Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 224)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
ASA Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Population Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 5)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Children     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contact (CTC)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Discover Social Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Egyptian Journal of Occupational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.524
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 21  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1363-4593 - ISSN (Online) 1461-7196
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1176 journals]
  • ‘Hearts’ and ‘minds’: Illustrating identity tensions of people
           living and working through marketising policy change of allied health
           disability services in Australia

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      Authors: Kristen Foley, Stacie Attrill, Chris Brebner
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Service-based caring sectors like disability are increasingly being operated via market logic, including shifts towards personalised funding. These shifts must be brought to life in/through people already located in relation to ideas and values that underpin historical policies. Our manuscript examines how identities are re/shaped in relation to marketised policy change and explores how identity change unfolds (or not) during periods of transition: situated within the transition to the National Disability Insurance Scheme executed in Australia as a major disability funding reform. Our qualitative dataset involves interview and focus group data collected with service recipients/carers (n = 28), providers/managers (n = 17) and advocates (n = 2) during shift from government- to personally-controlled funding of allied health services for people with disability in Australia (2017–2020). We used layered sociological inference to develop and interrogate processes of tension and identity change amidst lived experience(s) of policy change. Our analysis elucidates how various identities were encouraged, desired, resisted and constrained in relation to the policy transition. We bring together sub-themes from analysis of recipient/carer data (getting value-for-money; critiquing service quality; and experiencing system shortfalls) and manager/provider data (learning to transact; the call to care; and structural frictions in/and identity transitions) to interpret that recipients/carers are Feeling (like) the dollar sign and that managers/providers are Troubling profits. In both cases ‘hearts’ and ‘minds’ are perceived to be diametrically opposed and symbolic in/against processes of marketisation. We synthesise our data into an illustrative framework that facilitates understanding of how this perception of opposed ‘hearts’ and ‘minds’ seems to constrain the identity transitions encouraged by personalised funding, and explore ways in which desired identities might be supported amidst marketising policy transition.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2024-02-14T06:41:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593241230018
       
  • Mind-Stuff and Withdrawal of the Senses: Toward an Interpretation of
           Pratyahara in Contemporary Postural Yoga

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      Authors: Elizabeth McKibben
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Yoga has become a popular health and wellbeing practice that draws on ancient philosophy. Pratyahara is a core tenet of yoga practice and is often translated to mean withdrawal of the senses. Withdrawing from the senses plays a key role in aiding yoga practitioners to find spiritual enlightenment by transcending the worldly. Withdrawing from the material world, however, does not neatly fit within the parameters of the contemporary postural yoga industry. This paper looks at the conceptual origins of pratyahara through stances relevant to health research. The author weaves biomedical, esthetic, and neoliberal onto-epistemological stances through health discourse to discuss how postural yoga both resists and replicates power imbalances. In so doing the author emphasizes the paradoxical nature of pratyahara as it is reflected in socio-political tensions of the yoga industry. To conclude, the author suggests that pratyahara itself can be useful in resolving this tension as yoga fulfills a philosophical prerogative for social change.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2024-02-05T07:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231222450
       
  • Composing adult lives with a ventilator at the intersection of
           developmental and neoliberal discourses of time

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      Authors: Elizabeth J Straus, Helen Brown, A. Fuchsia Howard, Gail Teachman
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This paper explores temporalities and experiences of time drawn from an analysis of interview data from a critical narrative inquiry of the experiences of young adults living with home mechanical ventilation (HMV). The analysis centers the ideological effects of dominant discourses that shape understandings of time in the Euro-Western world and the ways in which young adults’ stories prompt a rethinking of time in health research and praxis. Data generation involved interviews and photo-elicitation with five young adults (ages 18–40). A critical narrative analysis of participants’ stories surfaced the influence of ableist, developmentalist, and neoliberal discourses of time and the creative resistance that points to the potential of crip orientations to time in opening up possibilities for living. Implications for practice and research are offered.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2024-01-18T07:12:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593241226646
       
  • Narratives about distributed health literacy during the COVID-19 pandemic

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      Authors: Susana Silva, Helena Machado, Ilaria Galasso, Bettina M Zimmermann, Carlo Botrugno
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The promotion of health literacy was a key public health strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the role of social networks and relationships for support with health literacy-related tasks in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic is scarcely understood. Moving beyond traditional notions of health literacy, which focus on individual skills and knowledge, this study uses the concept of distributed health literacy to explore how individuals make meaning of and respond to health literacy and make their literacy skills available to others through their relational and socially situated and lived experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing on 89 semi-structured interviews conducted in three European countries (Italy, Portugal, and Switzerland) between October and December 2021, we found narratives of stabilization, hybridization, and disruption that show how health literacy concerning COVID-19 is a complex social construct intertwined with emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses distributed among individuals, communities, and institutions within socioeconomic and political contexts that affect their existence. This paper opens new empirical directions to understand the critical engagement of individuals and communities toward health information aimed at making sense of a complex and prolonged situation of uncertainty in a pandemic.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T11:33:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231215715
       
  • “You kind of blame it on the alcohol, but. . .”: A discourse analysis
           of alcohol use and sexual consent among young men in Vancouver, Canada

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      Authors: Trevor Goodyear, John L Oliffe, Hannah Kia, Emily K Jenkins, Rod Knight
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      There is growing awareness about issues of sexual consent, especially in autonomy-compromising or “non-ideal” contexts, including sex involving alcohol. Understanding the conditions needed for consensual sex to occur in this emergent milieu is critically important, especially for young men (ages 18–30 years) who normatively combine drinking alcohol with sex and are most often perpetrators of sexual violence. This study offers a discourse analysis of young men’s alcohol use and sexual consent. Data are drawn from qualitative interviews with 76 young men (including gay, bisexual, queer, and straight men) in Vancouver, Canada, from 2018 to 2021. Informed by Kukla’s non-ideal theory of sexual consent and critical and inclusive masculinities, this analysis identified three discursive frames: careful connections, watering it down, and blurred lines. In careful connections young men discussed their efforts to actively promote sexual and decisional autonomy for themselves and their sexual partners when drinking. Yet, in watering it down young men invoked discourses of disinhibition, deflection, and denial to normalize alcohol use as being somewhat excusatory for sexual violence, downplaying the role and responsibility of men. Lastly, men operationalized blurred lines through a continuum of consent and of “meeting (masculine) expectations” when discussing sexual violence and victimization while intoxicated. Together, these discursive frames provide insights into the gendered nature of sexual violence and the extent to which idealized notions of sexual consent play out in the everyday lives of young men who use alcohol with sex. Findings hold philosophical and pragmatic implications for contemporary efforts to scaffold sexual consent.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-14T11:29:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231214942
       
