMJ Quality & Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 235)
Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Cognition, Technology & Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
ergopraxis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Health & Social Care In the Community     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Hong Kong Journal of Occupational Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 61)
Human Resources for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
International Journal of Emergency Mental Health and Human Resilience     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Emergency Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Nuclear Safety and Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Occupational Health and Public Health Nursing     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Hygiene     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Occupational Safety and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
International Journal of Workplace Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Journal of Accessibility and Design for All     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Ecophysiology and Occupational Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part C : Toxicology and Carcinogenesis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global Responsibility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Interprofessional Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Occupational Health Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Occupational Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Professional Counseling: Practice, Theory & Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Religion and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Safety Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Urban Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Vocational Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Karaelmas İş Sağlığı ve Güvenliği Dergisi / Karaelmas Journal of Occupational Health and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Musik- Tanz und Kunsttherapie     Hybrid Journal  
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 71)
Nordic Journal of Music Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Nordic Journal of Working Life Studies     Open Access  
Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Occupational Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Occupational Therapy in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Occupational Therapy International     Open Access   (Followers: 102)
Perspectives in Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical & Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
PinC | Prevenzione in Corso     Open Access  
Population Health Metrics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 3)
Psychology & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
QAI Journal for Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Qualitative Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Reabilitacijos Mokslai : Slauga, Kineziterapija, Ergoterapija     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Revista Brasileira de Saúde Ocupacional     Open Access  
Revista Herediana de Rehabilitacion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Inspirar     Open Access  
Revue Francophone de Recherche en Ergothérapie RFRE     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Safety and Health at Work     Open Access   (Followers: 75)
Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 80)
Sociology of Health & Illness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
System Safety : Human - Technical Facility - Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
The Journal of Rural Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Work, Employment & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Workplace Health and Safety     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Zentralblatt für Arbeitsmedizin, Arbeitsschutz und Ergonomie. Mit Beiträgen aus Umweltmedizin und Sozialmedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Occupational Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.633
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 13  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0962-7480 - ISSN (Online) 1471-8405
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [424 journals]
  • Student Placements in Occupational Health Services: nursing and
           physiotherapy

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      Pages: 593 - 594
      Abstract: This article outlines the practical considerations of establishing student placements in occupational health services. The placements have enhanced recruitment to both the occupational health service and the wider NHS environment. It is anticipated that the ongoing programme will offer practical placements and increase the wider understanding of the value of occupational health in the working-age population.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac123
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • 18th Egyptian Dynasty, Drilling a Stone Vase, c1504–1425 BCE

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      Pages: 595 - 597
      Abstract: Drilling a Stone Vase, Tomb of Rekhmire, facsimile painted by Nina de Garis Davies (1881–1965), period: New Kingdom. Dynasty: Dynasty 18. Date: ca. 1504–1425 B.C. Geography: Original from Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, Tomb of Rekhmire (TT 100). Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1931 (31.6.13).
      PubDate: Thu, 24 Nov 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac063
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Association of low back pain and sleep quality with presenteeism

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      Pages: 598 - 603
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundLow back pain (LBP) and poor subjective sleep quality (SSQ) are major risk factors for presenteeism. However, no studies have investigated whether combined LBP and poor SSQ are associated with presenteeism.AimsWe aimed to examine whether a combination of LBP and poor SSQ is associated with presenteeism.MethodsThis cross-sectional study included 936 workers (median age, 38 years; men, 89%), with evaluated presenteeism using the work limitations questionnaire. We divided them into ‘no presenteeism’ and ‘presenteeism’ categories. The presence of LBP was defined as a numerical rating scale (NRS) score of ≥1 in current pain intensity. SSQ was assessed using a single question regarding whether the participants typically got enough sleep. We categorized the participants into four groups: (i) LBP + poor SSQ, (ii) non-LBP + poor SSQ, (iii) LBP + good SSQ and (iv) non-LBP + good SSQ. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the association between presenteeism and the presence of LBP and poor SSQ, adjusting for age, sex, work type, education, marital status, smoking status, body mass index and weekly working hours.ResultsThe data from 533 participants were used for analysis (median age, 38 years; men, 90%, response rate, 66%). Combined LBP and poor SSQ were significantly associated with presenteeism (non-LBP + poor SSQ: adjusted odds ratio = 0.56, 95% CI 0.32–0.96; LBP + good SSQ: 0.33, 0.20–0.56; non-LBP + good SSQ: 0.29, 0.18–0.48).ConclusionsEvaluating both LBP and SSQ may be beneficial in considering presenteeism.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac126
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Prison officers’ experiences of aggression: implications for sleep
           and recovery