  • Biographical disruption, redefinition, and recovery: Illness identities of
           women with depression and diabetes

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      Authors: Deborah A Potter
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The rich conceptual literature on illness experiences has been based largely on singular diseases/conditions. However, over the last few decades, more complex disease patterns and increased longevity have complicated our understanding of how people experience illness. This study builds upon existing theoretical constructs (e.g. biographical disruption) to more robustly capture the illness experiences of those living with multi-morbid conditions. In-depth interviews, examining the post-diagnostic experiences of women living simultaneously with common somatic (diabetes) and psychiatric (clinical depression) conditions, revealed participants’ evolving socially embedded illness identity, as they engaged in (re-)constructing new biographies. Socially contextualized situations shaped and were shaped by their illness identity as they managed social relationships, medication use, and choice of providers. Although diagnosed for years, many continued to have lives in upheaval. While most experienced crumbling self-images and described disrupted biographies, others experienced different trajectories with corresponding illness identities. A new typology emerged, extending Bury’s concept of disrupted biographies to encompass redefined, and recovered, biographies, within and across the comorbid conditions.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-09T09:34:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231213773
       
  • Medication literacy and its social contextuality

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      Authors: Noémia Lopes, Carla Rodrigues, Elsa Pegado
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article aims to contribute to the discussion about medication literacy, by focussing on the social contextuality of the information mobilised in the use of medicines. We aim to explore the social construction processes of medication literacy, as an essential dimension for a more layperson-centred approach in the promotion of literacy in this field. This approach is justified by the growing social and cultural dissemination of medication use, the diversification of its uses beyond health and illness, and the increasing degree of lay autonomy in managing its use. The article is organised in two main sections. In the first section, we review the social history of medication literacy, including a discussion of the social contextuality of literacy phenomena. In the second section, the analysis of social contextuality is operationalised with a focus on information, covering: (i) ways of relating to institutional information and sources of information about medication; (ii) contexts of sociability in which information is shared and validated. This analysis is empirically supported by selected results from two research projects, conducted in Portugal, on the consumption of medicines and dietary supplements for performance purposes – that is, for the management and/or improvement of cognitive, bodily or relational performance.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T12:41:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231211520
       
  • Sensing pain: Embodied knowledge in endometriosis

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      Authors: Elina Helosvuori, Venla Oikkonen
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The article explores how sensations of pain are turned into embodied knowledge in endometriosis, a chronic gynaecological illness characterized by persistent, possibly paralysing pain. While previous studies have shown how people with endometriosis struggle to achieve accurate diagnosis and effective treatment, we examine the ways in which some of these difficulties are rooted in the complexities of embodied experiences of endometriosis pain and the challenges of translating the sensed patterns and shifts in pain into a language acknowledged within a clinical setting. Building on a phenomenologically inspired approach to chronic pain and drawing on interviews with people diagnosed with endometriosis in Finland, we examine how our interlocutors use their embodied sensations of pain to adapt to the evolving biomedical and lived surroundings in which their pain is evaluated and managed. The analysis shows how living with chronic pain involves constantly attuning to the multitude of symptoms as well as developing personal strategies of communicating sensations of pain to gain medical recognition and care. We argue that while the lived complexities of the body with endometriosis may fall outside the scope of medical practices of measuring, such complexities nevertheless require medical acknowledgment and careful attention.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T05:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231214938
       
  • ‘Through a kaleidoscope’: A Foucauldian discourse analysis of Belgian
           policy regarding patients with a migration background and depression in
           general practices

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      Authors: Camille Wets, Piet Bracke, Katrijn Delaruelle, Melissa Ceuterick
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      A higher prevalence of depression is found among patients with a migration background within the Belgian population. Nevertheless, this group is underrepresented in ambulant and residential mental health care services. Since general practitioners (GPs) have a crucial gatekeeping role, this led some researchers to investigate the possibility of a provider bias influencing GPs’ assessment and referral of depressed patients with a migration background. However, GPs’ accounts may be influenced by wider professional discourses present at the policy level, which are inevitably linked to institutions regulating the conduct of GPs. Therefore, this study applied a Foucauldian discourse analysis (a) to identify broader professional discourses in Belgian policy documents regarding patients with a migration background and depression in general practices, (b) to examine how patients with a migration background are discursively positioned and (c) to investigate which different balances of power in the relationship between GPs and patients with a migration background are demonstrated in the identified discourses. We identified three recurring discourses: (a) the othering discourse, (b) the health literacy discourse, and (c) the person-centred discourse. Our analysis demonstrated that the former two discourses illustrate the perpetuation of a biomedical discourse. While the last discourse is aligned with a counter-discourse associated with the person-centred care model in health care. Consequently, our analysis demonstrated the construction of a contradictory discursive framework throughout the various policy documents on which GPs might rely when speaking about patients with a migration background suffering from depression.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-12-05T05:41:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231211519
       
  • Visualising, navigating and making time: The use of a digital solution in
           treatment and rehabilitation from low back pain

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      Authors: Charlotte Ettrup Christiansen, Mette Terp Høybye, Ronja Rosenberg Grøn, Camilla Blach Rossen
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Illness trajectories are particularly characterised by the temporal dimension of human existence. In the area of low back pain, patients often have challenging temporal experiences such as unproductive waiting time and fragmented, repetitive consultations over many years. This study seeks to investigate relationships between digital technologies, temporal agency, and illness, through describing how users experienced a new digital solution, BackTrace, targeting patients with low back pain. The study builds on six months of ethnographic fieldwork, including semi-structured interviews, participant observation and a workshop. The study shows how the introduction of the digital solution could facilitate new possibilities of temporal actions for individuals living with and receiving care for low back pain. For many research participants, the use of BackTrace facilitated a useful visualisation of their past and present low back pain state; BackTrace could assist participants in navigating different external temporal demands; and it allocated time devoted to managing their back pain in everyday life and in consultations with health professionals. The study discusses how temporality can be a useful analytical entrance point to operationalise and explore the often-desired goal of empowerment in patient pathways.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-30T04:58:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231211496
       
  • Is Covid-19 “vaccine uptake” in postsecondary education a
           “problem”' A critical policy inquiry

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      Authors: Claudia Chaufan
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Since the launch of the Covid-19 global vaccination campaign, postsecondary institutions have strongly promoted vaccination, often through mandates, and the academic literature has identified “vaccine uptake” among postsecondary students as a problem deserving monitoring, research, and intervention. However, with the admission that vaccines do not stop viral spread, that older-age and co-morbidities are major determinants of poor outcomes, and that many vaccine side effects disproportionately affect the young, it cannot be assumed that a risk-benefit analysis favors vaccinating postsecondary students. Drawing from critical policy studies, I appraise the literature on Covid-19 vaccine uptake in postsecondary education. I find that this literature reflects the “scientific consensus,” hardly acknowledging contradictory medical evidence, ignoring coercive elements underlying “vaccine acceptance,” and neglecting ethical tensions built into the very design of vaccination policies. I discuss potential explanations for my findings, and their implications for academia’s role in society in the COVID-19 era and beyond.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-16T06:53:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231204169
       
  • Un-tracking menopause: How not using self-tracking technologies mediates
           women’s self-experiences in menopause

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      Authors: Marjolein de Boer, Marieke Hendriks, Emiel Krahmer, Jenny Slatman, Nadine Bol
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Self-tracking in general, and by women in particular is increasingly researched. In the literature, however, women’s interactions with selftracking technologies in menopause—a change that (almost) every woman will go through—is largely taken for granted. This paper addresses this lacuna by asking whether and how menopausal women use self-tracking technologies, and how this (non-) usage mediates their self-experiences. In doing so, it elaborates on another understudied phenomenon: the constitutive significance of “un-tracking”—that is, of various shades and levels of not using self-tracking technologies—in menopause. Most of the 13 interviewed women in this study reported that they stopped, drastically reduced, or resisted self-tracking in menopause. By framing the discussion of these accounts of “un-tracking” within the tradition of post-phenomenology and a phenomenology of situated bodily self-awareness, we show that these women experience their bodies as (1) wise and eu-appearing, (2) unmoldable and dysappearing, and (3) longing for disappearance. Herein, their experientially mediating un-tracking practices are temporally and socio-culturally contextualized in complex ways and bear substantial existential significance. This study establishes the potential harmful ways in which self-tracking mediates self-experiences, as well as the fruitful ways in which un-tracking may do so. Against the background of this observation, this paper makes an appeal to take a step back from uncritically celebrating self-tracking in healthcare contexts, and critically evaluates whether (the promotion of) using (more) self-tracking technologies in these contexts is desirable to begin with.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-11-10T01:00:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231204171
       
  • The practice of information appraisal: An ethnographic study of a health
           information intervention

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      Authors: Ronja Rosenberg Grøn, Charlotte Ettrup Christiansen, Janni Strøm, Mette Terp Høybye
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      As healthcare systems grow increasingly complex, greater demands are placed on patients’ abilities to find, understand, appraise, and use health information – often termed their ‘health literacy’. Most health literacy research does not focus on information appraisal. When it does, there is a tendency to equate it with patients’ assessment of credibility. This reproduces a healthcare-centric understanding of information appraisal where patient agency is omitted. This study explores how participants in a health information intervention practiced information appraisal. The intervention aimed to increase information uptake for people with low back pain by delivering health information to them through animations. This study draws on ethnographic participant observation of the encounters between the intervention and its participants, including 49 rapid interviews and semi-structured telephone interviews with 23 participants carried out in the spring of 2021. Inspired by a social practice approach, the study thoroughly grounds the health literacy subcategory of ‘appraisal’ in practice. It illustrates that participants appraised the information provided in the intervention according to several factors. These include relating the information to their personal health needs, interpreting the intended audience of the health animations, and prioritising their attention situationally between the animations and other immediate concerns. We suggest that information appraisal is a fundamental component of health literacy and should be considered key in research, policy and practice. To accommodate current healthcare ideals of patient centeredness, empowerment and informed choice, the complex and dynamic ways in which people appraise health information need be considered legitimate practices of health literacy.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-10-24T11:03:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231204173
       
  • ‘To improve quality of life’: Diverging enactments of a value in
           nephrology clinical practices

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      Authors: Anna Mann
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Quality of life has become a central value in the provision of healthcare for patients with chronic conditions. This has engendered debates in critical medical sociology on the non-neutral effects that valuing health and illness, medical interventions, and health care delivery in terms of quality of life yields. Focusing on the case of nephrology, this paper presents qualitative data collected in Austria of two dialysis units in which nephrologists initiated projects aimed towards ‘the improvement of patients’ quality of life’. Whereas the first involved nurses supporting patients in the administration of peritoneal dialysis at home, the second implied the provision of treatment and care exclusively focused on a well-being ‘in the here and now’ to patients. By conceptualising physicians as actors within networks of relations and values enacted in practices, it analyses how in both dialysis units reference to quality of life enabled nephrologists to problematise the provision of standard haemodialysis treatment to multi-morbid, elderly patients, to develop a new treatment protocol, and to interest and enrol others in the provision of healthcare according this new protocol. Valuing medical interventions in terms of quality of life not only leads to a governmentalization of living and an economisation of health. It also allows physicians to articulate a socio-medico-ethical problem – the availability of life-prolonging technologies for a growing population of elderly, multi-morbid patients – and develop solutions locally. What the solutions consist in may fundamentally differ, however.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-29T09:30:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231200128
       
  • Logic modelling as hermeneutic praxis: Bringing knowledge systems into
           view during comprehensive primary health care planning for homelessness in
           Australia

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      Authors: Kristen Foley, Toby Freeman, Lisa Wood, Joanne Flavel, Yvonne Parry, Fran Baum
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Logic modelling is used widely in health promotion planning for complex health and social problems. It is often undertaken collaboratively with stakeholders across sectors that hold and enact different institutional approaches. We use hermeneutic philosophy to explore how knowledge is ‘lived’ by – and unfolds differently for – cross-sectoral stakeholders during comprehensive primary healthcare service planning. An Organisational Action Research partnership was established with a non-government organisation designing comprehensive primary health care for individuals experiencing homelessness in Adelaide, Australia. Grey literature, stakeholder input, academic feedback, a targeted literature review and evidence synthesis were integrated in iterative cycles to inform and refine the logic model. Diverse knowledge systems are active when cross-sectoral stakeholders collaborate on logic models for comprehensive primary health care planning. Considering logic modelling as a hermeneutic praxis helps to foreground and explore these differences. In our case, divergent ideas emerged in how health/wellbeing and trust were conceptualised; language had different meanings across sectors; and the outcomes and data sought were nuanced for various collaborators. We explicate these methodological insights and also contribute our evidence-informed, collaboratively-derived model for design of a comprehensive primary health care service with populations experiencing homelessness. We outline the value of considering cross-sectoral logic modelling as hermeneutic praxis. Engaging with points of difference in cross-sectoral knowledge systems can strengthen logic modelling processes, partnerships and potential outcomes for complex and comprehensive primary health care services.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-25T11:04:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231200129
       