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      Pages: 604 - 608
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundPrison officers are at high risk of assault that can impair their mental as well as physical health. Such experiences can also disrupt sleep, with negative implications for well-being and job performance. To manage this risk, insight is needed into the mechanisms by which experiencing aggression from prisoners can affect officers’ sleep quality. By impairing recovery processes, work-related hypervigilance and rumination might be key factors in this association.AimsTo examine prison officers’ personal experiences of aggression and associations with sleep quality. Also, to consider whether work-related hypervigilance and rumination mediate the relationship between exposure to aggression and sleep.MethodsWe assessed prison officers’ experiences of aggression and violence, work-related hypervigilance and rumination via an online survey. The PROMIS was used to measure the quality of sleep.ResultsThe study sample comprised 1,806 prison officers (86.8% male). A significant relationship was found between the frequency of experiences of aggression at work and the quality of sleep. Work-related hypervigilance and rumination were significantly associated with sleep quality and mediated the relationship between workplace aggression and sleep quality.ConclusionsOur findings suggest that enhancing the safety climate in prisons might improve officers’ quality of sleep that, in turn, could benefit their wellbeing and performance. Implementing individual-level strategies to help prison officers manage hypervigilance and rumination, and therefore facilitate recovery, should also be effective in improving their sleep.
      PubDate: Wed, 14 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac117
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Cryoglobulins and cold agglutinins for hand arm vibration syndrome

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      Pages: 609 - 613
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundHand arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) is a condition caused by hand transmitted vibration from the use of hand-held vibrating tools or workpieces. The disease affects the vascular, neurological and musculoskeletal systems. The vascular component of HAVS is a form of secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon. Other causes of disease must be excluded before attributing the cause to hand transmitted vibration.AimsTo evaluate the prevalence, and utility of testing for, cryoglobulins and cold agglutinins in patients with HAVS symptoms.MethodsA retrospective cohort study of 1183 patients referred for HAVS clinical assessment at St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Canada, between 2014 and 2020. The standard operating procedure at the clinic includes a detailed clinical and exposure history, physical examination, objective investigations and blood tests. Data were retrieved from patient chart review and laboratory investigation results for all cases with cryoglobulin and cold agglutinin testing.ResultsA total of 1183 patients had a serum cryoglobulin measurement. Eleven patients (1%) were positive. Seven positive results were ‘low titre’ (1% positive) and the other four results were 2%, 6%, 9% and 18%. The patient with a 9% positive cryoglobulin titre had previously diagnosed Sjögren’s syndrome. There were no positive cold agglutinin tests in the 795 patients tested.ConclusionsRoutine testing for cryoglobulins and cold agglutinins in patients with HAVS symptoms is not recommended because test positivity rates are negligible. Testing may be considered if the clinical history or routine blood investigations suggest evidence of underlying cryoglobulinaemia or cold agglutinin disease.
      PubDate: Fri, 30 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac083
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Work–family imbalance, social support and health: a population-based
           study

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      Pages: 614 - 621
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundWork–family imbalance is a crucial determinant of workers’ health. Studies examining the impact of multiple roles in the workplace, conducted in low- and middle-income countries, are limited.AimsTo determine the association of work–family imbalance with self-perceived health (SPH) both in men and women, and to examine the interaction of social support with work–family imbalance on this association in a district in western Turkey.MethodsThis population-based cross-sectional study’s sample was randomly derived from working residents aged 30–64 living in Balcova District, Turkey. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were conducted for the associations between SPH, social support at home and at work, work–family conflict (WFC) and family–work conflict (FWC). Social support variables were considered as possible effect modifiers.ResultsWork to family variables had an independent, significant association with poor SPH [odds ratio (OR) = 2.92 (95% CI 1.47–5.78) for WFC, and 2.38 (95% CI 1.22–4.67) for FWC] in only women. In advanced analyses, both social support at work and at home were effect modifiers of the association between FWC and SPH in women (P < 0.001). In men, SPH was significantly associated only with job insecurity [OR = 2.52 (1.22–5.21)].ConclusionsFurther studies should be conducted to implement effective population prevention strategies to establish work–family balance and to reduce this double burden on women, specifically in low- and middle-income countries.
      PubDate: Mon, 15 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac088
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Occupation and 20-year hearing decline: findings from The HUNT Study

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      Pages: 622 - 628
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundStudies show that certain occupations are associated with an increased risk of hearing loss. However, many studies are cross-sectional, and the few longitudinal studies are mostly small or focus on only one occupation.AimsWe aimed to quantify the long-term hearing decline among workers in different occupations and assess whether the change differs between the occupations.MethodsThe study population was 4525 adults who participated in two population-based health studies in Norway, HUNT2 1996–1998 and HUNT4 2017–2019. Linear regression models assessed the association between occupations (clerks as reference) and 20-year hearing decline (hearing thresholds at 3–6 kHz, averaged over both ears) from HUNT2 to HUNT4. Models were adjusted for age, sex, recurrent ear infections, smoking and ear pathology.ResultsAmong the participants (40% men), the mean age at HUNT2 was 31.2 ± 5.4 years (range 20–39) and the average 20-year hearing decline was 11.3 ± 9.8 dB. Occupations that were associated with larger hearing decline included other craft and related trades workers (3.9 dB, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2–7.7) and building frame and related trades workers (3.4 dB, 95% CI 1.3–5.4). Among occupations with larger hearing decline, a higher proportion of the workers reported exposure to noise.ConclusionsThis large longitudinal study shows a larger long-term hearing decline among building frame workers and craft and related trades workers. Differences between occupations were modest, which may indicate successful preventive measures in Norway during the last two decades.
      PubDate: Tue, 30 Aug 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac085
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Improved perception of work following a stress management intervention