  • As if I was a spacecraft returning to Earth’s atmosphere. Expanding
           insights into illness narratives and childhood cancer through evocative
           autoethnography

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      Authors: Eva-Mari Andersen
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Today, a majority of children diagnosed with cancer are expected to grow up and live—hopefully until old age. Still, knowledge of the lived experience of childhood cancer survivors is sparse. In pursuit of knowledge expansion, by combining my intersecting roles as an academic, educational counselor, and childhood cancer survivor, I approach my personal illness narrative. By means of evocative autoethnography, I write intentionally vulnerably about my experiences and make them available for consideration. I explore my narrative through archives, artifacts, memories of the past, and conversations evoked in the present. I re-visit the cultural landscape of a southern Norwegian girl growing up in the 00s with cancer. Through this, my illness narrative presents as positioned, tangled, and interwoven with a developmental trajectory. Specific educational experiences seem to linger, and many are related to being absent from or re-entering school after the onset of illness. To grasp the intersecting and conflicting experiences of being very ill while also young, I suggest Erik Erikson’s moratorium as a key concept. To complement Arthur Frank’s illness narratives of restitution, chaos, and quest, I establish the moratorium narrative. As a fresh resource, the moratorium narrative underlines the need to make sensitive our academic community’s gaze on illness trajectories unfolding in formative phases and illness narratives defined by growing up. By providing a point of recognition that prompts elaboration, this could also provide the young and very ill with a much-needed narrative space of opportunity, of which more narratives are invited and insisted upon.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-20T07:07:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231200123
       
  • Shaping mindful citizens: Practitioners’ motivations and aspirations for
           mindfulness in education

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      Authors: Peter J Hemming
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Mindfulness meditation has enjoyed growing popularity in the UK over the last few decades and is increasingly found in many educational settings. To date, existing empirical research on mindfulness in education has focused primarily on its efficacy, rather than more sociological concerns. This article draws on qualitative data from a major research study entitled ‘Mapping Mindfulness in the UK’ to investigate the motivations and aspirations of mindfulness practitioners for promoting and delivering mindfulness in educational contexts. The analysis argues that some of the existing theoretical critiques of mindfulness as a neo-liberalising self-technology are too reductive and do not take adequate account of the views and experiences of practitioners. For participants in this study, mindfulness in education was more than an individualised self-help therapeutic tool, but was instead a uniquely versatile practice, representing multiple possibilities for individuals and society. The research makes significant contributions to several fields of sociological inquiry, including on mindfulness, mental health and wellbeing, and education and citizenship.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-19T02:04:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231179024
       
  • Progressing the understanding of chronic illness and its treatment: A
           post-human, ethological understanding of haemodialysis

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      Authors: Victoria Cluley, Helen Eborall, Katherine Hull, Niamh Quann, James O Burton
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Haemodialysis is a common treatment option offered internationally for people requiring kidney replacement therapy. Research exploring haemodialysis is predominantly clinical and quantitative, and improvements to its provision and receipt tends also to be clinically focused. In recent years, however, a number of studies have sought to explore the lived experience of haemodialysis. These studies tend to use semi-structured interviews and present descriptive findings. Such findings serve to raise the profile of patient perspectives and encourage thinking beyond the clinical gaze. To progress this, we apply a post-humanism approach to the understanding of the receipt of haemodialysis. Drawing on findings from a study to explore the experience and impact of in-centre, daytime, haemodialysis we follow Fox and Alldred’s ethological toolkit to provide a post-human analysis of haemodialysis. In doing so we argue that haemodialysis exists as a heterogenous and changeable assemblage of multiple and fluid, human and non-human factors that has the capacity to affect. Here we outline this post-human approach and the impact it has for understanding not just haemodialysis but also the receipt of treatment for other chronic illnesses.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-09-14T10:24:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231200126
       
  • The contribution of a complex systems-based approach to progressive social
           resilience

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      Authors: Philip Haynes, Angie Hart, Suna Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Matthew Wood, Josie Maitland, Josh Cameron
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The use of resilience in social practice has evolved from a theoretical framework at the intersection between individuals and their social ecology. Critics argue this theory still results in policies and practices that are too individualised, with the potential for negative social consequences. This paper further critiques contemporary understanding of resilience theory and its application. It juxtaposes complex systems theory with a social inequalities oriented resilience practice. This provides a paradoxical approach. It is acknowledged that state and public policy decisions and actions can be anti-resilient, undermining community and social resilience that already exists in the form of social relationships, self-organisation and co-production. Nevertheless, collective social resilience also illustrates the potential of local and service user organisations to contribute to an overall transformational change process.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-08-31T05:58:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231195784
       
  • ‘Trying to battle a very slow version of the system that exists
           outside’: Experiences of waiting for healthcare in English prisons

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      Authors: Sue Bellass, Krysia Canvin, Laura Sheard
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Prison has been described as the ultimate form of time-punishment – a place where time is no longer a commodity for individuals to spend, but is ordered by a system which symbolises its power through the control of segments of people’s lives. As such, a prison sentence epitomises the experience of waiting. Yet anticipating release is not the only form of waiting within carceral life; waiting for healthcare in its various forms also shapes people’s temporal experience. Drawing on interviews with 21 people who have lived in prison, this article describes how experiences of waiting for healthcare are mediated by expectation or hope, perceptions of the relationship between behaviour and healthcare access, and the consequences of waiting for care. Constraints on the autonomy of people in prison mean that waiting for healthcare differs in important ways from waiting for healthcare in the community, and can be perceived as an additional form of punishment. The experience of waiting for prison healthcare can affect physical and psychological well-being, and can in itself be understood as a pain of imprisonment.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-08-28T11:48:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231195785
       
  • ‘My cousin said to me . . .’ Patients’ use of third-party references
           to facilitate shared decision-making during naturally occurring primary
           care consultations

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      Authors: Olaug S Lian, Sarah Nettleton, Huw Grange, Christopher Dowrick
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In this paper, we explore the ways in which patients invoke third parties to gain decision-making influence in clinical consultations. The patients’ role in decision-making processes is often overlooked, and this interactional practice has rarely been systematically studied. Through a contextual narrative exploration of 42 naturally occurring consultations between patients (aged 22–84) and general practitioners (GPs) in England, we seek to fill this gap. By exploring how and why patients invoke third parties during discussions about medical treatments, who they refer to, what kind of knowledge their referents possess, and how GPs respond, our main aim is to capture the functions and implications of this interactional practice in relation to decision-making processes. Patients refer to third parties during decision-making processes in most of the consultations, usually to argue for and against certain treatment options, and the GPs recognise these utterances as pro-and-contra arguments. This enables patients to counter the GPs’ professional knowledge through various knowledge-sources and encourage the GPs to target their specific concerns. By attributing arguments to third parties, patients claim decision-making influence without threatening the GPs’ authority and expertise, which their disadvantaged epistemic position demands. Thereby, patients become able to negotiate their role and their epistemic position, to influence the agenda-setting, and to take part in the decision-making process, without being directly confrontational. Invoking third parties is a non-confrontational way of proposing and opposing treatment options that might facilitate successful patient participation in decision-making processes, and so limit the risk of patients being wronged in their capacity as knowers.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-31T05:56:04Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231188489
       
  • How workplaces produce or reduce disability along the career paths of
           young people with cystic fibrosis

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      Authors: Laura Silvestri, Damien Issanchou, Laura Schuft, Sylvain Ferez
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Using the theoretical perspective of “social participation” as considered in the Human Development—Disability Creation Process, this article examines certain obstacles and facilitators to sustainable access to work among young French adults with cystic fibrosis. Drawing from the analyses of 29 qualitative interviews, the results show how such obstacles do not depend solely on their health status or on the medical management of the illness, but also on the work environments that these young professionals have recently entered or are trying to access. In these contexts, managing information about the illness can represent a means of obtaining cooperation from colleagues and superiors to reduce material or organizational obstacles (e.g. adapted work schedules), as well as a means of preventing socially uncomfortable or disabling situations. In this light, the social participation model can complement Corbin and Strauss’ illness trajectory model, by setting the multi-factorial disabling or participatory situations along illness or medical trajectories. This enables dynamic consideration of how workplaces contribute to producing or reducing disability, in interaction with the actions taken by young people with cystic fibrosis to manage their career paths but also the evolution of illness, symptoms, or medical requirements.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-06T09:57:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231185265
       
  • Experiences and management of urinary incontinence following treatment for
           prostate cancer: Disrupted embodied practices and adapting to maintain
           masculinity

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      Authors: Richard Green
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores men’s experiences of and management strategies for urinary incontinence (UI) following treatment for prostate cancer. Qualitative interviews with 29 men, recruited from two prostate cancer support groups, explored their post-treatment experiences. Drawing on a conceptual toolkit connecting theories of masculinities, embodiment, and chronic illness, this paper identifies older men’s experiences and strategies for managing UI and explores how these are shaped by their masculinities. This article identifies interdependence between managing stigma for UI and maintaining masculinity. Men’s embodied practices for engaging in activities in public, crucial to masculine identity, were disrupted. In response, they adopted new reflexive body techniques to manage and resolve their UI, and thereby address the threat to their masculine identities, characterised in three strategies: monitoring, planning, and disciplining. The new embodied practices men described suggest three factors as important components for adopting new reflexive body techniques: routine, desire, and unruliness.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T06:01:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231185266
       
  • Discursive constructions of family functions in forensic psychiatry: A
           critical ethnographic perspective

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      Authors: Jean-Laurent Domingue, Jean-Daniel Jacob
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Significant barriers remain regarding the implementation of family-centred approaches in the domain of forensic psychiatry despite their effectiveness at increasing adherence to treatment, improving attendance to medical appointments, decreasing readmission rates and reducing episodes of relapse. We attribute these barriers to a fundamental gap in our understanding of the family function and its role within the forensic psychiatric system. Despite requesting to be included and considered as partners, some families feel excluded and sidelined, which causes distress, incomprehension and disengagement. We approached this tension at the discursive level through a critical ethnography of the Review Board and the work of Foucault on psychiatric power, which provided us with a unique opportunity to understand how the role of families are constructed and sustained in the Canadian forensic psychiatric system. To do so, we mobilized data stemming from ethnographic observations and documentary artifacts entitled ‘reasons for disposition’. Data analysis allowed us to identify two discursive constructions of familial functions: (1) families as repositories of information and (2) families as supervisory agents. These results have implications for health care professionals and administrators in forensic psychiatry who are increasingly adhering to family-centred care models without questioning what such care or what such family engagement entails.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T05:59:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231185263
       
  • Reflections of a white healthcare professional researching ethnicized and
           racialized minorities: Autoethnographically explored emotions revealing
           implicit advantages and consequences

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      Authors: Nina Halberg
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Health research is often embedded in biomedicine in which the goal is to remove all bias. However, this is problematic in research on social issues such as social and health inequities. Therefore, there is growing criticism of health researchers’ positions as neutral and invisible. I explore research-based advantages and consequences following my positionings within whiteness, nursing and healthcare professionality. Drawing on two ethnographic studies conducted in Denmark, one among black Nigerian women working in the streets of Copenhagen, the other following patients, defined in Danish healthcare as ‘ethnic minorities’, in two hospitals in the greater Copenhagen area, I take the point of departure from autoethnographic emotions of ‘doing good’, ‘discomfort’ and ‘denial’. As I analyse these emotions as a production in the contexts, I show the advantages and consequences of leaving my marked body unmarked. With an intersectional lens, I discuss how health researchers’ risk (re)producing social inequalities in health based on for example, avoiding topics of skin colour and experiences of discrimination. Ultimately, what legitimized my access to the people in the field paradoxically also risked delegitimizing their experiences of racialized and ethnicized inequalities. This is not only consequential for the interlocutors but also for the knowledge production, since we as health researchers’ risk implicitly avoiding important knowledge if we do not see our own research positionings as a racialized, ethnicized and culturalized matter. Therefore, the need for educational curriculum on racialization and anti-discrimination is imperative within the health professions and as health researchers regardless of profession or research area.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T05:54:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231185261
       