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      Pages: 629 - 635
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundIn the work and stress literature, surprisingly few studies of stress management interventions have evaluated effects on the perceived psychosocial work environment. Using data from a randomized controlled trial we investigated whether the perceived psychosocial work environment and overcommitment to work improved following a group-based, cognitive-behavioural stress management intervention.AimsWe hypothesized that the participants would experience less job demand, overcommitment and effort-reward imbalance (ERI) as well as higher job control following the intervention.MethodsUsing a wait-list controlled design, 102 participants were randomized to either an intervention group or a wait-list control group. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline and follow-up after three, six and nine months, and analysed using mixed model univariate repeated measures analyses of variance. Results are presented as effect sizes using Cohen’s d with confidence intervals (95% CI).ResultsChanges from 0 to 3 months for the intervention group were significantly superior to changes for the wait-list control group on all outcomes. The controlled effect size for job demands was d = 0.42 (0.01–0.84 95% CI), for job control d = 0.39 (0.06–0.71 95% CI), for effort-reward imbalance d = 0.61 (0.22–1.01 95% CI) and for overcommitment d = 0.44 (0.06–0.81 95% CI). Improvements were maintained at three months follow-up after the end of treatment.ConclusionsThe intervention improved the perceived psychosocial work environment and attitude to work with small-medium effect sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first paper from a randomized controlled trial of a stress-management intervention reporting on these important outcomes.
      PubDate: Tue, 20 Sep 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac091
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Mental health and wellbeing of border security personnel: scoping review

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      Pages: 636 - 640
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundWhilst the wellbeing of law enforcement personnel has been widely researched, border security personnel as a discrete group appear to be far less discussed, despite their roles frequently exposing them to potentially traumatic and challenging events such as contact with criminals or witnessing personal tragedies due to trafficking or smuggling.AimsThis scoping review aimed to explore existing literature to better understand the mental health of border security personnel and the factors affecting their wellbeing.MethodsFour electronic databases and grey literature were systematically searched for studies relevant to the review’s aims. Following the extraction of relevant data from each study, thematic analysis was used to synthesize findings.ResultsThirteen studies included relevant data and were included in the review, identifying stressors including poor management; fatigue; negative public attitudes; inadequate staffing levels, resources, and training; poor opportunities for promotion; low pay; work overload; dangerous working environments; and work-related moral dilemmas.ConclusionsThe review found that there has been little academic attention paid to border security personnel as a specific branch of law enforcement. Many of the stressors identified in this review are those also reported by law enforcement generally, although negative attitudes from the public and exposure to moral dilemmas appear to be more relevant for border security staff. Directly addressing work-related stress (e.g. by fostering a supportive organizational culture, addressing mental health stigma, and encouraging help-seeking) may be useful in enhancing the resilience of border security personnel.
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac108
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Identification of Surgeon Burnout via a Single-Item Measure

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      Pages: 641 - 643
      Abstract: AbstractBackgroundBurnout is endemic in surgeons in the UK and linked with poor patient safety and quality of care, mental health problems, and workforce sustainability. Mechanisms are required to facilitate the efficient identification of burnout in this population. Multi-item measures of burnout may be unsuitable for this purpose owing to assessment burden, expertise required for analysis, and cost.AimsTo determine whether surgeons in the UK reporting burnout on the 22-item Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) can be reliably identified by a single-item measure of burnout.MethodsConsultant (n = 333) and trainee (n = 217) surgeons completed the MBI and a single-item measure of burnout. We applied tests of discriminatory power to assess whether a report of high burnout on the single-item measure correctly classified MBI cases and non-cases.Results The single-item measure demonstrated high discriminatory power on the emotional exhaustion burnout domain: the area under the curve was excellent for consultants and trainees (0.86 and 0.80), indicating high sensitivity and specificity. On the depersonalisation domain, discrimination was acceptable for consultants (0.76) and poor for trainees (0.69). In contrast, discrimination was acceptable for trainees (0.71) and poor for consultants (0.62) on the personal accomplishment domain.ConclusionsA single-item measure of burnout is suitable for the efficient assessment of emotional exhaustion in consultant and trainee surgeons in the UK. Administered regularly, such a measure would facilitate the early identification of at-risk surgeons and swift intervention, as well as the monitoring of group-level temporal trends to inform resource allocation to coincide with peak periods.
      PubDate: Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac116
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Acute respiratory distress after exposure to chlorine dioxide-based
           disinfectant