  • Good care and adverse effects: Exploring the use of social alarms in care
           for older people in Sweden

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      Authors: Doris Lydahl
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In Nordic countries, ‘welfare technology’ is a concept used increasingly by policymakers when discussing the promise of digitalisation in care for older people. In this paper, I draw on data from 14 qualitative ethnographic interviews with employees in municipal eldercare in Sweden, as well as observations carried out at a nursing home, to suggest the importance of studying how good care is enacted through welfare technology, whilst simultaneously attending to the adverse effects sometimes consequent from these practices. In this article, I explore what values are supported when doing care with welfare technology, and what values are neglected in this process. The theoretical starting point for this article takes its inspiration from recent discussions of care within Science and Technology Studies (STS). Employing a double vision of care, the article argues for the importance of understanding how good care is enacted with technology, while also attending to what these care practices exclude and neglect. Focusing on the use of social alarms, the article shows that when doing care with such technology, values such as independence, safety and some forms of togetherness and availability were enhanced; while other values such as other forms togetherness and availability, a stress-free working environment and functionality were neglected.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-07-01T05:52:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231185260
       
  • Quantitative Textual Analysis as a means to explore corporate interests in
           food safety

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      Authors: Corina L. Vasilescu, Martin McKee, Aaron Reeves
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      The growing body of scholarship on the commercial determinants of health has, so far, mostly employed qualitative methods but this is now being complemented by a small, yet growing, corpus of quantitative studies. We illustrate the use of one such method, quantitative text analysis (QTA), in a case study of submissions to a public consultation on a draft scientific opinion by the European Food Safety Authority on the chemical acrylamide, demonstrating how this method can be used and insights that might be drawn from it. We use Wordscores as one example of QTA to illuminate the diverse positions taken by actors submitting comments and then assess whether the final policy documents moved towards or away from the positions taken by different stakeholders. We find a broadly uniform position among the public health community, opposed to acrylamide, contrasting with industry positions that were not monolithic. Some firms recommended major amendments to the guidance, largely reflecting the impact on their practices, while policy innovators seeking ways to reduce acrylamide in foods aligned with the public health community. We also find no clear movement in the policy guidance, likely because most submissions supported the draft document. Many governments are required to conduct public consultations, some attracting enormous numbers of responses, with little guidance on how best to synthesise the responses so the default position is often a count of those for and against. We argue that QTA, primarily a research tool, might usefully be applied in analysing public consultation responses to understand better the positions taken by different actors.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-06-13T10:20:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231173807
       
  • From embodiment to evidence: The harmful intersection of poor regulation
           of medical implants and obstructed narratives in embodied experiences of
           failed metal-on-metal hips

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      Authors: Pauline McCormack
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This research presents the results of a study about people with failed metal-on-metal hip implants, and draws on the STS concept of the technological imperative alongside research on the value of patient knowledge in clinical settings and the legitimacy of embodied stories. Popularly understood as positive and life changing, hip replacement surgery was hailed as ‘the operation of the century’, until a series of widespread failures of hundreds of thousands of hip implants, known collectively as metal-on-metal (MoM) hips, drew attention to the poor regulation of medical implants. This paper argues that poor regulation intersects with narratives of patients’ pain, which are obstructed by surgeons and the UK regulatory body, with the effect of denying both patients’ embodied experiences of implant failure, and their restitution to good health. Patient narratives about problems with their hip implant are the wellspring from which scientific evidence emerges which can indicate widespread implant failure. By obstructing these narratives the regulatory system undermines the very evidence it needs to operate effectively.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-06-05T12:37:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231179026
       
  • Coexisting cancer regimes: Transformations of breast and lung cancer in
           the United Kingdom

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      Authors: Cinzia Greco
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Using in-depth interviews with medical professionals working in the UK, I explore the coexistence of two different cancer regimes in which the different innovations for breast and lung cancer can be located. Breast cancer treatment has seen a protracted series of significant innovations in the context of an emphasis on screening that coexists with a segmentation in subtypes that has allowed targeted therapies for most patients. Lung cancer has also seen the introduction of targeted therapies; however, these can only be used for small groups of patients. Consequently, some interviewees working on lung cancer have expressed a stronger focus on increasing the number of patients undergoing surgery, as well as introducing screening also for lung cancer. As a result, a cancer regime based on the promises of targeted therapies coexists with a more traditional approach that focuses on diagnosing and treating cancers in their early stages.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-23T06:12:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231176979
       
  • Intercorporeal collaboration: Staging, parsing, and embodied directives in
           dementia care

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      Authors: Lars-Christer Hydén, Anna Ekström, Ali Reza Majlesi
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This study shows how concerted bodily movements and particularly intercorporeality play a central role in interaction, particularly in joint activities with people with late-stage dementia. Direct involvement of bodies in care situations makes intercorporeal collaboration the basic form for engaging with people with late-stage dementia. By detailed analysis of a videorecording of a joint activity involving a person with late-stage dementia as an example, we show that the process of concerted bodily movements includes not only an interactive bodywork but also a reconfiguration of the routine activities and actions in situ. Reconfigurations often require, and are the outcome of, particular practices for the systematic modification of the embodied conducts of the participants and their use of artifacts in the surrounding environment. These practices, that we highlight in our study, are (1) staging activities through organization and re-organization of body parts, as well as artifacts (rather than using verbal descriptions of activities); (2) decomposing (parsing) activities into smaller parts possible for the person with dementia to perform (rather than using verbal action descriptions); and (3) providing embodied directions and bodily demonstrations of actions (rather than using verbal directives). As a result, we point to these practices for their reflexive roles in the change of the use of modalities in interaction: from mainly using verbal language to the prominence of visual depiction and bodily demonstration as necessary methods to facilitate the participation of people with latestage dementia in joint activities
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-23T06:09:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231173809
       
  • Negotiating with digital self-monitoring: A qualitative study on how
           patients with multiple sclerosis use and experience digital
           self-monitoring within a scientific study

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      Authors: Karine Wendrich, Lotte Krabbenborg
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Research shows that patients can have values and use practices that are different from those envisioned by technology developers. Using sociomaterialism as an analytical lens, we show how patients negotiated with digital self-monitoring in the context of a scientific study. Our paper draws on interviews with 26 patients with the chronic neurological disease multiple sclerosis (MS) who were invited to use an activity tracker and a self-monitoring app for a period of 12 months as part of their everyday life. Our study aims to fill a gap: relatively little is known about how digital self-monitoring becomes materialized in the everyday lives of patients with chronic diseases. We show that patients engaged in digital self-monitoring because they are eager to participate in research to contribute knowledge that will benefit the larger community of patients rather than to improve their personal self-management. Although respondents adhered to digital self-monitoring during the study, it is not self-evident that they would do so for private self-monitoring purposes. It became clear that respondents did not necessarily perceive digital self-monitoring as useful for their self-management practices due to their established knowledge and routines. Moreover, respondents referred to the inconvenience of having to perform self-monitoring tasks and the emotional burden of being reminded of the MS because of the digital self-monitoring. We conclude by indicating what could be considered when designing scientific studies, including the suitability of conventional study designs for evaluating technologies used daily by patients and the challenge of integrating patients’ experiential knowledge into scientific practices.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-18T04:35:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231175321
       
  • “The Depressed” and “People with Anxiety” therapists’ discursive
           representations of patients with depression and anxiety in Danish
           Psychiatry

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      Authors: Anne Bryde Bryde Christensen, Karoline Dyrloev, Michaela Hoej, Stig Poulsen, Nina Reinholt, Sidse Arnfred
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Stigmatization within mental health care has previously been identified, and some diagnoses have been shown to be particularly exposed to negative attitudes and stigma. However, no previous studies have explored practitioners’ discursive construction of patients with different diagnoses within a transdiagnostic group context. We performed discourse analysis on 12 interviews with Danish mental health practitioners, who had been conducting either transdiagnostic psychotherapy (The Unified Protocol) or standard group cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) with patients treated for anxiety disorders or major depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to identify how patients with anxiety and depression were represented by therapists. We identified a “training discourse,” within which patients were evaluated through perceived motivation, responsibility, active participation, and progression. We argue that this training discourse can be related to a broader neoliberal order of discourse valuing efficiency and agency. The analysis indicated that patients with anxiety were sometimes “favorized” over patients with depression, and it is argued that the neoliberal order of discourse and pre-assumptions related to the diagnoses are contributing to this. The interviews indicate that multiple discourses were applied when describing patients, and ambivalence was often detectable. We discuss the findings of the analysis in relation to therapists’ general critical attitudes toward the psychiatric system and in relation to broader societal tendencies.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T10:03:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231173802
       
  • Navigating ambivalence: A qualitative study of young fitness
           self-trackers’ engagement with body ideals through social media

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      Authors: Carsten Stage, Stinne Bach Nielsen
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores how social media are involved in imagining and sensing body ideals among young fitness self-trackers in Denmark (age 15–24). The analysis is based on 20 interviews and contributes to existing research on social media, body image and self-tracking by showing that social media are central for the fitness practices of the participants, but also that gaining access to practical knowledge, motivational material and visual goals seem to be more important motivations for social media use than personal sharing and interaction. Social media are furthermore understood by the participants as unavoidable, but ambivalent terrains in the sense that cognitive and affective benefits, like knowledge or motivation, can only be accessed and felt by handling the risk of also encountering misinformation and demotivating images of idealised or deceptive bodies. The informants legitimise their engagement with social media by positioning themselves as mature media users able to navigate social media through practices of content dis/engagement. The ambivalence of social media is in other words experienced as both ‘elemental’ and ‘curatable’ by the informants; an experience that stresses the need to question the traditional conceptualisation of ambivalence as an inhibition of personal agency and will formation.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-05-16T09:50:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231175277
       
  • Constructing therapeutic support and negotiating competing agendas: A
           discourse analysis of vocational advice provided to individuals who are
           absent from work due to ill-health

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Benjamin Saunders, Carolyn Chew-Graham, Gail Sowden, Kendra Cooke, Karen Walker-Bone, Ira Madan, Vaughan Parsons, Cathy H Linaker, Gwenllian Wynne-Jones
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Work participation is known to benefit people’s overall health and wellbeing, but accessing vocational support during periods of sickness absence to facilitate return-to-work can be challenging for many people. In this study, we explored how vocational advice was delivered by trained vocational support workers (VSWs) to people who had been signed-off from work by their General Practitioner (GP), as part of a feasibility study testing a vocational advice intervention. We investigated the discursive and interactional strategies employed by VSWs and people absent from work, to pursue their joint and respective goals. Theme-oriented discourse analysis was carried out on eight VSW consultations. These consultations were shown to be complex interactions, during which VSWs utilised a range of strategies to provide therapeutic support in discussions about work. These included; signalling empathy with the person’s perspective; positively evaluating their personal qualities and prior actions; reflecting individuals’ views back to them to show they had been heard and understood; fostering a collaborative approach to action-planning; and attempting to reassure individuals about their return-to-work concerns. Some individuals were reluctant to engage in return-to-work planning, resulting in back-and-forth interactional negotiations between theirs and the VSW’s individual goals and agendas. This led to VSWs putting in considerable interactional ‘work’ to subtly shift the discussion towards return-to-work planning. The discursive strategies we have identified have implications for training health professionals to facilitate work-orientated conversations with their patients, and will also inform training provided to VSWs ahead of a randomised controlled trial.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-04-24T12:14:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593221148446
       
  • Media portrayals of psychotropic agents in AD/HD treatment: A social
           constructionist approach

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Josef Qaderi, Jonas Lindblom
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      In recent decades there has been a significant increase in diagnosing children and adults with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), and in the use of pharmacological treatment with Ritalin, Concerta and Strattera for AD/HD. This development has given rise to scientific criticism, claiming that the pharmaceuticals prescribed by doctors are, to a large extent, ineffective or harmful. This study discusses media’s portrayal of treatment of AD/HD. The aim of the article is to develop a social constructionist perspective, highlighting how scientific critique of pharmaceuticals for AD/HD is handled in the mass media. The authors introduce the concept of “psychopharmacological extensibility,” which demonstrates the importance of collective definitional processes in society. Psychopharmacological extensibility reflects the fact that the perception of AD/HD agents as beneficial medicines or harmful drugs is open to interpretation and dependent on social factors related to context, power, rhetoric, and marketization. The empirical data are based on 211 articles from eight of the largest newspapers in Sweden, published between 2002 and 2021. The result shows that Swedish mass media, in numerous ways, neglects or undermines the scientific criticism made, thereby facilitating an increased use of the diagnosis and of psychotropic agents in society.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-04-20T05:11:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231167060
       