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      Pages: 644 - 646
      Abstract: AbstractA hospital cleaner developed acute respiratory distress after working with a chlorine dioxide-based disinfectant. The content of chlorine dioxide in the product is below the limit that would require the product to be labelled as hazardous to health, but we show with a simple estimation that the relevant threshold limit values for chlorine dioxide in the working atmosphere may be exceeded under normal use of the product. This may have implications for risk assessment of the use of such chlorine dioxide-based disinfectants and may warrant stricter regulations for labelling these products.
      PubDate: Tue, 18 Oct 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac078
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • John Nelson Norman MB ChB, MD, PhD, DSc, FRCS (Edin, Glas), FFOM, C Biol,
           Fi Biol, FRSB Born: 16 May 1932 Died: 27 September 2022

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      Pages: 647 - 648
      Abstract: Professor Nelson Norman was an academic surgeon in Glasgow and Aberdeen whose early medical career with National Service began unexpectedly as medical officer at Halley Bay in Antarctica in 1959. He researched critical care while training as a general surgeon and then refocused in Aberdeen on the new specialism of Remote Healthcare in hostile environments. He established academic support for the new Offshore Oil and Diving Industry in Aberdeen at the University of Aberdeen and then Robert Gordon’s University. He developed training and medical support for British Antarctic Survey and was awarded the Polar Medal.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac124
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Skin and respiratory ill-health attributed to occupational face mask use

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      Pages: 649 - 649
      Abstract: The report on surveillance of skin respiratory ill-health attributed to occupational face mask use stated that occupational asthma due to sensitisation was implausible due to the absence of a respiratory allergen [1]. The chemicals used in the manufacture of disposable face masks are difficult to find. They have a waterproof layer which may contain PTFE, a recognized respiratory sensitizer, and many at least smell of biocides. A study of mask-related dermatitis identified positive patch tests to N-isopropyl-N-phenyl-4-phenylenediamine (IPPD), formaldehyde and thimerosal, which the authors stated were known components of disposable facial masks [2]. We have previously reported a pharmacist sensitised to benzalkonium chloride used to clean the floor of his workplace, whose occupational asthma relapsed when the staff uniforms had a final rinse with benzalkonium chloride during a MRSA outbreak [3]. We have also reported that a theatre nurse whose occupational asthma was reproduced by wearing a disposable theatre hat. We never found the actual agent involved but biocide treatment during manufacture was the most likely cause [4]. The Covid outbreak has resulted in RPE being sourced from many different manufacturers who are often not identified from the packaging, we need to return to products with identifiable constituents, particularly products that may be treated with biocides.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac103
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • Reply

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      Pages: 650 - 650
      Abstract: We thank Professor Burge for his comments on our manuscript. We agree entirely with his statement about the challenges associated with identification of components and chemicals used in manufacture of disposable face masks and the need to try and identify these constituents. We accept that some disposable masks may contain known respiratory sensitizers. However, to cause occupational asthma, these would need to be biologically available to the respiratory tract, and available in sufficient quantities, to cause sensitisation. A pilot immunological study in the laboratory of one of the authors found no evidence of extractable allergens in the type of disposable face mask to which a patient had attributed respiratory symptoms.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac104
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • A Research Agenda for Workplace Stress and Well-being

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      Pages: 651 - 652
      Abstract: Edited by KellowayE. Kevin and CooperSir Cary. Published by Edward Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham, UK/Massachusetts, USA, 2021. ISBN: 978-1-78990-501-4. Price: £100. 248 pp.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac115
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • The Healthy Business Bridge – How employee health creates business
           wealth

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      Pages: 652 - 652
      Abstract: By MillerDoreen Published by Miller Health Management, Oxford, UK, 1st edition, 2022. ISBN: 978-1739983238. Price: £11.99. 159 pp.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac095
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • News from SOM and OM Calendar

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      Pages: 653 - 653
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac140
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
  • List of Reviewers

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      Pages: 654 - 654
      Abstract: Occupational Medicine relies on the efforts of its peer reviewers to help ensure that submitted work is of an acceptable standard. Our reviewers also provide considerable guidance and wisdom, both to authors and to the editorial team. I am indebted once again to the invaluable work carried out by all our reviewers, who give their time willingly and without material reward. Thank you to those who reviewed papers during 2022.
      PubDate: Sat, 31 Dec 2022 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/occmed/kqac139
      Issue No: Vol. 72, No. 9 (2022)
       
 
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