  • Void and narrative in the clinic of addictions: A theoretical proposal

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      Authors: Clément Cimolaï, Vincent Bréjard
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      We propose a connection between the void and addiction via psychoanalysis and current developments in narration in the context of the psychoanalytic clinic. We maintain that the addicted subject is shaped in particular by a relationship to the void evolving from the disruptive effects of the narrative. Our modern era is marked by a parallel evolution towards an unbearable void, to be filled at all costs. The neo-liberal promise of ‘filling’ the void with consumer objects in turn feeds the illusion of a so-called freedom, based on alienation to the inseparable duos of growth/jouissance and productivism/consumerism. The void has a multidisciplinary heritage (philosophy, physics, art, psychology) underlining certain aspects of a dialectic of the void that fluctuates between nothing at all and everything as potential. Taking this dialectic into account allows us to construct a concept of the void centred around two types of void: a narrative void and an a-narrative void. We maintain that the toxic in addiction can be interpreted as a narco-narrative that is constructed upon an a-narrative void. The clinical implications and technical proposals are briefly explored as openings to a clinical consideration of the void in the field of addictology.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-04-12T11:30:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231167064
       
  • Layers of senses: Experiencing intercorporeality in teletherapy

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      Authors: Ariela Popper-Giveon, Yael Keshet
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Teletherapy, namely, therapy that uses technology for communication between patients and therapists, is challenged by the impersonal nature of remote and digital communication. Using Merleau-Ponty’s theoretical concept of intercorporeality, which refers to the perceived reciprocity between two people’s bodies during communication, this article aims to elaborate on spiritual caregivers’ experience of interacting with patients during teletherapy. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with 15 Israeli spiritual caregivers who use various forms of teletherapy (Zoom, FaceTime, phone calls, WhatsApp messages, etc.). Interviewees emphasized their physical presence with the patient as a main principle in spiritual care. They indicated the involvement of nearly all senses in physical presence therapy, which allows for joint attention and compassionate presence. When making use of various communication technologies in teletherapy, they reported the involvement of fewer senses. The more senses involved in the session and the clearer it is that space and time are shared by both caregiver and patient, the stronger the caregiver’s presence with the patient. Interviewees experienced teletherapy as eroding the multisensory joint attention and intercorporeality and, hence, the quality of care. This article points at the advantages of teletherapy for therapists in general and spiritual caregivers in particular but claims, nonetheless, that it challenges the main principles of therapy. Joint attention in therapy is, fundamentally, a multisensory phenomenon that may be understood as intercorporeality. Our use of the notion of intercorporeality sheds light on the reduction of the senses involved in remote interpersonal communication and its impact on care and, more generally, the interpersonal communication experienced during telemedicine. This article’s findings may also contribute to the field of cyberpsychology and to therapists engaged in telepsychology.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-03-13T12:29:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231156811
       
  • Peer support for accepting distressing reality: Expertise and
           experience-sharing in psychiatric peer-to-peer group discussions

    • Free pre-print version: Loading...

      Authors: Elina Weiste, Melisa Stevanovic, Lise-Lotte Uusitalo, Hanna Toiviainen
      Abstract: Health, Ahead of Print.
      Peer-based interventions are increasingly used for delivering mental health services to help people with an illness re-examine their situation and accept their illness as part of their life story. The role of the peer supporter in these interventions, known as experts-by-experience (EbE), is situated between mutual peer support and semi-professional service delivery, and they face the challenge of balancing an asymmetric, professional relationship with a reciprocal, mutuality-based, equal relationship. This article investigates how EbEs tackle this challenge when responding to clients’ stories about their personal, distressing experiences in peer-based groups in psychiatric services. The results show how the EbEs responded to their clients’ experience-sharing with two types of turns of talk. In the first response type, the EbEs highlighted reciprocal experience-sharing, nudging the clients toward accepting their illness. This invoked mutual affiliation and more problem-talk from the clients. In the second response type, the EbEs compromised reciprocal experience-sharing and advised clients on how to accept their illness in their everyday lives. This was considered less affiliative in relation to the client’s problem description, and the sequence was brought to a close. Both response types involved epistemic asymmetries that needed to be managed in the interaction. Based on our analysis, semi-professional, experience-based expertise involves constant epistemic tensions, as the participants struggle to retain the mutual orientation toward peer-based experience-sharing and affiliation.
      Citation: Health
      PubDate: 2023-02-28T06:35:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/13634593231156822
       
 
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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1464 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (358 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (112 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (117 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (686 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACM Transactions on Computing for Healthcare     Hybrid Journal  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Adversity and Resilience Science : Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Aging and Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Akademika     Open Access  
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 224)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applied Ergonomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Archivos de Prevención de Riesgos Laborales     Open Access  
ASA Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Population Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Social Health and Behavior     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atención Primaria Práctica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 5)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biograph-I : Journal of Biostatistics and Demographic Dynamic     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Biosafety and Health     Open Access  
Biosalud     Open Access  
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access  
Cadernos de Saúde     Open Access  
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CASUS : Revista de Investigación y Casos en Salud     Open Access  
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
CES Salud Pública     Open Access  
Child and Adolescent Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Children     Open Access  
Chinese Journal of Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia & Trabajo     Open Access  
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cleaner and Responsible Consumption     Open Access  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Contact (CTC)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuaderno de investigaciones: semilleros andina     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Opinion in Environmental Science & Health     Hybrid Journal  
D Y Patil Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Das österreichische Gesundheitswesen ÖKZ     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Discover Social Science and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Egyptian Journal of Nutrition and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Egyptian Journal of Occupational Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Emerging Trends in Drugs, Addictions, and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência : Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
EsSEX : Revista Científica     Open Access  
Estudios sociales : Revista de alimentación contemporánea y desarrollo regional     Open Access  
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EUREKA : Health Sciences     Open Access  
European Journal of Health Communication     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
F&S Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Face à face     Open Access  
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
FASEB BioAdvances     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Food Hydrocolloids for Health     Open Access  
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Frontiers in Neuroergonomics     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Frontiers of Health Services Management     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Gestão e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Annual Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Innovation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Transitions Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Health Behavior Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Health Equity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

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Heriot-Watt University
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Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
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